asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Adjusting page size in pdf Library control component .net web page azure mvc national-trade-policy-for-export-success10-part1744

CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
87
to adjust operational practices to minimize the number of transactions that require detailed inspection. This 
is achieved by applying a set of management procedures that include identifying, analysing, evaluating and 
mitigating the risks that might have an impact on achieving regulatory and revenue goals.
Customs also needs to keep pace with today’s constantly changing international environment, driven by huge 
increases in international trade, transnational organized crime, and terrorism. Customs administrations are 
increasingly aware that national and international cooperation is vital, which requires increased information 
sharing among customs services. The value of sharing information with other law enforcement agencies 
and the business sector has also been recognized as vital. All of this information forms the basis for risk 
management.
SECURITY OF TRADE SUPPLY CHAINS
Increasing international concern about the security of trade supply chains has increased the need to secure 
the movement of goods and protect means of transport. This concern for security needs to be balanced 
with the recognition that legitimate cargo should continue to receive the full benefi ts of trade facilitation. To 
this end, the WCO Framework of Standards to Secure and Facilitate Global Trade has been developed and 
endorsed by WCO members to address this issue in a balanced manner. A core element of the Framework 
is the initiative to use a consistent risk management approach to tackle threats to the trade supply chain.
The SAFE Framework of Standards – the Two Pillars
As detailed by WCO: ‘At the June 2005 annual Council Sessions in Brussels, Directors General of Customs 
representing the Members of the WCO adopted the SAFE Framework of Standards by unanimous 
acclamation. Not only did the adoption of this unique international instrument usher in a safer world trade 
regime, it also heralded the beginning of a new approach to working methods and partnership for both 
Customs and business.’
26
Importantly, the framework is to act as a deterrent to international terrorism, secure revenue collections and 
promote trade facilitation worldwide. The majority of the WCO’s 171 members have signed a letter of intent 
to implement the SAFE Framework. However, progress has been slow. Inhibiting factors include the level of 
awareness and preparedness, which is very uneven from one country to another.
Private sector representatives have strongly advocated for such an approach, but many have been frustrated 
by the lack of progress. The WCO’s Columbus Programme is building capacity through training and technical 
assistance for implementation in developing countries. The SAFE Framework is based on two pillars: 
customs-to-business partnerships and customs-to-customs cooperation:
26 WCO Framework of Standards to Secure and Facilitate Global Trade. Available at: www.wcoomd.org/fi les/1.%20Public%20fi les/
PDFandDocuments/Procedures%20and%20Facilitation/safe_package/safe_package_I.pdf. 2007
Box 35: Dealing with corruption
Customs is susceptible to corruption. Offi cials are vested with considerable authority and responsibility to make 
decisions that infl uence the duty and tax liability of traders and the admissibility of goods. Complex regulations and 
high tariffs increase incentives and opportunities for corruption. The use of procedures that offer little discretion to 
customs staff and that have built-in accountability methods limits the incentive for corruption.
Reform efforts should include automating clearance systems, which limits opportunities for customs offi cials 
and traders to meet. Automation, coupled with measures such as providing suffi cient staff compensation and 
increasing the risk of detection, helps stem corruption. The WCO’s Revised Arusha Declaration, which is a central 
global effort to increase the level of integrity in customs, provides a series of self-assessment, action planning, 
implementation and evaluation processes using WCO ‘integrity tools’.
For more information: 
www.wcoomd.org/home_cboverviewboxes_valelearningoncustomsvaluation_cbintegritytooloverview.htm
Adjusting page size in pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
best compression pdf; reader shrink pdf
Adjusting page size in pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf page size limit; pdf form change font size
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
88
 Customs-to-business partnerships. Customs should enter into strategic pacts with trusted economic 
operators. Customs needs to understand the concerns of business and business needs to know the 
requirements of customs. Most importantly, this relationship must become a partnership that results in 
mutually benefi cial outcomes.
This goal is promoted through the concept of the authorized economic operator (AEO), which allows 
for imported shipments from trusted operators to be rapidly moved from the controlled area of customs 
ports to the public area. The objective is for scarce customs resources to be focused on monitoring risky 
transactions. Low-risk AEO transactions should be subjected to simplifi ed customs clearance procedures 
with the least interference to supply chains. The AEO system requires that the customs authority be 
confi dent in its procedures and that the use of simplifi ed customs clearance procedures be coordinated 
by an agreement between the customs authority and the AEO.
 Customs-to-customs cooperation. The new challenges of the 21st century demand a new concept of 
customs-to-customs cooperation. Closer real-time collaboration is needed among customs administrations 
and between customs and business in facilitating legitimate trade and undertaking customs controls. The 
objective is to create a global customs network to support the international trading system, in partnership 
with the various public and private sector stakeholders. To establish this network, an international 
‘e-Customs’ network to ensure seamless, real-time and paperless fl ows of information and connectivity is 
needed.
Guided by the principles of cooperation, the Framework strengthens the links between customs administrations 
and their business stakeholders (customs-to-business partnerships) as well as cooperation among customs 
(customs-to-customs cooperation).
CUSTOMS VALUATION – A DIFFICULT TASK
Because of the asymmetry of information, valuation is one of the most diffi cult tasks for customs offi cials. 
Traders have a deep and intricate knowledge of the value of the inspected cargo and all of the factors 
that impact on that value. Customs offi cials must deal with many commodities and do not have the same 
expertise. Where traders take advantage of this asymmetry of information, they can declare a price that is 
lower than the true value. If this goes undetected, the trader benefi ts from lower duties. It is up to customs 
offi cials to acquire the expertise to counter this tendency.
In 1994, WTO members adopted the Agreement on Customs Valuation (ACV), which established that 
customs value should to the greatest extent possible be based on the transaction value – the price actually 
paid or payable for the goods, subject to certain adjustments.
27
Where the transaction value cannot be used 
because there is no transaction value or the price has been infl uenced by certain conditions or restrictions, 
the ACV provides fi ve alternative methods to be applied in a prescribed order.
28
Applying the ACV has presented serious problems for many customs administrations, particularly in 
developing countries. Efforts are ongoing in many administrations to enhance trader compliance and train 
staff to apply the ACV. Two approaches to assist customs offi cials to correctly implement the ACV are:
 Price lists. When customs offi cials can consult up-to-date price lists of the most frequently imported 
goods, they are in a better position to claim ‘reasonable doubt’ and request further documentation from 
the trader as to the prices actually paid or to resort to the alternative valuation methods specifi ed in the 
ACV. Examples are the price lists maintained for the valuation of second-hand cars, an imported item that 
is often grossly undervalued and for which reliable invoices do not exist. These lists consist of the prices of 
the new car according to model and year of construction plus a set rate of depreciation.
 Pre-shipment inspection (PSI) and destination inspection (DI). Under a PSI programme, a country’s 
Ministry of Finance or Customs Department contracts with a private fi rm to inspect cargo destined for its 
country at the point of export. A DI contract specifi es that the contractor inspects the cargo at the point 
of import, and relies on its corporate expertise and contacts abroad to undertake this task. PSI and DI 
contracts detail the specifi c data that need to be covered in the inspection reports as well as the service 
27 For a full treatment of this subject see: Goorman, A. and L. De Wulf, ‘Customs Valuation in Developing Countries and the World Trade 
Organization Valuation Rules’, Customs Modernization Handbook, World Bank, 2005.
28 Details can be found at: www.wto.org/english/docs_e/legal_e/20-val.pdf
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
one. Easy to zoom and crop image for adjusting image size. Besides C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. In
change font size in fillable pdf form; change pdf page size
VB.NET Image: Generate GS1-128/EAN-128 Barcode on Image & Document
width & height and four margin size in a EAN-128 barcode on multi-page TIFF/PDF/Word documents such as removing the document noise, adjusting page color mode
change paper size pdf; acrobat compress pdf
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
89
fee to be paid. The inspection report is provided to the importer and to the contracting authorities and 
can be used as additional information to assess the acceptability of the declared value for the purpose of 
calculating the duties and taxes due.
As of June 2010 12 countries have a PSI contract in place and 16 countries have a selective PSI contract or 
a DI contract in place.
29
The practice of customs authorities to contract PSI/DI services has frequently been 
criticized, including by the WCO and the WTO. However, having recourse to these services was authorized in 
the WTO Uruguay Round of trade negotiations. Some proposals submitted by WTO members in the ongoing 
Doha trade negotiations would prohibit the use of PSI/DI.
30
The matter is discussed in detail in the World 
29 Countries that report PSI or DI contracts that are subject to the WTO Agreement on PSI. See: www.ifi a-federation.org/content/wp-
content/uploads/2010/04/IFIA_PSI_list_06_10.pdf
30 Agreement on Pre-shipment Inspection, WTO. Available at: www.wto.org/english/docs_e/legal_e/21-psi.pdf
Box 36: Guidelines – pre-shipment inspections and destination inspections
 Contract only PSI/DI companies that have a good reputation and operate under the Code of Conduct of the 
International Federation of Inspection Agencies.
 Select PSI/DI service providers and renew their contracts through transparent and competitive bidding 
procedures.
 Contract a single PSI/DI company for a period of a few years and renew the contract under competitive 
conditions.
 Avoid split contracts. Companies are more complex to supervise, contracting costs tend to be more expensive, 
and individual companies are less carefully supervised by their respective headquarters for which they represent 
lesser profi t opportunities. Also, split contracts may lead importers to adjust their import patterns so as to benefi t 
from the most helpful inspection service providers.
 Have PSI/DI contracts fully endorsed by customs, not imposed on customs by the Ministry of Finance or the 
Central Bank.
 Link the PSI/DI contracts with a customs modernization project that clearly delineates the respective 
responsibilities of customs and the PSI/DI company.
 Make the PSI/DI contract explicit:
– Determine services to be rendered (price, classifi cation, duties paid, special import regimes);
– Establish time limits without automatic extensions;
– Create a list of goods to be inspected with exceptions detailed;
– Customs should be assisted in setting up databases;
– Establish clear performance criteria that will allow the government to verify performance, with penalties for 
failing to adhere to the criteria retained;
– Secure commitments to train customs staff and to transfer technology;
– Specify reporting requirements, including the number of inspections, irregularities addressed, adjustments 
to value made and resulting additional assessments;
– Implement a process to handle complaints.
 Record the PSI/DI inspection reports in the customs declaration and in the automated customs management 
system. Reconcile the fi ndings of PSI/DI inspection reports with customs declarations and values retained for 
the calculation of duties and taxes; explain the reasons for deviations detected.
 To enhance importers’ compliance, apply the legal penalties for offenses of undervaluation.
 Specify an arbitration or appeals procedure to provide importers with an avenue to contest PSI/DI assessments.
 Create a steering committee (located outside customs, but with the participation of customs) to oversee PSI/DI 
activities and report periodically to the private sector.
 Articulate an exit strategy to ensure a smooth transition of the functions that were performed by the PSI/DI 
service to customs. PSI/DI companies could be retained to assist in dealing with fraud-sensitive goods, or other 
cases where valuation poses particular problems.
 Introduce a publicity campaign to inform traders and the public about PSI/DI systems.
Source
: De Wulf, L., Sokol, J., editors, Customs Modernization Handbook, World Bank, 2005. Available at: siteresources.
worldbank.org/EXTEXPCOMNET/Resources/2463593-1213985777369/01_The_Customs_Modernization_Handbook.pdf.
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
is designed to help developer view source image or document page by adjusting the target file enlarge or reduce the source file until the file size fits the
change font size in pdf form; pdf paper size
VB.NET Excel: VB Methods to Set and Customize Excel Rendering
we treat every single Excel spreadsheet as a page in our VB the fixed image size ration that the size is limited Thus, when VB.NET users are adjusting the image
pdf file size; pdf change font size
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
90
Bank’s Customs Modernization Handbook.
31
Many customs authorities believe that having recourse to PSI 
and DI services has enabled them to collect more revenue. This is despite the fact that many of them have 
inadequately supervised the performance of the companies rendering these services and/or failed to make 
full use of the information provided.
Countries that have opted to use these services could do so as a temporary solution, while strengthening 
their in-house customs valuation capacities by carefully using the inspection data provided and setting up 
a mechanism to supervise the quality of the services rendered. Countries should also follow the guidelines 
listed in box 36 to ensure that PSI/DI services interfere as little as possible with legitimate trade.
RULES OF ORIGIN
Customs offi cers need to ascertain the origin of goods in order to apply basic trade policy measures such 
as quantitative restrictions, anti-dumping and countervailing duties, safeguard measures, origin marking, 
and public procurement, and for statistical purposes. These rules of origin (ROOs) are non-preferential in 
that they are intended to apply to all goods. However, preferential tariffs often apply as a result of preferential 
trade agreements between the importing country and the country of origin. These ROOs are often strict for 
the following reasons:
 They avoid trade defl ection, which results from claims that a good comes from a particular country that 
benefi ts from preferential tariffs, whereas that may not be the case; or
 The good may not comply with the specifi cations spelled out in the trade agreement.
The proliferation of trade agreements, each with their specifi c regulations, has caused problems for customs 
administrations and traders. Compliance with ROOs is often costly to the trader and verifi cation by customs 
offi cials is complex. Traders that are the most adept at complying with product-specifi c ROOs, and/or 
adjusting their product strategies to meet the ROOs, are most able to counter negative effects that arise.
ROOs have a legitimate purpose in preventing trade defl ection. However, critics point to an over abundance 
of ROOs and lack of harmonization between different national and regional rules. They also point to concerns 
that ROOs are used in a protectionist manner. For example, research carried out in 2007,
32
showed the system 
of trade preferences granted by developed countries to African countries is often undermined by restrictive 
ROO measures. The research showed that protectionist interest groups act to restrict the integration of 
preference-receiving developing countries into the global economy. For more information on ROOs and their 
application in the global trading system, see chapter 4.
IMPROVING COORDINATION AMONG BORDER AGENCIES AND 
SERVICE PROVIDERS
Improving coordination among border agencies and service providers is essential, particularly for developing 
countries and LDCs. Trade depends on a large number of agencies and service providers, all of which 
participate in the trade logistics chain at the border. Goods are fi nally cleared by customs, but only after 
clearances from other border agencies have been obtained. Agencies responsible for quality standards 
make separate inspections and may take samples to ensure imports conform to local quality standards. This 
process often delays release and can add considerable costs to imports due to delays, de-stuffi ng fees and 
demurrage, among other issues.
The fi nal clearance of goods is determined by the least effi cient border control agency. As a result, reforms 
limited solely to customs will be substantially less effective if other agencies and service providers are unable 
to enhance their performance.
There should be no duplication of effort among border agencies. For example, it makes little sense for 
customs to have a modernized risk management system if it is compromised by another government 
department’s mandatory reporting or examination approach. Better integrated border management requires 
coordination among border control agencies, including standards, sanitary, phytosanitary and veterinary 
31 For a full treatment of this subject see: Goorman, A. and L. De Wulf, ‘Customs Valuation in Developing Countries and the World Trade 
Organization Valuation Rules’, Customs Modernization Handbook, World Bank, 2005.
32 Cadot, O., J. De Melo and A. Portugal-Perez, ‘Rules of Origin for Preferential Trading Arrangements: Implications for the ASEAN Free 
Trade Area of EU and US Experience’, Journal of Economic Integration 22(2), pp. 288-319, 2007.
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
control add-on offers developers three different APIs for adjusting image viewing size. developers to adjust the width of current displayed page to the
apple compress pdf; optimize scanned pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Code for Adjusting Image Size. In order to We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
change font size pdf text box; best compression pdf
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
91
agencies. In most instances, it is recommended that customs, as the dominant agency, take the lead in 
coordinating various smaller agencies so as to ensure smoother functioning among the agencies. The WCO 
is currently considering the addition of a third pillar to its Safe Framework of Standards relating to cooperation 
between customs and other government border agencies – the customs-to-government pillar – in recognition 
of the importance and need for inter-agency collaboration to encourage better, more secure and effi ciently 
coordinated border management.
REFORMING ELECTRONIC CUSTOMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 
In recent years, customs clearance has greatly benefi ted from an electronic customs management system 
(ECMS). Applying an ECMS is the single most important reform measure of the last few decades and has 
greatly benefi ted trade facilitation. This trend is well documented in the World Bank’s Doing Business 2010 
project. When correctly introduced, it leads to the replacement of old-fashioned and redundant customs 
procedures by modern and effi cient processes that provide transparency and speed. However, introducing 
an ECMS must be complemented by other modernization processes, policies and personnel management, 
including adequate compensation, training and career planning.
33
In addition to a number of administrative 
customs processes, an ECMS promotes trade facilitation by:
 Permitting traders to deposit their declarations electronically from their offi ces ahead of the arrival of the 
cargo at the border using electronic data interchange;
 Assisting customs in establishing whether these declarations are fi lled in correctly and notifying the traders 
if they are unacceptable;
 Applying a risk module to select those goods that will be subject to either document or physical inspection;
 Selecting customs staff to handle declarations;
 Registering the fi ndings of the inspections;
 Assisting customs staff to establish the acceptability of declared values;
 Calculating the duties and taxes due;
 Issuing customs invoices;
 Providing a payment platform;
 Issuing the release documents.
Traders can follow the entire process electronically and prepare themselves and their transport to take the 
goods across the border as soon as the release documents are transferred electronically.
Single Window – using ICT to facilitate trade
The Single Window (SW) demonstrates how advanced ICT can facilitate trade. First introduced as Tradenet 
in Singapore in 1989, it has attracted signifi cant interest by the trading community worldwide and has been 
implemented in several countries. Early adopters include Mauritius, Ghana, Senegal and Tunisia.
As shown in fi gure 8, the SW enables traders to submit regulatory documents at a single location and/
or single entity, thereby avoiding duplication and increasing effi ciency through time and cost savings for 
traders. For example, in Pakistan one electronic declaration has replaced 26 clearance steps, 34 signatures 
and 62 verifi cations. As a result, more than 70% of consignments are cleared within one hour and the overall 
average clearance time has come down from several days to less than eight hours. Only 4% of import and 
2% of export consignments are now examined, down from 100% previously. Rebate payments are made 
automatically without having to fi le a claim. Refunds take less than 48 hours, compared to 90 days. Because 
there is no contact between the taxpayer and the tax collector, chances of malpractice or corruption are very 
remote.
34
33 Doyle, T., ‘Information and communications technology and modern border management’, in Mclinden, G. et al., editors, Border 
Management Modernization, pp. 37-38, World Bank, 2011.
34 For more information: www.utradepoint.com/eMagazine/04-2010/inner-pages/Reforming-Trade-Facilitation-The-Experience-of-
Pakistan.aspx
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
vintage effect creating, image color adjusting and image VB.NET image editor control SDK online tutorial page. functions into several small-size libraries that
adjust size of pdf; best pdf compression tool
C# Image: How to Add Customized Web Viewer Command in C#.NET
Able to adjust the displaying image size and style button for deleting an existing page from web other options for you, such as adjusting toolbar, controlling
change font size pdf document; reader pdf reduce file size
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
92
Figure 8: The Single Window
Source
: ITC.
Box 37: Tunisia: improved clearance time at the port of Radès
The border management project at the port of Radès, Tunisia, demonstrates the gains in clearance times that have 
been achieved. The project focused on integrating the clearance procedures of different agencies. Clearance 
operations (the middle band in the fi gure) accounted for one-third of the dwell time, which is the amount of time a 
ton of cargo remains in the port. Lengthy dwell time is typically an indication of an ineffi cient port operation. Further 
gains are expected to come upstream (the bottom band) from automated transmission of the manifest by the port 
operators and investment in handling to customs. Further gains are also expected downstream (the top band) by 
making e-payment possible and by reforming the port rate structure to ensure rates are predictable.
Structure of clearance time for containers at the port of Radès, 2006-2008
Source
: World Economic Forum, Global Enabling Trade Report, 2009.
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
Days
2007 S1
2006 S2
2006 S1
2008 S1
2008 S2
2007 S2
Post-clearance
Clearance operations
Pre-clearance
cargo clearance 
Plant Quarantine
Animal QuaranƟne 
Bank 
Customs 
Chambers of Commerce 
Tobacco Board 
Insurance Company 
Selects, sorts, filters 
information, routes it to 
targeted recipients 
(agencies, bank, etc.) 
in the proper sequence
or flow and returns
responses to Trader
Responses from the 
various authorities and 
financial institutions are 
returned to the Trader or
Agent. An all-positive 
final response denotes 
cargo clearance
Trader or Agent submits 
all information required 
for shipment once to the 
Single Window service 
provider
SINGLE WINDOW
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Rectangle Annotation Imaging Control
New RectangleAnnotation() ' set annotation size obj.X rectangle annotation by adjusting annotation properties profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjust file size of pdf; pdf page size may not be reduced
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
add text or image as a watermark on PDF page using VB be used as a text watermark; Support adjusting text font style in VB class, like text size and color;
best way to compress pdf; best pdf compressor online
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
93
Several key factors contribute to the successful launch of a SW:
 There must be a commitment from the highest level of government to stimulate the various national 
institutions that deal with trade to adhere to SW procedures. Governments must be willing to drastically 
simplify operating procedures that are engrained in the habits of operators and bureaucrats, many of 
whom may resist change.
 All trade procedures must be catalogued and streamlined to permit the single fi le submission to the SW. 
This is an arduous and time-consuming task that often encounters resistance.
 An agency must be identifi ed and vested with the power to implement decisions. This could be customs, 
but other agencies could also undertake this task.
 The SW operations can be undertaken by a government agency or subcontracted to a corporation 
operating under a public-private partnership, as is the case in Singapore and Ghana.
 The SW must have suffi cient fi nancial resources to operate effi ciently. Financing can be obtained either by 
budget transfers or from the revenues of transaction fees.
 The various border agencies involved must improve their clearing performance as the release of the import 
or export cargo will depend on the worst performer in the logistics chain.
TOWARDS FLUID TRANSIT PROCEDURES
Transit procedures permit the movement of goods through countries from one customs offi ce to the other 
without paying import duties, domestic consumption taxes or any other charges normally due on imports. 
These procedures are intended to protect the revenue of the transit country – for example to prevent goods 
intended for transit to be ‘leaked’ to the domestic market. A poor transit system is a major obstacle to trade. 
Only in exceptional cases should goods be subject to other import regulations applicable in the transit country, 
such as health and safety requirements. These procedures cannot nullify the costs related to distance, but 
should aim at introducing effi cient border-related procedures.
Border-crossing procedures can be complex when the transit country wants assurances that the transit 
goods that have entered its territory without paying duties leave the country. In the process, some transit 
countries introduce strict controls that slow down the transit trade. Smugglers have been known to exploit 
the weaknesses of transit procedures to discharge some of their ‘transit’ cargo domestically, thus avoiding 
paying the import taxes and fees. Dysfunctional transit procedures are a major issue for landlocked countries 
and hamper economic development (see box 38).
Box 38: Economic development in landlocked countries – ‘very, very tough’
In a speech at the International Development Research Centre in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, world-renowned 
economist Jeffrey Sachs described the special challenges faced by landlocked countries:
‘It’s a very peculiar thing. If you look at the landlocked countries in the world, like Bolivia (Plurinational State 
of), you will fi nd no success stories, except if you happen to be landlocked surrounded by rich countries. So 
there are a couple of rich landlocked countries, Switzerland and Luxembourg. And then there is a world of poor 
landlocked countries: in South America, Bolivia (Plurinational State of) and Paraguay; 14 utterly impoverished 
landlocked countries in tropical sub-Saharan Africa – Chad, Mali, Niger, Central African Republic, Rwanda, 
Burundi, Zambia, Malawi, and so forth – not big success stories economically; the landlocked countries in 
Central Asia – the ‘stans’ (Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan) where there’s nothing 
going on economically except pumping oil, because that’s the one commodity that you can fruitfully transport 
over 1,000 miles across borders. And you have to pity Uzbekistan in this regard: it’s the world’s only double 
landlocked country, meaning it’s the only country all of whose neighbours are landlocked, so you have to cross 
two international borders to get to a coast. It’s the only place like that in the world. And Lao People’s Democratic 
Republic and other landlocked countries – there’s not a success story among them in the world.
It’s tough being landlocked: overland transport costs are extraordinarily high still. You don’t ship most goods 
by air, except at a very late stage of economic development. And if you want to get started in economic 
development, if you don’t have access to a seaport, it’s very, very tough.’
Source
: New Approaches to International Donor Assistance’, speech by Jeffrey Sachs, International Development Research 
Centre, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 19 June 2001. Available at: www.idrc.ca/en/ev-25642-201-1-DO_TOPIC.html
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
94
THE CASE OF LANDLOCKED COUNTRIES
Exporters in landlocked developing and developed countries operate under great constraints. Table 7, based 
on fi ndings from the World Bank’s 2009 Logistics Performance Survey, clearly shows that costs in both Africa 
and Europe are much higher for landlocked countries than for their coastal counterparts.
35
Not only are the 
distances to the export market larger than for countries that share a border with these markets, but they must 
also deal with the procedures related to crossing one or even two additional borders to acquire imported 
inputs and to get their fi nal products to market.
Table 7: Export distance, cost and time in landlocked countries
36
Africa
Europe
Coastal
countries
Landlocked
countries
Coastal
countries
Landlocked
countries
Logistics performance index
2.46
2.39
3.68
3.58
Port or airport
Export time (days)
4.82
18.10
2.3
2.4
Import time (days)
7.21
6.99
2.2
3.6
Export cost (US$)
1 810.00
2 867.00
696.00
1 227.00
Import cost (US$)
2 701.00
3 059.00
823.00
1 496.00
Land
Export time (days)
4.13
4.67
2.3
6.0
Import time (days)
6.93
8.41
2.9
2.9
Export cost (US$)
2 125.00
4 000.00
593.00
1 704.00
Import cost (US$)
2 581.00
3 221.00
670.00
1 489.00
Source: Logistics Performance Survey data, 2009.
KEY ELEMENTS OF A TRANSIT OPERATION
Seals. There should be a physically secure mechanism to ensure that goods present at the start of the transit 
operation leave the transit country in the same quantity, form and status. The simplest way to guarantee this is 
for customs to seal the truck
37
to ensure that goods cannot be removed from or added to the loading space of 
the truck without breaking this seal or leaving visible marks on the loading space of the truck. Trucks and seals 
approved for use in the transit operation must conform to well-specifi ed criteria that guarantee their effective 
operation and security. New transport seals are under study and prototypes are already in use. These seals 
include a microchip that, when broken, transmits a signal, picked up via a satellite network that sends information 
to the organization or principal of the sealed container, including information on its location. Although the prices 
of such automated seals are relatively high, the cost will likely decrease in the coming years.
Sealing containers is relatively easy. However, sealing non-containerized conveyances presents some problems 
because the trucks often are not of as high quality as those that carry containers, and often participate in 
informal trade. Various sealing procedures have been proposed and are in operation. Good sealing systems 
conform to the WCO Kyoto Convention. They should be (i) strong and durable; (ii) capable of being affi xed 
easily and quickly; (iii) capable of being readily checked and identifi ed; (iv) cannot be broken, tampered with or 
removed without leaving traces; (v) cannot be used more than once, except for those seals intended for multiple 
use (e.g. electronic seals); and (vi) be made as diffi cult as possible to copy or counterfeit.
Guarantees. Customs must be given a guarantee to cover the payments of import duties, taxes and other 
charges due on importation in the transit country in case goods do not leave the country via the transit 
procedure. Guarantees should correspond to the duties and taxes ‘at risk’, but are sometimes calculated 
35 Connecting to Compete: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy, p. 20, World Bank, 2010.
36 Note: African coastal countries: Benin, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South 
Africa, Togo and United Republic of Tanzania. African landlocked countries: Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, 
Malawi, Mali, Rwanda, Uganda, and Zambia. European coastal countries: Belgium, Croatia, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, and Poland. 
European landlocked countries: Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg and Slovakia.
37 Trucks are used as an example. However, seals could be used for other modes of transport, such as wagons, barges, trains, etc. 
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
95
in terms of the value of the cargo, which is easier to establish than the ‘at risk’ duties. Banks and insurance 
companies can issue guarantees and in some instances obtain reinsurance from international insurance 
companies.
Non-guarantee forms of security such as deposits or the value of the trucks exist in some transit countries. 
These guarantees tend to be more expensive and diffi cult to mobilize and are not recommended. Guarantees 
can cover a single transit operation affected by the principal concerned or several transit operations up to 
given limits and specifi cations. Customs procedures specify the modalities of recovering the guarantee.
Authorized operators. Operators providing guarantees that they will abide by the transit rules and operating 
with acceptable vehicles are permitted to engage in the transit trade. National transit organizations are largely 
responsible for identifying authorized transit operators.
Documentation fl ow. To control the beginning and completion of a transit procedure, customs should have 
a reliable monitoring system. This system could be based on paper documentation issued by the customs 
post that controls the origin of the transit shipment and the documentation issued or verifi ed by the customs 
post at the exit of the country.
Increasingly, documents are transmitted electronically, relying on the transit module of the customs 
management system. This system permits the timely lifting of the bond upon the completion of the transit 
transaction. When the copies of the documents – or the electronically generated data match – have been 
returned to the point of origin of the transit and matched with the documents issued at the start of the journey, 
the transit operation is considered completed and the guarantee released. When they do not match, payment 
of the import duties, taxes and other charges – including a fi ne – are due. These charges are covered by a 
guarantee.
Human error and lax recording of the exit formalities can lead to redundant claims on the transit guarantee. 
These claims are costly and lengthy to settle and undermine the trade facilitation aspects of the overall transit 
procedures.
NET BENEFITS OUTWEIGH COSTS
Many bilateral, international and regional transit agreements are in place. The WCO and the WTO have 
agreements among their members. Yet, many of these agreements and treaties exist only on paper or are in 
a prolonged state of ineffective preparation or implementation. Inadequacy of or lack of legal instruments and 
frameworks are not the problems. Implementation is hampered by a perceived lack of capacity, scepticism that 
transit procedures can be implemented to adequately protect fi scal revenue, or from the lack of political will to 
overcome vested interests that benefi t from poorly operating transit mechanisms. In addition, the erroneous 
perception that fl uid transit procedures largely benefi t landlocked countries has undermined progress.
The World Bank estimates indicate that the benefi ts from transit can be signifi cant. For Kazakhstan they 
were estimated at 0.5%-0.6% of GDP; about two-thirds accrued to the railway sector and one-third to road 
transport. In the case of the United Republic of Tanzania vis-à-vis Rwanda, Burundi and Uganda, the main 
benefi t is the additional traffi c handled profi tably by the transit country’s ports and trucking fi rms, the volume 
of transit traffi c being large relative to domestic traffi c. The same type of benefi t accrues to Thailand from 
transit traffi c with Lao People’s Democratic Republic, though in this case the volume is small. In the case 
of Chile vis-à-vis Bolivia (Plurinational State of), the largest benefi t arises from a free trade zone from where 
imported vehicles and consumer goods are sold on to inland countries.
The general perception is that the net benefi ts accruing to transit countries substantially outweigh the costs. 
EFFICIENT TRANSIT PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES
Effi cient transit operations involve customs as well as transport operators, and require transport procedures 
that allow trucks and drivers to cross borders without transhipment of the cargo or switching of drivers. 
Mutual recognition of truck certifi cation insurance and driving licenses, as well as traffi c rights in the transit 
country for national trucks, are issues that need to be considered.
CHAPTER 3 – MOVE GOODS ACROSS BORDERS EFFECTIVELY
96
Transport regulations that specify which trucks are allowed to transport the transit goods also undermine 
competitiveness. For example, ‘tour de role’ rules imposed by transporters associations allocate transportation 
services. Table 8 provides an overview of how various trade and transport procedures and practices hamper 
transit trade and undermine competitiveness.
Table 8: Trade and transit procedures and practices
Procedure/practice
Documentation
Charges, cost
Comment
Unloading in port
Bill of lading
Port charges
The effi ciency of port operations is not always 
up to standard
Inspection and 
clearance by customs
Invoice to determine 
value, classifi cation 
and weight that 
permit the calculation 
of the duties to be 
guaranteed
Transit declaration
Guarantee
(deposit)
Often transit shipments are subjected to the 
same time-consuming procedure applied 
to imports for home consumption. Transit 
guarantee is purchased. Often the guarantees 
are calculated not on the ‘revenues at risk’ but 
on the value of the transit cargo, which may 
overstate the ‘duties at risk’.
Loading of vehicle 
Seals of containers and other conveyances. 
Poor sealing practices leads customs to operate 
convoys. 
Formation of a convoy
Convoy charges
Convoys depart only when all trucks are present, 
cause delays en route (mechanical problems 
with older vehicles), and can pass border control 
only when all trucks have reassembled at the 
border. Corruption issues.
Road transport in the 
transit country
Road transport 
charges
Fixed transit routes
These charges are often contrary to GATT 
Agreements.
Fixed routes are not always those trucks would 
chose. This limits the freedom of transporter.
Controls en route
Transit and other transport are often impeded by 
numerous road checks by police and customs 
and involve payments of gratuities.
Customs inspection 
upon exit from fi rst 
country
Copy of transit 
document
In the absence of 
an ICT system, this 
presents problems
Seals are checked.
Transit document checked and slowly remitted 
to issuing offi ce to discharge the guarantee.
Border inspections 
(vehicle)
New insurance 
charges
Driving license and insurance of vehicle check. If 
invalid, change of operator is needed. Possible 
axle load control, with axle loads that differ 
across countries.
Transfer to other truck
Transfer charges
When trucks cannot operate on the other side 
of the border, cargo can be damaged, lost or 
stolen.
Customs inspection 
entry in the destination 
country
Transit declaration – 
beginning of a national 
transit link
New guarantee must 
be purchased
Delays when customs do not recognize/accept/
doubt the transit seals/documents and insist on 
inspections.
Other inspections upon 
entry of second country
All documents
Security, health checks; could lead seals to be 
broken.
Arrival at destination
All documents
Costs of damage, loss
The seals are broken, duties paid and guarantee 
discharged.
Source: Arvis, J.F., Transit and the Special Case of Landlocked Countries, World Bank, 2005. Available at: www.gfptt.org/
uploadedFiles/4afdcdb3-f851-4641-a38b-98bd481f10c7.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested