asp.net mvc pdf viewer control : Change font size pdf application Library utility azure .net windows visual studio national-trade-policy-for-export-success7-part1756

CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
57
STRATEGIES TO ATTRACT FOREIGN CAPITAL
Foreign investors are attracted to investing abroad by three main factors:
 Opportunities for profi ts;
 Macroeconomic stability determined by a mix of monetary, fi scal and exchange rate polices; 
 A business-friendly environment, including protection of investors, attractive tax rates, ease of trading 
across borders, contract enforcement, rule of law, etc.
While profi tability is clearly the necessary condition to invest, both macroeconomic stability and a business-
friendly environment play important roles in investors’ decisions to the extent that they affect the costs of 
investing and the need for insurance coverage.
TARGETING FOREIGN INVESTMENT
This is arguably the most controversial area of policymaking with regards to foreign investment. Given that FDI 
contributes to a country’s competitiveness, it may be tempting for governments to pursue policies targeting 
FDI for specifi c local industries. However, the experience of countries has been quite negative except in very 
special circumstances. The conditions for the success of these policies are so stringent and country specifi c 
that it would be extremely risky and expensive to imitate them elsewhere. There are many examples of 
countries that have succeeded in attracting FDI without special foreign incentives or other ‘targeting’ policies.
Financial incentives should not discriminate against domestic investors. The discrimination would encourage 
domestic consumption rather than savings and possibly encourage capital fl ight, none of which is in the 
interest of developing countries. Moreover, government investment policies should not be seen as ‘picking 
winners’ by making investment decisions on the basis of the government’s judgement of the relative profi tability 
of individual projects. These judgements are best made by private investors who have the experience and 
skills in the given areas and risk their money and businesses to succeed.
There are few areas in which developing countries can consider government interventions. Where there 
are serious market failures or distortions, it is unadvisable to target foreign investment. At the same time, 
trade and investment barriers in developing countries are relatively high. Targeted incentives might be used 
temporarily to overcome anti-export bias in such circumstances (see chapter 5).
Developing countries are often unable to attract foreign investment due to shortages of technical or other 
labour skills, for example, in the fi nancial services sector. Governments should consider more proactive 
support to develop these skills under labour policies.
In many countries, setting up foreign businesses can be excessively costly due to a range of issues, including 
complying with business start-up procedures and regulations, minimum capital requirements, labour 
shortages and other factors. Under such circumstances, governments are justifi ed in providing fi nancial 
support as an incentive to foreign investors to compensate for such costs.
GOOD GOVERNANCE, KEY TO INVESTMENT PROMOTION
Transparency results in improvements in overall governance standards. For simplicity, good governance for 
investment promotion can be reduced to four main principles: predictability, accountability, transparency and 
participation. Table 3 outlines these principles together with examples of how to improve governance and the 
necessary mechanisms to achieve good governance.
Change font size pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change pdf page size; batch reduce pdf file size
Change font size pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best way to compress pdf; adjust pdf size preview
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
58
Table 3: Good governance in investment promotion
Requisites for good governance
Examples of how to improve 
governance
Mechanisms/instruments/
practices
Predictability
Clear policies and a legal framework for 
investment 
Streamlined and simple rules and 
regulations governing investments 
Effective investment facilitation services
Strong advocacy role of investment 
promotion agencies (IPAs) 
Online road maps for investors 
IPA investment implementation support 
services
Accountability
Introduction of ethical standards for civil 
servants 
Anti-corruption instruments and 
measures 
Dispute resolution mechanisms for 
investors
Code of conduct 
Client charters 
Anti-corruption legislation and 
enforcement (anti-corruption board) 
Investment ombudsman
Transparency
Easy availability of information for 
investors 
Timely disclosure of information on 
changes in the investment regime 
Information collection and sharing 
of national data on FDI and impact 
of international investment on the 
economy
Investment regime data on website 
Investment guides 
Online application and tracking system 
for permits and licences 
Client charters 
Analysis of FDI data by IPA and frequent 
publication of FDI trends and impact
Participation
Regular public-private sector dialogue 
on efforts to improve the investment 
environment 
Consultations with civil society on 
legislative and regulatory changes that 
will infl uence businesses
National business council and local 
chamber of commerce and industry 
Involvement of NGOs and labour 
organizations in consultations on policy 
decisions
Source: Notes on Good governance in Investment Promotion, Strengthening the Investment climate: a blue book on best 
practices, UNCTAD, 2004. Available at: http://www.unescap.org/tid/publication/indpub2402_chap5.pdf
Transparency is key
Transparency is key to overcoming foreigners’ disadvantages when investing in a host country. Transparent 
information on how governments implement and change rules and regulations concerning investment is a 
decisive factor in the investment decision.
22
Transparent policy environments compensate for what foreign 
investors may consider as disadvantages when investing in a host country with very different regulatory 
systems, cultures and administrative frameworks. Policies implemented in a transparent manner help to 
avoid hidden costs that may increase the perception of risk by foreign investors.
A transparent and predictable policy and regulatory framework assists businesses in the evaluation of 
potential investment opportunities on a more informed and timely basis, reducing the period before the 
investment becomes productive. Transparency conditions have also been endorsed in almost all recent 
international investment agreements, including regional agreements and most bilateral investment treaties 
and various WTO agreements. Countries can provide a clear indication of their commitment to transparency 
by signing international, regional and bilateral agreements.
Transparency is also related to higher fl ows and quality of investment. A 2007 OECD study shows that there 
is a strong relationship between international investment fl ows and the quality of governance against FDI 
infl ows.
23
22 ‘Investment policy’, in The Policy Framework for Investment: A Review of Good Practices, OECD, 2007.
23 Ibid.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change paper size in pdf document; best online pdf compressor
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
reduce pdf file size; pdf compressor
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
59
Barriers to transparency reform
A fundamental challenge in seeking to improve transparency is similar in all countries; it is the desire to 
protect ‘concentrated benefi ts at the expense of broader wellbeing’.
24
A lack of transparency also protects 
government offi cials from accountability. The OECD describes some obstacles to reform:
Many actors – both inside and outside the public sector – can have a stake in non-transparent practices. 
It is for this reason that, despite the broad apparent agreement in principle about their benefi ts, actual 
implementation of transparency-enhancing reforms is likely to involve painful shifts in the way policies are 
made and implemented, especially in countries with highly opaque policy environments. The diffi culty will 
be to develop the political momentum for pro-transparency reform and to prevent backsliding.
A further obstacle to reform is that it entails technological, fi nancial and human resources and requires 
administrative costs. The main transparency actions entail the creation of registers, websites, the 
development of ‘plain language texts’, and other mechanisms for making legal and regulatory codes, and 
any changes or new regulations being made accessible to interested parties.
25
Implementing such measures can be particularly burdensome, particularly for developing countries often 
lacking fi nancial and technical resources. Even when legislation has been introduced to reform the investment 
climate, implementation diffi culties often remain, commonly due to resource constraints. In other examples, 
corruption has impacted adversely on the rule of law and integrity of the host country.
26
OPEN TRADE POLICIES 
What trade policy would be conducive to FDI infl ows? The answer can be split into two parts. The fi rst part 
relates to trade policy as an instrument of incentives to attract FDI – the ‘pre-establishment stage’. The 
second part refers to trade policy after the establishment by foreign investors in the host country – the ‘post-
establishment’ stage.
In the pre-establishment stage, governments have two options with regards to trade policy as an instrument 
of attracting FDI:
 Lower trade barriers as an incentive to effi ciency seeking foreign investors; 
 Maintain a relatively high level of border protection of commodity and services markets with the hope of 
replacing imports by foreign producers establishing their presence in the host country.
Which of these two strategies should be pursued? The latter strategy, based on a high level of protection, 
presupposes a large domestic market in the host country that would make a foreign presence attractive. Small 
markets hardly create conditions for effi cient plant size to make local production effi cient and competitive. Yet 
even in large markets, the preferred option is a relatively open trade regime that creates better conditions for 
production effi ciency in the post-establishment phase. As noted earlier in this chapter, those countries with 
more open trade regimes, typically developed countries, record higher levels of FDI.
In the post-establishment stage an open trade regime – with low tariffs, no quotas and no non-tariff barriers 
(NTBs) to trade – is also the preferred option as part of the strategy to enhance a fi rms’ export competitiveness 
for several reasons. Tariffs and NTBs on imports constitute a tax on inputs used in producing exports and 
goods and services for the domestic market. They create an anti-export bias. Barriers to imports of capital 
and intermediate goods will be particularly costly. 
Trade policy is not considered to be the best policy option to address government economic priorities. 
Other instruments should be used. A high level of harmonization of rules such as sanitary and phytosanitary 
standards (SPS) and technical norms with those agreed under the existing SPS and technical barriers to 
24 Nixon, R., ‘Transparency Obligations in International Investment’, 2004. Available at www.treasury.gov.au/documents/876/PDF/
International_investment_agreements.pdf
25 ‘Investment policy’, in The Policy Framework for Investment: A Review of Good Practices, OECD, 2007.
26 ‘Investment policy’, in The Policy Framework for Investment: A Review of Good Practices, OECD, 2007.
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
300 dpi pdf file size; change font size in pdf fillable form
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf form change font size; optimize scanned pdf
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
60
trade (TBT) agreements in the WTO are also very important. Export controls and restrictions are also not 
recommended because they impede access to external markets, which would violate one of the foreign 
investors’ main objectives in developing countries (for further analysis see chapters 4 and 5).
IMPLEMENTING TRADE POLICY EFFECTIVELY
Well-designed trade policies are critical, but just as essential is the need for effective implementation. 
Also critical are a well-functioning legal system supporting property rights and contract enforcement, well-
functioning government legislative departments; effi cient customs and tax administration, modern trade 
infrastructure, such as metronomic systems, testing centres, information gathering and dissemination 
systems; and the absence of informal export and import barriers.
The non-discrimination obligation
Non-discrimination in the form of ‘national treatment’ obliges a government to treat enterprises controlled by 
the nationals or residents of another country no less favourably than domestic enterprises in like situations. It 
also holds that an investor or investment from one country be treated by the host country no less favourably 
than an investor or investment from any third country, referred to as most favoured nation (MFN) in international 
agreements. Reciprocally, non-discriminatory treatment does not grant advantages to foreign investors.
The practical use of these principles towards investment differs greatly across countries, because a state’s 
right to regulate frequently entails discriminating against foreign investors. Subject to specifi c commitments 
agreed to in international agreements, governments determine which industries will, or will not, be subject to 
national treatment. This decision is motivated by concern about factors including development and equity, 
and national interest, such as security. Exceptions to national treatment include more onerous licensing 
requirements for foreign investors than for domestic investors, special screening procedures for FDI entry 
of foreign fi rms, and limits on foreign equity ownership ceilings. Exceptions to national treatment are most 
typical for the fi nancial services, land and international transport sectors.
Although valid in many instances, government policies that detract from national treatment or MFN frequently 
involve costs that must be carefully balanced in relation to anticipated benefi ts. For example, they may 
cause less competition, distort resource allocation, hinder linkages between MNEs and local suppliers, 
and slow the diffusion of technological innovations. Such consequences may put off investors and give a 
negative perception concerning a country’s openness towards investment. Consequently, exceptions to non-
discrimination ought to be periodically re-evaluated to decide whether the original conditions that warranted 
such practices still exist.
Protect property and contractual rights
The protection of investment, including physical and intellectual property rights, is widely accepted as an 
essential component in creating the conditions for a strong investment environment and economic growth. 
Effective government policies play an important role in ensuring both the promotion and protection of property 
rights and contract enforcement measures are in place.
Secure, transferable rights to land are a vital precondition for creating a strong investment environment and 
an important inducement for investors and entrepreneurs to shift into the formal economy. Owing to these 
rights, the investor is able to participate in the eventual profi ts that are derived from an investment and 
diminish the risk of fraud in transactions. These rights provide an economic value and investors must be 
assured that their claim to these rights is properly established and protected.
27
Insecurity of property rights 
may arise due mainly to inappropriate or unclear legislation, non-existent or ambiguous land records and the 
inability to enforce existing land rights.
28
Contract enforcement is critical. The value of property is only realized when it is involved in a transaction. This 
transaction could involve using the property as collateral to obtain a loan or it could involve the sale of the 
property. It is ultimately the possibility of using an asset in a given market transaction that gives the asset its 
27 ‘Investment policy’, in The Policy Framework for Investment: A Review of Good Practices, OECD, 2007.
28 Blue Books on Best Practice in Investment Promotion and Facilitation, UNCTAD. Available at: www.unctad.org/TEMPLATES/Page.
asp?intItemID=4158&lang=1
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
pdf file size limit; adjust file size of pdf
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
best pdf compression; change font size pdf text box
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
61
value. Therefore, investors must have trust in the channels through which transactions involving these assets 
take place. Bureaucratic and cumbersome procedures for dealing with commercial transactions undermine 
the benefi ts to the investment environment of any established property rights.
Intellectual property rights as investment assets
A World Intellectual Property Organization report
29
notes that ‘property rights enable the exercise of ownership 
over the intellectual output of R&D activities. This is done by creating, using, and leveraging IP (intellectual 
property) rights that enable the owner of IP rights to enter into negotiations with others in order to take a 
new product to market through various kinds of partnerships.’ Frequently, these partnerships are based 
on special contractual arrangements known as licensing contracts that permit third party use of one or 
more types of IP rights in exchange for a valid consideration in cash or kind. In addition, a secure access 
to IP rights, through ownership or licensing of IP rights, can be essential to acquiring funds from fi nancial 
institutions and investors.
A growing number of developing countries are seeking to attract FDI, including industries where proprietary 
technologies are important. But foreign fi rms are reluctant to transfer their most advanced technology or to 
invest in production facilities until they are confi dent their rights will be protected. Strengthening IP rights 
can be an effective incentive for inward FDI; however, it is only a component of a broader set of factors. For 
example, China had no IP rights protection before 1985, but has subsequently undergone a gradual reform 
of its patent system and introduced protection measures. Recent research suggests that the strengthening 
of IP rights protection in China has a positive and signifi cant effect on attracting FDI.
30
Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are often constrained in more ways than larger enterprises 
in making an effective and effi cient use of the IP rights system. This means that their potential to invest in 
innovation activities is not always used. SMEs may profi t from various features of the IP system depending 
on their individual needs and technological capacity. In today’s knowledge-based economy, it is their skill 
in using the IP system successfully that will chiefl y infl uence their ability to make the most of their innovative 
capacity and regain their investments in innovation. For governments, it is important to ascertain the extent 
to which SMEs are currently aware of, have access to, and are making effective use of, the IP system and to 
determine the barriers that are preventing them from doing so.
An attractive taxation system
A host country’s tax policies can stimulate or discourage FDI infl ows and affect foreign investment decisions. 
A high tax burden relative to benefi ts from the stream of income from the project and relative to tax burdens 
levied in other competing locations is likely to discourage foreign investment. Location-specifi c projects and 
hence profi t opportunities may offer tax authorities somewhat greater room for manoeuvre, but the number of 
such projects is limited. In addition, it is well known that the host country tax burden is a function of statutory 
tax provisions and compliance costs. Compliance costs can become prohibitive. A poorly designed tax 
system and ineffective tax administration may discourage capital investment if the tax laws and regulations 
are not transparent, if they are too complex and if they are unpredictable. Under these circumstances, project 
costs would increase, and so would the uncertainty over net profi tability of the project.
Countries with a low tax burden will attract more foreign investors than those with a high tax burden. Similarly, 
transparent tax regimes based on relatively simple tax rules and effective tax enforcement mechanisms will 
be highly desirable. Together with tax treaties signed with major partner countries, this will create a highly 
effective way of ensuring the predictability of tax burdens, both current and in the future.
Tax systems should be neutral with respect to location, size of fi rms, origin of ownership and sectors to avoid 
discriminating against the most effi cient suppliers. However, exceptions to this rule could be envisaged and 
are even condoned under WTO rules. For example, lower tax burdens are often offered to investors, both 
foreign and domestic, for investments in poorly developed regions. Similarly, lower taxation privileges have 
29 Intellectual Property Rights and Innovation in Small and Medium Enterprises, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Available 
at: www.wipo.int/export/sites/www/sme/en/documents/pdf/iprs_innovation.pdf
30 Using data for 38 diverse countries from 1992-2005, the empirical evidence suggests that the strengthening of intellectual property 
rights protection in China has had a positive and signifi cant effect on attracting FDI. For further information see, Awokuse, T., ‘Intellectual 
property rights protection and the surge in FDI in China’, Journal of Comparative Economics, vol. 38, Issue 2, June 2010.
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
adjust size of pdf; best compression pdf
C# Image: Use C# Class to Insert Callout Annotation on Images
Easy to set annotation filled font property individually Support adjusting callout annotation size parameter in an easy way; C# demo code to change the filled
adjust pdf size; reader pdf reduce file size
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
62
been offered to fi rms in favoured sectors to boost labour skills or help develop the small enterprise sector. 
The use of tax incentives always raises the question of their effectiveness, which is why it is prudent to carry 
out a cost-benefi t analysis before they are introduced.
Subsidies usually do not affect project fundamentals, but investors happily receive them as an added bonus. 
Subsidies also tend to shorten the investment horizon and may make foreign investment decisions highly 
speculative. Much of what applies to tax policies also holds true for the use of subsidies by governments.
STRONGER REGIONAL COOPERATION 
Stronger regional cooperation increases the attractiveness of domestic markets. At the same time, the 
markets in many developing countries are too small to make the case to foreign investors for economically 
and fi nancially viable projects. Under these circumstances, there are two main solutions:
 Enable foreign investors to seek external markets outside the domestic markets of the host countries. 
Foreign investors would invest abroad with the view of using the host country as the production hub 
for exports to other countries and markets. In many parts of the world, this is becoming an increasingly 
realistic option, facilitated by regional integration and the accompanying lowering of trade barriers, which 
makes intra-regional trade a more viable option than in the past.
 Governments can greatly contribute to developing supply chains by expanding and integrating their 
external markets through, for example, regional trade agreements and deeper regional integration.
ENHANCING DOMESTIC COMPETITION
Contestable markets and domestic competition
For a contestable market to exist there must be low barriers to entry and exit so that there is always the 
potential for new suppliers to provide fresh competition to existing suppliers. For a perfectly contestable 
market, entry into and exit out of the market must be costless. However, contestability of markets and the 
benefi ts of FDI to the economy in general and to export sectors in particular can be adversely affected by 
high costs of imperfect competition. Competition in product and services markets can be impeded by the 
following barriers:
 Competition may be impeded by specifi c economic conditions that often originate in the small size of 
markets or in the nature of technology, typically leading to natural monopolies;
 Competition can be adversely affected by anti-competitive practices of fi rms, such as predatory 
pricing, price discrimination, price fi xing, exclusive purchase agreements, or other measures preventing 
contestability of markets and collusion.
The desirable level of competition will differ in each of these cases. The anti-competitive practices of fi rms 
are in most cases considered to be detrimental to a country’s competitiveness and social welfare. The origin 
usually lies in the market power of fi rms, which then becomes the target of efforts to enhance competition. 
This is of particular relevance to efforts to make the linkages between exports and foreign investment as 
effective as possible by generating additional effi ciencies and reducing confl icts. There are two main policy 
instruments to be used by governments to enhance domestic competition – trade and investment policies 
and competition policies.
Open trade and investment regimes enhance domestic competition
Import penetration is a powerful channel to increase domestic competition. Therefore, trade liberalization 
leading to lower import restrictions can be used to that effect. But governments must also consider the other 
roles of trade policy. One role is the impact of trade policy on fi scal revenues by the collection of customs 
duties and other trade taxes, which constitute a large share of government revenues in many developing 
countries. The other important role is to protect domestic fi rms. The pro-competitive effect of trade policies 
may directly contradict the other two roles, and is usually taken into account in reaching the fi nal decision. 
The general rule is for governments to meet their objectives with ‘fi rst-best policies’ rather than relying on 
trade policy, which is often not even the second-best choice.
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
63
Open investment policies can have the same effect because they can lead to increased domestic competition 
as foreign MNEs establish their presence in the host country. However, when foreign fi rms establish themselves 
in the host countries, it could lead to maintaining the status quo or an even lower degree of competition as 
foreign fi rms acquire domestic fi rms to eliminate competition. Under these circumstances, an open investment 
regime should be accompanied by appropriate competition policy tools to achieve the objective.
Competition policies to target anti-competitive behaviour
Open trade and investment regimes are powerful instruments of competition policies, but they may not 
be suffi ciently effective in reducing anti-competitive practices and production ineffi ciencies. Other tools of 
competition policy should be used to ensure that foreign investment leads to effi ciency gains and increased 
competitiveness.
Competition policies should target the anti-competitive behaviour of fi rms, including MNEs, because in the 
long run they negatively affect the trade performance and competitiveness of fi rms in developing countries. 
For example, some foreign investment projects have included exclusivity clauses and non-competition 
provisions. While such provisions could be benefi cial in the short term, they should be eliminated over time 
to ensure the competitiveness of incumbents.
Table 4: Policy matrix for the promotion of foreign investment in infrastructure and effi ciency-seeking 
manufacturing and services
Policy conditions 
Infrastructure 
Effi ciency-seeking manufacturing 
and services 
Non-discrimination of foreign investors 
vis-à-vis domestic investors and among 
foreign investors
Membership in the WTO, which ensures conformity to the principles of national 
and most favoured nation treatment in domestic economic policies 
Bilateral and regional investment treaties
Predictability, transparency and 
enforcement of domestic policies
Multilateral and bilateral investment agreements
Globally competitive policy conditions 
for entry of foreign investors
Provisions for a satisfactory sharing of 
risks in public-private partnership (PPP) 
deals
Effective trade facilitation 
Open trade policies 
Elimination of foreign currency 
restrictions – a liberal currency regime 
Attractive tax policies 
Macroeconomic stability 
Attractive and predictable business 
environment – ‘friendly’ bureaucracy, 
rule of law, etc.
Market access for foreign investors
Wide range of commitments on Mode 
3 [commercial presence abroad] in the 
WTO General Agreement on Trade in 
Services
Privatization of state-owned utilities
Framework for PPPs
Wide range of commitments on Mode 
3 (commercial presence abroad) in the 
WTO General Agreement on Trade in 
Services
Wide range of commitments in bilateral 
investment treaties
Competition policies
Size of the market
Regional agreements to enlarge the 
size of the domestic market
Regional agreements to enlarge the 
size of the domestic market
Resource endowments
Availability of natural resources (e.g. 
coal, water)
Availability of skilled labour Availability 
of natural resources
Sectoral policies/conditions
Pro-competitive regulations Policies to 
encourage technology transfer
Government promotion of backward 
and forward linkages Policies to 
encourage technology transfer 
Neutral fi nancial incentives to avoid 
the potential for bias and non-market 
orientated ‘picking of winners’ approach
Source
: ITC.
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
64
The existence of dominant positions of foreign fi rms should also be closely monitored and, if necessary, 
addressed. The list of known examples of anti-competitive behaviour is long and the types of non-competitive 
behaviour of fi rms may vary from case to case. Not all of these practices need to be remedied by government 
intervention, but they should all be a matter of concern when designing export strategies.
31
At the same time, foreign companies and MNEs should not be excluded from competition policies. Those 
companies are prone to seeking dominant and highly concentrated positions in the market. The need 
for competition policies becomes even more important in the aftermath of major privatization deals and 
deregulation. (For further analysis on competition policy, see chapter 1.)
Linkages with the domestic economy
The term ‘business linkages’ refers to any upstream or downstream, formal or informal relationship that takes 
place between MNEs and their local business partners in a country where the MNE does business. Such 
linkages fall into two categories: backward linkages with suppliers where MNEs source parts, components, 
indirect materials and services from local SMEs; and forward linkages developed between MNEs and their 
customers.
32
The ability of foreign affi liates’ linkages to contribute to domestic supplier development depends 
primarily on the domestic markets and local fi rm capabilities.
An effective business linkages programme is one of the fastest and most effective ways of upgrading 
domestic enterprises; facilitating the transfer of technology, knowledge and skills; improving business and 
management practices; and facilitating access to fi nance and markets.
31 For more information about these practices and the need for government intervention, see: Graham, E.M. and J.D. Richardson, 
Competition Policies for the Global Economy, Institute for International Economics, Washington, D.C., vol. 51, p. 41, 1997.
32 ‘TNC-SME linkages for development: issues – experiences – best practices’, Proceedings of the Special Round Table on TNCs, SMEs 
and Development, the Special Round Table on TNCs, SMEs and Development, UNCTAD, Bangkok, 15 February 2000.
Box 25: United Republic of Tanzania: private sector linkage programme
The Private Sector Initiative Tanzania (PSI Tanzania) began when BP Tanzania approached SBP, a research 
and private-sector development organization based in South Africa, to help create an enterprise development 
programme. PSI Tanzania was formally launched in April 2002 with eight corporate members, and has grown the 
number of private sector participants to 17.
The business linkages programme brings together major corporations – including Kahama Mining Corporation, 
Kilombero Sugar Company, National Microfi nance Bank and Tanzania Breweries – in the United Republic of 
Tanzania in a forum where they share experiences of working with SMEs and actively seek out ways to better 
integrate local SMEs into their supply chains.
The project is an example of how overlapping interests of large corporations and host countries can be managed 
to achieve development goals. The successful implementation of a corporate social responsibility initiative has led 
to enhanced incomes and employment arising from the inclusion of local SMEs into the supply chains of BP and 
other major corporations operating in the United Republic of Tanzania.
The fi rst stage of the programme focused on a supply chain diagnostic within each corporate partner, followed 
by sharing experiences and creating supplier development strategies. The corporations identifi ed opportunities 
for local SME outsourcing and ways of working more closely with suppliers to develop their capacity. An SME 
database of 506 Tanzanian suppliers was designed by SBP and shared among PSI corporate partners. These 
suppliers are now shared between the procurement departments of the corporations, resulting in an expanded 
market and increased opportunities for the SMEs.
During 2005, each PSI member company agreed to select three of their SME suppliers for special attention, 
increasing support and mentorship. For example, BP Tanzania selected three SME suppliers, involved in printing, 
catering and plastic packaging, that are new to their vendor list. An initiative is underway to develop a proposal to 
private sector donors to fund SME supplier training and capacity building.
Source
: Adapted from the United Kingdom Department of International Development’s (DFID) review of the 
project: PSI, United Republic of Tanzania, 2006.
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
65
A more active participation of developing countries in global supply chains dominated by MNEs will depend on 
the supply and demand conditions in supply chains. The condition for an effective participation of fi rms from 
developing countries is to have a product or a service to offer to fi rms. Nevertheless, the state of readiness 
to participate in supply chains can vary from fi rm to fi rm and from country to country. Some fi rms may be 
competitive and fully ready, others may need to strengthen some aspects of their business performance, 
such as management, quality control, technology and labour skills. In addition, fi rms can be prevented from 
becoming parts of multinational supply chains by infrastructure impediments well beyond their control, such 
as an unstable power supply, poor communications and poor road infrastructure. As detailed in box 25, 
governments can facilitate the process of greater involvement in global supply chains by putting in place 
favourable policies to encourage FDI.
MNEs typically seek ways to reduce costs across their supply chains. As a result, MNEs have incentives 
to cooperate – and transfer technology – with suitable suppliers in developing countries if more advanced 
technology will lead to lower prices, better quality of products or services and higher profi ts. Many developing 
countries need to take proactive steps to make their fi rms more attractive to MNEs.
Governments in countries with poor infrastructure services should ensure that local fi rms have access to 
competitively priced and reliable enabling infrastructure services, all of which are critical to the operation of 
supply chains. Financial policies should support an effective delivery of fi nancial services to ensure greater 
access to credit for fi rms, and to effective international payment transaction systems.
The technological gap of fi rms in emerging markets may not necessarily be the fundamental constraint to 
their participation in supply chains. Various studies have shown that MNEs are often keen to assist local fi rms 
to ensure that they have the required know-how, technology and fi nance to deliver top quality products and 
services – provided that those products and services are price competitive.
33
A study by the World Bank
34
provides interesting fi ndings from a wide range of case studies gathered to 
understand what large companies are doing to tackle constraints they face in doing business, as well as 
assisting their participation in global supply chain. The study’s key fi ndings are:
 Foreign companies investing in developing countries frequently confront situations where the conditions 
of existing infrastructure, technology and the general business environment signifi cantly raise operating 
costs. A number of the case studies discuss transfers of technology, know-how and knowledge, and 
efforts to improve the business environment. Examples include the development of hard infrastructure 
such as facilities (Alstom, Barrick and Nespresso), the dissemination of technologies (Qualcom) and 
knowledge (Dow and the Karachi Chamber of Commerce), and providing access to fi nance for suppliers 
(Nespresso).
 Companies are also supporting participation links to supply chains, ranging from design to production, 
assembly, packaging, marketing, distribution and consumption, as well as participation in the agribusiness 
industry (Walmart, Transfarm Africa, Coca-Cola, Kraft, Cargill). Examples also include assistance in 
meeting quality and safety standards, which are important when helping to incorporate local producers 
into global value chains (Consumer Goods Forum and Danone).
No technology transfer will take place or be effective if it cannot be assimilated by the labour force in 
developing countries. Investment in human capital through education and skills upgrade training should be a 
government priority. All countries that have benefi tted from technology transfer have simultaneously invested 
in education, particularly higher learning and targeted technical skills training.
35
33 For more discussion see: Smarzynska, J. and M. Spatareanu, op. cit., pp. 62-69.
34 The Role of International Business in Aid for Trade, World Bank, July 2011.
35 For a brief review of the literature on technology transfer, see: Saggi, K., ‘International Technology Transfer and Economic Development’, 
in Hoekman et al., op.cit., pp. 351-358.
CHAPTER 2 – PROMOTE EXPORTS AND FOREIGN INVESTMENT
66
POLICIES TO ATTRACT TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER THROUGH FDI
Most countries prefer to access foreign technology through licensing agreements or joint ventures. However, 
in practice the most frequently used channel of technology transfer has been FDI.
36
At the same time, MNEs 
rely heavily on research and development expenditures to maintain their global competitive advantages. 
Policies should focus on attracting FDI as a channel of technology transfer. Policies to enhance technology 
transfer technology from MNEs in developed countries to developing countries rest on three pillars:
 Participation of exporters in supply chains;
 Strict and effective enforcement of intellectual property rights;
 Education and training for labour skills.
Open trade policies are a prerequisite for attracting FDI and seeking access to foreign technology and 
know-how. The experience of developing countries with technology transfer pursuing import substitution 
strategies has not been positive. The experience of the formerly centrally planned economies has been a 
failure. However, technology transfer has been relatively successful in countries with open trade regimes or, at 
least, with emphasis on growth of exports, for example in the Republic of Korea, Japan and China. All these 
countries have demonstrated considerable skill in acquiring and absorbing foreign technology and, over 
time, generating their own.
37
ATTRACTING FDI: PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS
Securing sustainable partnerships requires sophisticated skills to assess competing interests and negotiate 
pragmatic agreements. Despite the benefi ts, many countries remain unconvinced and cautious about 
implementing PPPs for a number of reasons. Private investors – both domestic and foreign – typically operate 
within a time horizon that could make pure economic pricing for fi nal services or output diffi cult to implement. 
The private sector may also be fearful of what it perceives to be the risk associated with ever-changing 
government regulation. At the same time, both sides are often sceptical about the intentions of the other. For 
example, in a typical build-operate-transfer (BOT) project, the most common risks can be summarized as 
follows:
36 Ibid., p. 358.
37 Ibid., pp. 357-358.
Box 26: Ireland: national linkage programmes
Since the mid 1980s, Enterprise Ireland (EI) has been operating various linkage programmes to integrate foreign 
enterprises into the Irish economy. It pursues two objectives: (i) to support Irish enterprises in building capacity, 
innovating and creating new partnerships; and (ii) to assist international investors in sourcing key suppliers in 
Ireland. EI collaborates closely with foreign affi liates, their parent MNEs, and the various government agencies 
involved with local suppliers.
Between 1985 and 1987, an estimated 250 foreign affi liates were actively involved in the linkage programme. 
During that period, affi liates operating in Ireland increased their local purchases of raw materials fourfold, from Irish 
£ 438 million to Irish £ 1,831 million, and more than doubled their purchases of services from Irish £ 980 million to 
over Irish £ 2 billion. In the electronics industry alone, the value of inputs sourced locally rose from 12% to 20%. On 
average, suppliers saw their sales increase by 83%, productivity by 36% and employment by 33%.
EI worked closely with foreign affi liates to ensure suppliers were capable of meeting the demand and quality 
requirements. One of EI’s key criteria for selecting local suppliers was their management team’s attitude and 
potential to grow. Also noteworthy is that EI’s matchmaking is no longer seen as so critical. The need diminished 
over time as the composition of affi liates, their motivations for locating in Ireland, and their local knowledge 
changed. Ireland’s competitive advantages in the global value chain are generally recognized.
Source
World Investment Report 2001 – Promoting Linkages, UNCTAD, 2001.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested