asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Adjust pdf size application Library cloud html asp.net azure class national-trade-policy-for-export-success15-part1749

CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
137
to cooperate with the International Trade Centre, which complements the work of the WTO by providing a 
platform for business to interact with trade negotiators, and practical advice for [SMEs] to benefi t from the 
multilateral trading system.’
ITC disseminates information about the state of trade negotiations to the business community in the developing 
world. This has contributed towards enabling the business community to play a more active advocacy role 
with their governments, particularly in relation to sector-specifi c analyses where the negotiations will have a 
direct bearing on their future activities. Examples include new market opportunities as barriers come down in 
foreign markets or pressure to adjust as protection of the domestic market is reduced.
In addition to more active advocacy to promote their own interests in trade negotiations, developing countries 
need to position themselves to take advantage of trade opportunities resulting from trade policy changes 
and market developments. Identifying markets, including potential niches, and the conditions for success 
in those markets (such as changing trends and tastes) are essential areas where ITC provides assistance.
While WTO negotiations have moved slowly, partly due to the complexity of issues and number of participants, 
there has been a rapid increase in the number of regional agreements in recent years. This trend seems to 
be continuing. One explanation for this trend is pressure from business communities that have strong links 
in neighbouring countries where business can more clearly calculate the potential gains and risks from 
strengthening ties in wider regional markets without waiting for results from the WTO. Business needs to take 
an active role in all of these negotiations to ensure that the outcome facilitates trade and investment, and that 
bureaucratic obstacles are minimized.
WTO negotiations will lead to a loss of preferences in some key areas of interest to developing countries. 
For example, African countries should not expect to continue to benefi t from the United States’ Africa Growth 
and Opportunity Act to the same degree as in the past. Businesses must move from a strategy based 
on exploiting preferences toward one of increasing competitiveness in international markets, including 
by participating in global value chains. Raising productivity and reducing costs are key to increasing 
competitiveness. Government action is also needed to improve infrastructure, vocational training, fi nancial 
markets, and legal and institutional frameworks, while reducing bureaucratic obstacles to doing business 
and facilitating investment.
Businesses must be alert to challenges arising from changes in trading conditions, including the emergence 
of new competitors and the use by third countries of various legal and illegal instruments to promote their 
exports. Changes in trade regimes at home and abroad may lead to increased competition. Businesses 
may be able to meet this competition by improving their competitiveness in existing lines of production. 
However, businesses may also need to adapt, for example, by shifting to alternative products based on 
existing technological bases.
Governments must be concerned about negative effects on the private sector as well as in the labour market. 
Governments may need to implement adjustment programmes, supporting retraining of workers to help 
them and the businesses in which they are employed to cope with changes, and, where necessary, facilitate 
movement into new lines of production.
Changes in trade regimes rarely occur overnight. The business community and governments normally have 
some time to adapt to new situations. In the WTO there is usually an implementation period of 5 to 10 years, 
which may require legislative action by member states. However, in the past some shifts have occurred relatively 
quickly and a number of developing countries have had diffi culties in adapting to new situations. Assistance is 
available from ITC and other international organizations, through bilateral support, and from NGOs.
Adjust pdf size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
adjust pdf size; batch reduce pdf file size
Adjust pdf size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best way to compress pdf file; change font size pdf comment box
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
138
ANNEX: NON-TARIFF MEASURES – CLASSIFICATION FOR 
TRADE IN GOODS
The following taxonomy of NTMs was prepared by technical experts from international organizations, 
including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), International Monetary Fund 
(IMF), ITC, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), United Nations Conference 
on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the 
World Bank and World Trade Organization (WTO). This classifi cation is used to collect, classify, analyse and 
disseminate information on NTMs received from offi cial sources, such as government regulations, and from 
perception-based data, such as surveys.
The classifi cation differentiates NTMs according to 16 chapters (denoted by alphabetical letters), each 
comprising sub-branches (1-digit), twigs (2-digits) and leafs (3-digits). This classifi cation drew upon the 
existing, but outdated, UNCTAD Coding System of Trade Control Measures (TCMCS), and has been modifi ed 
and expanded by adding various categories of measures to refl ect current trading conditions. The current 
NTM classifi cation was fi nalized in November 2009.
Chapter A, on sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures, refers to laws, decrees, regulations, requirements, 
standards and procedures to protect human, animal or plant life or health from risks such as the establishment 
or spread of pests, diseases, disease-carrying organisms or disease-causing organisms; and risks from 
additives, contaminants, toxins, disease-causing organisms in foods, beverages or feedstuffs. The chapter 
is also known as SPS.
Chapter B, on technical measures, contains measures involving technical specifi cation of products or 
production processes and conformity assessment systems. This chapter is also known as technical barriers 
to trade (TBT). TBT measures are most often applied to industrial goods, but can be also applied to agricultural 
products. An NTM applied to agricultural products is classifi ed as a technical measure if its objective is not 
food safety. If the objective is food safety, the measure is classifi ed as SPS.
Chapter C, on pre-shipment inspection and other (customs) formalities, refers to checking, consigning, 
monitoring and controlling shipments of goods before or at entry into the destination country. Inspections 
and quarantine are examples of such measures.
Chapter D, on price control measures, includes measures to control the prices of imported articles to: 
support the domestic price of certain products when the import prices of these goods are lower; establish 
the domestic price of certain products because of price fl uctuation in domestic markets or price instability in 
a foreign market; and counteract the damage resulting from ‘unfair’ foreign trade practices.
Chapter E, on licences, quotas, prohibitions and other quantity control measures, includes measures that 
restrain the quantity traded, such as quotas, and licenses and import prohibitions that are not SPS-related 
(SPS-related licenses and prohibitions are classifi ed under Chapter A).
Chapter F, on charges, taxes and other para-tariff measures, refers to measures, other than tariff measures, 
that increase the cost of imports in a similar manner, i.e. by a fi xed percentage or amount. These are also 
known as para-tariff measures.
Chapter G, on fi nance measures, refers to measures that are intended to regulate the access to and cost of 
foreign exchange for imports and defi ne the terms of payment.
Chapter H, on anti-competitive measures, refers to measures that are intended to grant exclusive or special 
preferences or privileges to one or more limited groups of economic operators.
Chapter I, on trade related investment measures, covers measures that restrict investment by requiring local 
content, or requiring that investment should be related to export to balance imports.
Chapter J, on distribution restrictions, refers to restrictive measures related to internal distribution of imported 
products.
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file that, you are also able to adjust various image control the annotation shapes, the outline size (width and
pdf change font size in textbox; optimize scanned pdf
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
jpeg), gif, bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc. APIs for Visual C# .NET developers to adjust the image & document page viewing size with this
can a pdf file be compressed; pdf text box font size
CHAPTER 4 – ADDRESS EXPORT MARKET ISSUES
139
Chapter K, on restriction on post-sales services, refers to measures restricting producers of exported goods 
from providing post-sales service in the importing country.
Chapter L, on subsidies, includes measures related to domestic government support to producers, such as 
direct or potential transfer of funds (e.g. grants, loans, equity infusions), payments to a funding mechanism 
and income or price support.
Chapter M, on government procurement restrictions, refers to measures controlling the purchase of goods 
by government agencies, generally by preferring national providers
Chapter N on intellectual property refers to measures related to intellectual property rights in trade. Intellectual 
property legislation covers patents, trademarks, industrial designs, layout designs of integrated circuits, 
copyright, geographical indications and trade secrets.
Chapter O, on rules of origin, covers laws, regulations and administrative determinations of general application 
applied by government of importing countries to determine the country of origin of goods.
Chapter P, on export-related measures, encompasses all measures that countries apply to their exports. It 
includes export taxes, export quotas or export prohibitions, among others. This chapter has to be used when 
the measure is applied by the exporting country, i.e. when certain documentation has to be granted by the 
home country’s customs, which is not required by the importing partner. All the other chapters (A to O) refer 
to measures that countries apply to their imports.
Generate and draw PDF 417 for Java
417 barcode image text in Java Class barcode.setData("PDF417 for Java"); //Adjust PDF 417 size with left, right, top and bottom margins barcode.setleftMargin(3
reader compress pdf; change font size in pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
font type "Times New Roman", size "16", and style "Bold"), and then adjust brush color provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change font size pdf; pdf change font size
C# PowerPoint: How to Set PowerPoint Rendering Parameters in C#
this SDK to render PowerPoint (2007 or above) slide into PDF document or Generally, you are allowed to set image resolution, image size, batch conversion and
change font size in pdf comment box; reader pdf reduce file size
C# PDF: Use C# APIs to Control Fully on PDF Rendering Process
PDF document PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(@"c:\sample.pdf"); // compute zoom new Rectangle(0, 0, originalWidth, originalHeight), size); // adjust with a
change file size of pdf document; pdf font size change
CHAPTER 5
IMPROVE INPUTS AND 
CAPITAL GOODS
INTRODUCTION...........................................................................................................................................142
MARKET OPENNESS AS A MEANS OF REDUCING COSTS ..................................................................143
ELIMINATING ANTI-EXPORT BIAS.............................................................................................................145
ACTIONS TO REDUCE THE COSTS OF INPUTS .....................................................................................146
WTO RULES ON SUBSIDIES ......................................................................................................................146
SPECIAL TARIFF RELIEF SCHEMES..........................................................................................................149
EXPORT RESTRICTIONS AND TAXES .......................................................................................................152
SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONES....................................................................................................................152
REGIONAL SOURCING ...............................................................................................................................157
SUPPORTS FOR INPUTS TO EXPORTS ....................................................................................................157
ACTIONS TO ASSIST PRODUCTION AND OPENNESS TO FDI ............................................................158
CONCLUSION ..............................................................................................................................................160
VB.NET Excel: VB Methods to Set and Customize Excel Rendering
on the fixed image size ration that the size is limited by Adjust Image Scaling Factor. supports converting Excel to other document files, like PDF with online
change page size pdf; adjust pdf size preview
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
Support rendering image to a PDF document page, no change for image size. Able to adjust and customize image resolution to meet various C# PDF conversion
adjust pdf size; adjusting page size in pdf
CHAPTER 5 – IMPROVE INPUTS AND CAPITAL GOODS
142
IMPROVE INPUTS AND CAPITAL 
GOODS
INTRODUCTION
Access to inputs of goods and services at world prices and ability to take advantage of export opportunities 
under given conditions of access, discussed in chapter 4, may be crucial to export competitiveness. Ultimately, 
given equal terms of access as competitors, competitiveness in a foreign market implies being able to deliver 
at a fi nal price that is lower than that of competitors taking account of conditions of sale, quality, delivery times 
and, where appropriate, after sales services. This fi nal price of the good or service is itself a composite of 
production costs as well as delivery costs, which may be even higher than the costs of production.
For example, the cost of production of a banana in Latin America has been estimated at as little as 10% of the 
fi nal retail price in a European supermarket. The remaining 90% of the retail price is explained by the various 
services that are used in getting the banana from the farm gate to the supermarket shelf. For other products, 
the corresponding percentage likely ranges from 10% to 50%. Everything else being equal, international 
competitiveness depends largely on the price of imports of goods and services used not only in production 
but also in the delivery of the good or service to the consumer or user.
At the production level – the farm or factory gate or equivalent in services – the key factors in competitiveness 
are total factor productivity and the cost of inputs into the production process. In turn, productivity depends on 
a number of factors, such as technology, the quality of labour (the appropriate skill/wage cost combination), 
and management. The appropriate technology can vary according to the production scale and cost of other 
inputs, such as labour, energy and so on, in the producing country. For example, the appropriate technology 
in a small market, protected by high transport costs, and where labour costs are also low may be quite 
different from a large market with high labour costs in an industry subject to important economies of scale.
As an illustration, in a small country iron ingots might be produced economically in a simple charcoal foundry. 
At a different level of sophistication, steel might be produced in a mini-mill (depending on access to scrap 
metal), while in a large country a fully integrated steel mill might be appropriate. However, when it comes 
to exporting, the large-scale producer will likely capture the global market, but there may still be export 
opportunities for small-scale producers in neighbouring countries that are also distant from the large-scale 
producer. As a result, international competitiveness may depend on having access to technology and inputs 
of materials, parts and components at world prices.
However, the fi nal retail price also depends on the costs of the services required to deliver the goods or 
services to the purchaser, including transport, insurance, fi nance and telecommunications, etc. The exporting 
country also needs to look at liberalization in the services sectors to ensure that its exports of goods have 
access to services at world prices. This is equally, if not more, important for exports of services, such as 
tourism, and other potential exports in business services, banking and information technology industries 
where some developing countries are now achieving export success.
How can developing country producers of goods and services who wish to achieve international 
competitiveness ensure they have access to inputs at world prices? It may well be that in the relevant sector 
the domestic market is highly competitive and already produces goods and services at world prices because 
of domestic competition. However, not all countries can achieve comparative advantage in all sectors even if 
they have absolute advantage in all areas, which is unlikely.
In the delivery of goods and services to international markets, does the exporter have access to the services 
necessary for trade at competitive prices? In the longer term, it is desirable to try to assure openness to 
competition from world price suppliers to keep the domestic market competitive and provide inputs at world 
prices for exporters of goods and services.
C# Word: How to Draw Text, Line & Image in C#.NET Word Project
copy the sample codes below to adjust text properties such as image color, picture size, location of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjust file size of pdf; change font size in pdf form
C# Word: Set Rendering Options with C# Word Document Rendering
& raster and vector images, such as PDF, tiff, png rendering application still enables users to adjust and set developers can choose a target size or resolution
change paper size in pdf document; adjust size of pdf file
CHAPTER 5 – IMPROVE INPUTS AND CAPITAL GOODS
143
MARKET OPENNESS CAN REDUCE COSTS
It is generally accepted among economists that, subject to certain qualifi cations, openness is the key to 
economic growth, at least in the long term. This has been key in the policy prescriptions of international 
fi nancial institutions for many years. This is based on the notion that openness leads to cost-reducing 
specialization, to improved allocation of scarce resources, to the improved functioning of the economy, and 
hence to growth.
But there are situations that may warrant some form of intervention, based on long-standing ideas in welfare 
economics and the so-called theory of the second-best, for example, to protect the environment.
1
There is no 
guarantee that the process of moving towards greater openness will be achieved quickly and without costly 
adjustment. This leads to the discussion in the next section as to how to reduce the costs of exporters while 
the move to greater openness is being phased in.
While some industrial countries have pursued more openness to trade, others pursued a more cautious 
approach. Many economies turned inwards in the wake of the depression of the 1930s, leaving high tariff 
and non-tariff barriers (NTBs) that have taken many years to reduce. In developing countries, there was also 
a period when the thinking in development economics was in favour of import-substitution industrialization. 
This was based on the work of Raúl Prebisch
2
of the Economic Commission for Latin America and of 
Hans Singer,
3
then at the United Nations Department of Economic Affairs. Singer warned of a long-term 
deterioration in the terms of trade for developing countries, with their commodity export prices falling relative 
to their manufacturing import prices.
Contrary to the views of many neo-classical economists at the time, the Prebisch-Singer thesis (as it came to 
be called) foresaw that a continuing dependence on primary exports would lead most developing countries 
down the path of increasing indebtedness and would widen global income inequalities. On these terms, 
free trade could never be fair trade, and they called for import substitution, tariff controls and a drive for 
industrialization.
4
Their work also became the basis for the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), trying 
to give developing country exports an edge in major markets.
However, from the mid-1980s, the Washington Consensus on trade led to the most important trade reforms 
across the developing world and transition economies in recent history under International Monetary Fund 
and World Bank structural reform programmes. These ‘autonomous’ reforms among developing countries 
since the mid-1980s, carried out with varying degrees of enthusiasm, led to dramatic reductions in trade 
intervention among developing countries and increased the openness of their economies towards foreign 
investment.
Tariffs fell from some very high levels to moderate rates and there was substantial rationalization of tariff 
structures, reducing the number of bands, in a few cases, to a single level. NTBs, such as quotas, were 
largely eliminated. This process has continued in countries such as China and India so that their applied rates 
are now below 10%. Moreover, under these reform programmes, the dispersion in rates across sectors has 
been substantially reduced and tariff escalation is now more marked in developed than developing countries.
Apart from traditional trade theory, the reform process was justifi ed by statistical evidence linking openness 
to growth.
5
And there were some notable successes, particularly in East Asia. However, not all the successes 
could be attributed to the application of orthodox trade policies – there were also a number of failures, 
1 British economist Arthur Cecil Pigou’s Wealth and Welfare, published in 1912, discusses this. Pigou was later heavily criticized, 
although criticism of his role for the state looks weaker in the light of the fi nancial crisis of 2008. British economist James Meade’s Trade 
and Welfare, published in 1955, also discusses this issue. However, it often seems that policymakers prefer to focus on a naive, simplistic 
version of theory that appeals to their vision.
2 Prebisch, R., ‘The Economic Development of Latin America and its Principal Problems’, New York, United Nations, 1950.
3 Singer, H., ‘The Distribution of Gains Between Investing and Borrowing Countries’, American Economic Review 40, No. 2, pp. 473-485, 
1950.
4 Toye, J. and R. Toye, The UN and Global Political Economy: Trade, Finance, and Development; Chapter 5, Bloomington and 
Indianapolis, Indiana University Press, 2004.
5 Dollar, D. and A. Kraay, ‘Trade, Growth and Poverty’, Economic Journal, 114: 493, pp. 22-49, 2004. However, as Dollar emphasized 
on a number of occasions, these were statistical results with a number of countries falling above and below the central fi nding. See 
also: Sachs, J. and W. Warner, ‘Globalization and economic reform in developing countries’, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, 1, 
Washington, D.C., Brookings Institution, 1995. In 2002, Turkish economist Dani Rodrik and Venezuelan economist Francisco Rodriguez 
criticized the robustness of the statistical results. 
CHAPTER 5 – IMPROVE INPUTS AND CAPITAL GOODS
144
especially in Africa, and there has recently been some serious rethinking in the Bretton Woods institutions 
about trade policy prescriptions. Many of the reforms were carried out in the face of developments in trade 
theory that challenged the new conventional wisdom.
6
A reappraisal of the impact of trade reforms intensifi ed following the global economic slowdown in the wake 
of the Asian, Russian and Brazilian crises of 1997-1998, some two years after the conclusion of the Uruguay 
Round and the establishment of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The long overdue revisiting of the 
orthodoxy represented by the Washington Consensus was signalled in a number of ways. First, there was 
the intellectual challenge by American economist Joseph Stiglitz and Turkish economist Dani Rodrik, who 
queried the emphasis placed on openness and the lack of attention to institutional and governance issues.
7
Second, problems in implementing WTO agreements led to the breakdown of attempts to launch a new trade 
negotiating round in Seattle in 1999. Third, the 1990s saw a dramatic increase in the number of regional trade 
agreements. Finally, growing evidence emerged of the failure of trade reforms, especially in Africa.
In 2008, the Commission on Growth and Development (hereafter the Growth Commission) noted that relying 
on markets to allocate resources effi ciently is clearly necessary but ‘that is not the same thing as letting some 
combination of markets and a menu of reforms determine outcomes’. The Commission continues: ‘Wedded 
to the goal of high growth, governments should be pragmatic in their pursuit of it. Orthodoxies apply only so 
far … if there were just one valid growth doctrine, we are confi dent we would have found it.’
8
The Commission 
noted that economists can say with some confi dence how a mature market economy will respond to policy 
prescriptions. However, mature markets rely on deep institutional underpinnings that defi ne property rights, 
enforce contracts, convey prices and bridge informational gaps between buyers and sellers, which are often 
lacking in developing countries.
Noting that an important part of development is precisely the creation of these institutionalized capabilities, 
the Growth Commission states:
‘We do not know in detail how these institutions can be engineered, and policymakers cannot always 
know how a market will function without them. The impact of policy shifts and reforms is therefore harder 
to predict accurately in a developing economy. At this stage, our models or predictive devices are, in 
important respects, incomplete. As a result, it is prudent for governments to pursue an experimental 
approach to the implementation of economic policy.’ 
In this respect, the Commission quotes Chinese leader and reformer Deng Xiaoping’s oft-quoted dictum to 
‘cross the river by feeling for the stones’, and it argues that governments should sometimes move forward 
step by step, avoiding sudden shifts in policy where the potential risks outweigh the benefi ts. This will limit 
the potential damage of any policy misstep, making it easier for the government and the economy to right 
itself. It also notes that making policy is only part of the battle; policies must also be faithfully implemented 
and tolerably administered.
While the Growth Commission remarkably says almost nothing about trade policy, it touches on a number 
of closely related areas, including briefl y on what it calls the ‘great symbolic importance’ of the Doha Round, 
apparently accepting the downgrading by many economists of its economic signifi cance. In the areas of export 
promotion (including explicit or implicit subsidies, but not trade fairs, etc.) and industrial policy (in particular 
targeting, rather than cluster group formation, etc.), the Growth Commission indicates the various sides of 
the debate that were heard during its work. Orthodoxy suggests that neither export promotion nor industrial 
policies work. However, the Commission, in a clear break with orthodoxy, suggests that, ‘If an economy is 
6 Krugman, P., ‘Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade’, American Economic Review, 70, pp. 469-479, 1980. 
Krugman, P., Strategic Trade Policy and the New International Economics, Cambridge, MIT Press, 1986.
In 1992, Krugman expressed disappointment that the ‘fairly radical change in the way that economists explain international trade has so 
far at least had relatively little impact on their recommendations about trade policy.’ See: Krugman, P., ‘Does the New Trade Theory Require 
a New Trade Policy?’ The World Economy, 15:4, 1992.
7 Stiglitz, J., Globalization and Its Discontents, New York, W.W. Norton, 2002.
Rodrik, D., Has Globalization Gone Too Far? Washington, D.C., Institute for International Economics, 1997.
The Growth Report – Strategies for Sustained Growth and Inclusive Development, Commission on Growth and Development, 
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank, 2008. Available at: www.growthcommission.org/index.
php?Itemid=169&id=96&option=com_content&task=view
CHAPTER 5 – IMPROVE INPUTS AND CAPITAL GOODS
145
failing to diversify its exports and failing to generate productive jobs in new industries, governments do look 
for ways to try to jump-start the process, and they should.’ However, the Commission hedges its bets by 
arguing that these efforts should bow to certain disciplines:
 First, they should be temporary, because the problems they are designed to overcome are not permanent.
 Second, they should be evaluated critically and abandoned quickly if they are not producing the desired 
results. Subsidies may be justifi ed if an export industry cannot get started without them. But if it cannot 
keep going without them, the original policy was a mistake and the subsidies should be abandoned.
 Third, although such policies will discriminate in favour of exports, they should remain as neutral as 
possible about which exports. As far as possible, they should be agnostic about particular industries, 
leaving the remainder of the choice to private investors. Finally and importantly, export promotion is not a 
good substitute for other key supportive ingredients: education, infrastructure, responsive regulation, etc.
Thus, among professional economists, science is pointing towards a more cautious approach to openness 
to trade or at least to unfettered, rapid liberalization in the face of adjustment costs and the existence of 
externalities. This poses the question as to how to reduce the burden of existing trade interventions in goods 
and services on exporters in the short term.
ELIMINATING ANTI-EXPORT BIAS
Apart from the general argument on the benefi ts of a more open economy – at least in the longer term – it 
has also been long recognized that protecting domestic industries can create diffi culties for exporters by 
raising the price of inputs.
9
In general, tariffs and other measures that protect domestic industries create 
disincentives to export.
10
This can be explained in several ways.
First, tariffs directly raise the price of imported inputs: raw materials, and intermediate and capital goods. 
They also increase the profi tability of the protected import competing sector, which is then able to bid up the 
price of other inputs, such as land, labour (wage rates) and services. This has a negative effect on exporters 
who have to meet those prices or bids for their inputs.
Second, as an alternative way of thinking about the issue, tariffs will likely reduce imports, with a positive 
impact on the balance of payments, and a consequential upward pressure on the local currency, leading 
to an appreciation. This means that exports become more expensive for foreigners and they are negatively 
affected.
Either way, protection or other forms of intervention for a preferred import-competing sector has a negative 
impact on the export sector, producing an anti-export bias. This applies even when the imported inputs are 
duty free to exporters, because they still have to compete for inputs that are not imported, but whose prices 
are affected by the protected or supported sector that bids up the prices of those inputs.
However, openness in itself may not be suffi cient. There may be an absence of competition in the domestic 
market that also needs to be addressed. For example, when Argentina substantially reduced protection on 
cars and other goods to reduce prices as part of its anti-infl ationary drive following the adoption of the Law 
of the Convertibility of the Austral in 1991 (a convertibility standard for the peso), it found that large domestic 
fi rms in the distribution trade did not need to reduce retail prices. This required adopting more aggressive 
competition law. In Colombia, following the opening of the banking sector to foreign banks in the late 1990s, 
the arrival of foreign banks led to an improvement in the quality of banking services, including by local banks, 
but there appears to be no lowering of interest rates or any other sign of price competition as a result of 
improved banking technologies, with foreign banks comfortably co-existing with local banks.
Only a comprehensive opening of the economy in goods and services, supported by efforts to improve 
competition in the domestic market, can eliminate the anti-export bias. The diffi culty is that eliminating the 
9 This has its intellectual basis in: Lerner, A. P., ‘The Symmetry between Import and Export Taxes,’ Economica, (New Series), 3(11), 
pp. 306-313, 1936.
10 Aron, J., B. Kahn and G. Kingdon, editors, South African Economic Policy under Democracy, New York, Oxford University Press, 2009.
CHAPTER 5 – IMPROVE INPUTS AND CAPITAL GOODS
146
measures that protect or support the import competing sector in goods or services may be diffi cult to reduce 
or eliminate in the short term without causing severe structural adjustment problems, as discussed in the 
previous section.
How can a government act to reduce the costs of inputs into the export of goods and services without 
engaging in potentially disruptive, comprehensive liberalization in the short term? The options available to 
governments to assist exporters are to act directly on import, export or production costs, including through 
some long-term measures that are not specifi c to international trade. However, in pursuing some of these 
specifi c measures, governments must fi nd means that will not run afoul of WTO rules, whose reach has 
extended since the days of the earlier General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). Some of the measures 
used by successful exporters in the past, for example, in East Asia, are no longer legally available to newer 
exporters. Moreover, the Doha Round could well lead to a further tightening of those rules.
REDUCING INPUT COSTS
There are a number of means that can be used to lower the costs of imported inputs for export industries, but 
under WTO rules some care has to be taken to ensure that these are not uniquely for exporters or there is a 
risk that the scheme would be considered as an export subsidy.
Some countries favour using specialized schemes because they are easier to administer than larger scale 
national reforms. Such schemes include using duty drawback and special import licenses for exporters, 
as well as specialized schemes, like bonded manufacturing and export processing zones. Developing 
countries can benefi t using more favourable rules regarding subsidies to support local industry, such as duty 
drawback, special economic zones (SEZs), condoning or not collecting government revenues otherwise due, 
and export credits.
Governments need to further consider the merits of liberalizing on a preferential liberalization or most favoured 
nation (MFN) basis. Before looking in some detail at these various approaches, it is useful to briefl y review 
WTO rules on subsidies, which cover domestic supports as well as export subsidies.
WTO RULES ON SUBSIDIES
The WTO’s subsidy rules are highly complex, distinguishing between domestic supports (subsidies) 
and export subsidies, and providing for differential treatment of agriculture and manufactured products. 
Subsidies are defi ned as fi nancial commitments by a government. They may take the form of direct or indirect 
fi nancial transfers, government practices involving transfers, foregone revenues, provisions of goods and 
services (other than infrastructure), or some form of price or income support. Some subsidies are prohibited, 
while others are considered ‘actionable’, being subject to action at the multilateral level or to countervailing 
measures.
11
All ‘specifi c’ subsidies, which have to be notifi ed to the WTO, are subsidies that are not generally available, 
i.e. subsidies that are targeted to particular enterprises, industries or regions, as well as export subsidies 
and import-substitution subsidies. The WTO Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (the 
SCM Agreement) classifi ed specifi c subsidies under three different categories: prohibited (red), actionable 
(amber), and non-actionable (green) subsidies, known as the traffi c lights approach. However, the non-
actionable class was eliminated on 31 December 1999. In addition, the WTO Agreement on Agriculture 
prohibits the use of export subsidies, except in conjunction with product-specifi c reduction commitments, 
and defi nes the conditions under which certain types of domestic subsidies (green box, blue box or special 
and differential treatment (S&D) box)
12
are exempt from reduction commitments.
11 The agreement also originally contained a third category: non-actionable subsidies. This category existed for fi ve years, ending on 31 
December 1999, and was not extended. The agreement applies to agricultural goods as well as industrial products.
12 The S&D box offers special and differential treatment for developing countries.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested