September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
45 
agricultural areas, and total exclusion of the industry from water resource areas (such as that between 
Sydney and Wollongong). This has caused AGL to reconsider its exploration and production plans, 
Dart and Metgasco to withdraw from New South Wales and Apex Energy to withdraw plans to drill in 
the water catchment between Wollongong and Sydney. As a result AGL alone has had to reduce the 
value of its gas reserves in New South Wales by $343 million as a consequence of the exclusion 
policy, with seventeen years of prospective gas supply in New South Wales now effectively 
''sterilised'.'83 Despite these problems, though, industry and government representatives continue to 
argue that CSG must come online to fulfill the contracted obligations for export sales and provide a 
back-up in case domestic gas is required to supplement supply to export. The dilemma in meeting the 
needs of the market and also the demands of the public and government over environmental issues is 
therefore very clear for the CSG industry.  
Indeed the conflict of interest has been evident in the fact that public concern has caused a 
moratorium on fracking and the ban on the use of fracking chemicals in New South Wales and 
Victoria. In Victoria the Premier has extended a moratorium on hydraulic fracking despite the 
conclusions of a report from the Victoria Government-appointed Gas Market Task Force that 
recommend that it should be allowed. The Task Force will now undertake a further round of 
consultation before the Victoria Government makes a final decision on fracking, which has effectively 
delayed onshore gas production by approximately one year until at least mid-2015 (well after the 2014 
Victoria state election).84 
In June 2013, the Federal Government also got involved in the CSG debate and passed an 
amendment to Federal environmental law (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation 
Amendment Act 2013 – EPBC Act), which now requires Federal approval for Coal Seam Gas 
developments that are likely to have a significant impact on water resources. This mechanism is 
called the “water trigger”, and means that an environmental impact assessment and approvals 
process is now required with the Federal as well as State Government for some CSG projects.85 
These amendments to the EPBC Act have caused additional costs for the CSG industry and the 
Mining Council of Australia has noted that the new requirements add additional approval hurdles and 
will add up to two years to the approval processes, which would cost an overall additional $360-$730 
million.86 A first example of the legislation in practice was seen in July 2013 when Apex Energy was 
refused permission under the EPBC Act for a drilling program for exploration in the Sydney Water 
Catchment area between Wollongong and Sydney. 
In response to concerns about increased costs the Federal Government has made an attempt to 
reduce the burden of the assessment process. Representatives of the States, Territory and the 
Commonwealth met in mid-December 2013 at the Standing Council on Energy and Resources 
(SCER) and agreed to develop a national ‘harmonised’ environmental regulatory framework for the 
CSG industry. The framework aims to focus on water management and monitoring; hydraulic 
fracturing and chemical use; and well integrity and aquifer protection. The aim is to improve existing 
jurisdictional standards and practices, in order to build community confidence in the effectiveness of 
regulatory regimes governing the industry's development. However, until formal action is taken to 
reduce the approval burden the CSG industry will continue to face a significant regulatory process 
83 Robins B. (2013)  
84 APPEA (2013)  
85 http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/about-us/legislation/environment-protection-and-biodiversity-conservation-act-
1999/what-5 
86 http://www.ncoa.gov.au/docs/submission-minerals-council-of-australia--attachment-1.pdf 
Change pdf page size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
adjust size of pdf; adjust size of pdf in preview
Change pdf page size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best way to compress pdf file; pdf change page size
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
46 
and public opposition as it attempts to develop the gas reserves that are now needed to meet export 
and domestic demand. 
6.5 The combined impact of CSG developments on Queensland’s major LNG 
projects 
The development of CSG in general, then, is not only an operational challenge but is clearly an 
emotive issue in Eastern Australia. It is also very obviously vital to the development of the three 
liquefaction projects that are being developed on the east coast, which when operating at plateau, will 
add an additional 25 mtpa of LNG capacity. These projects are all located close to each other on 
Gladstone Island in Northern Queensland, and are operated by three different consortia: Queensland 
Curtis LNG (QCLNG) is operated by a BG-led group, Asia-Pacific LNG (APLNG) by a 
ConocoPhilips/Origin consortium and Gladstone LNG (GLNG) by a Santos-led group. However, one 
key issue common to all these projects is gas supply, although each has its own variant on the 
possible outcomes. The project details are referred to in Table 4 above, but it is worth reiterating the 
major points here in order to underline the key issues. 
Table 9: The major LNG projects on the east coast of Australia 
Source: Company Data 
QCLNG (BG, CNOOC, Tokyo Gas), FID: October 2010 
Queensland Curtis LNG is currently a 2-train scheme with a targeted capacity of 8.5mtpa, due to 
come online in the fourth quarter of 2014. As can be seen in Table 10 below the gas has been 
contracted to a variety of Asian buyers as well as to BG itself, and indeed BG’s global gas portfolio 
does provide some flexibility in the supply and marketing of QCLNG gas. Nevertheless it is 
particularly important that the project comes online on schedule, as the operator BG has firmly 
committed to first LNG production this year. Gas supply is being sourced from CSG assets owned by 
Queensland Curtis Gas (QCG) which, according to the latest BREE report, has 10,500 Pj (280 Bcm, 
Under 
Construction
Owners
Capacity LNG Trains
Cost 
Completion 
Date
(Mtpa)
(US$bn)
Australia Pacific 
LNG
ConocoPhilips (37.5%), 
Origin Energy (37.5%), 
Sinopec (25%)
9
2
22.5
2015/16
Queensland 
Curtis LNG
Train 1: BG Group (50%), 
CNOOC (50%); Train 2: BG 
Group (97.5%) Tokyo Gas 
(2.5%)
8.5
2
20.4
2014/15
Gladstone LNG
Santos (30%), PETRONAS 
(27.5%), Total (27.5%), 
KOGAS (15%)
7.8
2
18.5
2015
Planned
Arrow LNG
Shell (50%), PetroChina 
(50%)
8
2
na
2017+
Fisherman's 
Landing
LNG Ltd (100%)
1.5 (3.0)
1 (2)
na
2017+
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. control, C# developers can easily and accurately disassemble multi-page PDF document into two
batch reduce pdf file size; pdf page size dimensions
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
best pdf compression tool; pdf custom paper size
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
47 
9.9 Tcf) of 2P proven & probable reserves in the Surat Basin which will be supplied to QCLNG 
through a 340 km gas pipeline. QCG is currently drilling 2000 wells as part of the first phase of 
dedicated production for the project and is also carrying out an aggressive exploration program in the 
Bowen Basin to find reserves for a potential train 3. It has been reported that at the end of 2013 1,900 
of the required wells had been drilled and that as of November 2013 70% of the overall project 
facilities were complete,87 implying that Train 1 of the project is on schedule for first gas in Q4 2014. 
Train 2 is then expected to be online in the second half of 2015, with the overall project producing at 
full capacity by the first half of 2016. 
However, although the initial drilling campaign appears to be on track and the 2P gas resources 
available would appear to be just adequate to meet 20 years of contracted supply (even allowing for 
some gas lost in transmission and LNG production), the QCLNG partners have still decided that they 
need to buy in gas from the domestic market, especially in the early years of the project. BG itself has 
acknowledged that the CSG development requires a complex and extended start-up process, with 
thousands of wells being tied into the overall system, and as noted above the individual well 
performance can be very variable and uncertain. As a result BG has announced that it will purchase 
10-20% of the initial gas supply requirement from the domestic market in 2014-16, and has contracted 
to buy 7.6 Bcm from various suppliers over the next three years (see Table 11 below). All the 
purchased gas will come from the Surat Basin, and could of course also have been supplied into the 
domestic market.  
Table 10: Gas sales contracts signed by Queensland LNG projects 
Source: Company data 
GLNG (Santos, Petronas, Total, Kogas), FID: January 2011 
Gladstone LNG is a two-train 8 mtpa project that has contracted to sell its gas in large part to project 
sponsors Petronas and KOGAS (see Table 10 above). As of February 2014 GLNG was reported to 
be 75% complete,88 with first gas being targeted from the first half of 2015, although the operator 
Santos has not been specific about a date as of mid-2014. However, the major problem for GLNG is a 
lack of an adequate reserves base, as it has dedicated 2P proved and probable reserves totaling only 
5376 Pj (140 Bcm, 5.4 Tcf) of CSG located in the Surat Basin, 435 km from the LNG plant. Allowing 
87 http://www.bg-group.com/assets/files/cms/BG_Group_Q4_Analyst_Conference_Call_QA.pdf.pdf 
88 Energy Quest (2014), 
Buyer
Volume
Length
Start
mtpa
years
QCLNG
BG
3.7
20
2015
CNOOC
3.6
20
2015
TEPCO
1.2
20
2015
Chubu Electric
0.4
20
2014
APLNG
Sinopec
7.6
20
2015
Kansai Electric
1
20
2016
GLNG
Petronas
3.5
20
2015
KOGAS
3.5
20
2015
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
public override Bitmap ConvertToImage(Size targetSize). Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified size. Parameters:
pdf file compression; apple compress pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Using this C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion library component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a
change font size pdf document; pdf change font size in textbox
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
48 
for some gas losses in the transport and liquefaction processes this would provide only 11 years of 
production at peak capacity, well short of the 20-year contracts signed with the buyers. As a result, 
although the project seems to be on target to drill the 1000-1400 wells that will be needed at official 
start-up (see Table 12), and despite the fact that the total approved well count would allow the 
number to be increased to 2650 wells (with a further 4,100 wells awaiting approval), it is already clear 
that significant gas will need to be purchased from the domestic market if the LNG scheme is to 
operate at full capacity.  
Table 11 outlines some of the plans that the GLNG partners have made to fill the gap in supply. In 
2012 it was agreed that the project would purchase 365Pj (9.5 Bcm) of gas from Origin to act as 
ramp-up gas, and this was supplemented in December 2013 with a further agreement to buy an 
additional 100Pj (2.6 Bcm) in a five-year deal from 2016. Furthermore Santos will pipe a total of 750 
Pj (130 MMScf/d) of gas from its Cooper Basin assets in South Australia, (South Australia CB JV: 
Santos 66.6%, Beach 20.2%, Origin 13.2% with an estimated 3 tcf gas reserves) through the 935 km 
Epic pipeline (Wallumbilla to Moomba), of which 51Pj, or 1.4 Bcm, should be available in 2015. 
However, despite all this additional gas Santos will still have an estimated shortfall of 2P reserves, 
based on 20 years LNG production at capacity, of approximately 100bcm. It does have some 
reserves in the New South Wales Gunnedah Basin that it could use, but even this would not cover the 
whole shortfall. Santos did try to secure some Beach Energy gas from the Cooper Basin, but was 
outbid by Origin who could sell the gas to the APLNG project (see comment below), and therefore 
may be forced to source more gas from its Cooper Basin assets, through higher production, if its 
partners agree. The LNG sales agreements for GLNG are understood to have a long LNG production 
ramp-up, which may provide some relief for Santos while it sources additional gas, but nevertheless 
the project still has clear gas supply issues that need to be resolved and this is likely to have a 
significant impact on the domestic market in Eastern Australia. 
Table 11: Gas sourced from domestic market by QCLNG and GLNG 
Source: EnergyQuest (2014)  
Asia Pacific – AP LNG (ConocoPhillips, Origin, Sinopec), FID: Train 1 July 2011 & Train 2 July 
2012 
AP LNG is also a two-train project with a total capacity of 9mtpa, with the LNG having been largely 
contracted to one of the partners, Sinopec, but also to Kansai Electric in Japan. As can be seen from 
Table 12 the project is making good progress towards drilling the 1100 wells that are required for 
initial start-up, and APLNG is also the best positioned of the three Queensland LNG projects when it 
comes to available CSG gas reserves. It has over 13,000 PJ (350 Bcm, 13 Tcf) of 2P proven & 
probable CSG reserves dedicated to the project, which would increase to 16,000Pj (420bcm, 16 Tcf) 
Project Volume e Seller
Comment
bcm
QCLNG
0.78
Origin
Deal over two years signed in Nov 2013
4.94
APLNG
Extra gas during 2015-16 ramp up
1.92
AGL
3 year supply from 2014
GLNG
9.48
Origin
May 2012 deal for ramp-up gas
2.60
Origin
Dec 2013 - 5 year deal from 2016
1.36
Santos
3rd party gas in 2015
APLNG
3.75
Beach
8-year deal signed in 2013
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
formatted text and plain text to PDF page using .NET NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and
change font size in pdf form field; best pdf compressor
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) Dim page As PDFPage
change paper size in pdf document; advanced pdf compressor online
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
49 
if 3P probable reserves are also included. However, even though these reserves would be sufficient 
to cover around 25 years of LNG output, even allowing for losses, the project partners also have 
access to conventional gas production. In April 2013, Origin bid and won a contract to purchase 140 
Pj (3.75 Bcm) of gas over 8 years (17 PJ or 0.5 Bcm/year) of Beach Energy’s equity production from 
the South Australia Cooper Basin (see Table 11 above), which had previously been targeted at the 
New South Wales market but which could now, at Origin’s discretion, be available for APLNG. Extra 
reserves could also come from Arrow Energy, because Shell has decided to defer the development of 
its Arrow LNG project at Gladstone. It is therefore possible that Arrow could join the AP LNG scheme, 
bringing with it sufficient reserves to produce 270 Pj/annum (7 Bcma or 670 MMcsfd) of gas, which 
would be enough to supply one train. This could potentially imply a third train at AP LNG,89 or 
alternatively the extra gas could supply trains 1 & 2 but still provide small volumes for train 3, although 
it should be noted that Shell has not made any firm commitment to this idea and remains in 
negotiation with other LNG projects in the region.  
Table 12: Progress with gas development for Queensland LNG projects 
Source: Companies, Department of Natural Resources and Mines, Australia 
It is clear, therefore, that although it was initially assumed that the three Queensland projects would 
have their own equity gas as feedstock for their liquefaction plants (based on CSG), it now appears 
that at least two of the plants will be short of some gas, with the result that they will need to source 
gas from the domestic market. Even one of the main APLNG partners, Origin Energy, has contracted 
gas originally intended for the domestic market as an insurance policy, although its LNG project 
appears to have sufficient reserves of its own. The key driver for these purchases of domestic gas, 
apart from concerns about overall levels of reserves and well drilling, has been nervousness about 
the deliverability of gas from CSG wells with uncertain initial production and forward decline curves. 
This has led LNG project sponsors to contract for domestic gas supply to cover the ramp-up period for 
their projects (the first 3-4 years), and this has had the direct consequence of altering the dynamics of 
sales to domestic consumers, as reflected in the market analyses for each State described above. 
This helps to explain the anticipated dip in domestic gas consumption in the 2014-18 period, 
especially in the power sector, as gas is diverted to LNG projects. In the longer term the potential 
availability of existing reserves and future resources should ensure that a more balanced supply-
demand picture can be re-established once well performance at the CSG assets has been 
established, but until then the price of gas in the domestic market, and the reaction of domestic 
consumers and politicians to the export projects, is likely to be volatile. The next section analyses this 
situation in more detail. 
An alternative option available to LNG project investors is to procure short-term cargoes either from 
within their own portfolios or from the LNG spot market. This was the case for the delayed Tangguh 
project in Indonesia in the 2000s.  However, with recent Asian spot cargo prices in the $12 to 
89 Note:  In September 2011 Arrow acquired Bow Energy which had 240 Pj (2.4 tcf) of 2P CSG reserves and 2752 (27 tcf) of 3P 
CSG reserves in Queensland’s Surat Basin. 
Project Wells needed for 
2 trains
Q2 2013 3 Q3 2013 3 Q4 2013
Total wells since 
FID at y/e 2013
% of total 
required
QCLNG
2000
196
225
205
1900
95%
APLNG
1100
87
105
108
610
55%
GLNG
1000-1400
56
67
38
398
28%
Arrow
2500
0
0
0
0
0%
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
can a pdf file be compressed; acrobat compress pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
change font size fillable pdf; pdf reduce file size
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
50 
$20/MMbtu range this serves to indicate a) that recourse to the Australian domestic market is 
generally preferable and b) in extremis these projects could afford to take domestic prices up to the 
lower of Asian LNG spot prices or LNG contract prices (both on a net-back basis) depending on the 
tightness of supply/demand balance in the domestic market. 
6.6 Gas contracts and prices in Eastern Australia 
As has been mentioned above, gas prices have historically been set within the context of long term 
gas supply agreements (GSAs) between producers and consumers on the east coast, with the actual 
price levels being a matter of confidential negotiation and so not transparent. However, the remote 
nature of the market, without an export option, and the fact that in the power sector gas had to 
compete with relatively low cost coal as an alternative fuel, have meant that prices to date have been 
relatively low by international standards. Indeed this has become more obvious over the past few 
years due to the establishment of trading exchanges in the key States in the region. In June 2010 the 
AEMO set up a Short Term Trading Market (STTM) in New South Wales, South Australia, and 
Queensland, with gas trading hubs at Sydney, Adelaide and Brisbane respectively. 90 Victoria, 
however, has a separate market with a different design but the same overall goal of providing a spot 
market clearing price.91  
Recent prices in the STTM and Victorian markets are shown in Figure 22 below, and indicate that 
there has been a significant move up over the past four years. The gas price in Sydney reached a low 
of below A$1/GJ (US$ 0.85/MMBtu) in December 2010 but had reached A$4/GJ (US$3.40/MMBtu) by 
September 2013, having peaked at a level of over A$8/GJ (US$6.80/MMBtu) in mid-2012. In a similar 
trend, the Brisbane price has moved from A$2/GJ (US$1.70/MMBtu) in 2010 to a peak of A$10/GJ 
(US$8.50/MMBtu) in late 2012 before settling at around A$6/GJ (US$5.10/MMBtu) in 2013. Indeed 
the average for all the East Australia markets in 2013 has been in the range A$4-6/GJ (US$3.40-
5.10/MMBtu), two to three times the level seen in 2010.  
90 
Gas is traded ex ante (a day ahead) with AEMO setting a day-ahead price and providing a market schedule. As demand 
predictions become more accurate, shippers can rebid by re-nominating quantities of gas with pipeline operators. Real-time 
information on the state of the market, pipeline capacities, production capability, pipeline storage, and demand forecasts is 
provided by the Gas Bulletin Board. The physical balancing of gas is the responsibility of pipeline operators. Some shippers can 
provide balancing gas to supplement shortages, which is purchased by AEMO as a part of Market Operator Services.
91 Bids are stacked and the spot market clearing price is set at the required demand. Gas prices set in the market are 
effectively in an unlimited range from A$0/GJ to A$800/GJ (US$0-680/MMbtu). Bidding commences at 6am each day, with 
rebidding at 10am, 2pm, 6pm and 10pm, and prices are gas-only and do not include transmission price. As with the other 
markets, AEMO is responsible for the physical balancing of gas and the financial market (Note: in the STTM pipeline operators 
are responsible for balancing). 
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
51 
Figure 22: Gas prices in Eastern Australia 
Source: AER (2013a) 
The sharp increase in prices on the east coast, in particular since 2012, has reflected the increasing 
availability of export markets as an option for producers, in particular because at least two of the LNG 
projects under construction have contracted for gas that might otherwise have been destined for the 
domestic market. Clearly the question of gas diversion is not black and white, as some third-party gas 
purchased by the LNG operators would not have been produced if it had not been for this extra 
demand and the availability of higher prices. Nevertheless the experiences of major industrial 
customers on the east coast suggest that it is becoming more difficult to contract for long-term gas at 
low prices a) because producers are now considering a greater variety of sales options and have 
consequently got greater bargaining power and b) because in all likelihood the increased underlying 
cost-base of the new gas production renders the historical lower contract prices unrealistic. 
Table 13 shows a selection of contracts that have been signed in late 2013 and early 2014, 
emphasizing that producers now have a clear choice between selling to LNG export projects or 
domestic consumers. The details of the price arrangements can only be gleaned from various 
reporting sources, but a series of statements would suggest that the level of prices is significantly 
higher than the spot price seen at the various hubs. In December 2013, for example, Santos reported 
that it had signed five domestic contracts at prices over A$8/GJ (US$7.20/MMBtu), while in the same 
month Incitec announced a gas purchase agreement with AGL for its Phosphate Hill plant that implied 
a delivered gas price of A$11-12/GJ (US$9.80-10.80/MMBtu). At the other end of the scale Strike 
Energy announced the signing of a deal with Orora in January 2014 with prices in the range A$6-8/GJ 
(US$5.40-71.0/MMBtu), while in a recent report the advisory company IES estimated prices of A$7-
9.00/GJ (US$6.25-8.00/MMBtu)for a number of recent agreements.92 
92 Energy Quest (2014) 
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
52 
Table 13: Some recent gas contracts in Eastern Australia 
Source: Energy Quest (2014) 
Prices for the gas sales to the LNG plants appear to have been set at levels similar to those for the 
domestic market. In May 2012 Origin contracted to sell gas to GLNG at $8.00/GJ (US$7.20/MMBtu), 
while the deal struck in December was priced in an estimated range of approximately A$10.00/GJ 
(US$8.90/MMBtu). Interestingly both deals were to provide gas at Wallumbilla,93 a gas trading 
exchange in Queensland that was established in March 2014 and whose location makes it ideally 
placed to act as the gas supply point for gas supplied to LNG export projects because of its proximity 
to them and the main domestic supply routes. This hub is expected to attract short-term traders, 
which will deepen market liquidity, and make spot and forward prices available to increase trade. It is 
also likely to encourage an increasing trend towards gas being priced on an LNG netback basis as 
the domestic and export markets become linked. 
Figure 23 shows a calculation of the netback price of LNG based on an oil-linked contract and a 
14.5% slope, with an exchange rate of A$1=US$0.93. At a US$100/bbl oil price the LNG price 
delivered to Japan would be US$14.50/MMbtu,94 equivalent to US$13.50/MMbtu at Gladstone after 
removing shipping costs. The cost of liquefaction is assumed to be US$3.50/MMbtu, bringing the 
netback price at Gladstone down to US$10.00/MMbtu, or A$10.75/MMbtu. The removal of transport 
costs to various points in Eastern Australia then provides netback prices either at pricing hubs such 
as Wallumbilla or Sydney or at production points such as Moomba. The estimated netback price at 
Wallumbilla, for example, would be A$10.10/MMbtu or A$9.60/GJ, close to the prices agreed in recent 
93 http://www.originenergy.com.au/news/article/asxmedia-releases/1539 
94 Internationally traded LNG is priced in US$/MMBtu.  These prices have been converted to A$ in Figure 23 to compare with 
local prices 
Announced
Seller
Buyer
Volume
Commences
Term
bcm
year
years
LNG
Oct-10
Santos
GLNG
19.5
2014
15
May-12
Origin
GLNG
9.5
2015
10
Nov-13
Origin
QGC
0.8
2014
2
Dec-13
Origin
GLNG
5.0
2016
5
Total
34.8
Domestic
May-11
AGL
Xstrata
3.6
May-13
10.5
Dec-12
Origin
MMG
0.6
2013
7
Apr-13
Beach
Origin
4.5
2014-145
08-Oct
May-13
Esso-BHP
Lumo Energy
0.6
2015
3
Jul-13
Strike Energy
Orica
3.9
20
Sep-13
Esso-BHP
Origin
11.2
2014
9
Nov-13
Esso-BHP
Orica
1.1
2017
3
Dec-13
AGL
Incitec
0.5
2015
2
Jan-14
Strike Energy
Orora
0.8
2017
10
Feb-14
Strike Energy y Austral Bricks
0.3
2017
10
Total
27.1
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
53 
contracts discussed above. The price in Sydney would be A$9.20/GJ, again within the range of recent 
industrial prices in Eastern Australia. The conclusion therefore must be that the Eastern Australian 
market is adjusting to a new interaction with the global LNG market and customers will therefore have 
to pay higher prices in future. 
Figure 23: Netback price of LNG to various locations in Eastern Australia 
Source: Authors’ estimates 
Indeed this new reality has over the past few months been reflected in the forecasts of a number of 
agencies and consultancies who foresee a significant rise in gas prices in Eastern Australia over the 
next decade, as shown in Figure 24. Not surprisingly, though, these increases have provoked a 
political debate about whether Australia should allow its gas to leave the country in such large 
amounts or be held back for domestic consumers at lower prices.  
0.00
5.00
10.00
15.00
20.00
25.00
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
A$/mmbtu
Oil Price (US$/bbl)
LNG Price
Gladstone (pre LNG)
Sydney Price
Moomba Price
Longford Price
Wallumbilla Price
September 2014: The Future of Australian LNG Exports 
54 
Figure 24: Gas price forecasts for Eastern Australia 
Source: BREE, (2013a) 
The greatest impact could well be felt in the State most reliant on gas imports - New South Wales. 
BREE predicts that prices in the State will increase as the domestic and export markets become 
increasingly linked and as the cost of domestic production rises ,95 citing estimates from consultancy 
ACIL Allen which indicate that prices could rise from approximately A$6.50/GJ (US$5.80/MMBtu) in 
2013 to approximately A$7.50/GJ (US$6.70/MMBtu) in 2028, while EnergyQuest predicts that prices 
will rise from approximately A$5/GJ (US$4.50/MMBtu) in 2013 to approximately A$10.50/GJ 
(US$8.93/MMBtu) in 2028.96 Meanwhile gas marketers AGL and Origin Energy have already applied 
to the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART), the setter of retail prices in New South 
Wales, for a 20% increase in retail prices in New South Wales from July 201497.  
The impact of these expected gas price rises, in combination with possible gas shortages, would of 
course be to put pressure on both households and industry, and is already having a political backlash. 
The Federal Minister for Energy has stated that "hundreds, if not thousands" of jobs would be at risk 
with low gas supply and high prices in New South Wales. Furthermore industry lobby group 
Manufacturing Australia has stated that local manufacturers simply cannot secure long term contracts 
for gas, saying that "what gas is available is skyrocketing in price by up to 200 per cent. Left 
unchecked this crisis will permanently push many manufacturing businesses over the edge, costing 
Australia 200,000 manufacturing-reliant jobs and $28 billion in economic value."98 Michael Fraser, 
CEO of AGL and Grant King, CEO of Origin Energy have also commented that the tightening of gas 
markets will lead to destruction of demand, particularly in gas-fired electricity generation.99 
95 BREE (2013a)  
96 EnergyQuest (2013)  
97 Dingle, S. (2014)  
98 http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-30/gas-shortages-nsw-macfarlane/4980952 
99 The Australian, 3 Aug 2013, “AGL warns of plant closures as carbon price falls and gas prices rise” 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested