asp.net open pdf : Compress pdf Library control class asp.net web page wpf ajax nswreport2-part2019

7
2 LOAD ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES
2.1 Load estimation using field data
Estimation of the load of suspended sediment and other pollutants is an important part of
analysing the response of a catchment to rainfall events. Loads are not generally
measured directly in-stream; rather, load estimates are inferred from measurements of
pollutant concentration and water discharge in-stream.
In general, pollutant load, L, over a time period, T, can be represented by the equation
L = CQdt
T
0
(2.1)
where C is the pollutant concentration and Q is the water discharge.
A close approximation to this load equation is given by
L = 
CQ
i i
i
T
t
=
1
δ
(2.2)
where the sampling interval, 
δ
t, is short compared to the period of time over which the
discharge and concentration vary. Most techniques for pollutant load estimation are
based on this equation involving concentration and water discharge. In practice, this
equation is usually not able to be used directly to calculate pollutant loads, as the
sampling period for discharge and/or concentration is longer than the period over which
concentration and discharge are invariant. However, when the sampling interval
approaches the concentration variability with flow, the method of linear interpolation can
be used to generate ‘real’ nutrient and sediment loads. As such, linear interpolation has
been used in studies which test the accuracy and bias of the other methods (e.g. Young
and DePinto 1988; Kronvang and Bruhn 1996). Linear interpolation can be described by
the following equation (Kronvang and Bruhn 1996):
 
+
=
≤<
+
+
+
+
− +
1
1
1
1
1
1
)
(
)
(
n
i
i
t t t t
i
i
i
t
i
t
t
i
i
i
i
t
t
t t
t C
C t
q
(2.3)
where concentrations are denoted C
ti
, t
i
, i = 1,...,n are the times at which concentration is
measured, t
0
and t
n+1
are the times at the start and end of each subinterval, and q
t
is the
discharge for each time step.
Unfortunately, although river discharge is usually sampled frequently, often at intervals
of less than a day, and mostly continuously, pollutant concentrations are generally
sampled infrequently, often at routine intervals (i.e. daily, weekly, monthly, or
Compress pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf markup text size
Compress pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf compression settings; change font size in pdf form field
8
seasonally). In these cases, linear interpolation may be inappropriate, and calculating
pollutant loads usually involves another method of estimating pollutant concentrations
for the period within the sampling interval. Generally, less confidence may be placed on
loads estimated using data with a wide sampling interval or a sampling interval that does
not characterise flood events. The ideal sampling interval will vary from one river to
another. Accurately capturing variations in sediment and nutrient load given the rapid
fluctuations in sediment and nutrient concentration is a major problem in some rivers.
This issue is particularly important in small catchments, where response to rainfall events
tends to be rapid, and in subtropical Australian catchments, where 50% of the annual
discharge can occur in 3% of the time (e.g. Cosser 1989). In larger rivers, such as the
Richmond River, northern NSW, a sampling interval of four times a day characterises the
concentration variability adequately, whereas in a steep mountain stream,  the water level
may rise and fall over a 24 hour period and a pollutant sampling interval of less than one
hour may be more appropriate.
There are many different techniques used for calculating load estimates, differing in
complexity, accuracy and bias. The choice of technique may depend on the data
resolution, the mathematical ability of the operator, the computer technology available,
or the relationships within the data and between various pollutant concentrations. Ideally,
data should be collected to suit a particular river and a particular method of load
estimation. However, more often data are collected without clear objectives thus
reducing collection efficiency and usefulness.
2.1.1
Methods
2.1.1.1 Averaging
Averaging methods are generally considered to be the simplest available techniques for
pollutant load estimation, and are often applied because of a lack of more appropriate
techniques. Estimates of load over a time period are made by using averages of
discharge, concentration or load for a given subinterval and then summing these over the
entire period. These averages may be over different time periods, such as monthly,
quarterly or yearly, and can combine discharge and concentration in a number of different
ways (Table 2.1). Whilst these methods are easy to apply, the assumptions implicit
behind such calculations, including independent and identically distributed data, are
rarely met. This leads to bias in the estimation of loads, especially if the sampling
program does not collect data from the entire range of discharge and concentration
variability. Where a positive relationship occurs between concentration and discharge,
loads will tend to be underestimated by time averaging, and where a negative relationship
exists, loads will usually be overestimated. The magnitude of over- or underestimation
will depend on the range in variation in concentration (Walling and Webb 1985). This
effect is likely to be more severe for suspended sediments which tend to show stronger
positive relationships with discharge than nutrients which are transported in both
dissolved and particulate form (Walling and Webb 1985).
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
best pdf compressor online; change font size pdf document
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf files optimized; change font size in pdf file
9
Walling and Webb (1981) considered a number of average estimators in a comparison of
the precision and accuracy of load estimation procedures on a river in the United
Kingdom using empirical techniques. They found that Methods 1, 3 and 6 (Table 2.1),
underestimated load by 70% or more. Methods that weight concentration by discharge at
the time of sampling (Methods 2, 4 and 5) are more likely to produce accurate load
estimates. However, the precision of these methods, as indicated by the standard
deviation of load estimates produced, is generally less than the precision for Methods 1
and 3. Walling and Webb (1981) conclude that Methods 1 and 3 produce the most
worthwhile results, the consistency of which indicates that the use of a correction factor
may be appropriate with these methods. At the very least these methods would be most
likely to reproduce approximately the relative ranking of pollutant load. All six
estimation methods that Walling and Webb (1981) considered showed a sharp drop in
the precision of load estimates as the sampling interval increased.
Similar conclusions were made by Preston et al. (1989). They also found that average
estimators using daily discharge with monthly or quarterly average concentration
frequently have the lowest mean squared error. Such estimators were found to have a
high precision, however, their accuracy was sometimes poor. Other average estimators
were found to have a higher bias or variance or both. Estimators using average discharge
data were found to be inaccurate and imprecise especially under event sampling. The
precision of average estimators was found to slightly improve when the calculations were
stratified.
Clarke (1990) also considered the mean and variance of loads calculated using Methods
1, 2, and 3 (Table 2.1). Clarke (1990) made the assumption that suspended sediment
concentration and mean daily discharge are bivariate, log-normally distributed. Clarke
(1990) found that Method 2 provided an unbiased estimate of suspended sediment load,
whereas the estimate provided by Method 1 was negatively biased with respect to that
provided by Method 2. However, the variance associated with Method 2 has variance of
the order 1/n whereas the variance associated with Method 1 is of the order 1/n
2
. These
results support and explain the empirical results found by Walling and Webb (1981).
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf compressor; best pdf compression
VB.NET PDF- HTML5 PDF Viewer for VB.NET Project
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf change page size; change font size fillable pdf
10
Table 2.1: Averaging techniques for the determination of annual riverine loads
Method
Load Equation
Source
1
k
c
n
q
n
i
i
n
i
i
n
=
=
1
1
Walling and Webb (1981)
2
k
cq
n
i i
i
n
=
1
Walling and Webb (1981)
3
kq
c
n
i
i
n
=
1
Walling and Webb (1981)
4
k
cq
q
q
i i
i
n
i
i
n
=
=
1
1
Walling and Webb (1981)
5
k
cq
i p
i
n
i
=
1
where p
i
denotes the period between samples
Walling and Webb (1981)
6
k
c q
m
m
i=
1
12
where m denotes the month
Walling and Webb (1981)
7
=
n
i
i
n
c
Q
1
This study
8
j
n
j
j
j
q
c
c
=
+
+
1
1
2
Lesack (1993)
9
q
c
n
jm
ijm
m
i
n
j
N
m
m
m
=
=
=

1
1
1
12
Preston et al. (1989)
10
q
c
n
jh
ijh
h
i
n
j
N
h
h
h
=
=
=

1
1
1
4
Preston et al. (1989)
11
365
1
n
qc
i i
i
n
=
Preston et al. (1989)
12
365
12
1
12
q
N
c
n
im
i
m
m
im
i
m
=
Preston et al. (1989)
13
365
1
4
n
q
N
c
n
ij
i
h
h
ih
i
h
=
Preston et al. (1989)
14
N
n
q c
k
k
ik ik
i
n
k
k
=
=
1
1
2
Preston et al. (1989)
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
change page size of pdf document; best way to compress pdf file
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
change pdf page size; change paper size pdf
11
Notation:
n = number of days sampled
N = total number of days
= total discharge
q 
= average discharge
k = scaling factor for the length of the period considered
q
j
= discharge during the sampling interval j
2.1.1.2 Ratio estimators
Ratio estimators aim to take advantage of correlation within a sample. Generally
discharge data is used as an auxiliary variable, x
i
, with load data treated as a dependent
variable, y
i
. The ratio estimate is usually calculated as
Y
R
= (y/x) X 
(2.4)
where y and x are the sample means of y
i
and x
i
respectively, Y
R
is the ratio estimate of
load and X is the discharge.
If y
i
/x
i
is nearly the same for all sampling units, y/x varies little from one sample to
another and the ratio estimate is of high precision.
The ratio estimator is the best linear unbiased estimator under two conditions:
1. the relationship between x
i
and y
i
is a straight line passing through the origin
2. the variance of y
i
about the line is proportional to x
i
.
In general these conditions will not be met, so that the ratio estimator is biased, although
consistent. Preston et al. (1989) found that the ratio estimators they considered (Table
2.2) were more often less precise than other approaches considered, but were virtually
unbiased in each test case. This most likely reflected that the underlying distributions of
the data considered for each test case were appropriate for ratio estimation.
Preston et al. (1989) observed little difference between ratio estimates under non-event
scenarios, although they found the simple ratio method to be slightly more precise. In all
cases stratification under event sampling was found to virtually eliminate bias, however
stratification under non-event sampling did not improve estimation and was often found
to reduce precision slightly. Stratification is the term used to describe separating the data
into groups with common attributes (e.g. high flow, rising stage, falling stage, event, low
flow, seasonal etc.). Overall, ratio estimators were found to be more robust than other
estimation methods, virtually unbiased in all test cases, but slightly less precise than the
averaging and regression methods that were tested.
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
change font size pdf; pdf font size change
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Generally speaking, you can use this .NET document imaging SDK to load, create, edit, convert, protect, compress, extract, and navigate PDF document (page).
best pdf compression tool; adjusting page size in pdf
12
Table 2.2: Ratio estimators for the determination of annual riverine loads
Method
Load Equation
Source
15
Q
q
l
Preston et al. (1989)
16
rQ
n N
n
l rq
+
(
)
(
)
(
)
1
1
Preston et al. (1989)
17
R Q
Q
Preston et al. (1989)
18
(
)
(
)
R
nN n
Nq
l R R q q Q
+
− +
− −
1
Preston et al. (1989)
19
R
n N
s
q
s
lq
Q
q
lq
1
1 1
2
2
Preston et al. (1989)
20
R
n N
s
lq
n N
s
q
Q
lq
q
1
1 1
1
1 1
2
2
+
+
Preston et al. (1989)
Notation:
n = number of days sampled
N = total number of days
= total discharge
l
= average load
q 
= average discharge
r 
= average sample ratio
R
Q
= jackknifed ratio
R = estimated ratio over population
s
lq
= covariance between load and flow
s
q
2
= variance of flow
Note:
1. For the average discharge and average load variables, the period over which this should be calculated
has not been specified by the authors. However, it is generally considered that they should be daily
averages calculated over a ‘sufficiently’ long time period to capture a wide range of behaviour.
2. The jackknifed ratio is calculated using the equation
(
)
=
− −
=
n
j
j
Q
R
n
nR
n
R
1
( 1)
1
ˆ
where R
j
is calculated by removing the jth observation from the population and estimating the ratio over
this subset of the population.
13
2.1.1.3 Regression Estimators
Regression estimators, also commonly referred to as rating curves, have been widely
applied to estimating suspended sediment loads. Regression estimators are based on
extrapolating a limited number of concentration measurements over the entire period of
interest by developing a relationship between pollutant concentration or load and stream
discharge, and applying this relationship to the entire discharge record. Typically this
relationship is considered to be log–log, that is, the log of pollutant load or concentration
is assumed to be a linear relationship of the log of stream discharge. This relationship is
generally applied because both discharge and concentration are often best described by a
bivariate log–normal distribution.
It has been found in a number of studies that the regression curve estimates based on this
log–log relationship are biased, systematically under-predicting sediment loads. The
reasons for this bias have been analysed and discussed by a number of authors (Preston et
al. 1989; Ferguson 1986, 1987; Singh and Durgunoglu 1989). Essentially, whilst
parameters are unbiased in log–log space, the process of transforming parameter
estimates back to the stream discharge or stream load space introduces bias into the
parameter estimates. This means that the rating curve that is calculated underestimates
the pollutant yield. Ferguson (1986) found that ratings curves can under-predict by up to
50% of the load value, even when a full concentration time series is available. The
degree to which the ratings curve underestimates load values increases with the amount
of scatter of the data around the ratings curve. Care must be taken to ensure that rating
curves are not used in inappropriate situations; for instance, where the relationship
between discharge and concentration is not log–log or when a small number of
observations are used and the relationship between discharge and concentration is not
clearly revealed for a range of conditions (Preston et al. 1989). Further, discharge
concentration relationships with time often follow loop relationships either on an event
basis (due to hysteresis for example) (Walling and Webb 1980) or on a seasonal basis
(Davis and Keller 1983). To improve accuracy in these situations it is usually necessary
to stratify the data and develop two or more rating relationships depending on the
complexity of the data.
A number of solutions to the problem of bias have been presented, generally based on the
concept of a bias correction factor. One such correction factor was suggested by
Ferguson (1986), where the correction factor varied with the mean squared error of the
log-transformed regression, given as Method 21 (Table 2.3). Cohn et al. (1989) criticise
this correction factor, stating that it does not eliminate bias, and that it can lead to severe
overestimation of loads. Cohn et al. (1989) compare a traditional ratings curve to two
modified curve structures, including that given as Method 22 (Table 2.3). They state that
this method is unbiased and performs nearly as well as or better than the other
approaches in all cases, assuming that the hypothesis of the log–linear model is correct.
Findings presented by Walling and Webb (1988) indicate that the use of correction
factors for log–log relationships did not lead to more accurate estimates of sediment load.
Walling and Webb (1981) highlighted major discrepancies between load estimates using
ratings curve methods. For example, two studies conducted in New Zealand (Griffiths
14
1979; Adams 1980) using rating curve regression methods showed a consistent
discrepancy. On average, the results of Adams (1980) were 70% higher than those of
Griffiths (1979); results on one particular river differed by nearly two orders of
magnitude. In a two-year study of an 85.5 km
2
rural Hunter Valley catchment, Loughran
(1977) developed rating relationships from data stratified seasonally and for rising and
falling stage. There were no discernible seasonal patterns revealed, however there were
distinct variations between rising and falling stage. Sediment loads were calculated using
two methods: rating relationships and measured concentration integrated with hourly
flow. There were large discrepancies found between the loads calculated by each method,
however when the two years were considered together, the methods agreed within 8%.
Table 2.3: Regression techniques for the determination of annual riverine loads
Method
Load Equation
Source
21
(
)
[
]
q
b
b
q
s
i
i
cr
i
exp
ln
exp
0
1
2
1
365
2
+
=
Ferguson (1986)
22
(
)
[
]
=
+
365
1
1
0
ln
ˆ
ˆ
exp
i
i
i
MVUEBCF
q
b
b
q
Preston et al. (1989)
23
(
)
[
]
q
b
b
q
s
i
i
cr
i
exp
ln
exp
0
1
2
1
365
2
=
+
Preston et al. (1989)
24
(
)
[
]
=
+
365
1
1
0
ln
ˆ
ˆ
exp
i
i
i
q
b
b
q
Kronvang and Bruhn
(1996)
Notation:
a,b = parameters estimated by regression of log-transformed concentration and discharge
= discharge
s
lq
= covariance between load and discharge
s
cr
2
= variance of residual in prediction of concentration
MVUEBCF = minimum variance unbiased estimator bias correction factor
,
b b
o
1
= fitted regression parameters
,
b b
o
1
= fitted robust regression parameters
2.1.1.4 Discussion
Preston et al. (1989) completed a comparison of three classes of load estimation
techniques. The classes they investigated were simple averaging methods, ratio
estimation methods and regression methods. They evaluated a number of different
techniques within these classes using Monte Carlo sampling studies. Preston et al. (1989)
found that no group of estimators were better in all cases. In general it was found that
ratio estimators, whilst often imprecise, were virtually unbiased in all test cases. Ratio
estimators also appeared to be more robust than regression estimators to bias caused by
many hydrological or constituent characteristics. Differences between groups of
15
estimators were found to be generally due to violations of model assumptions caused by
test case characteristics. Unfortunately, ratio techniques tend to require a greater number
of samples to achieve the same precision as regression estimators. Since estimators
within each category were designed for data meeting specific statistical criteria, then an
appropriate load estimator would be available if the characteristics of the data were well
defined (Preston et al. 1989). In practice, limited data and information means that it is
generally difficult to identify the most appropriate method for load estimation. Successful
application may depend on the development of an a priori scheme for identifying
whether an estimator is appropriate (Preston et al. 1989).
Preston et al. (1989) also considered stratified versions of all ratio and regression
estimator methods. Stratification is a modification of the approaches presented. The
population is divided into homogeneous subunits called strata which are sampled
separately, and the estimates are combined to obtain an estimate over the entire
population. It was found that stratification could substantially improve the accuracy and
precision of estimates. The results found by Preston et al. (1989) indicate that this is not
always the case. Whereas the precision of averaging techniques improved slightly with
stratification, error levels were found to be higher when stratified sampling is used with
regression techniques.
The selection of an appropriate load estimation technique therefore depends not only on
the availability of concentration and discharge data, but also on the hydrological
characteristics of the catchment being considered, the desired accuracy of estimates and
the preferred complexity of the load estimation technique. No single technique has been
found to be optimal in the literature, with all techniques having some disadvantages
associated with their use. The choice of technique will depend on the characteristics of
the catchment being considered, and the availability of data for that catchment.
2.1.2
Results
As outlined, there are many methods for calculating nutrient and sediment loads (Tables
2.1, 2.2, 2.3) due to both the sampling strategy and the difficulty of integrating
continuous streamflow data with non-continuous concentration data. Each method
employs a different strategy for approximating the concentration between discrete
samples, so each is likely to give a different load with respect to the same period of time.
In this section some of the methods outlined above will be used to calculate loads using a
‘test’ data set for a one-year period.
2.1.2.1 Test data set
The subcatchment chosen covers an area of 1790 km
2
above the township of Casino in
the subtropical Richmond River catchment, northern NSW. The catchment has mixed
rural land use (beef and dairy grazing, forest for timber, and a small amount of urban and
crop lands). A stratified sampling approach was used during data collection in the
Richmond River catchment.  Samples were collected routinely on a monthly basis and up
to six times per day during flood discharge. Water samples for nutrient analysis were
16
taken during the rising and falling stages of the flood hydrograph. Samples were taken
from approximately mid-depth at three points across the stream using a sample-rinsed
submersible bottle and placed in a sample-rinsed 10 L bucket. Subsamples were taken
from the bucket and placed in acid-washed and sample-rinsed 10 mL polyethylene vials.
Samples for suspended sediment analysis were filtered through preweighed 0.45 µm
filters using a vacuum of 30 kPa. The filter paper was placed in a vial and the volume of
filtrate was recorded. Samples were placed on ice until frozen in the laboratory freezer (–
20°C) within twelve hours. Laboratory analysis was carried out of a Lachat Instruments
Auto Analyser using cadmium reduction (nitrogen) and molybdate blue (phosphorus)
following persulphate digestion. Suspended sediments were measured by weighing each
filter paper after drying to constant mass at 60°C (approximately 8 hours) and subtracting
the mass of the filter paper with sediment from the mass of the filter paper without
sediment.
In total, 70 water samples were collected between July 1995 and June 1996 and 74% of
the samples were collected during three floods of varying magnitude (Figure 2.1). The
NSW Department of Land and Water Conservation records stage height at Casino, and
discharge is calculated using stage-discharge rating relationships. For the purpose of this
study, discharge was retrieved on an hourly and a daily basis. Turbidity data (Figure 2.1)
is collected routinely 365 days a year by Casino Shire Council for the purposes of
assessing treatment requirements for town water supply. Water is drawn from the
Richmond River 3 km upstream of Casino above a 3 m weir, 1 m from the bottom, and 8
m from the river bank. Turbidity is measured at source at about 12:00 noon daily using a
Great Lakes Instruments turbidity meter Model 8202. Comparisons are regularly made
using a Hach Model 2100A.
Nutrient and sediment loads for the test catchment were generated using linear
interpolation on a one-hour time step (Table 2.4). These are believed to be accurate and
unbiased estimates of nitrogen, phosphorus and suspended sediment loads, and all other
methods considered will be compared to the loads generated using linear interpolation.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested