asp.net mvc pdf viewer free : Change font size in pdf software Library dll winforms asp.net windows web forms Nepad+Markets+Report+Feb+14+final+draft1-part1842

11 
products (both internally sourced and imported) that have been poorly handled and 
processed, which often leads to losses in the nutritional value (Kabahenda, 2009). 
Future fish production must be able to supply a quality product to the market in a timely 
manner, whether these are local, regional or international. As markets for fish farmers 
could be dualistic i.e. to supply local, community markets for instance and/or larger, 
more demanding  foreign, importing customers such as supermarkets (demanding in 
terms of food hygiene standards, traceability and often certification requests) This could 
either be achieved through larger ventures or cooperative assemblages of small 
producers or a combination of both, instigating codes of practice and standards that 
ensure compliance with phytosanitary and traceability issues.  
Increased supply and quality would enable the establishment of new fish market chains, 
with aquaculture products that by their very nature can be differentiated from wild 
caught counterparts in terms of freshness and availability. Improvements in distribution 
expand the market for producers and enable production volumes to be increased 
without immediately impacting on local prices. Conversely, up-scaling production results 
in economies which can allow prices to fall and the market to expand even further as 
the product becomes affordable to a larger proportion of the population.  The more 
affordable aquaculture products become, the greater the health benefits for poorer 
consumers who have to spend proportionately more of their available income on food 
according to Engels Law (Anker, 2011).  For example lower retail prices due to increased 
aquaculture production have seen per capita fish consumption double in Egypt since 
1995 (IPSNews, 2009). 
Male 
Female 
Female 
activities – 
processing and 
Figure 2. Nigerian Aquaculture - Gender Activities (Adapted from Adebo and Alfred, 2008) 
Change font size in pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf form change font size; optimize scanned pdf
Change font size in pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best online pdf compressor; reduce pdf file size
12 
1.4. Aquaculture is a Business 
Many perspectives on aquaculture development have focused on production 
technologies and their potential. While these have been important drivers for growth, 
the development of markets and research into consumer understanding and preference 
in the rapidly changing food markets, have been equally if not more important. 
Aquaculture development is market driven (Muir, 2005)  
Aquaculture is a business and will not be sustainable if not managed as such. This 
includes incorporating production, processing, storage and distribution methods which 
ensure a reduction in post-harvest losses and a focus on quality; a scenario commonly 
absent in many SSA fishery market chains, particularly those supplying domestic 
markets (Kabahenda, 2009). A duality often exists between fish for domestic 
consumption and those fish products that are destined for inter-continental export 
(Figure 3).
Reducing post-harvest losses and increasing product quality is a major challenge for SSA 
capture fisheries and aquaculture producers alike, particularly with the informal market 
structures seen in many countries. For instance fish production is often based in areas 
far from urban zones and therefore 
markets; difficulties in accessing 
credit, particularly for small 
aquaculture ventures; a severe lack of 
cold-chain resources hampered by 
poor electricity supplies; an unreliable 
transportation network; competition 
from cheap imports and an 
unsophisticated processing industry 
capable of adding value to African fish 
products.  
Large scale development of the SSA 
aquaculture industry will need not 
only private investment but the 
participation of government/public 
bodies and NGOs. Aquaculture in SSA 
must now be seen in business terms 
and be profit-orientated, managed 
efficiently and promoted as such. 
Markets and marketing are critical elements to the success of any business. 
Unlike more developed regions around the globe, in SSA little data exists regarding 
domestic fish markets, market structure and marketing. Consumer surveys are very rare 
and information on standards and product differentiation is generally not available. 
Figure 3. Dualities in Fish Supply 
Chains in Developing Countries 
(Beveridge et al, 2011). 
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
batch pdf compression; change page size pdf acrobat
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
best pdf compression tool; best way to compress pdf file
13 
Traditional markets and systems are complex but unsophisticated and often based on 
informal, long established relationships. Few if any records are kept, either by small 
market players or official sources, and if they are, they are not kept up-to-date. Many 
capture fisheries have/are seeing dwindling yields and IUU fishing and trade is 
entrenched in the system. 
Although wild fish may be increasingly scarce in domestic markets and subsequently 
more expensive, it does not mean that anyone who produces farmed fish will find it 
easy to sell at a profit. Aquaculture products frequently have to be priced higher than 
fish and fish products coming from wild sources due to their cost of production, 
processing, storage and distribution. This price must be justified in the minds of 
consumers through higher standards and quality (Moehl et al, 2006).  
Developing a market for aquaculture products in SSA needs information. In most African 
countries data relating to markets and consumers are lacking. Many markets are 
informal and not secure in driving investment decisions. In more sophisticated markets 
on the continent such as Botswana and Namibia it is easier to make demand and supply 
forecasts. Detailed market investigations are needed before investment decisions are 
taken by potential producers (DAAU, 2011). 
The starting point is understanding the wants of different consumers and the price they 
are willing to pay. Marketing communications can help to alter these, but this is 
expensive for the small to medium sized producer.  Some of the fundamental market 
questions which need to be addressed are:  
 Have the markets been identified and secured? 
 Has market timing, seasonality, needs and price been researched? 
 Is the market size and price/demand elasticity known? 
 Can the quality demand of the market be matched or bettered? 
 In what form should the product be presented in the market? 
 Is the market competition known? 
 Have market logistics (handling, freezing etc.) been considered? 
 Have the phytosanitary and other legal requirements been addressed?  
Such issues have been distilled into the modern mantra of “The Four-Ps of Marketing” 
namely: 
 PRODUCT 
 PLACE (distribution)  
 PRICE  
 PROMOTION 
Traditionally marketing has been seen as selling what you have. Viewpoints on modern 
marketing approaches take a very different outlook by concentrating efforts on 
producing what you can sell (Burden, 2009). 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
adjust pdf size preview; best pdf compressor
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
change font size pdf document; advanced pdf compressor
14 
2. Size and Scale of Current and Potential Aquaculture Markets in Three Key African 
Countries – Ghana, Nigeria and Uganda 
2.1. African Aquaculture 
African aquaculture statistics are dominated by North Africa’s production, most 
prominently from the large and organized Egyptian industry. It produces mainly tilapia, 
mullet and carp (GCFM, 2010) and had an annual production of over 693,000MT in 2008 
(Hall et al, 2011). The rest of the continent, particularly SSA (excluding South Africa 
which has an established 
aquaculture and mariculture 
industry) has a small but 
rapidly growing sector, albeit 
from a small base and 
hampered by bottlenecks such 
as feed, seed and market 
accessibility.
In developing 
countries increased 
urbanization and ‘improving’ 
transport links are stimulating 
domestic markets, increasing 
product flow to commercial 
outlets, and reducing food 
supply access for poorer rural 
communities (Muir, 2005). 
Aquaculture production in SSA is primarily focused on fin fish culture, and mainly on 
native freshwater species such as tilapia and African catfishes. It is these farmed species 
that dominate production in three key SSA fish culturing nations – namely Ghana, 
Nigeria and Uganda. 
This trio of countries are considered to be highly attractive for aquaculture 
development, not only because they have a well established culture of fish consumption 
(perhaps one of the most important conditions for aquaculture product demand - Jagger 
and Pender, 2001), but because they are all located in regions of high population density 
(Figure 4) and therefore strategically placed near large and rapidly growing markets. It is 
these three countries which will be examined now. 
2.2. Ghana 
Supply 
Fisheries in Ghana are dominated by marine capture (80% of production) at 
400,000MT/year (50,000MT of which is exported). This is enhanced by some 40,000MT 
from inland fisheries; Lake Volta in the south east of the country being the principal 
Figure 4. SSA 
Population Density 
Uganda
Ghana
Nigeria
(Source: www.unep.net ) 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
pdf page size dimensions; pdf text box font size
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
adjust pdf size; pdf compress
15 
source. Ghana’s total annual fish consumption is  +800,000MT and with Ghanaian 
waters providing approximately 400,000MT for the domestic market, there is a 50% 
supply gap in the market. This is currently catered for by imports, mainly low value, 
frozen pelagic species (Orchard and Abban, 2011) imported from other African nations 
and the EU (GAIN, 2010). 
Aquaculture production stood at 8,000-9,000MT in 2010 (Kaunda, 2010) though 
unofficial figures currently put production at approximately 15,000MT/year (Murali, 
2010, pers.com). In 2009 there were at least 1300 fish farms in Ghana, the majority 
were small-scale, non-commercial and less than 0.4 of a hectare, and most located in 
the south of the country (Asmah, 2009). Larger, commercial cage farms are found in 
Lake Volta (Blow and Leonard, 2007). 
Demand  
Ghana has a high domestic demand for fish. Fish is the preferred animal protein source 
and accounts for 74% of total animal protein ingested (Kawarazuka, 2010). Average per 
capita consumption is around 20-25kg/year (consumption being highest in the south of 
the country, lowest (down to 10kg/year) in the north) (Hiheglo, 2008). 
With a growing economy 
(real GDP growth 5.7% in 
2010 (IMF, 2011)) a growing 
population and increasing 
urbanization (Table 5) the 
market for Ghanaian 
aquaculture is growing.   
Aquaculture in Ghana is dominated by the production of tilapia (80%) and catfish. In a 
survey conducted by Asmah (2008), Ghanaians attitudes towards fish consumption 
where recorded, and those on tilapia highlighted. Some of the key findings were: 
 80% preferred the taste of smoked fish, and taste is the over-riding factor 
determining choice of fish species purchased (48%); 
 87% of households considered themselves consumers of tilapia, and of those 41.7% 
were regular consumers (at least once a month); 
 Regular tilapia consumers over-riding purchase factor was taste (35.5%); 
 Tilapia weighing at least 200g were the most popular size for household 
consumption (average 80%) and tilapia is preferred in a fresh state. 
Although the predominant size preference of tilapia by household consumers is 200g, 
there are various size ranges available, particularly from the larger producers. Table 6 
indicates current size ranges and retail prices. 
Table 5. Ghanaian Population and Urbanization,
2010-2025 (Adapted from UNHabitat, 2010)
2010
2015
2020
2025
Total Population (millions)
24.3
26.9
29.5
32.2
Urban Population (%)
51.5
55.0
58.4
61.6
Population of Largest Urban 
Agglomeration: Accra (millions)
2.3
2.7
3.1
3.5
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
can pdf files be compressed; reader shrink pdf
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
change font size in pdf text box; adjust size of pdf
16 
Tilapia product ranges that are widely 
available in Ghana are whole round, 
gutted, gutted/de-scaled and also dried 
(Murali, 2011, pers. com). Filleted 
tilapia is a limited supermarket product, 
catering for a higher income bracket. 
Three quarters of Ghanaian consumers 
still buy their fish in traditional markets 
(Asmah, 2008) and such markets 
account for 69% of the food retail 
sector in the country, followed by small 
convenience stores (30%) and lastly supermarkets (1%) (GAIN, 2010). Retailers within 
these traditional markets tend to cluster, selling the same forms and types of fish 
(Quagrainie et al, 2009). 
Apart from Ghanaian households, the food service sector (i.e. restaurants, hotels and 
institutions (RHIs)), is a rapidly expanding sector worth USD$500million per annum 
(GAIN, 2010). This market prefers larger sized tilapia, +500g in comparison to individual 
consumers (Seddoh, 2010). 
Fish trading in Ghana is predominantly undertaken by a well established and resilient 
traditional system (Figure 5) overseen by women traders in all sectors, including 
aquaculture (Seddoh, 2010). Larger ventures in this sub-sector such as the cage farmers 
in the Lake Volta region are frequently by-passing these ‘fish mummies’ and have 
identified more direct 
routes to urban markets 
and are targeting more 
specific customers and 
their needs e.g. RHIs, and 
in doing so are realizing 
profit margins higher up 
the value chain. Table 7 
indicates the profit 
margin spread in the 
value chain of tilapia 
(fresh and smoked) which 
can be captured by 
removing intermediaries 
in the market, such as 
processors and 
wholesalers. 
Table 6. Range and Price of Tilapia on the
Ghanaian Market (Murali, 2011, pers. com)
Size Category
Weight Range
Price (USD$)
Size 3
+800g
$6/Kg
Size 2
500-800g
$4.5/Kg
Size 1
400-500g
$3.5/Kg
Regular
300-400g
$2.2/Kg
Economy
200-300g
$2.2/Kg
Small
150-200g
$1.5/Kg
Figure 5. Fish Market Chain in Ghana (Quagrainie et al, 2009). 
17 
Small-scale fish 
producers however 
are still very much 
reliant on traditional 
traders to buy their 
fish, and in this 
scenario farmers are 
often unable to follow changing market demands and supply patterns, often resulting in 
the acceptance of prices that are below their true market value for their fish (Seddoh, 
2010).  
Market Opportunities 
Some of the current aquaculture opportunities in Ghana are listed below: 
 Increasing peri-uban aquaculture around large urban areas e.g. Accra 
 Integrating aquaculture with agricultural systems, particularly in small-scale ventures 
 Direct targeting of traditional markets with aquaculture produce 
 Direct targeting of RHIs and growing supermarket sector 
 Targeting of northern markets where fish consumption is lowest 
 Increase catfish production for domestic and regional markets 
 Value addition of tilapia products e.g. smoking 
 Utilization of present marine fish processing capacity to process aquaculture 
production for export markets 
2.3. Nigeria 
Supply 
Fisheries in Nigeria are dominated by marine capture, with inland fisheries smaller but 
significant. Nigeria’s total annual fish consumption is estimated at more than 1.5 million 
MT with Nigerian waters providing approximately 541,000MT in 2008 (GAIN, 2010) of 
which around 30% is from inland fisheries (Abiodun and Ayunda, 2008). Nigeria has a 
supply gap which is currently catered for by imports that reached 937,000MT in 2008 
(USAID, 2010); mainly of low value, frozen pelagic species (80%) from the EU, South 
America and other African nations; the other 20% being stockfish (dried, unsalted fish) 
from Scandinavia (GAIN, 2010). Domestic fish production In Nigeria is generally sold in 
two forms; fresh or smoked (ARD, 2009). 
Aquaculture production stood at 143,000MT in 2008, around 20% of total domestic fish 
production, and worth an estimated USD$447 million (USAID, 2010). The number of fish 
farms in Nigeria was reportedly over 5,000 in 2009 (Miller and Atanda, 2011). Some 70% 
of fresh catfish are sold in local restaurants (Gorman and Martin Webber, 2009). 
Table 7. Value Margin Spread in Ghanaian Tilapia 
(Adapted from Seddoh, 2010).
Product
Margin spread
Tilapia
Hatchery
(fingerlings)
Fish Farm
Smoked
Wholesale/
Retail
RHIs
Fresh
-7%
7%
-
64%
68%
Smoked
-7%
7%
33%
29%
36%
18 
Demand 
Nigeria has a high domestic demand for fish, and a market of 1.5 million MT/year (GAIN, 
2011). Average per capita consumption is 9.8kg/year (USAID, 2010) and fish contributes 
34.7% of the total animal protein consumed (Kawarazuka, 2010). 
Nigeria has a growing 
economy with real GDP 
growth at 8.4% in 2010 
(IMF, 2011) a growing 
population and increasing 
urbanization (Table 8). 
Aquaculture in Nigeria is dominated by the production of catfish (often reared in high-
density tank systems). Catfish are predominately sold fresh in the south, though smoked 
fish are also sold in southern markets particularly catfish that are low in quality or small 
in size. Smoked catfish are preferred in northern parts of the country. 
Peri-urban catfish aquaculture is growing 
around large urban areas (DFID, 2006). In 
2009, 3,120 farms were located in Lagos State 
and 136 in Kaduna State in 2008 (ARD, 2009). 
Locating in close proximity to urban areas 
enables access to large markets and reduces 
post-harvest losses due to inadequacies in 
transport, storage and other infrastructures 
(losses in transport are estimated between 
10-15% - Gorman and Webber, 2009).  Such 
losses in volume and quality are problems 
frequently faced by current traders and 
retailers and many farmers also would like to 
reduce problems with post-harvest handling 
and increase direct links and/or sales to 
traders and retailers further up the market 
chain (Dixie and Ohen, 2006) as shown in 
Figure 6. This would enable farmers to 
increase quality and realize those profit 
margins (Table 9) currently appropriated by 
often female traders (ARD, 2009) and primary 
wholesalers who often to do not disclose 
information such as current market prices 
with producers. Too often, many participants 
in a value chain choose not to collaborate 
among themselves due to lack of leadership, 
mistrust of competitors, weak information, or lack of scale (Martin Webber and Labaste, 
Table 8. Nigerian Population and Urbanization,
2010-2025 (Adapted from UNHabitat, 2010)
2010
2015
2020
2030
Total Population (millions)
158.3
176.0
193.2
210.1
Urban Population (%)
49.8
53.4
56.8
60.3
Population of Largest Urban
Agglomeration: Lagos (millions) 
10.6
12.4
14.2
15.8
Figure 6. Nigerian Domestic Catfish 
Farming Value Chain 
(Source: Gorman and Webber, 2009) 
19 
2010). Farmers tend to sell at the same price/kg whether to wholesalers, processors or 
direct to customers (ARD, 2009). 
Market Opportunities 
In the marketing study conducted by Dixie and Ohen (2006) consumer motivations for 
purchasing catfish were dominated by three factors; availability, taste and familiarity; 
and 90% of those consumers stated they were increasing their purchase of the product.  
Some of the current aquaculture opportunities in Nigeria are: 
 Increasing  urban and peri-uban aquaculture around large urban areas e.g. Lagos 
 Direct targeting of traditional markets with aquaculture produce i.e. to individual 
consumers 
 Integrating aquaculture with agricultural systems, particularly in small-scale ventures 
 Direct targeting of RHIs and the growing supermarket sector 
 Targeting of northern markets 
 Increasing catfish production for inter-regional export 
 Increasing tilapia production for domestic and regional markets 
2.4. Uganda 
 
Supply 
Fisheries in landlocked Uganda are dominated by lake capture. Uganda’s total annual 
fish production averages around 427,000MT, though volumes are seen to be decreasing 
(Hemmerle et al, 2010). 
Official FAO aquaculture production figures suggested >50,000MT/year in 2008, 
however this is seen as a gross over-estimate (Dickson et al, 2011), and probably reflects 
the potential production of pond acreage and not actual volumes produced (Ssebisubi, 
2011). Most of the aquaculture in Uganda is pond-based production and typical rates 
are 5MT/hectare/year for fertilized tilapia ponds. Tilapia cage farming is conducted on 
one medium scale venture in Lake Victoria (Blow and Leonard, 2007). 
Demand 
As in the previous two cases Uganda has a high domestic demand for fish. Average per 
capita consumption is 8.6kg/year (Hemmerle et al, 2010) and fish accounts for 34.3% of 
total animal protein ingested (Kawarazuka, 2010). 
Table 9. Value Margin Spread
in Nigerian Catfish 
(Adapted from ARD, 2009).
Product
Margin spread
Catfish
Wholesale
Retail
Restaurant
Fresh
25%
11.8%
16.7%
20 
Uganda has a growing 
economy with a real 
GDP growth of 5.2% in 
2010 (IMF, 2011), a 
growing population and 
increasing urbanisation 
(Table 10). 
Aquaculture in Uganda is dominated by the production of tilapia and catfish. In the 
domestic market whole tilapia is the preferred species due to its familiarity to 
consumers (Waiswa, 2011, pers.com).  
Average prices of whole tilapia in Uganda are shown in Figure 7. Prices have increased 
over the past decade due to decreased wild capture, poor farmed supply and rising 
demand (Dickson, 2011). Current fresh tilapia prices are around USD$2.2/kg in the town 
of Iganga in eastern Uganda (Waiswa, 2011, pers.com), and this is within the price bands 
seen for most of the regions in Uganda. Prices in the north of the country i.e. located 
furthest away from large water bodies and hence fishing areas, have been recorded as 
significantly higher (Dickson, 2011). 
Both wild and farmed catfish are in shorter supply, and considered somewhat of a niche 
market at present. They are preferred smoked or whole and consequently prices at 
retail are higher at 10,000UGX (USD$3.5)/kg (Bakaki, Nabukeera, 2011, pers.com).  
Ugandan fish farmers tend to have limited access to markets and production is either 
sold by piece to households, or to traditional traders more familiar in buying fish from 
artisanal fishermen by the bundle at auctions held at landing sites. Due to the smaller 
size of farmed fish compared to wild caught, farmers tend to get lower price at farm 
gate compared to wild counterparts (Ssebisubi, 2011). However these smaller fish do 
Table 10. Ugandan Population and Urbanisation,
2010-2025 (UNHabitat, 2010)
2010
2015
2020
2030
Total Population (millions)
33.7
39.7
46.3
53.4
Urban Population (%)
13.3
14.4
16.0
18.0
Population of Largest Urban
Agglomeration: Kampala (millions)
1.6
1.9
2.5
3.2
Figure 7. Average Whole Tilapia Prices in Uganda, 2011 
(Source: Dickson et al, 2011). 
(Prices given in UGX. US$1=2800UGX.31/09/2011 www.xe.com ) 
+USD$2/
kg
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested