September 2014 
OIES PAPER:  NG 90 
*Senior Research Fellows, OIES, **Senior Regulatory Officer, 
NSW Resources and Energy 
The Future of Australian 
LNG Exports: 
Will domestic challenges limit the development of future LNG 
export capacity? 
David Ledesma, James Henderson* & Nyrie Palmer** 
Pdf reduce file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change page size pdf; acrobat compress pdf
Pdf reduce file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
reduce pdf file size; best pdf compression
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
ii 
The contents of this paper are the authors’ sole responsibility. They do not 
necessarily represent the views of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies or any of 
its members. 
Copyright © 2014 
Oxford Institute for Energy Studies 
(Registered Charity, No. 286084) 
This publication may be reproduced in part for educational or non-profit purposes without special 
permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgment of the source is made. No use of this 
publication may be made for resale or for any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior 
permission in writing from the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies. 
ISBN  
978-1-78467-008-5 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
easy and developers can shrink or reduce source image NET Image SDK supported image file formats, including & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change font size fillable pdf; adjust pdf size preview
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
jpeg), gif, bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc. the web viewer will instantly enlarge or reduce the source file until the file size fits the
change font size in pdf; pdf custom paper size
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
iii 
Acknowledgments 
The authors would like to thank everyone who helped us in drafting the paper, in Australia as well as 
the UK. Your contributions have helped to enrich the document and ensure accuracy of the content 
and conclusions 
How to C#: Special Effects
filter will be applied to the image to reduce the noise. LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size.
reader compress pdf; best way to compress pdf file
VB.NET Image: Compress & Decompress Document Image; RasterEdge .
reduce Word document size according to specific requirements in VB.NET; Scanned PDF encoding and decoding: compress a large size PDF document file for easier
adjust pdf page size; compress pdf
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
iv 
Preface 
With seven the new LNG projects under construction and due for completion in the 2014 – 2018 
timeframe amounting in addition to existing facilities, Australia is expected to overtake Qatar as the 
world’s largest supplier of LNG by the end of the 2010s.  With its plentiful gas reserves, prior track 
record of LNG project execution and operation and relative proximity to the fast growing Asian LNG 
markets the degree of comparative advantage would seem to guarantee a benign investment 
environment.  
However, several factors, among them competition for skilled labour within Australia, the strength of 
the Australian dollar and the specific logistical and environmental sensitivities of the project locations 
have resulted in significant cost escalations and in some cases delays to the original project 
schedules.  This paper also serves to convey an understanding of the much overlooked Australian 
gas market and, significantly the impact that the new LNG projects are already having on internal 
supply/demand – price dynamics and the political challenges raised. 
Much energy media attention has focused on the problems faced by the current group of new 
Australian LNG projects. This paper comprehensively addresses the root causes but more importantly 
conveys the scale of the new wave of Australian LNG supply and integrates this with its impact on the 
domestic market which until now has been largely isolated from global energy dynamics.  The OIES 
Natural Gas Research Programme is committed to producing timely and insightful research on both 
supply and demand side developments and this paper achieves both these objectives. 
Howard Rogers 
Oxford, September 2014 
VB.NET Image: How to Zoom Web Images in Visual Basic .NET Imaging
and also some file types like PDF and multi out" functionality allows VB developers to easily reduce the size of web image or document file being displayed
change font size on pdf text box; best online pdf compressor
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
page document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF to help developers to decrease and reduce current zooming Reset the Size of Currently Viewed File via btnFit
change font size pdf form; adjust pdf size
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
Contents 
Acknowledgments .................................................................................................................................. iii 
Preface ................................................................................................................................................... iv 
Contents .................................................................................................................................................. v 
Figures ................................................................................................................................................... vi 
Tables and Maps .................................................................................................................................... vi 
1. Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 1 
2. LNG in Australia .................................................................................................................................. 2 
2.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 
2.2 Australia’s gas resources .............................................................................................................. 4 
2.3 Australian gas demand ................................................................................................................. 8 
3. Australia’s three existing LNG projects ............................................................................................. 11 
3.1 The North-West Shelf .................................................................................................................. 11 
3.2 Darwin LNG ................................................................................................................................. 13 
3.3 The Pluto Project ......................................................................................................................... 13 
4. The 2010s growth spurt of Australian LNG ....................................................................................... 15 
4.1 Challenges facing project construction ....................................................................................... 19 
4.2 Projects under construction......................................................................................................... 24 
5. The varying importance of the domestic gas markets in Australia ................................................... 26 
5.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 26 
5.2 Market size and growth potential ................................................................................................ 27 
5.3 The Northern Territory – a very small domestic market, dominated by LNG export strategy .... 30 
6. The Eastern gas market and the impact of imminent LNG exports .................................................. 32 
6.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 33 
6.2 Overview of the East Australian gas market ............................................................................... 33 
6.3 Gas resources and production in Eastern Australia ................................................................... 38 
6.4 Coal Seam Gas development issues in Eastern Australia ......................................................... 41 
6.5 The combined impact of CSG developments on Queensland’s major LNG projects ................. 46 
6.6 Gas contracts and prices in Eastern Australia ............................................................................ 50 
6.7 Could a gas reservation policy be introduced? ........................................................................... 55 
6.8 Conclusion – East Australia’s gas debate and LNG projects ..................................................... 57 
7. The Future – the competitiveness of Australian LNG ....................................................................... 58 
7.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 58 
7.2 Australian LNG will need to be cost competitive under new contractual terms .......................... 60 
7.3 Economics of LNG export projects ............................................................................................. 60 
7.4 FLNG as another alternative to reduce costs ............................................................................. 65 
7.5 Which new projects will proceed? ............................................................................................... 66 
8. Conclusions ....................................................................................................................................... 67 
Appendix 1 – Australian Gas Basins ..................................................................................................... 69 
Appendix 2 - Governance and regulation ............................................................................................. 71 
Appendix 3 - Gas Pipelines ................................................................................................................... 73 
Appendix 4 – Reserve Classifications ................................................................................................... 78 
Abbreviations ........................................................................................................................................ 79 
Bibliography .......................................................................................................................................... 80 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Compact rich image editing functions into several small-size libraries that are VB.NET programmers the API to scale source image file (reduce or enlarge image
change font size in pdf text box; change font size pdf text box
C# Word: How to Compress, Decompress Word in C#.NET Projects
Efficiently reduce Microsoft Office Word document size using C# code; to compress the Word document file to a & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change paper size in pdf; change page size of pdf document
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
vi 
Figures 
Figure 1: Energy production in Australia by fuel (2011/12) ..................................................................... 2 
Figure 2: Australia’s major resource and energy exports by value (2011/12) ........................................ 3 
Figure 3: Australian primary energy consumption by fuel ....................................................................... 4 
Figure 4: Major gas suppliers to Asia ...................................................................................................... 5 
Figure 5: Australian gas production by region (2012) ............................................................................. 7 
Figure 6: Gas demand by sector 2012-13 .............................................................................................. 9 
Figures 7a & 7b: Domestic gas demand by region 2012 and 2018 (projected) ..................................... 9 
Figure 8: Gas demand by industry (2003-2012) ................................................................................... 10 
Figure 9: Estimate of Australian LNG export capacity (Note: Assuming that contracts for existing 
plants are extended) ............................................................................................................................. 17 
Figure 10: Steel prices 2008-2013 (Index July 2008=100) ................................................................... 20 
Figure 11:  Australian/US Dollar exchange rate vs. the date of LNG project FIDs ............................... 21 
Figure 12: Hourly manufacturing compensation costs in US Dollars (Index: 2000=100) ..................... 22 
Figure 13: Split of demand by sector in Western Australia (2012) ....................................................... 28 
Figure 14: Western Australia domestic gas prices 1990-2012 ............................................................. 29 
Figure 15: Split of Australian gas consumption by domestic region and exports (2012) ...................... 33 
Figure 16: Split of gas demand in East Australia by state in 2012 (Bcm/%) ........................................ 34 
Figure 17: Gas production versus demand by state in East Australia .................................................. 35 
Figure 18: New South Wales and ACT gas demand and contracted supply (2012-2024) ................... 37 
Figure 19: Forecast of gas use in Eastern Australia power sector ....................................................... 37 
Figure 20: Demand forecast for EA market to 2020, including LNG exports ........................................ 38 
Figure 21: Gas production in Eastern Australia to 2012 ....................................................................... 41 
Figure 22: Gas prices in Eastern Australia ........................................................................................... 51 
Figure 23: Netback price of LNG to various locations in Eastern Australia .......................................... 53 
Figure 24: Gas price forecasts for Eastern Australia ............................................................................ 54 
Figure 25: Comparison of delivered costs of LNG to Japan ................................................................. 61 
Tables and Maps 
Table 1: Australia’s total gas resources (bcm) ........................................................................................ 4 
Table 2: Australia’s natural gas resources .............................................................................................. 6 
Table 3: Delays and cost overruns at the Pluto LNG project ................................................................ 15 
Table 4: LNG projects under construction in Australia (January 2014) ................................................ 18 
Table 5: Australian LNG projects under construction – cost escalation and time delays ..................... 19 
Table 6: Summary of East Australian gas market by state (2012 and 2030E) ..................................... 34 
Table 7: Eastern Australia gas reserves and resources estimates....................................................... 39 
Table 8: CSG reserves and resources controlled by four major LNG projects in EA ........................... 40 
Table 9: The major LNG projects on the east coast of Australia .......................................................... 46 
Table 10: Gas sales contracts signed by Queensland LNG projects ................................................... 47 
Table 11: Gas sourced from domestic market by QCLNG and GLNG ................................................. 48 
Table 12: Progress with gas development for Queensland LNG projects ............................................ 49 
Table 13: Some recent gas contracts in Eastern Australia ................................................................... 52 
Table 14: LNG projects under consideration in Australia (June 2014) ................................................. 59 
Table 15: Analysis of project development factors for the five primary new LNG supply sources ....... 62 
Table 16: Distances of various LNG producing countries to Asian gas market .................................... 64 
Map 1: Australian domestic market, major pipelines and LNG export projects ...................................... 8 
Map 2: Eastern Australian Gas Infrastructure ....................................................................................... 32 
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
1. Overview 
By 2018 Australia will become the largest LNG exporter globally with an aggregate of 86 mtpa LNG 
liquefaction capacity, with 67% based on the development of conventional gas reserves offshore the 
north and north-west of the country through three existing and three new land-based plants, while a 
further 4% (one facility) will use floating LNG technology. The balance (29%) will use unconventional 
(coal seam) gas as feedstock to three plants on the east coast on Gladstone Island. The six land-
based liquefaction plants currently under construction, with a combined capacity of 58 mtpa, have all 
faced cost, environmental and timing challenges.  That said, they are all expected to be operational 
by the end of the decade. The three coal seam gas projects on the east coast however may face 
continued feed-gas operational issues and possible shortages after start-up and, due to the nature of 
coal seam gas developments, new wells will have to be continually drilled throughout the life of the 
projects1. The probable need to supplement upstream feed-gas supply with ‘grid-sourced’ gas will 
impact on the east coast domestic gas market, where the price of gas has risen sharply over the past 
two to four years, as well as becoming less readily available under long-term contracts, even before 
the LNG export projects start production. This has led to lower domestic demand expectations and to 
some consumer groups calling for a gas reservation policy, or some similar review of exports, to keep 
gas available to the domestic market and hence keep gas prices down. In Western Australia there is a 
domestic market obligation (DMO), but domestic gas prices are also rising towards LNG export net-
back parity levels, while in the Northern Territory, there is little or no political will to introduce a gas 
reservation policy,2 despite the fact that a major recent industrial plant closure has been blamed to 
some extent on lack of gas availability.3  
This paper, authored by two UK-based and one Australia-based researcher, will review the existing 
status of LNG projects that are in operation, before examining the seven new projects that are under 
construction and the reasons why these projects have experienced cost overruns and delays. The 
paper will then examine the domestic market in the west and north of the country, before focusing 
primarily on the markets in the east of the country. It will analyse the domestic debate over the 
potential balance of gas exports versus domestic use, covering issues such as the increasingly close 
relationship between LNG export volumes and prices, the outlook for future gas demand, the 
environmental debate over unconventional gas and the differing political priorities of the federal and 
regional governments. The paper will conclude by looking forward at the factors, both international 
and domestic, that will determine the extent and pace of new Australian LNG capacity to be 
constructed and discuss whether such projects will be able to find a place in an increasingly 
competitive global LNG market given the various political, commercial and economic challenges. 
Finally the authors will examine whether, in extremis, domestic politics and gas demand could result 
in no significant new Australian LNG capacity build. 
1 i.e. because of rapid well production decline rates. 
2 http://gastoday.com.au/news/nt_says_no_to_gas_reservation/081167/ 
3 http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/nt-govt-urged-to-review-gove-gas-decision-2013-07-31 
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
2. LNG in Australia  
2.1 Introduction 
With three existing LNG projects already providing over 24mtpa of LNG export capacity, and with a 
further seven schemes under construction, Australia’s LNG export capacity is expected to exceed 
85mtpa by 2018, at which point it will become the world’s largest LNG exporter (due also to Qatar’s 
continued moratorium on new developments). The additional development of over fifteen potential 
new Australian projects, (expansions and new greenfield schemes), could take the country’s total 
LNG export capacity as high as 150mtpa beyond the end of this decade,4 based not only on 
conventional onshore and offshore reserves but also on Australia’s plentiful coal seam gas5 (CSG) 
and shale gas resources. As such the outlook for Australian LNG exports would appear to be on a 
growth trajectory and with further room for expansion. However, the well-documented cost overruns 
and delays in many of the current developments, combined with an increasing domestic lobby 
focussed on rising gas prices and environmental issues, have coincided with growing indications of 
increased international competition in the global LNG market. Taken together, these factors have 
raised significant questions about the role of Australian LNG in the global gas market, and in this 
paper we examine the current debate and highlight the key issues that could determine its outcome. 
However, although the gas industry in Australia is set for significant growth, it is important to note that 
its current contribution to the economy is relatively small when compared to the other commodities, 
which the country possesses in abundance. As shown in Figures 1 and 2, gas actually only accounted 
for 13% of total energy production in 2011/12, with coal and uranium taking the first two places, and 
its share of exports by energy content was even smaller at 8%.  
Figure 1: Energy production in Australia by fuel (2011/12) 
Source: Australian Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics 
In terms of the broader economy, the impact of gas, measured in export revenues, is dwarfed by the 
contribution currently made by iron ore and coal (Figure 2), with LNG ranking fifth with a contribution 
of A$12 billion in 2011/12 compared to the A$63 billion brought in by overseas sales of iron ore. From 
4 BREE (2013a) p.31 
5 Coal Seam Gas, also known as Coal Bed Methane is methane which is held within the structure of the coal seams by 
adsorption. It may be produced in commercial quantities when the coal is de-pressurised and de-watered through drilling.  
Coal
60%
Renewables
1%
Crude oil and 
NGL
5%
LPG
1%
Natural gas
13%
Uranium
20%
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
the perspective of GDP, oil and gas combined contributed approximately A$28 billion of value added 
in 2011/12, equivalent to only 2% of total GDP,6 while the sector paid just under A$8 billion of taxes, 
or 4% of the total federal government revenue.7 Meanwhile employment in the sector stands at 
17,000,8 compared to more than double that figure in the coal extraction industry. As will be noted 
later, this importance is expected to grow as new LNG projects start up and LNG exports increase. 
Figure 2: Australia’s major resource and energy exports by value (2011/12) 
Source: Australian Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics 
However, although the statistics concerning revenue generation and direct economic contribution 
suggest a limited current role for gas, the significant investment in the industry’s expansion means 
that its political and economic role is set to expand rapidly. On the domestic front the current spending 
on LNG projects accounts for more than a third of all business investment in Australia, a figure which 
could rise to over 60% if all the proposed projects also go ahead (although as discussed later this is 
unlikely), while gas will also play an increasing role in providing energy for the country’s other major 
industries. Furthermore, as the new LNG projects come online it is expected that the LNG sector will 
make a much larger contribution to export revenues, compensating for much slower anticipated 
growth in the exports of other commodities. As early as 2017/18 LNG export revenues are anticipated 
to reach A$62 billion, a more than five-fold increase over 2011/12 and moving LNG into third place 
behind iron ore and coal.9 However, while this rapid expansion of export sales is taking place, gas is 
also expected to assume a much greater role in the domestic energy mix, with its share of total 
primary energy consumption forecast to rise from only 23% in 2011/12 to 35% by 2034/35. In 
combination with renewable energy it is expected to displace coal from the energy mix (Figure 3) as 
part of the government’s drive to deliver reduced CO
2
emissions. Internationally, LNG will also help 
Australia’s goal to establish itself as a more active participant in the Asia-Pacific region, as outlined in 
the government’s 2012 white paper “Australia in the Asian Century”,10 providing the energy to support 
growth in countries such as China, Japan and Korea while also generating significant extra revenues 
6 Deloitte (2012) page v  
7 Ibid. p.ii 
8 BREE (2013b), p.8 
9 Deloitte (2012) 
10Australia in the Asian Century (2012)  
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
A$bn
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
for its own economy. As a result, the ability of the Australian gas industry to develop sufficient 
resources at reasonable cost to satisfy both its domestic and export markets will be important for 
energy economies across the Asia-Pacific region. 
Figure 3: Australian primary energy consumption by fuel 
Source: Australian Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics
2.2 Australia’s gas resources 
According to the BP Statistical Review 2014 Australia contains 3.7tcm of proved gas reserves, and 
this figure corresponds with the 136Tcf (3.85tcm) of Economically Demonstrated Resources (EDR) 
identified by Geoscience Australia, of which 103Tcf (2.9tcm) is conventional gas and 33Tcf (0.9tcm) is 
to be found in unconventional fields. Table 1 shows the breakdown of resources, highlighting the fact 
that beyond the proved reserves base the country also contains significant upside from currently Sub-
Economic and Inferred Resources, particularly in the areas of coal seam gas and tight gas (see 
Appendix 4 for full reserve definitions). Although not acknowledged yet by federal bureaux, Australia 
also contains very large potential shale gas resources, estimated by the recent EIA survey of global 
shale gas to be the seventh largest in the world at 437Tcf (12.4tcm).11 
Table 1: Australia’s total gas resources (bcm) 
Source: Australian Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics 
11 EIA (2013) p.6  
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
2006/07
2011/12
2034/35
PJ
Coal
Gas
Oil & Oil Prodcuts
Other
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested