asp.net mvc generate pdf from view : Change font size in pdf text box software control cloud windows web page azure class measuring_and_managing_shareholder_value_creation1-part1474

The value creation measures considered are:
Economic Value; 11
The Equity Spread;
Implied Value; and
Cash Flow Return on Investment and Value-
Creation Potential.
Economic Value
The use of economic value (EV) as a measure of
business unit and company performance has
become increasingly widespread in recent years.
In North America,it has been adopted in various
forms by a number of large companies,including
Coca-Cola, AT&T, Kellogg, and Scott Paper as
their principal measure of profitability,replacing
operating income and net earnings as the focus
of management’s attention.
The origin of EV measures can be traced to
Ricardo in the mid-1800s who used the term
super normal rent to describe EV. In the mid-
1920s General Motors used a measure called
residual incometo indicate the amount of income
left over after paying for the various components
of costs including a charge for capital. Although
used by management accountants for many
years,it was revived by the PIMS project and pop-
ularized by Bennett Stewart
12
who redefined it as
economic value added and by Copeland et al. as
economic profits. Since then this term has also
been defined as economic value creation and
shareholder value added by others. 13
9
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
13 The basic concept was first proposed by Alfred Marshall
in the 1880s and was further mentioned by Peter Drucker in
1964. Recently,it has also surfaced in academic accounting
literature and is known as the Edwards-Bell-Ohlson (EBO) or
the Feltham-Ohlson framework—see Bernard (1995). Frenkel
and Lee (1996) show the equivalence between the EBO
model and the economic-value model.
11 Economic value measures include residual income,
economic value added, shareholder value added, economic
profit, and economic value creation. These measures are
expressed in dollars. The rest of the Statement uses the term
economic value (EV) to describe these measures.
12 See Buzzell and Gale (1996,27) and Stewart (1991).
less 
Revenue
Gross Profit
Expenses
After Tax
Cost of Goods
Sold
Current Assets
Fixed Asset
Working
Capital
Revenue
Net Assets
Net
Operating
Profit After
Tax
Net
Operating
Profit
After
Tax %
Asset
Turnover
RONA%
Current
Liabilities
less 
plus
times
divided
by 
divided
by 
less 
EXHIBIT 4. RATE OF RETURN ON NET ASSETS (RONA) 
Change font size in pdf text box - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
best pdf compressor online; pdf text box font size
Change font size in pdf text box - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size in pdf; pdf file size limit
The key difference between EV measures and 
traditional measures of performance such as
after-tax rate of return on net assets (RONA) as
illustrated in Exhibit 4 (see page 9) is that EV
accounts for the cost of capital and expresses
the value-creation performance in easily measur-
able units—dollars. Rather than saying that
RONA increased from 13 percent to 14 percent
in a particular period and letting the reader infer
its value-creation implications,it is much easier
and intuitively appealing to state the firm created
$100 of shareholder value.
In certain firms,managers' compensation is tied
to RONA and there have been instances where
managers have foregone investment opportunities
that had the potential to generate returns higher
than the cost of capital (i.e., , value-creating 
decisions) to protect the minimum level of RONA
required to receive bonuses. Moreover,unless a
specific cost of capital is used to compare
RONA,managers cannot know whether they have
created value.
EV measures have some additional advantages:
first,by explicitly recognizing the importance of
capital and its associated costs, , it motivates 
a capital-usage discipline. Second, it clearly
shows the linkage between the operating-margin
performance and capital intensity, and thereby
can be used to better pinpoint opportunities 
for improvement as well as to assess the appro-
priate level of investment to achieve these
improvements. Third, it can easily link value 
drivers such as price and product mix to value
creation. Fourth, it is consistent with the 
standard discounted cash flow (DCF) or the 
NPV framework. Fifth, and more importantly,
since EV is an annual measure,it can be used to
evaluate managerial performance and to provide
incentives. 14
However,there are also some challenges in the
actual calculation of all of the EV measures.
These challenges arise because the actual 
calculations may require that precise estimates
of the cost of capital be derived and several
adjustments to the financial statements be
made.
15
(See Appendix A for a discussion of
these specific adjustments.)
The exact number and magnitude of adjustments
required to convert the published numbers to
value-based numbers depends upon the specific
situation. In general,four key principles should
be followed:
First, cash flow from operations must be
derived by making the necessary adjustments
to reported earnings. Thus, any noncash
charges to reserves or write-offs affecting the
income statement (and balance sheet) must
be reversed.
Second, appropriate attention must be given
to accounting for expenses that can be 
construed as investments in the future. For
example,research and development expenses,
which are usually treated as an expense of the
period,can be considered as an investment in
the future. In such cases,only a portion of the
R&D cost should be expensed in a given year;
the rest may be capitalized and added to 
the asset base (and expected to earn the cost
of capital). Similarly, , expenditures on large
construction projects or major research and
10
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
14 From a present value context (i.e.,for valuing a project 
or a firm),the DCF method provides an identical NPV to that
calculated by discounting EVs. DCF is a well-known capital
budgeting tool that is almost exclusively used at the project
level. Thus,it provides a one-time (today) value of an invest-
ment to be undertaken. EV, on the other hand, , provides an
annual measure and can be used at the project/business/
firm level.
15 Although many such adjustments may be required,
experience indicates that not more than five to six adjustments
may be economically relevant. Examples of such adjustments
can be found in Copeland, Koller, and Murrin (1996, 213) 
and Stewart (1991).
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
change font size in pdf file; best compression pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf compress; acrobat compress pdf
development initiatives generally have a long
time-to-market cycle and may not generate
immediate cash flow yet consume capital.
Third,the asset base must reflect the replace-
ment value of the capital and must not be
affected by goodwill write-offs,asset write-offs,
or a highly depreciated fixed asset base whose
book values do not reflect replacement or mar-
ket value,etc. The idea is to ensure that the
capital base used to calculate the capital
charge reflects the true underlying capital
being used in the business.
Fourth, and most important, , all adjustments
must be material, , transparent, , and have an
impact on managerial decision making.
In essence,the firm may well have three sets of
books: one to satisfy auditing and reporting
requirements,a second to satisfy the tax author-
ities,and a third—value-based books—to be used
in making value-creating decisions. It should
also be noted that this third set reflects an 
economic-value number that is different from
reported earnings and free-cash flow; some care
is required in its derivation and interpretation.
Fundamentally, there is a trade-off between 
simplicity and accuracy. A very complex calcula-
tion with myriads of adjustments will fail
because of an inability to understand it.
Managers will not abide by a measure that 
they cannot control or understand. (A detailed
example of how to calculate EV is provided in
Appendix A.)
While EV is a better measure of financial gain
than the traditional income statement,it is still
subject to malfunction. Experience shows that
financially oriented measures and incentives
based solely upon these measures can result in
people taking the shortest,most expedient path
to personal gain. This path often does not
include such important initiatives as strengthen-
ing and building long-term customer relation-
ships,protecting the company’s brand image as
a franchise or as an employer, or investing for
future growth and potential. A careful alignment
of incentives to long-term EV creation is neces-
sary to avoid this scenario (see Section VII).
The Equity Spread
Another measure of shareholder-value creation
is the one proposed by Marakon Associates 
the equity spread. This measure considers the
difference between the ROE and required return
on equity (cost of equity) as the source of value
creation. This measure is a variation of the EV
measures.
Instead of using capital as the entire base and
the cost of capital for calculating the capital
charge,this measure uses equity capital and the
cost of equity to calculate the capital (equity)
charge. Correspondingly,it uses economic value
to equity holders (net of interest charges) rather
than total firm value.
For an all equity firm, both EV and the equity
spread method will provide identical values
because there are no interest charges and debt
capital to consider. Even for a firm that relies on
some debt,the two measures will lead to identical
insights provided there are no extraordinary
gains and losses,the capital structure is stable,
and a proper re-estimation of the cost of equity
and debt is conducted. (A detailed example of
how to calculate the equity spread is provided in
Appendix A.)
A market is attractive only if the equity spread
and economic profit earned by the average 
competitor are positive. If the average competitor’s
equity spread and economic profit are negative,
the market is unattractive.
11
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Support to change font size in PDF form. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; List<BaseFormField
pdf compression; best way to compress pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color.
can pdf files be compressed; optimize scanned pdf
Implied Value
The implied value measure was popularized by
the Alcar Group and is similar to discounted
future market value (DFMV) proposed by the
Strategic Planning Institute.16In this framework,
the emphasis is not on annual performance but
on valuing expected performance. The implied
value measure is akin to valuing the firm based
on its future cash flows and is the method most
closely related to the DCF/ NPV framework.
With this approach,one estimates future cash
flows of the firm over a reasonable horizon,
assigns a continuing (terminal) value at the end
of the horizon,estimates the cost of capital,and
then estimates the value of the firm by calculating
the present value of these estimated cash flows.
This method of valuing the firm is identical to
that followed in calculating NPV in a capital-
budgeting context. Since the computation arrives
at the value of the firm,the implied value of the
firm’s equity can be determined by subtracting
the value of the current debt from the estimated
value of the firm. This value is the implied value
of the equity of the firm.
To estimate whether the firm’s management has
created shareholder value, , one subtracts the
implied value at the beginning of the year from
the value estimated at the end of the year,
adjusting for any dividends paid during the year.
If this difference is positive (i.e.,the estimated
value of the equity has increased during the
year) management can be said to have created
shareholder value.
The use of a change in the implied values as a
measure of value creation differs in at least two
distinct ways from the EV and the equity spread
measures of value creation. First, , the implied
value measure is based on a longer-term view of
the business by using the estimates of future
cash flows. Thus,the change in its value across
two years may be different from the economic
value estimated under the first two methods.
Since forecasts are used, it suffers from the
same problem as that of the DCF/NPV frame-
work: forecasts can be manipulated to show
desired results.
Second,for exchange-listed companies,if capital
market participants have similar forecasts to
those of business managers,the implied value
measure should provide the same outcome as
the market value of the firm’s equity. If that is the
case,it may be easier to use the changes in the
market value of the firm as the measure of value
creation and not worry about estimating future
cash flows. If that is not the case, the 
difference between the two values (value gap)
may require further investigation.
However,despite these differences,the underlying
logic behind the implied value measure provides
an almost similar decision-making framework as
the one resulting from the EV and equity spread
measures. Value is created if management’s
decisions generate cash flows over and above
the cost of capital and the firm is able to sustain
this performance over a long time period. (See
Appendix A for a detailed example of the implied
value measure.)
Cash Flow Return on Investment
Many investors are of the opinion that a company
is of little use to them unless it has the capacity
to produce cash. These supporters of cash flow
measurement and analysis claim that it makes
company managers think more like shareholders
because it concentrates their attention on the
actual value of the company. Managers are
forced to decide,for instance,whether they can
reinvest the capital the company generates at a
12
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
16 See Buzzell and Gale (1996,23-214).
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change font size in fillable pdf; adjust size of pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Save text font, color, size and location changes to Other robust text processing features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
change font size in pdf comment box; adjust size of pdf
level that adds value. If they cannot,they are likely
to either give it back to shareholders in the form
of dividends or buy back the company’s shares,
which can be expected to raise the value of those
still in circulation.
One method of measuring and analyzing company
cash flow is the approach followed by the Boston
Consulting Group and Braxton Associates called
CFROI (cash flow return on investment). CFROI
represents the sustainable cash flow a business
generates as a percentage of the cash invested
in the business.
17
This cash flow on cash invested
can be expressed as an internal rate of return
(IRR) over the normal economic life of the assets
involved. The difference between this return and
the cost of capital reflects the firm’s value-
creation potential (the more positive the spread,
the higher the potential). The changes in the
CFROI across years can then be used as an 
indicator of the firm’s annual performance.
The appeal of CFROI and other metrics that
focus on cash generation is that they help 
managers get a clear picture of a business unit’s
capital efficiency. Unlike traditional accounting
measures such as return on assets,for example,
CFROI looks at the true cash amounts invested.
CFROI is not fooled by devices used to enhance
accounting returns, , such as operating leases,
and it is not distorted by current or historical
inflation. This helps managers judge whether a
unit’s ability to create value can be enhanced
through expansion,reduced capital allocation,or
assorted efforts to boost profitability.
Assessing the long-term cash flow that the 
company is likely to generate is not straight-
forward. Calculating CFROI requires: converting
accounting data (income statement and balance
sheet) into cash in current dollars, , calculating
cash flows in current dollars (accounting for infla-
tion adjustments on monetary or near-monetary
assets such as inventories), , estimating the 
normal life of the assets,calculating the value of
the non-depreciating assets at the end of the
horizon,and then calculating the internal rate of
return. In addition, , assumptions regarding the
business environment,industry trends,etc. will
have to be made. The expertise to develop such
long-term scenarios may not be present in 
many companies,particularly smaller ones. The
difference between this return and the real cost
of capital is termed the CFROI Spread;a positive
spread reflects a positive expected value 
creation performance.
The CFROI methodology can also be used in 
valuing the firm by estimating annual CFROIs
over the estimated period rather than estimating
the CFROI value using current values. These 
estimates for a variety of industrial sectors are
provided by consulting companies, which use
this method in valuation. The changes in the
estimated value across individual years (by 
re-estimating value at the beginning and at the
end of the year) can be considered synonymous
with value-creation performance in that year.
18
The period of cash flow that will need to be
explicitly forecast is industry specific, , but it is
unlikely to be much less than five years except in
the case of the most stable of environments.
The cash flows should be forecast far enough
out of steady state to be a reasonable approxi-
mation of forecast reality. This steady state
needs long-run average economic conditions,so
organizations need to be careful that they are
not forecasting on the basis of either boom or
slump conditions continuing indefinitely.
13
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
17 When inflation is a significant factor,both cash flow and
cash invested are expressed in current dollars.
18 Boston Consulting Group also uses a modified version 
of CFROI called Total Business Return (TBR). Rather than
adjusting for inflation, , current costs of assets are used in 
calculating TBR. For details, , see Shareholder Value
Management,booklet 2,The Boston Consulting Group,1996.
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
adjust size of pdf file; advanced pdf compressor
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
pdf file compression; change paper size in pdf document
Looking at cash flow is not the cure for all ills,
however. It can become extremely complex and
is probably way out of reach for ordinary
investors. But a large segment of the institutional
investment community now uses it as a matter
of course,and management is more frequently
perceiving a real value in looking at their 
businesses this way. (See Appendix A for a
detailed example of how to calculate CFROI.)
Asking whether CFROI is better than EV is like
asking whether a Cadillac is better than a
Lincoln Town Car. There are trade-offs to each
approach. CFROI provides a longer-term per-
spective but is complex; EV is relatively easy to
use but is an annual measure.
Wealth-Creation Measures
Wealth-creation measures rely entirely on the
stock market and do not require any analysis of
the firm’s financial statements for calculating
value-creation performance. Thus, they are 
primarily applicable to exchange-listed firms and
are not useful for individual subsidiaries within 
the firm or for privately held firms.
The principle behind their use is simple: it 
is assumed that capital markets are, on 
average, capable of pricing all securities 
efficiently. The price of a common share of 
any firm is determined through the market’s
expectations about the firm’s (expected) value-
creation abilities. The higher the potential, the
higher will be the share price relative to the 
capital invested. With that premise,a measure
of the firm’s managerial performance can be
gauged by the rate of return earned by share-
holders from their investment in the shares of
the firm. Since changes in share price reflect 
the changes in investor expectations about
future performance,these changes can be used
as a surrogate for the annual value-creation 
performance. Two wealth-creation measures con-
sidered are:
Total Shareholder Return; and
Annual Economic Return.
Total Shareholder Return
A useful summary measure for estimating the
annual wealth-creation performance is the total
shareholder returns (TSR) concept that shows
the relative wealth creation of firms within 
a homogenous group. This return is simply the
rate of return earned by a shareholder through 
a combination of price changes and dividends
received.
The TSR measure allows managers to make
appropriate trade-offs among profitability,growth,
and free-cash flows and to measure a unit’s 
contribution to the overall company capital gain
and dividend yield to investors.
Because it is possible that this return may be
affected by overall capital market conditions
rather than any specific decisions made by 
management, TSR typically is compared on a
risk-adjusted basis with a peer group and/or 
a widely used benchmark (such as the TSE300
or S&P500) for evaluating relative performance.
If the relative performance is positive,one may
conclude that the capital market has responded
favorably to managerial decisions made in that
year, and, in turn, , management has created
shareholder value. This measure is based entirely
on the market’s perceptions about a firm’s future
performance.
In Exhibit 5, , a firm’s TSR is split into three 
component financial drivers. Its profitability (ROl)
and growth in invested capital are the two 
key-value drivers of capital gains. Companies
generating high returns on their invested capital
14
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
(i.e.,ROIs above investor’s required rate of return)
achieve stock-price increases when they are able
to invest more capital at these high ROIs. An
alternative strategy is exemplified by companies
that increase their return on invested capital,
which also drives relatively superior TSRs for
their shareholders through capital gains perfor-
mance. The third driver of a relatively superior
TSR is free-cash flow. (A detailed example of how
to calculate TSR is provided in Appendix A.)
Annual Economic Return
Another wealth-creation measure is the annual
economic return (AER).
19
The AER explicitly
accounts for both dividends and externally raised
capital as well as the timing of these decisions to
calculate a firm’s annual wealth-creation 
performance. The rationale behind this measure
is as follows: assume that at the end of each year,
management has a choice of liquidating the firm
at the market value of equity (net of any debt).
Shareholders receive this liquidated amount and
can invest the proceeds in other investments.
Alternatively,management may believe that it can
do better by continuing to operate the business.
20
In this scenario, management continues to run
the business,pay dividends, and raise external
capital as and when required. The wealth-creating
ability of management can be evaluated by 
comparing the return it generates with what it
could have accrued to shareholders under the 
liquidation scenario.
The AER method requires an estimation of the
shareholder’s alternative investment rate,which,
in theory,is the cost of equity capital correspond–
ing to the riskiness of the firm—an estimation
challenge that is also faced by value-creation
measures. Even the TSR method is not immune
to this challenge; ideally,the actual TSR should
be compared with the expected TSR—the
required rate of return by shareholders or, , in
other words,the cost of equity capital.
15
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
TSR
Capital Gains
Profitability
(ROI)
Growth
(Investment)
Free-Cash
Flow
Dividends
EXHIBIT 5. FINANCIAL DRIVERS OF TOTAL SHAREHOLDER RETURN (TSR) 
Source: Boston Consulting Group Inc. 1996.
19 See Jog and Halpern (1996),which shows a ranking of
Canadian firms based on this measure.
20 While debatable, readers who still remember their 
corporate finance textbooks can see that this description is
the Miller-Modigliani proposition on dividend policy
The main benefits of the AER measure over the
TSR measure are that it accounts for the amount
and timing of dividends and external capital
raised and also for the differences in opportunity
costs across firms. (See Appendix A for a
detailed example of how to calculate AER.)
Hybrid Value/Wealth-Creation Measures
Hybrid value/wealth-creation measures require
information from both the financial statements
and the stock market. In essence,these measures
evaluate a firm’s performance by comparing the
market value of the firm (equity) with the invested
capital (equity). By comparing a company’s current
value with the capital that has been invested in
the company since its formation,the investment
community can tell if a firm is creating wealth or
wasting it—even destroying it.
The difference between the market value of the
firm (equity) and the adjusted capital (equity) can
be thought of as a crude proxy for the net wealth
creation by a firm’s management. In efficient
capital markets, , this difference represents the
market valuation of a firm’s investment opportunity
set. The most common hybrid value/wealth-
creation measure is market value added.
Market Value Added (MVA)
MVA requires adjusting all capital (debt and equity)
and reflects capital market expectations about the
firm’s future value-creation performance. The
value of capital can be adjusted to ensure that it
reflects the cumulative capital invested by the
firm’s capital providers. For example,if the reported
book value may have been affected by written-off
extraordinary and normal losses,one must adjust
the book value upward accordingly.
A modification of this approach is to use the mar-
ket value of the firm’s equity less the adjusted
invested shareholder capital. This is often used
since the market value of debt is generally
unavailable. It requires adjusting for negative
changes to equity in the past and is affected by
share price and reflects capital market expecta-
tions about the firm’s future value-creation 
performance. The market value of a firm’s equity
can be calculated by multiplying the number of
all outstanding shares times the price per share,
and market value of the firm can be calculated
as the sum of the market value of all outstanding
securities—common shares, , preferred shares,
and debt. The value of capital can be estimated
by ensuring that all relevant adjustments (see
Appendix B) are made.
Management’s value-creation performance in a
particular period can be estimated by calculating
the annual change in these two performance
measures. This annual wealth-creation perfor-
mance is simply the incremental wealth created
by management for its shareholders over a specific
time period. For investors,a crucial insight that
MVA offers is to beware of companies that pursue
growth for growth’s sake. Unless the capital
employed to generate earnings produces more
wealth then it costs,MVA tends to stagnate and
investors achieve no gain.
When comparing the performance of firms with
one another using this measure,it is necessary to
adjust for the differences in the size of the firms.
This can be done by dividing the change in MVA by
the adjusted value of equity (capital) at the end of
the previous year of each firm. This is referred to
as a standardized value. These standardized 
values can be used to provide a performance
ranking of firms relative to their peers.
MVA is not totally adequate when it comes to a
natural resource industry like oil and gas,where
resources are not renewable and an asset base
16
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
can appreciate in value through time—unlike
machinery,factories and manufacturing inventories
that depreciate in value. (A detailed example of
how to calculate MVA is provided in Appendix A.)
Exhibit 6 compares the various techniques for
measuring shareholder-value performance 
discussed in this Statement.
17
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
•  definition of 
operating economic
profit, capital base, 
and cost of capital
Economic
Value
Rate of Return
on Net Assets
The Equity
Spread
CFROI/Value
Creation
Potential/
Implied or 
Plan Value
Total 
Shareholder
Return
Annual
Economic
Return
Market 
Value
Added
Standardized
Market Value
Added
•  none if accounting
values are used
•  relies on forecasts
•  future cash flows,
terminal value,
current value of
capital base
•  cost of equity and 
equity base
•  no estimation needed
•  requires stock price
and dividend 
information
•  must know the 
amount and timing, 
external equity raised
•  requires adjustment of 
capital base
•  determination of
capital-adjusted
equity value
•  same as above
•  same as above
•  better for comparison
across firms
•  differentiating between 
expense and investment
•  requires a variety of
adjustments
•  supports the free-cash
flow produced
•  can be used for 
compensation design
•  easy for line managers 
to grasp
•  can be used for 
comparisons with other
companies
•  takes into account the cost
of the firm’s invested capital
•  is consistent with DCF
•  no bias regarding new and
old business
•  similar to IRR and NPV
metrics
•  does not require
accounting data
•  directly related to 
shareholder wealth
creation
•  same as above for firms
raising capital frequently, this
is a better measure than TSR
•  accounts partially for 
opportunity costs
•  provides an indication of 
the investors’ expectations
about future value-creating
performance
•  can be used for comparisons
with other companies
•  easy for line managers to 
grasp
•  inter-divisional comparisons
can be difficult
•  since it is ratio based and 
ignores cost of capital, RONA
provides no explicit recognition
of value creation
•  since it is based on forecasts, it
does not provide a direct
measure of performance
•  not useful for compensation
design
•  complex and difficult for line
managers to grasp
•  ignores capital structure
changes
•  since it is just a percentage, it
provides no explicit recognition
of value creation
•  not directly related to annual
managerial performance
•  requires establishment of peer
group for comparison
•  not applicable for operational
units or private firms 
•  not directly related to annual
managerial performance
•  does not adjust for size 
differences for comparisons
•  not directly related to annual
managerial performance
•  ignores dividends
•  can be biased against lower
return start-up investment; can
favor businesses with heavily
depreciated assets
•  adjusts for the size differences
for comparisons
Performance
Measure
Key Challenges in
Estimation
Limitations/
Challenges
Other
Comments
EXHIBIT 6. COMPARISON OF SHAREHOLDER-VALUE-CREATION MEASURES
VII. ADDITIONAL ISSUES
RELATED TO SHAREHOLDER-
VALUE-CREATION MEASUREMENT
Stock Price
Both the (pure) wealth-creation measures and the
hybrid measures are based on share price and
assume that the share price reflects the market’s
expectations about the firm’s future value-creation
performance. A change in the stock price, , and
consequently in MVA, is automatically attributed
to management’s value-creation performance.
However, there are some major problems with
using the stock price as the only yardstick of 
managerial value-creation performance.
First,the overall level of stock market prices may
change simply because of macro-economic 
conditions (e.g.,interest rates) in the economy
that would affect the prices of all stocks. These
changes would have no relation to managerial
value-creation performance.
Second,consider a situation where a firm has
conducted an exploration program that has
resulted in it finding economically proven
reserves of oil. Fairly accurate estimates of
costs associated with drilling and transporting
are available. Based on current prices of oil and
future uncertainty in oil prices,the stock market
has put a value of $100 million on the firm’s
equity at the year end. New management arrives
at the beginning of the year and decides to take
a holiday for one year. During that year,the world
price of oil increases and so does the uncertainty
about future prices. Accordingly, the market
value of firm’s equity rises to $150 million,repre-
senting a TSR and AER of 50 percent and change
in MVA of $50 million. However, it is not clear
what these changes have to do with managerial
value-creation performance,unless one assumes
that management’s decision to take a holiday
(and not start production) was undertaken with
great foresight.
The third problem with stock-market-based
measures is that they are unable to identify the
value-creation performance of individual sub-
sidiaries and business units. The market price
may reflect the market’s expectations of what
corporate management would do with the overall
firm, but the market price cannot be used to
assign a specific value to individual business
units that may have wide variations in their value-
creation performance. If the intent is to promote
value-creating behavior within each business
unit,perhaps by linking incentive compensation
with wealth-based measures (e.g., stock
options),then wealth-based measures based on
the share price of the overall firm are simply
inadequate. In this case, , one must resort to
value-creation measures.
Uncontrollable Factors
EV measures suffer some disadvantages in
regard to uncontrollable factors. For example,a
rise in oil price may increase the calculated EV
for any given year. Considerable care must be
taken to decide when managers get applauded
(or blamed,if the reverse happens) for factors
not under their control.
Similarly,in periods of rising prices there may be
a tendency by management to overproduce in
order to benefit from the rise in oil price and to
show even higher EV. However,this implies that
the firm has exercised the option of investing
now rather than later. The value of this exercised
option must now be subtracted while estimating
economic value.
21
Similarly,if proper incentive 
18
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
21 See Dixit and Pindyck (1994,ch. 12).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested