asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Change font size in pdf fillable form control application system web page html wpf console national-trade-policy-for-export-success14-part1748

CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
127
Reporting 
country
 lamina eviL
stcudorp
 elbategeV
stcudorp
 dna laminA
staf elbategev
 ,dooF
 ,segareveb
occabot
slareni M
slaci mehC
 ,citsalp ,niseR
rebbur
 ,sniks ,sedi i H
sdoog levart
 kroc ,dooW
selcitra
repaP
selitxeT
raewtooF
 ,enotS
ssalg ci i marec
slatem esaB
 ,yrenihcaM
 lacirtcele
tnempiuqe
selciheV
 ,stnemurtsnI
 ,skcolc
sredrocer
 suoenallecsi M
serutcafunam
Total
Philippines
2
1
2
3
3
11
Poland
1
2
2
4
9
Singapore
2
2
South Africa
1
1
19
26
10
11
14
33
5
8
128
Chinese Taipei
2
1
1
1
7
12
Thailand
2
1
4
23
1
31
Trinidad and 
Tobago
1
3
1
1
1
7
Turkey
12
47
6
33
5
24
5
1
1
8
142
Ukraine
5
5
4
2
3
4
1
24
United States
11
10
8
4
41
21
2
8
9
2
156
13
1
3
289
Uruguay
1
1
Venezuela 
(Bolivarian Rep. of)
3
2
4
14
2
25
Total
26
37
2
27
50
494
315
2
42
102
221
23
69
703
209
24
24
63
2433
Change font size in pdf fillable form - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf file compression; adjust size of pdf file
Change font size in pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best pdf compressor; reader compress pdf
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
128
Today, exporters perceive technical measures as the biggest problem they face, while quantity control 
measures, such as prohibitions and quotas, have become much less important (see fi gure in box 50). This 
is because measures such as textile and clothing restrictions have been eliminated over several rounds of 
international trade negotiations and in RTAs. At the same time, WTO rules and rules in most RTAs permit the 
use of technical measures for health and safety reasons. Anti-dumping duties, countervailing measures and 
safeguards are also permitted to countermand what are considered to be unfair practices by other countries. 
This issue is discussed later in this chapter, under the section Competition from Third Countries.
Several examples of the issues at stake and some of the frustration dealing with them have been documented 
for Philippines exporters of agricultural products by the Philippine Institute for Development Studies, as 
described in box 51.
TECHNICAL BARRIERS: WHY EXPORTERS WORRY
The main concerns of exporters relate to two different types of measures: technical barriers to trade (TBT) 
and sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures, which are covered by two WTO agreements, as discussed in 
box 52. These measures usually serve legitimate public policy goals, including protecting human health and 
safety, or the environment. The WTO does not set these standards. Most standards are set by international 
organizations: the International Organization for Standardization, the International Electrotechnical 
Commission, the International Telecommunications Union, the FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission, 
the International Offi ce of Epizootics, and the International Plant Protection Convention. These international 
standards are then rendered in national law, which includes implementing regulations.
However, some countries may use standards that go beyond international standards for domestic reasons, 
and these may be permitted under WTO rules, subject to certain conditions.
WTO PRINCIPLES FOR STANDARD SETTING
The WTO does not set standards, it establishes rules or principles under which standards must be set and 
applied. The WTO requires that the setting of standards conform to the following principles:
 Avoidance of unnecessary obstacles to trade;
 Non-discrimination and national treatment;
 Based on scientifi c principles;
 Harmonization to reduce costs in production, conformity assessment, etc.
Transparency
The ideas behind these principles are that standards need to have valid scientifi c reasons and that standards 
and their administration should be fair and transparent. This is intended to protect WTO members from 
arbitrary decisions taken for protectionist reasons, that is, for the purposes of assisting or sheltering local 
industry from foreign competition, but hiding behind measures that are purportedly for health or safety 
reasons.
In addition to arbitrary administration of standards, exporters are concerned that technical barriers can 
impact negatively on the capacity of fi rms. Developing countries and LDCs are concerned that arbitrary 
administration of standards and technical barriers will prevent them from effectively exporting their goods. 
NTMs can infl uence supply capacities, export competitiveness and market access for developing countries 
and LDCs. For example, according to a World Bank study, a strict European Union standard allowing only 
4 ppb total afl atoxins in cereals, dried fruits and nuts for direct human consumption is estimated to decrease 
African exports of these products by 64% or US$ 670 million. Codex Alimentarius established a less stringent 
standard 15 ppb.
17
17 Wilson, J. and T. Otsuki, Food Safety and Trade: Winners and Losers in a Non-Harmonized World, World Development Research Group, 
Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2002.
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
adjusting page size in pdf; pdf form change font size
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
change font size in fillable pdf; change font size fillable pdf
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
129
Box 51: Philippines: examples of NTMs affecting agriculture
Mangoes
The Philippine mango enjoys great demand in East Asia. However, to gain market entry exporters face some 
stringent requirements. For example, to enter Japan and the Republic of Korea, fruits need to undergo vapour heat 
treatment (VHT) to remove fruit fl ies. Government representatives from Japan and the Republic Korea supervise 
the process, with the exporting company fi nancing the entire operation, including the expenses of the foreign 
inspectors’ stay in the Philippines. Despite these precautions, Diamond Star Agro Products, a major mango 
exporter, incurred a loss of approximately PHP 9 million when one of its shipments was found not to comply with 
Japan’s chlorpyriphos residue limits. The company had invested several million pesos to upgrade and improve the 
testing of its products for exports. Japan intends to further lower the limits for 44 other chemicals, which results in 
higher costs to exporters for laboratory tests and inspections.
Tuna
The European Union submitted a notifi cation in December 2007 that it would be reducing the maximum residue 
limit (MRL) of lead in tuna from the 0.5 ppm limit outlined by the internationally accepted Codex Alimentarius to 0.2 
ppm. The cited reason was the negative effect of excessive lead on children’s intelligence quotient. About 35% of 
Philippine tuna exports go to the European Union. Hence, this stringent directive alarmed the Philippines. Because 
the European Union was unable to present strong scientifi c basis for the proposal, the Philippines submitted a 
formal position paper claiming that the prevailing 0.5 ppm standard is suffi cient to address the EU’s concern. 
The canned tuna industry admits that an MRL of 0.2 ppm will force some exporting companies out of the trade 
business as natural conditions in the quality of Philippine waters would prevent them from attaining a lower level 
of lead content.
Chemicals in foods
Some countries impose maximum levels for, or completely prohibit, certain chemicals in foods. For instance, 
certain chemicals in food colouring traditionally used in the Philippines are banned in the European Union, forcing 
noodle exporters to alter their production practices and use of ingredients. Similarly, high levels of particular 
chemicals contained in soy sauce are prohibited, preventing soy sauce exporters from accessing the market. 
Differing requirements among countries have forced exporters to alter their formulations to suit each one, taking 
away economies of scale and increasing the necessary capital investment for alternative processes.
Wood packaging
Products are not the only targets of specifi c processing requirements. In particular, wood packaging material, such 
as wooden crates and palettes, are required to be fumigated prior to shipment. The Bureau of Plant Industry must 
certify the fumigation process. Because all accredited fumigators are currently based in Manila, transportation costs 
add to the exporters’ fi nancial burden. The European Union also proposed debarking in addition to fumigation, but 
this requirement was postponed after receiving complaints from trading partners. The additional requirement was 
more restrictive than international standards. From 1 January 2009, all wood packaging material imported into the 
European Union must be debarked.
Labelling
In East Asia, many issues involve sanitary and phytosanitary standards. But EU member states, like other 
developed countries in the West, are particularly strict when it comes to labelling practices. A shipment 
by Fiesta Brands, a long-time manufacturer and exporter of coconut products, was delayed because the 
packaging gave the manufacturing plant address as a particular highway, which it had done for years. 
However, it was not accepted as an exact address. The company was forced to ask the government for an 
exact offi cial address, which took nearly two months.
Source
: Philippine Institute for Development Studies, Policy Notes No. 2007-10, December 2007.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
pdf page size dimensions; change page size pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf font size change; pdf change font size in textbox
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
130
Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are more vulnerable than larger companies to the effects of trade 
barriers. SMEs tend to have limited resources and less ability to absorb risks, especially when operating in 
intensely competitive markets. When faced with trade barriers, SMEs may have to forgo a market completely, 
or incur additional variable costs that could impair their competitiveness.
18
WHAT CAN EXPORTERS DO ABOUT TECHNICAL BARRIERS?
In preparing a strategy to deal with NTMs, there are four potential options. First, developing countries need 
to participate more effectively in the work of the international standards setting organizations. However, this 
requires a high degree of technical skills, and participation is costly and long term.
Second, developing countries may negotiate mutual recognition agreements, which would obviate the need 
to meet the foreign market standards.
19
This may be an option where the trading partners have similar existing 
standards, for example, between highly industrialized countries or between developing countries that are 
parties to a regional agreement. However, it may not be a practical option for developing countries seeking 
access to sophisticated international markets.
Third, exporters can challenge the use of measures that create unjustifi ed barriers to trade in the WTO 
dispute settlement process or in negotiation. An example is given in box 53.
Fourth, the most realistic choice for exporters is to try to meet the standards in the markets they seek to 
penetrate. This is the focus of the remaining part of this section.
Meeting international standards or setting higher national standards is not straightforward. As noted in a 
recent report by UNIDO, while the TBT and SPS institutional infrastructure and services are taken for granted 
in industrialized countries, this is often not the case for most developing, potentially exporting, countries 
where even the rudimentary elements of this infrastructure are missing.
20
Acknowledging this problem when the WTO agreements were drafted, a special clause was introduced to 
suggest that industrialized countries should provide related technical assistance if so requested by those 
countries not having the full infrastructure in place. Thus, an option is to seek technical assistance from the 
country whose market the exporter is trying to penetrate. Table 13 lists common needs of exporters related 
to technical barriers to trade/sanitary and phytosanitary measures (TBT/SPS) compliance requirements, 
including standards, testing, metrology, system certifi cation, inspection, traceability, packaging and labelling. 
Table 13 also sets out the infrastructure and institutional services needed to support these requirements.
18 ‘The Role of Trade Barriers in SMEs Internationalisation’, Trade Policy Working Paper No. 45, OECD, 2006. 
Available at: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/34/25/37872326.pdf
19 Vergano P. and F. Vergano, Vietnam’s Fisheries Exports to the EC Public-Private Collaboration to Address Non-Tariff Measures, ITC, 
2009. Available at: www.intracen.org/btp/publications/vietnam-fi sheries.pdf
20 Trade Capacity Building Report, UNIDO, 2008. 
Available at: www.unido.org/fi leadmin/media/documents/pdf/tcb_unido_submission.pdf
Box 52: Defi ning technical barriers to trade and sanitary and phytosanitary measures
Technical barriers to trade (TBT) refer to technical regulations and voluntary standards that set out specifi c 
characteristics of a product, such as size, shape, design, functions and performance, or the way a product is 
labelled or packaged. Also included are technical procedures that confi rm products comply with regulations and 
standards.
Sanitary regulations restrict or prohibit the importation and marketing of certain animal species, or products thereof, 
to prevent the introduction or spread of pests or diseases.
Phytosanitary regulations restrict or prohibit the importation and marketing of certain plant species, or products of 
these plants, so as to prevent the introduction or spread of plant pests or pathogens.
Source
: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Technical Barriers to Trade; OECD, Phytosanitary 
Regulations.
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. DocumentType.PDF DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
change page size pdf; best online pdf compressor
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. DocumentType.PDF DocumentType.TIFF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf compression; pdf page size
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
131
Table 13: Common needs of exporters – TBT/SPS compliance requirements
Exporter’s needs
Compliance requirement
Necessary infrastructure and/or 
service
Access to standards and technical 
regulations
Product standards/technical 
regulations, including packaging and 
labelling
Reference centre in standards body or 
other organization
Local product testing recognized by the 
(international) client
Internationally recognized (accredited) 
conformity assessment services
Testing laboratory upgrading 
towards internationally recognized 
accreditation. MRAs (mutual recognition 
arrangements) between accreditation 
bodies
Accuracy of measurement, precision 
manufacture
Internationally recognized equipment 
calibration; measurement traceability 
to International System of Units (SI) 
(measurement) standard
Metrology laboratory upgrading towards 
internationally recognized accreditation; 
inter-calibration schemes
Ensure continuity of product 
characteristics and quality
Enterprise Quality Management System 
Certifi cation (ISO 9001)
Certifi cation and consultancy capacity, 
and internationally recognized certifi ers
Ensure continuity in managing 
environmental impact
Enterprise Environmental Management 
System Certifi cation (ISO 14001)
Certifi cation and consultancy capacity, 
and internationally recognized certifi ers
Food safety assurance
Management system to control food 
contamination (HACCP)
Certifi cation and consultancy capacity, 
and internationally recognized certifi ers
Address consumer concerns relating to 
child labour, workers exploitation, etc.
Social accountability (SA8000)
Certifi cation and consultancy capacity, 
and internationally recognized certifi ers.
Traceability of products and inputs from 
fork/shelf to farm/producer
Traceability system
Certifi cation and consultancy capacity, 
and internationally recognized certifi ers
Examination of shipment content to 
order
Product inspection
Cross-border inspection services
Source: Trade Capacity Building Report, UNIDO, 2008.
For exporters to provide proof of compliance with common international standards in the TBT/SPS 
agreements, complex standards, metrology, testing and quality (SMTQ) infrastructure is required. This can 
be implemented in either a country or a region.
Countries implement these various requirements so that their exports can enter target markets. Creating 
domestic standards and using internationally recognized standards also helps countries avoid becoming 
dumping grounds for sub-standard products, upgrades their image, and increases the marketability of their 
products and processes.
Box 53: Viet Nam: case study – private associations defend industry
The Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers (VASEP) represents most important fi rms in 
the sector, promoting seafood exports. When the United States brought an anti-dumping case against VASEP 
members over catfi sh exports, VASEP actively supported its members. It established a dedicated fund to defend 
the case, assisted members to fi nd a law fi rm to protect their interests, and coordinated the defence.
VASEP also provided information to members as the case developed, launched international campaigns to protect 
the interests of Vietnamese producers and exporters, and published a White Book to counter price estimates used 
by United States authorities as proof of dumping. Although its members lost the case, VASEP’s campaign set a 
precedent for future action and was a good example for other business associations in Viet Nam.
Source
: The Role of Trade Barriers in SMEs Internationalisation, Trade Policy Working Paper No. 45, OECD, 2006. Available at: 
www.oecd.org/dataoecd/34/25/37872326.pdf
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
132
Exporting countries need to establish two key institutions: a standards body and an accreditation body. The 
standards body is ‘responsible for standards formulation, dissemination, consumer protection and market 
surveillance’.
21
It should be a member of international standards setting organizations (ISO, CODEX), and 
function as the de-facto WTO TBT/SPS enquiry point. The accreditation body provides the critical conformity 
assessment infrastructure. Domestically, the accreditation body is responsible for accrediting laboratories, 
system certifi ers and inspection bodies.
In some countries, national standards bodies (NSB) are called ‘institutions’ or ‘institutes’ (e.g. Sri Lanka 
Standards Institution, British Standards Institute); in other countries they are called ‘associations’ (e.g. 
Standards Association of Zimbabwe) or ‘bureaus’ (e.g. Bureau of Indian Standards).
In addition to this institutional infrastructure, enterprises also require various management system certifi cations. 
The national standards body is typically responsible for both generating awareness of these management 
systems at enterprise level and for training auditors.
To attain system certifi cation, the country requires internationally recognized certifi cation bodies. Enterprises 
also need testing services for chemical, microbiology, textile and leather, and other products. In the global 
trading environment, laboratories providing such services must have international accreditation to guarantee 
global acceptance of the certifi cates granted, and to avoid costly duplicative foreign testing.
Establishing operational systems for conformity assessment and accreditation or upgrading existing national 
systems to meet foreign market requirements tends to require technical assistance from relevant international 
agencies. When developing infrastructure for the compliance required to support a country’s exports, the 
following steps are important:
 Identify the country’s export sectors and the range of products produced;
 Identify the markets for which these products are destined and the TBT/SPS requirements that must be 
met in those markets;
 Determine the trade volumes and calculate the number of laboratory tests and inspections, equipment 
calibrations and enterprise system certifi cations needed to meet TBT/SPS conformity requirements.
22
The UNIDO website states the following:
‘The range of identifi ed tests defi nes the necessary laboratory infrastructure – calibration, microbiological, 
chemical, and other sector-specifi c testing.
Each laboratory category would respond to the identifi ed spectrum of tests and have to dispose of the 
defi ned capacity of tests to be conducted.
Then, depending on the extent of the country export potential, key export sectors, geographic 
dispersion of export production, the number of laboratories required to satisfy the testing needs can be 
approximated.’
23
Governments can use various strategies when upgrading infrastructure and seeking accreditation of existing 
laboratories:
 Public-private partnerships (PPPs). Private sector participation in the design, fi nancing and execution 
of infrastructure projects is recognized as a means to reduce the large gap between infrastructure needs 
and limited government resources.
24
Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are common instruments for 
infrastructure projects for quality, sanitary and phytosanitary controls and compliance.
 Attract foreign investment. Internationally recognized laboratories could be invited to invest. Investors can 
generate adequate returns by charging appropriate fees for testing.
21 For further information see the UNIDO webpage, Standards Bodies, available at: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o72302
22 Ibid.
23 Ibid.
24 Aggarwal, R. and A. Huelin, ‘The private sector: Important partners in aid for trade,’ International Trade Forum, Issue 4/2009, ITC, 2009. 
Available at: www.tradeforum.org/news/fullstory.php/aid/1495/The_private_sector:_Important_partners_in_aid_for_trade.html
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
133
 Business-to-business assistance.
25
By establishing links between large corporations and SMEs, local 
fi rms can boost their competitiveness and become integrated into global supply chains. The main reasons 
given by foreign investors for low levels of purchases from local suppliers include concerns that goods and 
services from local suppliers do not meet their quality, price and delivery requirements. Foreign investors 
often regard local suppliers as unresponsive to their requests for improved quality, delivery and price. 
Large companies can assist in overcoming these trade barriers and act as channels for small producers to 
export their goods and services. They can also help small producers enhance the quality of their products 
through training programmes and contractual arrangements.
 Regional cooperation. Establishing laboratories for use by exporters from several countries can create 
economies of scale and maintain adequate standards. One example is the Quality Programme adopted 
by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), which is in the process of being enforced 
across the sub-region.
26
 Financial and technical assistance. Financial and technical assistance can be sought from international 
donors to upgrade compliance infrastructure in the areas of standards and conformity assessment – 
testing, calibration and accreditation. Box 54 details the benefi t of donor assistance in Sri Lanka.
 Trade advocacy. Governments can assist exporters to overcome trade barriers by ‘directly interceding 
on exporters’ behalf with foreign government offi cials. This can involve various actions, including active 
in-market representation by consular staff, meetings by high-level government offi cials, or discussion in 
multilateral fora’.
27
25 Ibid.
26 Trade and Investment Conference, ECOWAS, 2009. Available at: acpbusinessclimate.org/projets/WP2.28.2-1.057/documents/
WP2.28.2-1.057_brochure_en.pdf
27 Ibid.
Box 54: Sri Lanka: internationally recognized conformity infrastructure
Sri Lanka’s export sector is based on processed products such as garments and textiles, ceramics, rubber 
and shrimp. In the absence of internationally accredited testing laboratories able to issue globally accepted 
testing certifi cates, Sri Lankan exporters were faced with the problem of proving compliance with international 
market requirements and getting their products to these markets. Recognizing the importance of having testing 
capacities developed locally, UNIDO, with a fi nancial contribution of US$ 1.8 million from the Norwegian Agency 
for Development Cooperation (NORAD), provided signifi cant support for Sri Lanka’s conformity infrastructure.
The assistance was timely and of strategic importance, not only in cutting the high costs of testing nationally 
manufactured products abroad, but also in providing Sri Lankan exporters assurance of the conformity of their 
products with international standards and those of recipient markets.
The UNIDO/NORAD support resulted in seven internationally accredited laboratories in Sri Lanka for food analysis 
and chemical, microbiological and rubber/plastics testing. It helped establish and upgrade the testing laboratories 
following the ISO/IEC 17025 guidelines and led them towards international accreditation from the Swedish Board for 
Accreditation and Conformity Assessment (SWEDAC). To ensure testing accuracy and ensure reliable calibration 
of testing equipment, the country’s metrology capabilities were strengthened by upgrading the industrial metrology 
laboratories in the areas of dimensional, volume, mass, thermometry, pressure and electrical metrology so as to 
achieve international accreditation of their services through SWEDAC.
Source
Industrial Development Report, UNIDO, 2009.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
134
EXPORTING IN THE PRESENCE OF DOMINANT FIRMS
Today, a large share of international trade is intra-fi rm trade, which takes place within rather than between 
fi rms. As economies grow, an increasing share of their trade occurs within the same broad industry, intra-
industry trade, with trade in intermediate products such as parts sent for incorporation into a fi nal (or other 
intermediate) product in another country. An example is steel plate or engines for incorporation into cars.
In some areas, such as trade in fresh produce, fi rms have virtual monopolies as sellers, or monopsonies 
(a market in which only one buyer faces many sellers) as purchasers, or both. It is often very diffi cult for 
individuals or small businesses to enter such markets as independent traders. Moreover, when dealing with 
such large enterprises, developing country businesses may not always receive what they consider to be fair 
prices, which is part of the impetus for the fair trade movement of recent years. At the same time, there is 
widespread recognition that in the right conditions such alliances can be benefi cial.
28
Where there are dominant fi rms, penetrating foreign markets may require making strategic marketing 
alliances or joining part of a value chain. This approach can apply to goods as well as services. Value chains 
are also important in trade in intermediate products, which are estimated to account for 56% of trade in 
goods and 73% of trade in services.
29
This is because inward foreign direct investment from transnational 
companies and sales of foreign affi liates in services – as well outward stocks and sales of foreign affi liates 
– also generate imports of intermediate products, which underlines the importance of vertical specialization 
networks.
30
Vertical specialization networks are production arrangements in which fi rms make fi nal goods in 
multiple stages located in multiple countries.
THE IMPORTANCE OF VALUE CHAINS
For developing countries, these fi ndings regarding the size of trade in intermediate products are signifi cant 
because these countries are important exporters of raw materials and intermediate products, while their 
presence in trade in fi nished goods is more limited. However, there is the possibility that with training or 
experience they may be able to move up the production chain into more advanced manufactured products. 
Trade in intermediate products is highly price sensitive and it is easy for large fi rms to switch sources of supply. 
This underscores the usefulness of participating in value chains that provide stable contractual relationships.
Value chains cover the range of transactions and support services, such as fi nance, logistics and transport, 
required to bring a product or service from its origins to its end use. Thus, value chains begin with raw 
materials and other inputs, moving through production and processing into packaging, marketing and sales 
in domestic and international markets. For every product or service, value chains include all of the enterprises 
involved in supplying, producing, processing and buying, as well as the organizations that provide the 
technical, business and fi nancial services to support the export process.
31
In addition to the benefi ts of participating in trade in intermediates, participating in a value chain has several 
advantages for the small exporter from a marketing perspective. Value chain participation offers a package 
of information on the mechanics of trading, including fi nance, transport and customs, as well as information 
on packaging and labelling and market requirements. It may offer information about shifts in demand so that 
the exporter can adapt rapidly to change. It may also provide useful allies against protectionist threats and 
other changes in the conditions of access. For example, allies in the United States market helped to enact 
the AGOA and maintain rules of origin benefi cial to African exporters.
28 Unleashing Entrepreneurship: Making Business Work for the Poor, UN Commission on the Private Sector and Development, UNDP, 
2008. Available at: www.undp.org/cpsd/indexF.html
Creating Value for All: Strategies for Doing Business with the Poor, UNDP 2008. Available at: www.undp.org/gimlaunch
29 Miroudot, S., R. Lanz and A. Ragoussis, ‘Trade in Intermediate Goods and Services’, OECD Trade Policy Working Paper No. 93, 
OECD, Paris, 2009. World Trade Report 2008 – Trade in a Globalizing World, WTO, Geneva, 2009.
30 Ibid.
31 Kaplinsky, R. and M. Morris, A Handbook for Value Chain Research, International Development Research Council, Ottawa, 2000. 
Available at: www.globalvaluechains.org/docs/VchNov01.pdf.
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ), USAID and other development organizations have also produced useful 
guides and methodologies on the value chain.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
135
Another example is Thailand, which has become a hub of vehicle production for regional and global markets 
through its linkages with car producers and parts and components suppliers (see box 55). Thailand’s 
business-friendly environment, important policy reforms and greater regional integration were important. 
However, transnational corporations at different levels of the production process and in the international 
marketing of the fi nal product also played a key role.
ITC BUILDS CAPACITY
ITC assists small business by connecting them with value chains or supporting them to be able to engage in 
direct marketing. For example, ITC assists enterprises to connect directly with buyers and learn the precise 
specifi cations and quality requirements of major markets. ITC also sponsors exporters to prepare for and 
attend international trade fairs. ITC facilitates bringing buyers and sellers together in face-to-face meetings. 
However, success requires careful preparation, including trade fl ow analyses that help to identify products 
with complementary business interests; supply and demand surveys documenting market characteristics 
and business practices; and identifying enterprises most active in particular product sectors.
Box 55: Thailand: global integration of the auto industry
In Thailand, as in many other countries, the automobile industry was an early target for industrial development 
through import substitution. Tariffs on completely knocked down (CKD) kits were set much lower than completely 
built up (CBU) vehicles to encourage local assembly. Concern that the initial scheme had failed to lead to broader-
based industrial development prompted Thailand to adopt a local content policy in 1975, with corresponding 
adjustment of tariff rates on CBUs and CKD kits to provide greater incentives to use local parts. Local content 
requirements were increased in the mid-1980s.
The late 1980s saw a shift from domestic market orientation towards global integration, setting the stage for 
Thailand to emerge as a centre of automobile and auto part manufacturing in the region. The Thai economy 
entered a period of rapid economic growth. Limits on the number of series of local cars and the import ban on 
imports of new cars were lifted. The abolition of the local content scheme from 2000 was announced as part of 
Thailand’s compliance with the new WTO Trade-Related Investment Measures Agreement. In the area of foreign 
direct investment policy, all selective incentives granted to export-oriented activities and a 49% equity ownership 
restriction on domestic market oriented projects were abolished, with immediate effect in 1999.
In 1995, Thailand became a signatory to the ASEAN Brand-to-Brand Complementation Scheme, aimed at 
promoting trade in parts and components among automotive companies operating in the ASEAN region. Thailand 
also implemented general tariff cuts on CBU passenger vehicles and rates were also reduced in successive stages 
on CKD kits starting in 1992, exposing the domestic industry to increased competition.
However, the cascading nature of the tariff structure provides substantial effective protection from domestic motor 
vehicle production, estimated as high as 64.8%, but this has not been a binding constraint on auto exports since 
the local industry has become integrated in a global network.
Under the domestic reforms and the greater integration in the ASEAN and the wider Asia Pacifi c region, the Thai 
auto industry has undergone a major transformation and has experienced rapid export-oriented growth. No single 
factor explains this success. However, credit is given to multinational corporations that set up production plants in 
Thailand to service the global market.
While major companies such as Toyota and Honda use Thailand as an important regional production base for 
small cars, most manufacturers also use Thailand as the main base for one-ton pickups, which like the small cars 
are then marketed through their outlets in other countries. It is also notable that of the 1,454 indigenous parts 
suppliers, the large majority of fi rst-tier suppliers operate under technology agreements with foreign producers.
Source
: Athurkola, P. and A. Kohpaiboon, Thailand in Global Automobile Networks, Case Study, ITC, Geneva, 2011.
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
136
ITC then provides the platform for negotiations between ‘matched’ enterprises, which are expected to show 
their commitment by covering the costs of their participation. ITC also has programmes to assist small 
businesses in marketing using modern information technologies.
COMPETITION FROM THIRD COUNTRIES
Exporters trying to penetrate a foreign market must be concerned about competition from other third country 
exporters. As discussed earlier, an important factor is differing terms of access for different exporters. Some 
exporters may be eligible for preferential tariff treatment, more favourable ROOs, or application of NTMs 
whose impact may not fall equally on all third countries.
Competitors for foreign markets may use various instruments to promote national exports, some of which 
may not comply with international rules. For example, if the competitor is using an export subsidy, it is likely 
illegal for products, but unlikely to be illegal under current rules for services exports. Whether subsidies are 
currently legal for agricultural exports depends on whether they were declared during the Uruguay Round 
of trade negotiations and whether the levels fall within the scale of commitments for cutting back their use.
Exporters faced with illegal subsidies can resort to bilateral discussions and, if that fails, invoke the WTO 
dispute settlement mechanism. This approach was used successfully in recent years by non-benefi ciary 
countries, mainly in Latin America, against European Union policies supporting bananas from ACP countries. 
However, it seems unlikely that an importing country would pursue an anti-dumping action against a business 
competitor from a third country for the benefi t of a disadvantaged exporter.
In the case of legal supports by third country competitors, the longer-term solution is to seek to change 
the rules by negotiation. The disadvantaged exporting country should seek support from a coalition of 
other interested governments. This is what has happened with the agreed elimination of agricultural export 
subsidies in the current WTO Doha Round of trade negotiations, although implementation will not likely be 
achieved until the negotiations are concluded.
CONCLUSION
STRATEGIES FOR MARKET ACCESS
The business sector has a vital interest in shifting market trends and conditions of access, changes in trade 
and related policies, and negotiations affecting trade in goods and services. Developing country exports 
have grown at high rates in recent years, and ITC has a range of tools to help exporters identify market 
opportunities.
While average tariffs on agricultural and industrial goods are modest, there are important areas of interest 
to developing countries and LDCs where protection levels are quite high and NTMs can be important – in 
some cases more important than tariffs. In the case of services, it is diffi cult to assess the impact of trade 
regulations, and there have been only a few attempts to make such calculations. However, restrictions on 
the movement of labour seem to have a strong negative effect on the potential earnings of the developing 
countries. Negotiated changes in trade regimes will present new opportunities for some countries and pose 
challenges for others, for example, through the loss of preferences. Businesses must prepare for change.
Businesses have considerable concerns about the growing incidence of NTMs, such as TBT and SPS. 
Environmental measures and anti-dumping duties are also more important today. This is partly due to success 
in reducing tariffs and eliminating quotas and other NTMs in earlier trade negotiations. Occasionally, the issue 
is not the existence of such measures, which may be for socially desirable reasons, such as environmental 
protection, but the manner in which they are administered. WTO and most regional agreements make 
provision for consultations and dispute settlement procedures to resolve disagreement concerning the use 
of NTMs. NTMs are being discussed in several areas of the Doha Round of trade negotiations, potentially 
leading to further clarifi cations on the use of NTMs.
In December 2005, a WTO Ministerial Declaration recognized the key role ITC can play as an interlocutor for 
business and a provider of technical assistance. The Ministers declared, ‘We encourage all [WTO] Members 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested