asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Change font size pdf text box application Library tool html asp.net web page online Nabirye_Digitizing_20131-part1738

Digitizing the Monolingual Lusoga Dictionary: Challenges and Prospects
307
10.
From InDesign to TLex
Following the submission of the MA, conference papers were presented about 
different aspects of the study and the compilation process. At those conferences 
we were able to meet with and talk to various dictionary publishers, to hear 
how theyactualize their projects. We also had a chance to listen to presenta-
tions on the different software solutions available for dictionary compilation 
and that is how we ended up talking to the developers of TLex.
The initial interest at the time was to start work on a second edition of the 
WSG, using a better dictionary writing system than Shoebox. The developers of 
TLex indulged us in the advantages of their software and since the problems 
that arose in the compilation stage were still ripe in our minds, itwas easy to 
ask relevant questions based on our compilation experience.
A lot has been written about TLex already in the scientific lexicographical 
literature, so we will limit ourselves to a single reference. The most concise 
overview of the various features of TLex can be found in De Schryver (2011a), 
which contains all the references to earlier publications for the reader who is 
interested in specific details of the software.
8
We were quickly convinced and elected to have our data transferred to 
TLex. This in the understanding that TLex is primarily a powerful dictionary 
database which takes care of the A-to-Z section(s) of a dictionary, and that most 
extra-matter material is the domain of desktop publishing software, where a 
dictionary file exported from TLex may be joined to the extra texts that have 
been prepared in still other programs, like word processors and the like. 
Although the WSG was initially rather well organised with explicit mark-
up labels preceding each field as long as it resided in Shoebox, the move to 
InDesign, and the further compilation therein, meant that the programmers 
could only import the InDesign data into TLex. The InDesign data is inherently 
"flat" with the only remaining structure the formatting. The developers of TLex 
havedeveloped in-house finite-state importers, which are able to analyse such 
features and differences like bold vs. italics. vs. small caps etc. in running text, 
and also take punctuation (, vs. ; vs. . vs. : etc. as well as various types of brack-
ets) into account, in order to recreate or even simply to create a text that is 
properly structured. In simple terms, as the data is being transferred to TLex, a 
DTD (i.e. document type definition) needs to be built, which regulates the dic-
tionary grammar. Such custom importers never import everything perfectly, 
mainly because the source files are rarely 100% consistent, especially those that 
involved a lot of manual intervention (as was the case for the WSG).
As expected, a number of problems arose during the importation stage of 
the WSG. The first basically revolved around the language barrier, given that 
the entire text (being a monolingual Lusoga dictionary) was literally foreign to 
the programmers. As a result, there were cases where some parts of the article 
information ended up being misplaced. The solution here was to continuously 
liaise with the programmers during the importation exercise, to check the draft 
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
Change font size pdf text box - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
acrobat compress pdf; change font size fillable pdf
Change font size pdf text box - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf compress
308
Minah Nabirye and Gilles-Maurice de Schryver
imports for any anomalies and to alert the programmers in time. This close 
cooperation enabled us to actually make substantial improvements to the 
internal structure of the dictionary articles, and to help design a solid DTD. 
Another problem that arose during the importation was that we had 
added a new letter to the Lusoga alphabet —a velar nasal, , which is not com-
monly used. When the importation was carried out, the default sorting did not 
know where to place entries containing the velar nasal. The placements of 
entries with the letter were therefore found in all sorts of illogical positions. 
Examples of such entries include (a)kakuŋŋuntabbiliŋŋania, daŋaŋŋanziiza. In 
TLex various sorting methods may be used and customised, and here it suf-
ficed to add the velar nasal in-between n and o in the four-pass table-based 
sorting which is based on ISO 14651. 
The most annoying problems were those which resulted from inconsisten-
cies in the InDesign file, inconsistencies either inherited from the MS Word 
document, the Shoebox database or inserted in the InDesign file itself. Solving 
those was a trying job for both us and the programmers, but of course a much 
better dictionary database was the result. For example, the derivation category 
and the consideration of unpredictable plural forms were two of the last-min-
ute additions to the dictionary entry parts whose proper placements were 
problematic because they were not given in the information on parts of the 
entry in Shoebox.
One of the more interesting "clean-ups" was that TLex forced us to make a 
clear separation between actual dictionary contents (which are unique to each 
dictionary article) and all metalanguage (such as part of speech assignments or 
cross-reference texts, which are repetitive). All the metalanguage became part 
of the Style System, so easily changeable at any stage without the need to actu-
ally touch the dictionary contents. In this context, conditional metalanguage 
was also introduced on various levels. For example, to introduce run-ons, TLex 
will now automatically precede a single run-on with the meta-text "bgz:", but 
multiple run-ons with the meta-text "bbgz:".
In a first phase, the data in the TLex file was meant to mimic the layout 
seen in the InDesign file as much as possible, down to the fonts and abbrevia-
tions used, as that is what we were familiar with having worked with the data 
for so many years. Needless to say, all errors spotted during the conversion 
were of course corrected, so the data in the TLex file is now "the latest version". 
A screenshot of the imported WSG data into TLex is shown in Addendum 2.
11.
The online version of the WSG
With dictionary data in TLex, it has always been trivial to export the material to 
any of the commonly-used formats, with the aim to produce a paper diction-
ary, an online dictionary, any other type of electronic dictionary, or even to 
reuse any (parts of the) data in another application. The current version of TLex 
(7.1), for example, has all of the following data export options:
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
compress pdf; change font size pdf comment box
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color.
adjust pdf size preview; pdf change font size
Digitizing the Monolingual Lusoga Dictionary: Challenges and Prospects
309
Comma Separated Values
HTML (Web Page)
RTF (Rich Text Format) (MS Word, LibreOffice et al.)
XML (Data / Structured)
XML (Formatted / Publisher-friendly)
TLex Online Publishing [Advanced]
Text
Lemma signs
Index
ODBC database
In order to place a dictionary on a website, thus as an online dictionary in 
searchable format, one would typically choose the "TLex Online Publishing" 
option. Although doing so and preparing the website only takes a good day's 
work —provided one has a domain name and web space already, with data-
base software installed on the server —it took us another two years before we 
took this step. The reasons for waiting so long are many, but basically we first 
wished to give the sales of the printed copies a chance, yet when seeing that 
those were not doing that great, we reversed the argument, now assuming that 
the free online version would help the sales of the paper copies. 
The exact same contents from the TLex file were eventually placed online 
in June 2012. These are thus the contents from the WSG without the cross-refer-
enced material (i.e. without (1) to (5) mentioned in Section 6). A screenshot of 
the online version of the dictionary, baptized e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga, is shown in 
Addendum 3.
Given that there are far fewer space constraints on the Internet, the textual 
condensation may be lessened, by for instance starting each sense on a new 
line. Also, and in contrast to printing, colour may be used royally in an online 
environment, which helps to quickly navigate dictionary articles. Both of these 
were implemented for the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga. To further improve the use-
fulness of the dictionary, the symbols shown in Table 1 were alsointroduced. 
Table 1:"Quick-help" for the online e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga.
Symbol
Functionality
Example
&
AND
itaka & eitaka
|
OR
itaka | eitaka
"..."
Exact phrase
"kulondoola ensonga"
_
Single-character wildcard
_taka
%
Multi-character wildcard
%soga
/(1-9)
Within x words of one another, given order "nga ni"/2
@(1-9)
Within x words of one another, any order
"ekigobelelwa ensonga"@4
#
XOR (find one or the other, but not both)
ekigobelelwa # ensonga
^
None of ...
^ekigobelelwa ensonga
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
adjust pdf page size; change font size in pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change font size pdf form; best way to compress pdf file
310
Minah Nabirye and Gilles-Maurice de Schryver
With the symbols seen in Table 1, the user has been handed an extremely power-
ful search tool with which a dictionary may be searched in a manner unlike 
anything available before. One of the early "electronic dreams" has been 
implemented (cf. De Schryver 2003), and in this respect the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga
may very well be the most advanced online dictionary currently available —
not just for the Bantu languages, but for any language.
9
12.
The offline version of the WSG
The makers of TLex also have a module called the "TLex Electronic Dictionary 
System", with which downloadable e-dictionaries may be produced for offline 
use on a computer. The same contents can also be burned to a disc (CD-ROM, 
DVD, etc.) or written to a USB flash drive. Assuming that there would be a 
market for this type of dictionary as well, such an e-version of the WSG was 
also prepared, a screenshot of which is shown in Addendum 4. 
In this offline version of the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga, the search options in-
clude:
Match any of the given search terms
Match all of the given search terms
Case sensitive
Match whole words only
Search the full text
This e-dictionary further allows for automated Web searches, either for text or 
images, and has an MS Word plugin, which can automatically display, in a 
pop-up window, the dictionary contents of the words one is typing in or click-
ing on.
13.
Marketing of the WSG
The three major bookshops in Uganda —Uganda Bookshop, Aristock Booklex 
and Makerere University Bookshop —are also the only true bookshops in the 
whole ofUganda, other books being sold from supermarkets. All three are 
located in Kampala. For each, the normal procedure for publishers is to 
approach them with copies of a book, with payments only forthcoming once 
(and months after) the books deposited have been sold. Since the end of 2009, 
payments for three consignments from Uganda Bookshop, two from Makerere 
University Bookshop, and just recently the first from Aristock Booklex were 
received. In addition, a few hardcopies were acquired by once-off customers 
directly from our warehouse in Kampala or through our website. All of this 
amounts to about 200 copies sold so far, which is less than 10% of the print-run. 
The great majority of the sales were local. There may have been a small uptake 
in the interest in the dictionary following the official launch of the WSG by 
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Support to change font size in PDF form. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; List<BaseFormField
change page size pdf; reader pdf reduce file size
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Save text font, color, size and location changes to Other robust text processing features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
pdf font size change; batch pdf compression
Digitizing the Monolingual Lusoga Dictionary: Challenges and Prospects
311
Uganda's President, on the 8th of October 2010, when about five articles in the 
main Ugandan newspapers also reported on the publication (cf. e.g. Jaramogi 
2010, De Schryver 2011).
The efforts to promote the electronic versions of the dictionary were as 
follows: We sent several messages to the two main mailing lists that unite the 
electronically connected Basoga, i.e. BuSoga Yaife and Busoga Bulletin. Mem-
bers of these mailing lists mostly constituteBasoga in the diaspora, whom we 
assumed to be our main target audience for an electronic product dealing with 
their language and culture, in their language. We also wrote targeted e-mails to 
various other interest groups and individuals to announce the release of the e-
Eiwanika ly'Olusoga. At the same time, the company website of Menha Publish-
ers was updated to include detailed information on both the paper and elec-
tronic versions of the dictionary. The online version of the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga
is freely accessible from our website, while a fully automated system takes care 
of the purchases of the downloadable version. The electronic version of the 
dictionary was envisaged to serve a wider market of users who could order 
and pay online from any part of the world. The offline dictionary can even be 
downloaded as a trial version first. 
In spite of all these marketing efforts —which, lest it be forgotten, come 
on top of nearly a decade of detailed research, painstaking dictionary compila-
tion and inventive fund-raising running into the tens of thousands of Euros —, 
during the first fifteen months of e-Eiwanika ly'Olusogabeing available, exactly 
two copies of the downloadable version were sold: one to a private user in 
Uganda, and one to a library in the US.
14.
Actual use of the WSG
No studies have so far been undertaken of the actual use of the hardcopy ver-
sion of the monolingual Lusoga dictionary. It may or may not be used success-
fully, it may or may not fill a lookup need — we simply don't know. With 
regard to the online version, however, we are in a position to look at how this 
product is used, given that we can study the log files attached to this Internet 
dictionary. Sadly, the findings are unsatisfactory. 
For the first fifteen months that the dictionary has been online so far, just 
over 2000 searches were made by about 1000 different users. As a comparison, 
over the years, the Online Swahili–English Dictionary has attracted approxi-
mately 1000 visitors a day, who perform about 2000 searches every four and a 
half hours! As may be seen from Figure 1, the distribution of the number of 
searches per user in the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusogais Zipfian, so most users actually 
only look up a single word and leave. There are a few return visitors, such as # 
270, who looked up 59 words over a period of nearly 40 days, or # 62 who 
looked up 10 words over a period of nearly 9 days. Studying the actual 
searches for particular users (cf. De Schryver and Joffe 2004: 192) is not inter-
esting, given the very large number of immaterial searches. 
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf form change font size; change page size of pdf document
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
pdf optimized format; advanced pdf compressor
312
Minah Nabirye and Gilles-Maurice de Schryver
Figure 1:Number of searches per user of the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga.
Both the number of searches and the number of visitors has remained stable 
since the launch of the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga. This may be deduced from Figure 
2, where the monthly number of searches and users are plotted.
Figure 2:Monthly number of searches and users of the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga.
Most searches are immaterial because non-Lusoga words are being looked up 
in a monolingual Lusoga dictionary, and when Lusoga words are being looked 
up, they mostly belong to a limited number of registers. Just one quarter 
(25.02%) of the searches result in a "hit", meaning that the word or one of the 
words being looked up is/are found at least once in the full dictionary text. A 
massive three-quarter (74.98%) of the searches result in a "miss". The top-fre-
quent "hits" and "misses" are reproduced in Tables 2 and 3 respectively. 
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
Digitizing the Monolingual Lusoga Dictionary: Challenges and Prospects
313
Table 2:Most frequent "hits" in the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga.
Search
Freq.
Search
Freq.
Search
Freq.
Search
Freq.
hello
11
bi wanindi 
wan pod ...
4
bugisu
2
nze
2
kiswahili 10
olusoga
4
akasolo
2
embooli
2
itaka
10
kuma
3
embolo
2
amaloboozi 2
eiwanika
8
omunie
3
omukyala2
itaka & 
eitaka
2
tomba
8
diamond
3
kalenda 2
katonda
2
go
7
microscope 3
bye
2
okutomba
2
father
7
k
3
me
2
be healthy
2
i love you 6
school
3
wanzi
2
kuba
2
a
6
house
3
ighe
2
nkutu#
2
baba
6
_
3
bugiri
2
mudindo
2
mama
5
doctor
3
mapenzi 2
muna
2
eitaka
5
%
3
baaba
2
ensonga
2
taka
5
o
3
embwa
2
okwenda
2
boy
5
omudindo 3
mkeka
2
jambo
2
lusoga
4
se
2
okuluma 2
kale
2
ekinazi
4
amadhi
2
iganga
2
bantu
2
car
4
emmana
2
e
2
tai
2
enfuli
4
ekinhazi
2
me too
2
(hapaxes to follow)
Table 3:Most frequent "misses" in the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusoga.
Search
Freq.
Search
Freq.
Search
Freq.
Search
Freq.
man
20
happy
5
together
3
bird
3
love
20
thank you 5
ly
3
omunege
3
water
12
home
5
look for
3
and
3
emana
11
spirit
5
blood
3
old
3
dog
11
cow
4
person
3
sitiari
3
one
10
nyako
4
mana
3
tarihi
3
lion
8
god
4
how are 
you
3
moon
3
come
8
apple
4
omunye
3
genius
3
king
8
see
4
devil
3
tree
3
woman
8
atom
4
sun
3
yes
3
good 
morning
7
life
4
death
3
eat
3
fuck
7
child
4
install
3
my love
3
book
7
stone
4
girl
3
hand
3
mother
7
unite
4
stabalaize
3
sleep
3
table
6
fire
4
want
3
kodeyo
3
food
6
cat
4
building
3
hate
3
vagina
5
kikokotoo 4
snake
3
(searches with freq. 2 
and hapaxes to follow)
sex
5
omusadha 3
kuudhi
3
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
314
Minah Nabirye and Gilles-Maurice de Schryver
A study of the most frequent "hits" in Table 2 reveals that 20% of the found 
material is actually English (typically mentioned in the etymology slots), that 
several of the Lusoga words are simply the words and symbols taken from the 
instructions to the dictionary (cf. Table 1, e.g. itakaeitakaensonga, taka, _, %, ...), 
and that way too many of the other searches are F-words on the one hand: 
tomba'fuck', ekinazi'vagina', enfuli'labia minora', omunie'anus', omudindo'anus', 
emmana 'vagina', ekinhazi 'vagina', akasolo 'penis', embolo 'penis', okutomba 'to 
fuck', mudindo 'anus', or basic vocabulary on the other: baba 'father', mama
'mother', kuma 'light', omukyala 'woman', amadhi 'water', ... Genuine searches 
include the words in the title of the dictionary, and words like embooli'sweet 
potatoes', amaloboozi'voices', ...
These were the hits; the picture for the misses is even more depressing. As 
many as 85% of the misses in Table 3 are simply English words, several of them 
again from the F-field: fuck, vaginasex, or baby words: man, love, water, dogone, 
lion, ... Thefew Lusoga misses include more (misspelled) F-words: emana'vagina',
mana'vagina', omunye'anus', omunege'penis', misspellings of basic words: omusadha
'man', kodeyo'hello', ... and foreign words: nyakositiari, tarihi, ...
Clearly, then, the use of Internet dictionaries remains biased towards pru-
rient content and some high-frequency words (cf. De Schryver and Joffe 2004: 
190). The type of words being looked up, as seen from both the hits and the 
misses, moreover indicates that the e-Eiwanika ly'Olusogacannot be said to be 
used for any serious purposes. If ever there was a noble use for the expression 
cast pearls before swine, then this is it. This project is not only the adaptation of 
an academic study being fully misused by the community, it is also philan-
thropy gone very wrong.
15.
What we can learn from all this
Wearing an academic hat, it is possible to explain away quite a number of the 
depressing findings. Some of the arguments could then go as follows. If we 
compare Lusoga to the neighbouring Luganda, for instance, one can state that 
Luganda has a longer tradition as a written language, dating back to at least a 
century ago (Meeuwis 1999). It has been a medium of instruction in Uganda for 
about half that time (Ladefoged et al. 1972: 87-99). To this date, Luganda is the 
language of the church and the media, both in Buganda and Busoga. When the 
monolingual Luganda dictionary was published in 2007 (Kiingi et al. 2007) all 
copies were sold within a year and they had to reprint soon after. For Lusoga, 
in contrast, a language that only received its first official recognition in Uganda 
and Busoga in 2005 (NCDC 2006: 5), it is still too early for a monolingual Lusoga 
dictionary to attract enough attention.
Also, Lusoga is not yet stable as a written language. One could hypothe-
size that most users will find it problematic to decide on the right spelling of 
the lemmas to be looked up, and after a few trials they may give up. That 
doesn't necessarily mean that such users do not want a monolingual Lusoga 
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
Digitizing the Monolingual Lusoga Dictionary: Challenges and Prospects
315
dictionary per se; failure to figure out how the words of interest are written and 
listed in the dictionary simply drives away such potential users. Comparing 
Table 2 with Table 3 —where one notices that the same type of words and 
even the same words —aresearched for in both correct and wrong spellings, 
actually gives weight to this argument.
Because Lusoga is only just beginning to have a presence in the written 
genre and in scholarly works, the majority of the academic papers written so 
far have been onproblems that could help advance the description of Lusoga. 
Very few reference works exist on Lusoga, and fewer even have been written in
Lusoga, which implies that the interest and need to use Lusoga in an advanced 
setting or in a way which requires one to check the proper form or the exact 
meaning(s) of a word in a dictionary, has not yet arisen.
Lastly, the WSG project was started and developed as an academic study. 
It was therefore designed and aimed to fulfil scholarly demands, not market-
oriented demands. The need to market the dictionary arose after the project 
was passed by the academic bodies and therefore the way it is taken to the 
market and presented to this very niche market needs to be adjusted if it is to 
receive the attention we think it deserves.
Conversely, and wearing a business hat, one simply has to admit, based 
on the evidence seen in Tables 2 and 3, that what the Busoga community needs 
first is a bilingual English–Lusoga dictionary. At a push, one could wish to con-
clude that they need a bilingualised dictionary, thus a monolingual Lusoga 
dictionary where English glosses are provided at each sense of each dictionary 
article. 
Additionally, the material could have been made far more user-friendly in 
a digital environment. For one, the entire metalanguage could easily have been 
expanded: writing the parts of speech in full rather than use the current 
obscure abbreviations, or "in Luganda" rather than "Lg.", "example" rather than 
"gez.", and even "this word is a singular noun in class 7, with its plural in class 
8" rather than "7/8", etc. One could also have decided to do away with ortho-
graphic conventions in the pronunciation field, such as those that regulate the 
compensatory lengthening of vowels. Using full words throughout rather than
morphemes, could also have been considered. And so on.
Yet deep down the actual tension is actually one between a product that is 
needed to make a society dictionarate, versus a product that is needed to make 
money, and must, by definition, be sellable and thus user-friendly. Monolin-
gual dictionaries in a non-dictionarate environment must therefore be facili-
tated by a deus ex machina. Even then, the battle remains an uphill one. The 
heavily government-funded and over-trained Northern Sotho NLU, for 
instance, has had their monolingual dictionary online for a number of years 
now, known as the Pukuntšutlhaloši ya Sesotho sa Leboa ka Inthanete. Several 
teams of lexicographers worked on the dictionary for well over a decade, a dic-
tionary which potentially serves a community of over 4.6 million speakers in 
digitally advanced and well-connected South Africa. For the past 15 months, 
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
316
Minah Nabirye and Gilles-Maurice de Schryver
about 1400 visitors made use of this online monolingual Northern Sotho dic-
tionary, searching for roughly 6300 items, with a hit rate of 35%. While these 
figures are all higher than those for the monolingual Lusoga dictionary, the 
difference is clearly not as big as one would have hoped. Therefore, even 
though there may be little need for it in the present communities, monolingual 
dictionaries ought to be funded and the process guided by competent govern-
ment bodies. Bringing it back to South Africa, the NLUs simply mustfocus on 
the production of monolingual dictionaries, as no one else will. 
Endnotes
1.
The first author would like to thank Brian Mugabi who helped scan the Lusoga texts, back in 
2003, which served as the basis for the corpus of the MA study.
2.
The first author would like to acknowledge the help and support of her supervisor, Dr. K.B. 
Kiingi, who ensured that both a worthy MA and a fully-fledged monolingual dictionary of 
Lusoga were eventually produced.
3.
Ironically, back in October 2003 already, the first author of this article was in e-mail contact 
with the second author —then at the University of Pretoria. Both WordSmith Tools (for cor-
pus querying) and TshwaneLex (for dictionary compilation) were discussed. The first author 
deemed both software programs too advanced or otherwise not suitable at the time. When 
the first author was at the University of Pretoria fromAugust to November 2005, the second 
author had just left —about to relocate and be affiliated to the University of the Western 
Cape for a number of years. Both authors finally met in person at the Afrilex 2008 conference 
in Stellenbosch (and got married a year later). WordSmith Tools and TLex were taken up 
soon after, for all future work on Lusoga (cf. e.g. De Schryver and Nabirye 2010).
4.
The first author would like to thank Hassan Wasswa Matovu who helped import the diction-
ary draft into InDesign and who was also responsible for the final dictionary typesetting.
5.
The total number of printed pages is 704 (= 2 + 22 for the front matter, + 552 for the A-to-Z 
text, + 7 + 14 + 15 + 8 for the interspersed sections, + 63 + 21 for the back matter), which is 
exactly 22 quires of 32 pages each, the standard in bookbinding. Trying to fit one's contents 
into an exact multiple of 32 pages is always the cheapest option for printing. Some of the data 
that had been prepared was deleted to attain this multiple.
6.
At the time, this very much felt like we were just being sent away. When, in early 2009, we 
checked with Oxford University Press Southern Africa, however, they also felt they could not 
take on a dictionary like ours. That said, OUPSA did help us find an excellent printing house 
in Cape Town.
7.
When Menha Publishers worked on their next book, a Festschrift for Patrick Hanks (De 
Schryver 2010), new moneys were invested into the company and the website was updated. 
8.
All of these publications are also available from the company website of TshwaneDJe Human 
Language Technology, see the References for the URL.
9.
The number of results shown per search has been limited to 5, however, this to make sure 
that the online dictionary contents cannot just be "stolen" in one go.
http://lexikos.journals.ac.za
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested