asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Adjust size of pdf in preview control application platform web page html .net web browser national-trade-policy-for-export-success1-part1743

ix
FIGURES
Figure 1: The trade policy/export competitiveness interface 
7
Figure 2: Global GDP growth and merchandise trade volume, 1950-2009 
43
Figure 3: Growth of global output, FDI stocks, merchandise exports and services, 1980-2008 
44
Figure 4: FDI infl ows, global and by group of economies, 1980–2010 (billions of dollars) 
45
Figure 5: Private investment in sub-Saharan infrastructure projects by sector, 1990-2008 
48
Figure 6: Skoda/Volkswagen car sales 1991-2010 
55
Figure 7: Skoda/Volkswagen after-tax profi ts 1997-2010 
55
Figure 8: The Single Window 
92
BOXES
Box 1: 
OECD recommendation on separating competitive and natural monopoly functions 
18
Box 2: 
Argentina: monitoring competition in restructured ports 
21
Box 3: 
Indonesia: using competition law for restructuring ports 
22
Box 4: 
Jamaica: stopping abuse of dominance in port management 
22
Box 5: 
Zambia: abuse of dominance in port management led to tariff increases 
23
Box 6: 
Mexico: encouraging competition – the spatial separation model 
25
Box 7: 
Sweden: encouraging competition – the vertical separation model 
25
Box 8: 
United States: lessons from airline deregulation – the viability and benefi ts of competition 
27
Box 9: 
Air cargo cartel fi ned by European Commission for price fi xing 
28
Box 10: Examples of deregulation in freight transport 
28
Box 11: Expected gains from the United States-Mexico bilateral trucking dispute 
29
Box 12: Price fi xing in bus services from Singapore to Malaysia and southern Thailand 
30
Box 13: Reform of the EU’s electricity sector 
31
Box 14: China: reform of the energy sector 
32
Box 15: Russian Federation: abuse of dominance in the power transmission market 
33
Box 16: Pakistan: cartelization in liquefi ed petroleum gas market 
34
Box 17: Forms of market entry – the United States Telecommunications Act of 1996 
34
TABLES
Table 1: Non-competitive and competitive components of key infrastructure industries 
16
Table 2: Sectoral and sub-sectoral breakdown of PPP projects, as of 2009 
49
Table 3: Good governance in investment promotion 
58
Table 4: Policy matrix for the promotion of foreign investment in infrastructure and effi ciency-seeking 
manufacturing and services 
63
Table 5: Major functions of an investment promotion agency 
70
Table 6: Measuring national logistics performance 
83
Table 7: Export distance, cost and time in landlocked countries 
94
Table 8: Trade and transit procedures and practices 
96
Table 9: Average tariffs on agricultural and industrial products, 2008 (%) 
111
Table 10: Examples of products with high rates of duty 
112
Table 11: GATS commitments by sector 
123
Table 12: Anti-dumping measures initiated January 1995–June 2010, by reporting country and sector 
126
Table 13: Common needs of exporters – TBT/SPS compliance requirements 
131
Adjust size of pdf in preview - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in pdf form; can a pdf file be compressed
Adjust size of pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size in pdf comment box; change font size on pdf text box
x
Box 18: Peru: abuse and transfer of monopolistic power 
35
Box 19: Chinese Taipei: abuse and transfer of monopolistic power 
36
Box 20: Latvia: abuse of dominance 
37
Box 21: Mexico: competition-related elements of the WTO Panel Report 
38
Box 22: Global car production 
52
Box 23: India: business service outsourcing creates value 
53
Box 24: GATS – The relationship between trade and investment 
56
Box 25: United Republic of Tanzania: private sector linkage programme 
64
Box 26: Ireland: national linkage programmes 
66
Box 27: Czech Republic: targeting the right technology investment 
71
Box 28: Botswana: enabling investors to secure clearances and approvals 
72
Box 29: Investment decision-making for Philips Electronics 
78
Box 30: Ghana: customs reform and modernization 
79
Box 31: Delays damage companies’ competitiveness 
80
Box 32: Indonesia: pineapple producer faces inhibiting trade facilitation costs 
81
Box 33: Yemen: poor trade facilitation hurts tuna exporters 
82
Box 34: Infrastructure for trade facilitation 
84
Box 35: Dealing with corruption 
87
Box 36: Guidelines – pre-shipment inspections and destination inspections 
89
Box 37: Tunisia: improved clearance time at the port of Radès 
92
Box 38: Economic development in landlocked countries – ‘very, very tough’ 
93
Box 39: A pragmatic solution – the West African Transit Agreement 
97
Box 40: Rwanda: deregulating international transport 
100
Box 41: Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland: privatization 
101
Box 42: Malaysia: consultation mechanisms 
103
Box 43: Circumvention through third-country assembly 
116
Box 44: The Honda case 
116
Box 45: Effects of EU and United States rules of origin on African exports of textiles and clothing 
117
Box 46: Implications of the absence of multilateral rules 
118
Box 47: Classifi cation of non-tariff measures (NTMs) 
119
Box 48: Examples of the four modes of supply from the perspective of importing ‘country A’ 
121
Box 49: Sample schedule of commitments – Arcadia 
122
Box 50: Recent trends in NTMs 
125
Box 51: Philippines: examples of NTMs affecting agriculture 
129
Box 52: Defi ning technical barriers to trade and sanitary and phytosanitary measures 
130
Box 53: Viet Nam: case study – private associations defend industry 
131
Box 54: Sri Lanka: internationally recognized conformity infrastructure 
133
Box 55: Thailand: global integration of the auto industry 
135
Box 56: The SCM Agreement: options for a developing country 
148
Box 57: xport competitiveness and duty drawback 
151
Box 58: Common features of SEZs 
154
Box 59: Costa Rica and Senegal: experiences 
155
Box 60: Nepal: ensuring textile and apparel benefi t from SEZs 
156
Box 61: Nepal creates a business-friendly investment climate 
156
Box 62: Vanuatu promotes investments and exports 
157
Box 63: Colombia encourages investment and export promotion 
159
VB Imaging - VB Codabar Generator
image, New PointF(100F, 100F)) docx.Save("C:\\Sample_Barcode.pdf"). VB Code to Adjust Codabar Parameters. set barcode data // Codabar barcode size related barcode
change font size pdf document; change font size in pdf file
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
configure the VB.NET image viewer or adjust its properties with mouse click and reset the size of the a powerful toolkit to print bitonal images, PDF, and so on
change paper size pdf; adjust size of pdf file
xi
ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations are used:
ACP 
African, Caribbean and Pacifi c
ACV 
Agreement on Customs Valuation
AEO 
Authorized economic operator
AGOA 
African Growth and Opportunity Act
ASEAN 
Association of Southeast Asian Nations
CBU 
Completely built up
CKD 
Completely knocked down
CVD 
Countervailing duty
DI 
Destination inspection
DSL 
Digital Subscriber Line
ECOWAS 
Economic Community of West African States
EEA 
European Economic Area
EPZs 
Export processing zones
EU 
European Union
FDI 
Foreign direct investment
FTAs 
Free trade agreements
G20 
Group of Twenty
GATS 
General Agreement on Trade in Services
GDP 
Gross domestic product
GSP 
Generalized System of Preferences
IATA 
International Air Transport Association
ICT 
Information and communications technology
IMF 
International Monetary Fund
IPA(s) 
Investment promotion agency(ies)
IPO 
Initial public offering
ISO 
International Organization for Standardization
IT 
Information technology
ITC 
International Trade Centre
LDCs 
Least developed countries
LMIC 
Low- and middle-income countries
LPG 
Liquefi ed petroleum gas
LPI 
Logistics Performance Index
MFN 
Most favoured nation
MNEs 
Multinational enterprises
MRL 
Maximum residue limit
NAFTA 
North American Free Trade Agreement
NTBs 
Non-tariff barriers
NTMs 
Non-tariff measures
OECD 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
PPP 
Public-private partnership
PSI 
Pre-shipment inspection
ROOs 
Rules of origin
RTAs 
Regional trade agreements
S&D 
Special and differential treatment
SCION 
Standard input-output norms
SEZs 
Special economic zones
SMEs 
Small and medium-sized enterprises
SPS 
Sanitary and phytosanitary
SW 
Single window
TBT 
Technical barriers to trade
TCMCS 
Coding System of Trade Control Measures
TRQs 
Tariff rate quotas
TTC 
Trade transaction cost
TTFA 
Trade and Transport Facilitation Audit
UNCTAD 
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
VAT 
Value-added tax
WCO 
World Customs Organization
WTO 
World Trade Organization
C# Image: View & Operate Web Page Using .NET Doc Image Web Viewer
multiple document and image formats, like PDF and TIFF; Adjust the page order of source document file using mouse NET users to choose best viewing size as they
adjust size of pdf in preview; change font size pdf text box
Generate and draw Data Matrix for Java
all 2D barcodes like QR Code, Data Matrix and PDF 417 in text in Java Class barcode.setData("Java Data Matrix"); //Adjust Data Matrix size with barcode
change font size pdf; pdf markup text size
Tutorial Guide for Java Barcode Generation Component in details
Package for the purpose type with linear, QR Code, PDF 417 or image text in Java Class barcode.setData("BARCODE-JAVA"); //Adjust Code 39 size with barcode
apple compress pdf; pdf change font size in textbox
VB.NET Word: Create VB.NET Word Document Viewer in Web, Windows
Professional VB.NET Word document viewing component with quick thumbnail preview support; If needed, you can try VB.NET PDF document file viewer SDK, and VB.NET
change font size in pdf fillable form; change font size pdf form reader
INTRODUCTION
1
INTRODUCTION
TRADE-LED GROWTH .....................................................................................................................................2
DOMESTIC POLICY PRECONDITIONS ........................................................................................................2
TRADE POLICY OPTIONS FOR NATIONAL EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS  .............................................3
THE TRADE POLICY AND EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS INTERFACE ......................................................6
DESIGNING TRADE POLICY FOR EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS .............................................................8
INTRODUCTION
2
INTRODUCTION
Export performance has been critical for the economic development of many developing countries in recent 
years. It has contributed to faster growth and poverty reduction. Exporting has produced economic benefi ts 
deriving from effi ciency gains associated with exploiting comparative advantages and improved allocation of 
scarce resources. There are also dynamic gains in the export sector driven by greater competition, greater 
economies of scale, better use of capacity, dissemination of knowledge and know-how, and technological 
progress.
TRADE-LED GROWTH
There are now many examples of developing countries that have been able to develop competitive export 
industries and have been rewarded with remarkable economic growth: the Republic of Korea and Chinese 
Taipei in the 1960s; Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore in the 1970s; China 
in the 1980s; and Central and South American countries in 1990s, such as Chile. These countries were also 
able to tap into the phenomenal growth in international trade. Between 1950 and 2005 the volume of world 
trade increased 27 times, from US$ 296 billion to over US$ 8 trillion.
1
Despite international trade experiencing 
a contraction of 12.2% in 2009
2
in the wake of the fi nancial crisis, trade is again on the upswing. This is 
evidenced by a record-breaking 14.5% surge in the volume of exports in 2010.
3
But what trade policies and regulations are needed to achieve export success? This book attempts to answer 
this question by promoting a better understanding of trade policy, which can enable countries to achieve 
export success. It is now widely recognized that to tackle the myriad constraints faced by exporters, trade 
policy can no longer be limited to so-called ‘border measures’.
4
Policymakers must address a wide range of 
national issues, including creating an enabling business environment (competition, investment, institutions, 
etc.); providing competitive access to infrastructure (energy, communications, transport, etc.); facilitating 
reliable and effi cient movement of goods to destination markets; and ensuring product compliance with 
quality and sanitary and phytosanitary standards.
Because of the success of forerunners of export-led economic growth, since the mid-1980s many other 
developing and least developed countries (LDCs) have tried to emulate this model. There has been a 
fundamental shift in development policy. The import substitution model encouraged countries to build up 
their own domestic agricultural and manufacturing capacity and substitute domestically produced goods for 
imports. This may have been important at an earlier stage of development in some countries, but also led to a 
number of failures and slow growth, and a number of countries that had earlier followed an import-substitution 
model have become more outward oriented. Today, the focus is on improving international competitiveness, 
allowing the exploitation of dynamic export markets.
DOMESTIC POLICY PRECONDITIONS
To be export competitive among countries with similar resource endowments, a range of supporting domestic 
policies is required. Many countries are unable to realize the full potential of export-led growth because 
1 ‘The GATT/WTO at 60: WTO World Trade Report examines six decades of multilateralism in trade’, WTO Press Release 502, 
4 December 2007. Available at: www.wto.org/english/news_e/pres07_e/pr502_e.htm
2 ‘Trade to expand by 9.5% in 2010 after a dismal 2009’, WTO reports, WTO Press Release 598, 26 March 2010. 
Available at: www.wto.org/english/news_e/pres10_e/pr598_e.htm
3 ‘Trade growth to ease in 2011 but despite 2010 record surge, crisis hangover persists’, WTO Press Release 628, 7 April 2011. 
Available at: www.wto.org/english/news_e/pres11_e/pr628_e.htm
4 Kaukab, R., ‘Inclusiveness of trade policy-making: Challenges and possible responses for better stakeholder participation’, 
Commonwealth Trade Hot Topics, Issue 70, February 2010.
INTRODUCTION
3
domestic preconditions remain largely unfulfi lled. For example, LDCs still contribute just 1% to global trade. 
Partial efforts have been made by many countries, but anything short of a comprehensive approach fails to 
overcome the full range of constraints inhibiting export development.
A comprehensive and clearly articulated approach to trade policy and regulatory practices, with buy-in by all 
stakeholders, is vital to the success of an export strategy. When different government departments handle 
trade-related policies in isolation rather than in an integrated manner, it is diffi cult to develop and implement 
a coherent policy framework to support an export strategy. A coherent trade policy framework bridges 
government departments, public and private sector trade-related programmes, and private-sector actors. 
The result is an overarching set of prioritized objectives prepared in a holistic fashion by bringing together all 
relevant stakeholders and driven by the common goal of export impact for good.
This book aims to address these concerns by advancing a coherent trade policy framework. To address the 
need to unleash the export potential of fi rms through trade policy ‘at the border’, ‘behind the border’ and 
‘beyond the border’, this book advances prioritized objectives to tackle the overriding constraints faced by 
both the public and private sectors.
This introduction explains how the International Trade Centre (ITC) prioritized the objectives discussed in 
each chapter. It gives an overview of how trade policy options can infl uence national export competitiveness 
and trade policy options. It goes on to presents a framework, created specifi cally for this book, to explain 
the interface between trade policy and export competitiveness (see fi gure 1). The framework captures at a 
glance the scope for trade policy to infl uence export competitiveness. It illustrates the need for specifi c trade 
policy instruments to address constraints exporters face behind the border, at the border and beyond the 
border, related to every stage of production and distribution of manufactured goods, agricultural products 
and services for export. Some of these trade policy instruments that have multiple purposes in addressing 
common, overlapping issues. Finally, this introduction provides a further explanation of how these objectives 
are addressed in each chapter of the book.
TRADE POLICY OPTIONS FOR NATIONAL EXPORT 
COMPETITIVENESS 
Export competitiveness refers to ‘the capacity to produce, distribute and sell products and services as or 
more effectively and effi ciently than is done by the relevant competitors’.
5
In the current globalized trading 
environment, the notion of competitiveness has taken on added importance and emerged as a key indicator 
and determinant of ‘successful’ nations. Christian Ketels, an economist specialized in competitiveness 
strategy, suggests: ‘Exports are an important diagnostic tool that can help signal whether more fundamental 
conditions in the economy are right. The overall success on global export markets as well as the particular 
pattern of industries that successfully export provides valuable ‘revealed’ information on underlying 
competitiveness conditions.’
6
He further adds that poor export performance is ‘an indication that there are 
weaknesses that either limit the productivity of companies or negatively affect their ability to project their 
capabilities on global markets. Exports in particular sectors give an indication that the location has a particular 
set of strengths in its competitiveness fundamentals that are conducive to their success.’
National trade policy that promotes export competitiveness must fi nd ways to increase the ability to sell 
domestically produced goods and services on global markets. Finding such ways requires the analysis 
of factor endowments, institutional strengths and market opportunities. Strategies may then be shaped to 
take account of overall national development and socio-economic ambitions, typically involving multiple 
government departments, ministries and agencies, as well as the effective participation and collaboration of 
the private sector. Often a strategy aimed solely at attaining export success may be politically unfeasible due 
to incompatible competing interests that impact on the process of trade policy decision-making. Strategies 
5 Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland. Available at: formin.fi nland.fi /public/default.aspx?nodeid=15265&contentlan=2&culture=en-
US
6 Ketels, C., ‘Export competitiveness: Reversing the logic’, paper prepared for World Bank’s Development Debate, ‘What do we mean 
by Export Competitiveness and How do Countries Achieve it in an Uncertain World?’, Harvard Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness, 
2010.
INTRODUCTION
4
also need to be formulated within the international trading context to ensure compliance with commitments 
under the World Trade Organization (WTO) and other regional and bilateral agreements. The main priority is 
to ensure domestic policies and partners work in tandem to achieve export competitiveness.
IDENTIFYING DRIVERS FOR EXPORT SUCCESS
Consensus is emerging concerning the fundamental drivers of exports. Increasingly, it is understood that 
broad reforms at the national level can have positive results for exporters. Global competitiveness frameworks 
and fi rm-level value chain analyses that have emerged have been helpful in this respect.
Global competitiveness frameworks
The emergence of international competitiveness frameworks has been infl uential in pinpointing a wide range 
of stumbling blocks to trade. Frameworks most relevant for trade policy include the following::
 The World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Index outlines 12 pillars for global competitiveness: 
– Institutions, infrastructure, the macro-economic environment and health and primary education are 
basic requirements for competitiveness.
– Higher education and training, goods market effi ciency, labour market effi ciency, fi nancial market 
development, technological readiness and market size are essential to enhance effi ciency.
– Business sophistication and innovation are indicators of innovation-driven economies. 
 The World Economic Forum’s Enabling Trade Index is also relevant. The index measures how economies 
have developed institutions, policies and services to facilitate trade, and groups its indices around:
– Market access
– Border administration 
– Transport and communications infrastructure 
– Business environment. 
 The World Bank’s Doing Business Report has also emerged as a recognized framework to measure 
progress related to trade policy and export competitiveness. Its 11 indices measure ease with:
– Starting a business
– Dealing with construction permits
– Getting electricity
– Registering property
– Getting credit
– Protecting investors
– Paying taxes
– Trading across borders
– Enforcing contracts
– Resolving insolvency.
These frameworks help trade policy reformers to assess the trading and business environment of their 
country against international best practices. This enables them to focus on specifi c areas to reform that will 
improve their country’s ranking on international indices and, at the same time, strengthen competitiveness 
and increase exports.
However, while international frameworks are useful to assess competitiveness, their effectiveness is limited 
for the following reasons:
7
 They focus on broad economic competitiveness rather than export competitiveness. As such, they cover 
some issues that may be less critical for the export environment (or too far upstream) and fail to go into 
suffi cient detail on some issues that are particularly critical for exports.
Ibid.
INTRODUCTION
5
 Most analyses of export competitiveness uncover a series of issues that a country would need to address 
to achieve more success in export markets. This is to be expected, as the factors that constrain exports 
are generally multiple and simultaneous. But it is seldom fi nancially feasible, operationally practical, or 
politically possible to address all these issues concurrently. In short, there is a need to turn an assessment 
into practical and actionable policy.
The value chain approach
International frameworks generally assess and expose constraints rather than propose ‘remedies’ or policy 
recommendations. Further analytical work is required at the country level to devise more targeted policy 
responses. Value chain analysis can be used as a framework to complement global competitiveness 
benchmarking.
The value chain approach analyses each link in the ‘chain of activity’ at the sector level. A value chain for any 
product or service extends across research and development, raw materials supply and production, delivery 
to international buyers, and ultimately to disposal and recycling.
8
By ‘analysing the costs of doing business through a specifi c product or industry lens, value chain analysis 
facilitates the identifi cation of binding constraints to growth and competitiveness and the effective targeting 
of institutional and policy-related issues, at the sector and economy-wide levels alike’.
9
How is value chain analysis for national reforms to trade policy? The fi ndings of a report from the World Bank 
Group suggest that the reform agenda that typically emerges from the value chain analysis relates to three 
broad core areas:
10
 Product or services market issues – trade policy, competition policy, price distortions, subsidies, licensing, 
standards for products and services, customs, logistics, property rights, and the regulatory framework.
 Factor market issues – wages, capital charges, utility market issues, labour market rigidities, land price 
and zoning.
 Market-related issues – market diversifi cation, research and development, product or service diversifi cation 
and supplier linkages.
Importantly, the fi ndings suggest that the obstacles to trading are typically not unique to one particular 
sector, but affect exporters from diverse sectors. These common factors suggest that fi rm productivity greatly 
depends upon public inputs to production and well-functioning markets in which fi rms operate. Government 
policies either contribute to or constrain the creation of a business-friendly environment in which fi rms can 
effi ciently obtain and sell their inputs.
The multifaceted nature of export competitiveness requires a clear understanding of the wide range of 
contributing and constraining factors. Constraints are likely to be multiple and intertwined, tied to cross–
cutting issues such as good governance; infrastructure; product standards, certifi cation and corresponding 
regulatory requirements for the provision of services; access to fi nance; and fi rm linkages.
THE TRADE POLICY AND EXPORT COMPETITIVENESS 
INTERFACE
The list of constraints that prevent a country from expanding trade is very long. Most developing countries 
are unable to make wholesale reform changes simultaneously. First, this is due to a failure to create the 
necessary constituency for reform. Because policymaking requires buy-in from a diverse range of stakeholders 
with competing views, they need to be convinced of the rationale for reform. Second, many countries are 
constrained by a lack of fi nancial resources to carry out often-expensive reforms.
8 ‘Value Chain Analysis: A Strategy to Increase Export Earnings’, International Trade Forum – Issue 1, ITC, 2003. 
9 Moving toward competitiveness: A value-chain approach’, World Bank, 2007. 
Available at: www.ifc.org/ifcext/fi as.nsf/AttachmentsByTitle/MovingTowardCompetitiveness/$FILE/Value+Chain+Manual.pdf
10 Ibid.
INTRODUCTION
6
As a result, it is critical to galvanize stakeholders around overarching constraints, which if addressed would 
have the greatest impact on expanding trade and promoting economic growth. Because country situations 
are so diverse, there is no singular trade policy framework that can be advocated globally. However, there are 
some similar, fundamental components.
The ITC trade policy and export competitiveness framework developed for this book and detailed in fi gure 
1 is intended to assist readers in identifying overriding objectives and suitable trade policy instruments to 
address constraints. The framework is intended to enable policymakers, private sector organizations and 
entrepreneurs to take a holistic approach to national trade policy reforms. Reforms should be implemented 
with a wide range of instruments aligned to support enterprises in achieving export competitiveness and 
success. The framework is the analytical basis for this book.
THE PRODUCTION SUPPLY CHAIN
The top half of fi gure 1 shows the most typical inputs fi rms require across the entire supply chain:
 It begins with the need for fi rms to access raw materials and intermediate goods for production. Here the 
most cost competitive and reliable source of supplies is sought, either domestically or abroad.
 Next, inputs are transported to the fi rm via customs, distribution warehouses and overland (road, railway, 
etc.). Some inputs may be ‘transported’ via telecommunication or other modes of cross-border trade 
(outsourcing services).
 Inputs are then processed into agricultural or industrial products or services.
 Finally, the products or services are ‘transported’ to destination markets. To transport goods to the 
border fi rms are increasingly reliant upon effi cient logistics functions, for which there is a need for good 
communication systems (telecommunications and Internet). Good communications systems are also 
necessary for the export of services typically characterized as ‘business process outsourcing’. All products, 
whether agricultural or manufactured, must conform to technical barriers to trade (TBT) requirements. 
Agricultural products must conform to sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) requirements. Services may need 
to meet regulatory requirements.
Firms must compete with both domestic and foreign fi rms as providers of goods or services to destination 
markets. Cost, access and reliability of inputs is inevitably a main concern of fi rms endeavouring to be 
competitively priced and reliable providers of goods. At the same time, non-competitiveness in any of the four 
areas discussed earlier can make exporting an unrealistic option for fi rms.
TRADE POLICY INSTRUMENTS
The bottom half of fi gure 1 details typical trade policy instruments that governments can use to support 
the competitiveness of fi rms at each stage of the supply chain. These instruments encompass a broader 
understanding of trade policy responses ‘at the border’, ‘behind the border’ and ‘beyond the border’. 
Governments can use some instruments to target specifi c areas of the supply chain that would boost fi rm 
competitiveness. Other instruments are cross-cutting and affect multiple areas of the supply chain through 
policies that shape the country’s trading and economic landscape.
An example of the former is the use of duty drawback schemes to ‘provide exporters of manufactured 
goods with imported inputs at world prices and thus increasing their profi tability, while maintaining the 
protection for domestic industries that compete with imports’.
11
Such policies are specifi cally intended to 
achieve access to inputs at competitive prices. Similarly, mutual recognition of academic qualifi cations is 
an important determinant of export of professional services (under the broader area of trade in services). 
11 Export Competitiveness and Duty Drawback, World Bank: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/TRADE/0,,contentMDK:2
0540524~pagePK:148956~piPK:216618~theSitePK:239071,00.html
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested