asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Change page size pdf application software tool html windows azure online national-trade-policy-for-export-success13-part1747

CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
117
region without affecting the origin, the most basic form occurring when the materials come from the country 
for which the fi nal goods are destined. For example, under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) 
an African garment manufacturer/exporter imports fabric from the United States, produces garments with the 
fabric, and exports the garment to the United States.
Diagonal cumulation occurs where inputs come from an approved third country or region. For example, 
NAFTA member Canada imports garments from NAFTA member Mexico, which uses fabric produced in the 
United States, another NAFTA member.
Full cumulation allows qualifying origin to be conferred even if the transformation is not suffi cient to meet 
the normal ROO, in effect simply treating a good as if it were entirely produced in the last country of export.
Tolerance (or de minimis) rules, which relate only to substantial transformation or change of tariff heading, but 
not to the value added rule, allow a certain percentage of non-originating material to be used without affecting 
the preference. The absorption principle provides that parts of materials that have acquired originating status 
by satisfying the ROOs for that product can be treated as being of domestic origin in any further processing 
or transformation.
ROOs are particularly complex in the case of textiles and clothing, which are very important exports 
of developing countries and LDCs. For example, in the EU, ROOs for cotton clothing require that the 
manufacturing process be from yarn forward, meaning that imported fabric cannot be used and the yarn 
must be produced locally. The United States applies the change of tariff heading rule that precludes the use 
of imported cotton fabric, yarn and cotton thread, and also requires that visible lining cannot be imported. 
See box 45 for a discussion of the impact of the relaxed ROOs under AGOA on African countries.
Box 45: Effects of EU and United States rules of origin on African exports of textiles 
and clothing
Currently the European Union and the United States offer preferential market access to exports from a group of 
African countries. Although similar regarding the extent of preferences for apparel, a key sector for LDCs, these 
agreements differ regarding ROOs. The EU’s Everything But Arms initiative and the Cotonou Agreement require 
yarn to be woven into fabric and then made up into apparel in the same country or in a country qualifying for 
cumulation. However, the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) grants a special regime to ‘lesser developed 
countries’, which allows them to use fabric of any origin and still meet the criteria for preferences.
A recent study found that the relaxation by the United States of ROOs for apparel from Africa under AGOA 
increased imports from the seven main exporters by about 300%. This large effect was considered to be particularly 
noteworthy because, ‘an analysis based solely on the high utilization rates of preferences might erroneously 
conclude that the special ‘double transformation’ requirements in T&A (textiles and apparel) had little effect’. An 
analysis at the product level revealed that less restrictive ROOs are associated with an expansion of the range of 
exported apparel. Indeed, under preferential market access, more lenient ROOs reduce costs for exporters and 
may encourage export diversifi cation or export growth at the margin.
The author claims: ‘To our knowledge, this is the fi rst research that has looked at the relationship between ROOs 
and export diversifi cation.’ With respect to the dynamic effects of AGOA-specifi c rules, the author found evidence 
that the uptake of preferences was gradual over time, taking place in the fi rst three years during which a country 
benefi ts from the specifi c rules. The research also revealed that the impact of the AGOA-specifi c rules on exports 
was different across countries, and that the differences in ROOs accounted for differences in performance. However, 
the study could not fully take account of the quality of infrastructure, political and social stability, governance, and 
fi scal policies aimed at attracting foreign investment in accounting for the uneven effects.
The author commented that many analysts believe that the primary reason for Asian investment in apparel 
industries in African countries was to circumvent United States barriers to imports from Asian countries. But, 
he notes, the removal of quotas at end of the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing and of any other barriers 
will erode preferences for apparel exported by those countries in subsequent years, a fact that highlights the 
importance of lenient ROOs.
Source
: Portugal-Perez, A., ‘The costs of rules of origin in apparel: African preferential exports to the United States and the 
European Union’, Policy Issues in International Trade and Commodities Study Series No. 39, UN, New York and Geneva, 2008.
Change page size pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf files optimized; pdf optimized format
Change page size pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf reduce file size; change font size in pdf file
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
118
Currently, the United States applies liberal ROOs to textiles and clothing products from African countries 
covered by AGOA, but there is no certainty that this tolerance will be continued indefi nitely as these rules are 
reviewed from time to time.
ROOs can protect domestic producers in the importing country. They may also raise the costs of supplying 
the markets of the importer that grants the preference by requiring changes in production that use higher 
cost inputs as well as in proving conformity with the rules. ROOs may be an important factor in investment 
decisions if they create uncertainty as to the degree of preferential access that will be available for the 
fi nished goods. ROOs may therefore determine the economic effects of preference systems. However, ROOs 
are irrelevant for a very large number of items that are duty free in major markets.
There are no WTO provisions on preferential ROOs. WTO members are free to apply their own ROOs, as 
illustrated in box 46.
NON-TARIFF MEASURES GROW IN IMPORTANCE
The ongoing decline of tariff rates has brought into sharper focus the importance of non-tariff measures 
(NTMs) that may used to protect, support and regulate certain sectors. For example, agriculture often 
benefi ts from domestic supports as well as export subsidies. The services sector may receive various kinds 
of assistance, but most importantly is often subject to regulatory measures intended to ensure a standard of 
service or, intentionally or otherwise, to provide support for domestic suppliers. NTMs may be applied directly 
or indirectly, for example, to inputs rather than to fi nal goods.
According to recent ITC surveys, NTMs are among the top three trade-related concerns, constituting one 
of the most important challenges to developing countries’ exports, especially in the aftermath of the recent 
fi nancial crisis. Given that access to information, technical infrastructure and capacities are more limited in 
developing countries, their exporters are more likely to be negatively affected by NTMs.
NTMS AFFECTING GOODS
NTMs are complex, encompassing policy measures and instruments – except ordinary customs duties – 
related to exports, imports and production of goods and services. In agriculture, a number of measures affect 
international markets for key products of export interest to developing countries. For example, the United States 
provides substantial support to its cotton producers, thus reducing export opportunities for poor countries that 
have few alternative exports. European countries and the United States offer a range of export subsidies or 
subsidized export credits that enable their fi rms to compete more effectively in international markets.
These subsidies hurt developing countries, which do not have the funds to provide similar measures, and are 
among the key issues in the WTO negotiations. For example, subsidized cereal exports have provided cheap 
food for net-food-importing countries, many in Africa. However, there is increasing recognition that subsidies 
discourage local production in extremely poor countries where there is high dependency on agriculture.
Box 46: Implications of the absence of multilateral rules
The absence of multilateral rules of origin has allowed the United States and the EU to issue ad hoc determinations 
in origin disputes. In the 1980s, an investigation conducted by the European Commission at the Ricoh photocopier 
plant in California concluded that the photocopiers should be denied United States origin and should continue to 
be considered Japanese. 
Subsequently, the European Commission enacted a specifi c regulation on the origin of photocopiers. As a result of 
this origin determination, anti-dumping duties imposed on direct imports of Ricoh photocopiers from Japan were 
extended to Ricoh exports from California to the EU, despite the fact that these photocopiers presumably included 
substantial United States value added.
Source
: Globalization and the International Trading System, UNCTAD/ITCD/TSB/2. UNCTAD, 24 March 1998.
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
can get a basic idea of the page layout from Apart from that, you are entitled to change the orientation You can accurately define the size and location of all
change font size pdf fillable form; can a pdf be compressed
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Insert formatted text and plain text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in C#.NET class. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and
change font size in pdf text box; change file size of pdf document
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
119
NTMs include instruments such as sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS), technical barriers to trade 
(TBT), quotas, anti-competitive measures, import or export licenses, export restrictions. They also include 
customs surcharges, fi nancial measures, anti-dumping measures, and other charges mentioned in the 
previous section. In services, where there are few international rules, controls are usually exercised through 
regulation that may discriminate against foreign suppliers.
To better understand NTMs, international organizations have developed a classifi cation system that allows 
some measurement of the incidence of NTMs and the share of trade in goods affected by them. Box 47 
provides a review of the current system. Further details are provided in the annex.
Box 47: Classifi cation of non-tariff measures (NTMs)
In 2009, the following classifi cation of NTMs was prepared by a group of technical experts from the Food and 
Agriculture Organization, IMF, ITC, OECD, UNCTAD, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization 
(UNIDO), the World Bank and the WTO. It will be used to collect, classify and disseminate information on NTMs 
applied in various countries. The goal is to create a global database on the NTMs. UNCTAD, the World Bank and 
ITC are working together on this project.
NTMs include SPS and TBT measures, quotas, anti-competitive measures, import or export licenses, export 
restrictions, customs surcharges, fi nancial measures and anti-dumping measures.
The classifi cation differentiates NTMs according to 16 chapters denoted by alphabetical letters, each 
containing sub-branches (1 digit), twigs (2 digits) and leafs (3 digits). This classifi cation drew upon the 
existing, but outdated, UNCTAD Coding System of Trade Control Measures (TCMCS), and has been modifi ed 
and expanded by adding various categories to refl ect the current trading conditions.
No data will be collected for several chapters of the classifi cation, including government procurement, 
subsidies and ROOs.
Source
: UNCTAD.
Technical 
measures
Sanitary and phyto-sanitary measures (SPS)
Technical barriers to trade (TBT)
Pre-shipment inspection and other formalities
Price control measures
Licenses, quotas, prohibition & other quantity control measures
Charges, taxes and other para-tariff measures
Finance measures
Anti-competitive measures
Trade-related investment measures
Distribution restrictions
Restrictions on post-sales services
Subsidies (excluding export subsidies)
Government procurement restrictions
Intellectual property
Rules of origin
Export-related measures (including export subsidies)
Non-
technical 
measures
Export 
measures
Import measures
Chapter
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
Support conversion to PDF from other documents, keeping original document page size. Support rendering image to a PDF document page, no change for image size.
adjust size of pdf in preview; change font size in pdf comment box
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font users how to add text comments on PDF page using C# text box to PDF and edit font size and color
change font size pdf; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
120
NTMS AFFECTING SERVICES
This section provides a brief introduction to issues exporters of services may face. Trade in services is a highly 
specialized area with an abundant literature. Interested readers are referred to the websites of WTO, ITC 
and other major international organizations that have produced general and sector-specifi c information on 
international trade in services, some of which is designed to assist developing countries in WTO negotiations 
and in developing their potential for exporting services.
12
International trade in services received little attention prior to the Uruguay Round of trade negotiations. One 
major accomplishment of that Round was the General GATS, intended to bring trade in services within the 
purview of the WTO. GATS is a framework agreement to be elaborated in future negotiations. GATS also 
helps to focus policymakers in defi ning services and how to classify commitments on services. As a result, 
the NTMs affecting international trade in services were written down.
The WTO classifi cation system consists of 12 core service sectors, which are further subdivided into some 
160 sub-sectors.
Business services (including professional services and computer services)
 Communication services
 Construction and related engineering services
 Distribution services
 Educational services
 Environmental services
 Financial services (including insurance and banking)
 Health-related and social services
 Tourism and travel-related services
 Recreational, cultural and sporting services
 Transport services
 Other services not included elsewhere
Under this classifi cation system, any service sector may be included in a member’s schedule of commitments 
with specifi c market access and national treatment obligations. Each WTO member submitted a schedule 
under the GATS. GATS spells out four ‘modes’ by which trade in services was supplied, depending on the 
territorial presence of the supplier and the consumer at the time of the transaction:
From the territory of one member into the territory of any other member (Mode 1 – cross-border trade);
 In the territory of one member to the service consumer of any other member (Mode 2 – consumption 
abroad);
 By a service supplier of one member, through commercial presence, in the territory of any other member 
(Mode 3 – commercial presence);
 By a service supplier of one member, through the presence of natural persons of a member in the territory 
of any other member (Mode 4 – presence of natural persons).
Box 48 gives examples of the four modes of supply.
The GATS defi nition of services is somewhat broader than that used for the construction of balance of 
payments (BOP) statistics. While BOP statistics focus on residency rather than nationality, i.e. a service is 
exported if it is traded between residents and non-residents, certain transactions falling under the GATS, in 
particular in the case of Mode 3, typically involve only residents of the country concerned.
12 A recent publication that may be of interest: Cattaneo, O., International trade in services: new trends and opportunities for developing 
countries, World Bank, Washington, D.C., 2009.
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
public override Bitmap ConvertToImage(Size targetSize). Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified size. Parameters:
reader shrink pdf; change font size in fillable pdf form
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
set as 1, then the two output PDF files will contains the first page and the explain how to split a PDF file into multiple ones by output PDF file size.
300 dpi pdf file size; change paper size in pdf
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
121
Commercial linkages may exist. A company established under Mode 3 in country A may employ nationals 
from country B (Mode 4) to export services cross border into countries B, C, etc. Similarly, business visits to 
country A (Mode 4) may be needed to provide technical back up or other support complement; cross-border 
supplies or, for example, to upgrade the capacity of a locally established offi ce.
As with GATT, the main principles of GATS are MFN and national treatment. The market access available in 
principle was set out in a written schedule of commitments by each WTO member at the end of the Uruguay 
Round of trade negotiations and is now being renegotiated in the Doha Round. However, actual treatment 
may deviate from the commitments, as in the case of goods where applied tariffs are often lower than bound 
levels. The treatment afforded in practice depends on (i) whether members chose to commit to pre-existing 
levels of openness when they submitted their schedule of commitments; (ii) whether they have undertaken 
unilateral reforms, and (iii) whether they have negotiated further market opening under bilateral or regional 
agreements, which are called Economic Partnership Agreements in GATS terminology.
13
The WTO provides a hypothetical example for a mythical country, Arcadia, shown in box 49.
Box 49 presents a realistic but simplifi ed scenario. In some countries the schedules of commitments run to 
many pages. The example of Arcadia illustrates that in the area of services the main measures in use are 
forms of government regulation establishing areas where foreigners may participate and to what extent. 
Unlike tariffs, but similar to many non-tariff measures for goods, it is diffi cult to estimate the quantitative 
impact of service measures.
14
Access to various sectors of the Arcadian market for services depends on meeting certain conditions that 
may not even be within the power of the foreign exporting company. By contrast, even in respect of technical 
barriers to trade, which is discussed later in this chapter, it is up to the foreign company to decide whether or 
not it will devote the resources necessary to meet a standard in the foreign market and hence gain access.
At the end of the Uruguay Round when service commitments were scheduled, researchers catalogued the 
existence of measures by WTO members by sector and by type of measure. An example of this effort by the 
13 GATS EPAs are regional agreements in services only. EU EPAs with ACP partners can cover goods and services.
14 There have been attempts at estimating the quantitative impact of measures in the area of services, mainly based on gravity models 
that postulate that the unexplained residual error is associated with the presence of a measure affecting certain fl ows of international trade 
in services.
Box 48: Examples of the four modes of supply from the perspective of importing 
‘country A’
Mode 1: Cross-border trade
A user in country A receives services from abroad through its telecommunications or postal infrastructure. Such 
supplies may include consultancy or market research reports, tele-medical advice, distance training, or architectural 
drawings.
Mode 2: Consumption abroad
Nationals of country A have travelled abroad as tourists, students, or patients to consume services.
Mode 3: Commercial presence
The service is provided in country A by a locally established affi liate, subsidiary, or representative offi ce of a foreign-
owned and controlled company (bank, hotel group, construction company, etc.)
Mode 4: Presence of natural persons
A foreign national provides a service in country A as an independent supplier (e.g. consultant, health worker) or 
employee of a service supplier (e.g. consultancy fi rm, hospital, construction company).
Source
: WTO.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
pdf compression settings; batch pdf compression
Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
change "Width" & "Height" to set your thumbnail size; items in thumbnail; Click "Swap" to change two items Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF
change paper size in pdf document; adjust pdf page size
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
122
World Bank is shown in table 11, which breaks down the number of commitments by the number of GATS 
sectors and by high-income countries (HIC) (i.e. developed countries in the World Bank terminology) and 
by low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) (i.e. developing countries). As noted in the table, these are 
the actual commitments that are currently being negotiated in the Doha Round, to which must be added 
commitments made by countries that have acceded to the WTO since the end of the Uruguay Round in 1995.
Generally, developed countries made more commitments than developing countries in almost all sectors 
(see table 11). Sectors with the fewest commitments were land, water and air transport, postal services, basic 
telecoms, R&D, education, health and social, and recreation/culture. Developing countries have some export 
interest in the latter three groups of services. They also have an interest in business services, computer-
related services and construction, where there is a relatively high level of commitments.
There have been several studies of developing country interest in future liberalization of the services market. 
Estimates suggest that liberalization of the temporary movement of labour would be of particular interest, 
and potentially worth several hundred billion United States dollars to developing countries. However, this is a 
highly sensitive area and few analysts expect there to be any serious commitment to liberalization except on 
an ad hoc basis when it suits countries that have serious labour shortages.
Developing countries also have potential interest in transport, back-offi ce services, and tourism. Some 
developing countries have become successful in retail, legal services, accounting, engineering and health 
services. Suggestions have been made as to how developing countries can enhance their supply capabilities 
for international trade in services beyond areas dependent on low-cost labour.
Few observers expect there to be important commitments to new liberalization in the Doha Round of trade 
negotiations, but there is some evidence of liberalization in practice. Developing countries need to seek out 
opportunities and determine the specifi c conditions that will allow them to exploit openings in the services 
market. Recent sectoral studies by ITC and other agencies could prove a useful starting point, supplemented 
with specifi c technical assistance.
Box 49: Sample schedule of commitments – Arcadia
Modes of supply: (1) Cross-border trade; (2) Consumption abroad; (3) Commercial presence; (4) Presence of 
natural persons
Sector or sub-sector
Limitations on market access
Limitations on national 
treatment
Additional 
commitments
I. Horizontal commitments 
All sectors included in the 
schedule
(4) Unbound, other than for 
(a) temporary presence, as intra-
corporate transferees, of essential 
senior executives and specialists; 
and 
(b) presence for up to 90 days of 
representatives of a service provider 
to negotiate sales of services
(3) Authorization is 
required for acquisition of 
land by foreigners
II. Sector-specifi c commitments 
4. Distribution services 
C. Retailing services (CPC 
631, 632)
(1) Unbound (except for mail order: 
none) (2) None (3) Foreign equity 
participation limited to 51% (4) 
Unbound, except as indicated in 
horizontal section
(1) Unbound (except for 
mail order: none) 
(2) None 
(3) Investment grants 
are available only to 
companies controlled by 
Arcadian nationals 
(4) Unbound
Source
: WTO.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
123
Table 11: GATS commitments by sector
GATS Sector
Number of 
GATS sectors 
and modes of 
supply 
Average number of 
commitments
Commitments/GATS 
items per sector (%)
High-
income 
countries
Low- and 
middle-
income 
countries
High-
income 
countries
Low- and 
middle-
income 
countries
Construction 
20
11.2
3.3
56.0
16.5
Motor vehicle repair
4
1.8
0.3
45.0
7.5
Wholesale trade 
8
4.6
0.5
57.5
6.3
Retail trade 
8
4.4
0.8
55.0
10.0
Hotel/restaurants 
4
2.8
2.8
70.0
70.0
Land transport 
40
9.4
2.3
23.5
5.8
Water transport 
48
4.4
3.0
9.2
6.3
Air Transport 
20
3.7
1.5
18.5
7.5
Auxiliary transport 
20
5.1
1.3
25.5
6.5
Postal services 
4
1.3
0.6
32.5
15.0
Basic telecoms 
28
1.5
1.3
5.4
4.6
Value-added telecom 
28
18.7
5.0
66.8
7.8
Financial services 
60
31.3
12.4
52.2
20.6
Real estate services 
8
3.5
0.3
43.8
3.8
Rental activities 
20
9.5
1.3
47.5
6.5
Computer-related 
20
15.5
4.2
77.5
21.0
R&D services 
12
4.1
1.0
34.2
0.3
Business services 
108
56.5
12.2
47.9
11.3
Refuse disposal 
16
8.8
1.0
55.0
6.3
Education 
20
4.7
1.3
23.5
6.5
Health and social 
24
5.0
1.9
20.8
7.9
Recreation/culture 
48
13.3
4.6
27.9
9.6
Source
: Hoekman, B., ‘Assessing the General Agreement on Trade in Services’, in Martin, W. and L.A. Winters (eds.), The 
Uruguay Round and the Developing Economies, World Bank, Washington, D.C., 1995.
This is an area where it is not possible to fi nd customs agents who have experience in all manner of goods. 
Developing countries should challenge the agencies to provide practical advice in their areas of actual and 
potential interest in making realistic assessments of their capabilities, in identifying markets and conditions of 
entry, and helping them to meet those requirements. ITC and UNCTAD have already carried out a number of 
studies in the area of services that provide useful ideas and guidance on how to enter international markets 
for services.
WHY ARE NTMS USED?
Like tariffs, NTMs are used for a variety of reasons. They may be used as part of national policy to promote 
production generally, for example, through regional, scientifi c, or educational policies that provide support 
that is legal under WTO rules. NTMs may also be used to foster specifi c sectors favoured by the government. 
These sectors could include mining, petroleum exploration, farming, manufacture of specifi c goods, such 
as motor vehicles or aircraft, or services such as tourism and telecommunications. However, NTMs to foster 
specifi c sectors favoured by the government may or may not be permitted under WTO rules.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
124
NTMs may be used for other objectives, such as protecting the environment or human or animal life or 
plants, including endangered species. Some measures are used for moral reasons, such as prohibitions on 
pornographic material, or, in some countries, importation of alcohol. Other measures, such as pre-shipment 
inspection or customs valuation methods, may be used to ensure the right duty is charged and collected. 
NTMs may also be used for national security reasons, such as prohibition against arms importation or in 
support of sanctions imposed by the United Nations.
WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF NTMS?
NTMs can have potentially serious effects on international trade. They impact the cost, price or quantity of the 
goods affected. Measures such as anti-dumping duties, countervailing measures and various other charges 
directly increase prices. Subsidies may directly affect production or exports as a support measures intended 
to reduce prices or they may operate indirectly as a subsidy on material or other inputs to production or trade. 
Examples of indirect subsidies are those on the use of fertilizers, water, gas or electricity or on interest rates 
on borrowed investment capital or export credits for trade. Measures directly affecting quantities may include 
prohibitions, quantitative restrictions and import licences. 
However, other measures not ostensibly intended to have a direct impact on price or quantity may have 
similar effects. For example, TBT or SPS measures may be intended to protect health. However, public health 
may be used as an excuse for protecting local industries. Irrespective of the validity of the rationale, the cost 
of meeting these standards will raise the cost of production and the price. Experience shows that monitoring 
measures are often a prelude to imposing other restrictions and tend to have a ‘chilling’ or harassing effect 
on trade, which leads to reductions in quantity or increased prices of the exported goods as exporters try to 
allay fears of a fl ood of cheap imports. Either way, the measure will affect both price and quantity of the good 
concerned, and there will be consequences for trade, production, government revenues and producer and 
consumer welfare.
There is considerable literature on the technically complicated process of estimating the economic impact 
of NTMs, which is beyond the scope of this chapter. However, the economic effect of certain measures, and 
therefore their protectionist potential, can be very signifi cant.
For example, research shows that NTMs contribute to a large share of trade restrictiveness across countries.
15
On average, they add an additional 87% to the restrictiveness imposed by tariffs. This implies that on average 
tariffs are still more important in the cases covered by the research, but the contribution of NTMs to the overall 
restrictiveness increases with income per capita. Rich countries have a greater tendency than poor countries 
to impose less transparent NTMs on their imports.
However, for specifi c products the impact of NTMs can be higher than the average. For 55% of tariff lines the 
ad valorem equivalent (AVE) of NTMs is higher than the tariff, with simple average AVE ranging from zero to 
51%. These results suggest that tariffs are more important for some products than NTMs, but in other cases 
the reverse is true – hence, the need for thorough research on market conditions.
A study using fi rm-level data generated from 16 developing countries in the World Bank Technical Barriers to 
Trade (TBT) Survey Database, fi nds that standards increase short-run production costs by requiring additional 
inputs of labour and capital.
16
It also fi nds that the fi xed costs of compliance are non-trivial; approximately 
US$ 425,000 per fi rm, or on average about 4.7% of value added.
WHO USES NTMS AND WHAT IS THEIR EFFECT?
As shown in box 50, technical regulations and anti-dumping actions are used to a great extent by developed 
countries, while in developing countries customs procedures, additional charges and regulatory procedures 
are perceived as the main issues. The exports of developing countries seem to be particularly vulnerable to 
such measures in developed and developing country markets. There is considerable variation, with some 
15 Kee, Hiau Looi; A. Nicita and M. Olarreaga, ‘Estimating Trade Restrictiveness Indices’, Economic Journal, January 2009.
16 Maskus, K., T. Otsuki and J. Wilson, ‘The Cost of Compliance with Product Standards for Firms in Developing Countries: An 
Econometric Study’, Policy Research Working Paper 3590, World Bank, Washington, D.C., 2005.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
125
developing country markets becoming important users of the anti-dumping mechanism and other developing 
countries being the main targets. Such measures have a chilling effect on other trading partners and similar 
products. If exporters see anti-dumping measures being applied against another export business in their own 
country or from another exporting country for the same or similar products, they may become more cautious 
in their pricing practices and in aggressive marketing.
There is little question that anti-dumping measures have become more widespread since the end of the 
Uruguay Round, as tariffs have been reduced and the use of other measures eliminated or curtailed under 
WTO rules. For example, textile quotas have been eliminated. Exporters should be aware of the countries 
and sectors that apply these measures as they have often been extended to other exporters. Exporting fi rms 
need to be sure that they are exporting at prices that are not lower than their domestic sales price. Table 12 
shows which WTO countries have applied such measures by sector between January 1995 and June 2010.
Box 50: Recent trends in NTMs
A 2008 UNCTAD survey identifi ed trends between 1994 and 2006 in NTMs of concern to developing countries and 
found the following:
In accessing developed country markets the most typical barriers faced by developing country exporters are 
technical measures, including technical regulations, standards and SPS regulations, and price control measures, 
such as anti-dumping actions.
In trade between developing countries, customs and administrative entry procedures, para-tariff measures (e.g. 
import surcharges and additional charges), and other regulatory measures affecting infrastructure and institutions 
are among constraining trade obstacles.
Products of export interest to developing countries, such as agricultural and fi sheries products, electrical equipment, 
pharmaceuticals, textiles and clothing, are the most affected by NTMs. The most recent trend indicates increasing 
use of technical measures, as well as quantitative measures associated with technical measures, and decreasing 
use of all other measures.
A report from the Imani Development Board suggests that NTMs have become signifi cantly less identifi able. In 
the past, state involvement through price controls, foreign currency controls, state marketing and import licensing 
meant that such barriers to trade were clear. Today, most of these controls have been lifted in most countries. 
Existing NTMs are inclined to be more arbitrary, qualitative and often non-transparent. The lack of transparency for 
regulating trade between governments has increased the misuse of the system.
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Tariff
measures
(tariff rate
quota etc.)
Price
control
measures
Finance
measures
Refundable
deposit for 
sensitive
product
categories
Automatic
licensing
measures
Quality
control
measures
Prior
authorization
for sensitive
product
Quotas for 
sensitive
product
categories
Prohibition 
for sensitive
product
categories
Monopolistic
measures
Technical
measures
1994
2006
5.8
0.3
7.1
1.8
2
1.5
0.6
2.8
1.7
49.2
34.8
18.1
17.1
0.2 0.2
2.5
6.8
1.3
1.5
31.9
58.5
Source
: Imani Development Board, Inventory of Regional Non-Barriers: Synthesis Report, 2007, UNCTAD, Development and 
Globalization, Facts and Figures.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
126
Table 12: Anti-dumping measures initiated January 1995–June 2010, by reporting country and sector
Reporting 
country
 lamina eviL
stcudorp
 elbategeV
stcudorp
 dna laminA
staf elbategev
 ,dooF
 ,segareveb
occabot
slareni M
slaci mehC
 ,citsalp ,niseR
rebbur
 ,sniks ,sedi i H
sdoog levart
 kroc ,dooW
selcitra
repaP
selitxeT
raewtooF
 ,enotS
ssalg ci marec
slatem esaB
 ,yrenihcaM
 lacirtcele
tnempiuqe
selciheV
 ,stnemurtsIn
 ,skcolc
sredrocer
 suoenallecsi M
serutcafunam
Total
Argentina
1
1
9
13
3
6
17
1
8
60
38
11
5
17
190
Australia
6
10
16
1
19
5
3
18
3
81
Brazil
4
2
1
5
18
17
3
15
1
1
22
9
2
5
105
Canada
4
6
3
4
1
2
2
68
2
2
94
Chile
3
1
4
8
China
1
4
69
36
10
3
11
3
137
Colombia
1
1
6
2
13
1
24
Croatia
1
1
1
3
Czech Republic
1
1
Egypt
3
15
3
9
15
7
52
European Union
4
3
3
53
19
2
9
22
7
2
102
31
7
2
3
269
Guatemala
1
1
India
10
185
71
4
9
58
1
4
37
51
2
2
2
436
Indonesia
4
9
1
4
17
35
Israel
1
3
1
3
5
1
2
2
3
21
Jamaica
3
1
4
Japan
4
3
7
Korea, Republic of
18
7
3
9
5
2
5
19
2
70
Latvia
2
2
Lithuania
1
5
1
7
Malaysia
3
6
13
1
2
25
Mexico
3
4
1
1
14
4
2
2
2
44
2
4
83
New Zealand
1
4
1
3
3
4
6
22
Nicaragua
1
1
Pakistan
5
3
9
1
6
24
Paraguay
1
1
2
Peru
1
3
2
2
1
3
8
5
2
15
2
4
48
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested