27
Sediment export rates (kg/ha/yr) are based on Neil and Fogarty (1991) and Wasson et al.
(1996) and on outputs from a spatially and temporally calibrated HSPF computer model
developed for the Johnstone River catchment, Queensland, discussed in Appendix I.
2.2.1.5 Sediment yield and nutrients found in catchment soils
An estimate for nutrient export rate may be made by multiplying the sediment yield of a
particular catchment by the concentration of nutrients in catchment soils. This method
was used for calculating phosphorus export from small catchments (<10 km
2
) on the
Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT (Wasson et al. 1996). In this case Wasson et
al. (1996) used a soil phosphorus concentration of 0.03%  ± 0.001% and suggested that
channel erosion was the major source of phosphorus in Southern Tablelands’ catchments.
Soil nitrogen concentrations in the Richmond River subcatchment above Casino are
0.17% ± 0.1% and soil phosphorus concentrations are 0.031% ± 0.024% (McGarity and
Munns 1955). This simple model does not account for nutrient enrichment caused by
selective erosion of fine organic and clay particles that typically have greater nutrient
concentrations than bulk soils (e.g. Finlayson and Silburn 1996). This may or may not be
important depending on the dominant source of erosion, catchment slope or the size of
the rainfall event causing transport of soil particles. In the Jerrabomberra Creek
catchment near Canberra, channel incision is the dominant source of sediment yield
(Wasson et al. 1998). In this instance there may be little opportunity for nutrient
enrichment during major transport events when eroded sediments are exported directly
by channel flow. In contrast, in catchments with large areas of cultivated land, surface
erosion may be the dominant source of sediment being transported (Sharpley and Menzel
1987).
2.2.1.6 Multi-factor empirical modelling approach
A modelling approach was used to derive nitrogen, phosphorus and suspended sediment
exports from Queensland coastal catchments (Moss et al. 1993). The objectives of the
modelling exercise were to (a) determine the relative importance of each particular
catchment as a source of nutrients to the coastal environment, (b) evaluate the effects of
different land uses, (c) evaluate the relative importance of point sources compared with
diffuse sources, (d) evaluate the significant of fertiliser inputs and (e) scope the effects of
better land use practices of reduction of sediment and nutrient export. The models
employed are expressed in the following equations:
Suspended sediment (t) =
L [p,g,c; km
2
] * E [p,g,c; t km
–2
] * DR [p,g,c] * R [p,g,c]
(2.5)
Nutrient export (t) =
L [p,g,c; km
2
] * E [p,g,c; t km
–2
] * SC [p,g,c; t t
–1
] * ER [p,g,c] * DR [p,g,c] * CF [p,g,c] * R [p,g,c]
(2.6)
R [p,g,c] =
storm discharge (ML) / catchment area (km
2
)
(2.7)
Change font size fillable pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf page size may not be reduced; best pdf compressor
Change font size fillable pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
can a pdf be compressed; change file size of pdf
28
where 
L = area of a specified land use
E = erosion rate for a specified land use
DR = delivery ratio for a specified land use
R = runoff correction factor for a specified land use
SC = soil nitrogen or phosphorus content
ER = enrichment ratio (phosphorus only)
CF = dissolved nitrogen or phosphorus compensation factor
p = pristine lands
g = grazing
c = cropping
Moss et al. (1993) used erosion rates of 500, 2000 and 5000 t km
–2
for pristine, grazing
and cropping respectively, a delivery ratio of 0.1, an enrichment ratio of 1.5, and a
dissolved nitrogen compensation factor of 1.5. They did not consider it necessary to
compensate for dissolved phosphorus, making the assumption that the majority of P is
transported in particulate forms. About 70% of the nitrogen load in the Richmond River
subcatchment is transported as dissolved load, and about 50% of the total phosphorus
load is as dissolved inorganic and organic forms. These correspond to CFs of 3 for
nitrogen and 2 for phosphorus. Enrichment ratios for total phosphorus range from 1.5 to
8.9 (Sharpley and Menzel 1987). When the delivery ratio is large, the nutrient enrichment
ratio is small (Novotny and Chesters 1989; Finlayson and Silburn 1996). A comparison
of sediment-bound nutrient transport in the Richmond River subcatchment and soil
nutrient concentrations suggest an ER of 1.6 for phosphorus and 0.8 for nitrogen. These
calculations assume there is no other source of particulate nitrogen or phosphorus other
than catchment soils, a reasonable assumption given that most (> 82%) nutrient and
sediment transport occurs during flood periods in the Richmond subcatchment. An ER of
less than 1 for nitrogen may reflect an underestimate of catchment soil nitrogen, or a non-
diffuse source of particulate nitrogen in river transport.
2.2.1.7 Turbidity as a predictor of nutrient and sediment exports
Turbidity is commonly found to positively correlate with other water quality parameters
such as nutrients and suspended sediments. Poor relationships between suspended
sediment concentrations and turbidity are commonly found when a low range of
suspended sediment concentrations is used, but the relationships improve when a larger
range is considered (e.g. Gippel 1989; Eyre et al. 1997). Nutrients also show a poor
correlation with turbidity in the lower range; this may be due to dissolved nutrient
sources (point sources), biological processes, or sediment–water interactions increasing
nutrient concentration without any effect on turbidity. Continuous turbidity records
collected using automated optical sensors can be calibrated with routinely collected water
quality samples to derive a continuous record of sediment concentration (Webb and
Walling 1982; Walling et al. 1997). The utility of turbidity readings for the calculation of
total phosphorus and suspended sediment loads has recently been shown for the Latrobe
River catchment (Grayson et al. 1996). They stressed that turbidity meters are by no
means standard. Although many models may quote NTU units there is much variation
between instruments. It was concluded that turbidity readings provided a good predictive
approach to measuring loads.
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in to add text field to specified PDF file position Support to change font size in PDF form.
best way to compress pdf files; change font size in fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
change font size pdf form reader; optimize scanned pdf
29
The routinely collected turbidity data provided by the Casino Shire Council and nitrogen,
phosphorus, and suspended sediment concentrations collected in the Richmond River test
catchment during 1996 were used to develop relationships using least squares regression
(Figure 2.6). On days when more than one measurement of suspended sediment
concentration was taken, a geometric average was used. High correlations were found
between discharge and turbidity, and between suspended sediment and turbidity (r
2
>
0.85). The correlations were poorer for nitrogen and phosphorus, although phosphorus
showed a much better relationship for turbidity greater than 10 NTU.
1
10
100
1000
Turbidity (NTU)
10
100
1000
10000
100000
Discharge (ML/d)
y = 0.217x
0.621
r
2
= 0.855
100
1000
10000
Nitrogen(ug/L)
1
10
100
1000
Turbidity (NTU)
y = 378.202x
0.253
r
2
= 0.434
10
100
1000
Phosphorus(ug/L)
1
10
100
1000
Turbidity (NTU)
y = 78.135x
0.239
r
2
= 0.557
1
10
100
1000
Suspended sediments(mg/L)
1
10
100
1000
Turbidity (NTU)
y = 2.451x
0.913
r
2
= 0.875
n=47
n=32
n=47
n=47
Figure 2.6: The relationships between turbidity, discharge, nitrogen, phosphorus
and suspended sediment concentration in the Richmond River test catchment
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
pdf change font size; best online pdf compressor
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
can a pdf file be compressed; pdf compression
30
2.2.1.8 Sediment yield as a function of catchment area and slope
The yield of a catchment per unit area is likely to decrease with increasing area (Ongley
1976; Haith and Shoemaker 1987; Novotny and Chesters 1989; CSIRO 1992; Milliman
and Syvitski 1992; Milliman 1995). In a study of Canadian watersheds discharging to
Lake Erie, there were also apparent relationships of total nitrogen and total phosphorus
yield with basin area for basins between 10 and 10 000 km
2
, illustrating the particulate
dependence of nutrient transport (Ongley 1976). However, the scatter was large and
greater than the inverse trend (especially in the case of nitrogen) and no causal
relationships were developed. Milliman and Syvitski (1992) collated sediment yields,
basin area, and runoff for 280 world catchments. The catchments were categorised into
five groups based on height above sea level: > 3000 m, 1000–3000 m, 500–1000 m, 100–
500 m, and < 100 m. For each category, regression relationships were developed with
catchment area and catchment runoff (Table 2.6). The relationships with area had
correlations between r
2
= 0.70 and 0.82, but the relationships for runoff were poorer (r
2
=
0.36 to 0.66). The regression equations for the 100–500 m category were used to estimate
sediment yield for the Richmond River test catchment.
Table 2.6: Regression relationships between catchment area, runoff, and sediment
yield for each topographic category (Milliman and Syvitski 1992)
Height (m a.s.l)
Description
Regression equations (Area)
Load (1 × 10
6
t yr
–1
)
Regression equations (Rainfall)
Yield (t km
–2
yr
–1
)
> 3000
High mountain
280 A
0.46
0.5 R
1.16
1000–3000
Mountain
170 A
0.52
20 R
0.65
500–1000
Upland
12 A
0.42
0.002 R
1.74
100–500
Lowland
8 A
0.66
0.002 R
1.67
< 100
Coastal plain
1 A
0.64
0.001 R
1.57
A
catchment area
R
rainfall
2.2.2
Results
Estimates of nutrient loads for the test catchment using each empirical method are
compared with the ‘real’ loads calculated using linear interpolation (Table 2.7). The
simple empirical regression models both over- and underestimated nutrient exports in the
test catchment. Estimates made using population density (Table 2.7; E1) underestimated
both nitrogen and phosphorus export by 0.46 and 0.08 ×. The fertiliser loading regression
overestimated nitrogen (1.41 ×) and underestimated phosphorus exports (0.59 ×). Nutrient
and sediment interrelationships (Table 2.7; E3) both overestimated by up to 3.2 × and
underestimated by up to 0.18 ×. Land export relationships for nitrogen underestimated
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page
change file size of pdf document; compress pdf
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET RasterEdge.Imaging. Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
reduce pdf file size; change paper size in pdf document
31
nitrogen export using average rates given for tropical Australian catchments (Young et al.
1996). When the upper rates were used (Table 2.5), nitrogen export was slightly
overestimated (1.23 ×) and phosphorus and suspended sediments were underestimated.
Sediment yield and catchment soil nutrient content (Table 2.7; E5) underestimated both
nitrogen and phosphorus export. It is likely that particulate matter being exported is
enriched in phosphorus compared to catchment soils. The other reason for an
underestimate by this method is that there are additional sources of nutrients in the
catchment such as human sewage and animal effluent which are unrelated to soil nutrient
concentrations.
Table 2.7: A comparison of estimated nutrient and suspended sediment exports in
the test catchment generated using empirical models and the real exports calculated
by linear interpolation
(The factor difference is calculated as the load of the method in question divided by the load estimated by
linear interpolation.)
Model Description
Total N
(t)
Factor
difference
Total P
(t)
Factor
difference
SS*
(10
3
t)
Factor
difference
Real Linear interpolation
606
142
141
E1
Population density and riverine
nutrient export
278
0.46
12
0.08
E2
Fertiliser loading and riverine nutrient
export
855
1.41
84
0.59
E3
Nutrient and sediment export
interrelationships
P-N 1083
SS-N 1942
1.79
3.20
N-P 75
SS-P 343
0.53
2.42
N-SS 26
P-SS 40
0.18
0.28
E4
Land use export relationships
747**
1.23
87**
0.61
113
0.80
E5
Sediment yield and soil nutrient
content
381***
0.63
77***
0.54
E6
Moss et al. (1993) ‘Model 2’
602
0.99
146
1.03
147
1.04
E7
Turbidity and nutrient and sediment
relationships
707
1.17
137
0.96
127
0.90
E8a
Sediment yield and runoff
62
0.44
E8b
Sediment yield and catchment area
123
0.87
*
suspended sediment
** calculated using upper limits of nutrient and sediment generation rates (Table 2.5)
*** calculated using upper limits of soil nutrient concentration in the Richmond catchment
The model of Moss et al. (1993) (here denoted E6) takes into account both enrichment
and nutrient sources other than soils, using an enrichment ratio for phosphorus and a
dissolved nutrient compensation factor for nitrogen and phosphorus. Loads estimated
using this method agree with the ‘real’ loads within 4%. Nutrient and suspended
32
sediment exports generated using routinely collected turbidity measurements also show a
reasonably close comparison to the exports calculated using linear interpolation. The
nitrogen export was positively biased by 17%, whereas phosphorus and suspended
sediment were negatively biased by 4% and 10% respectively. The sediment yield verses
runoff model (Table 2.7; E8a) underestimated sediment yield in the Richmond test
catchment by 0.44 ×, whereas the relationship between catchment area and sediment load
showed a negative bias of 13%.
Of the range of empirical methods tested, the model demonstrated by Moss et al. (1993)
appears to give the best estimate of nutrient and sediment exports from the test catchment
(within 4% of the loads calculated using linear interpolation). Regression relationships
between turbidity and pollutant loads also appear robust.
2.3 Discussion
2.3.1
Performance of the tested methods
The previous sections have described a range of methods (mathematical equations and
empirical models) that have been described in scientific literature. Some of these
methods were compared to ‘real’ nutrient and sediment loads (calculated by linear
interpolation) using a subcatchment of the Richmond River catchment, northern NSW,
for which there was a data set available (Figure 2.7). Nitrogen load in the test catchment
was estimated by 18 methods, 11 of which gave estimates within 25% of the load
calculated by linear interpolation (Figure 2.7; LI). Phosphorus load in the test catchment
was also estimated using 18 methods, 10 of which gave estimates within 25% of the load
calculated by linear interpolation. Suspended sediment loads were estimated using 17
methods, 9 of which gave an estimate within 25% of the real loads calculated by linear
interpolation. The poorest estimates for pollutant loads were generated using the two
averaging methods (1, 2) which used time factors to scale loads or concentrations up to
the annual time scale. These scale methods are not suitable for use with the stratified data
set that exists for the Richmond test catchment because sampling was biased towards
high flow. Estimates were improved using flow as a scaling factor (Methods 1a, 2a,
equivalent to Methods 7, 15).
The empirical methods using relationships between nutrient export and population (E1)
or fertiliser loading (E2) were generally poor predictors of nutrient load for the test
catchment. These methods are probably more suited to regional-scale studies rather than
for catchment-scale estimates where highly localised conditions prevail. They also show
the likely effects that changes in catchment land use and management could have over
time as population intensity and the demand for food production increases.
33
0
250
500
750
1000
Nitrogen (t)
LI 1
1a
2 2a
7
8
15 15a a 24 24a a E1 1 E2 2 E3 3 E3 3 E4 E5 5 E6 6 E7 7 E8aE8b
Method
0
100
200
300
400
Phosphorus (t)
LI 1
1a
2 2a
7
8
15 15a a 24 24a a E1 1 E2 2 E3 3 E3 3 E4 E5 5 E6 6 E7 7 E8aE8b
Method
0
100
200
300
3Suspended sediments (10 t)
LI 1
1a
2 2a
7
8
15 15a a 24 24a a E1 1 E2 2 E3 3 E3 3 E4 E5 5 E6 6 E7 7 E8aE8b
Method
6,709
7,722
1,083
1,942
1,343
1,883
1,389
3,182
Figure 2.7: A comparison of nutrient and sediment loads generated using a range of
methods for the Richmond River test catchment
(The dashed line is the load calculated using linear interpolation)
34
2.3.2
Choosing the right method
There are a wide variety of methods available (mathematical, empirical, or computer
modelling) for calculating nutrient and sediment loads of catchments. No method will
give an accurate and unbiased assessment for all situations and therefore it is important
to choose the right method. The appropriateness of each method is dependent on data
availability, the hydrological characteristics of the catchment, catchment area, and the
complexity of land use, soil types, and interacting morphological characteristics such as
topography. Further constraints include financial and technological issues, however,
these will not be considered here.
Data availability can be classified into four groups:
1. stratified or flow-weighted data
2. routine data with spot sampling during flood flow
3. routine data
4. no data.
2.3.2.1 Stratified or flow-weighted data
Stratified or flow-weighted data is the best class of data available and characterises
concentration over the entire range of flow conditions (e.g. the Richmond River test
catchment). This sort of data is usually collected only in a flow-gauged catchment. Flow-
weighted data is best collected in small or quick response catchments using automated
techniques such as optical turbidity sensors (calibrated using routine or spot sampling) or
automated samplers that store and preserve water samples for later laboratory analysis. In
larger catchments, or in catchments that have only a few storm events during the annual
cycle such as the Richmond River catchment, water sampling can be done manually
taking 2–6 samples per day over the storm flow period, which may last for 3–15 days.
The best method for calculating nutrient or sediment loads with data that characterises
the range of flow conditions is linear interpolation, but Methods 8, 15a, 24, and 24a
(Table 2.4) should also give an accurate measure of annual load. The problem with
manually collected data in this category is that it usually covers a small time period of 1
or 2 years when there are initiatives for collection. The period of data collection may not
always coincide with ‘typical’ catchment conditions, for example data collected during a
drought year. The utility may be extended when used to calibrate predictive models (e.g.
Moss et al. 1993).
2.3.2.2 Routine data with spot sampling
The next best category is routine data (e.g. collected daily weekly, fortnightly, monthly,
seasonally) combined with spot sampling during high flow. This sort of data is often
collected by government bodies and water supply authorities to fulfil State of the
Environment objectives and regional water quality assessments (e.g. The Northern
Rivers—A Water Quality Assessment, conducted and published by the NSW EPA 1996).
Calculation of annual pollutant loads using routine data with spot sampling of high flow
will often depend on the availability of discharge data. In the event that discharge data is
available or can be calculated using a gauging station close by, nutrient loads can be
35
calculated using methods 8, 15, and 24. Methods 1a and 2a may also give a reliable
estimate. Given the relative ease of these methods, it would probably be appropriate to
use more than one method and compare the results.
2.3.2.3 Routine data
Routine collection is the most common method for assessing water quality. Such data is
commonly collected by government departments and local councils for resource
assessment and State of the Environment reporting. This sort of data is usually collected
on a spatial or regional basis covering many locations within the jurisdiction of the
agency or department concerned. Data are often compared to water quality guidelines
(ANZECC 1992).
Turbidity data collected on a daily basis constitutes a special case when routine data
collection may produce very reliable load estimates (e.g. the Richmond River at Casino).
Turbidity data is collected routinely in many catchments of NSW in which water supply
is drawn from the river adjacent to a town. It is likely that data may exist or could be
collected using spot sampling over the full range of seasonal conditions (including flood
sampling) to calibrate routinely collected turbidity data sets. A set of likely data sources
was collected from the Water Cycle Planning Management Section, NSW Department of
Land and Water Conservation, Parramatta. Although it seems likely that any local
authority drawing river water for town water supply would need to measure turbidity, no
attempt has been made to verify the availability of data from each location.
Sometimes routine data is collected from a single site routinely on a time frame from
days to weeks, and if discharge data is available or reliable estimates of discharge can be
made, an estimate of pollutant load may be calculated. In this situation, an assessment of
the representativeness of the concentration data over the range of river discharges would
be needed. If several of the routinely collected concentration data happened to coincide
with flood discharge it would be possible to use Methods 1a, 2a, 8, 15, and 24 to estimate
pollutant loads. Again it would be best to use several methods to help assess the
reliability of the estimates.
In the event that none of the routinely collected samples coincided with storm discharge,
there are several situations when reliable estimates may still be made:
1. In a regulated river system where discharge variability was low due to the operation
procedures of an upstream dam.
2. When there was no flood flow for the period in question.
In the event that none of the previous criteria were fulfilled, load estimates would be
tenuous. In this case it may be possible to use the data to help calibrate a computer
model.
2.3.2.4 No data
When there is no data available (most situations), empirical models and computer models
can be used to estimate loads. For example, the computer model AQUALM has
36
commonly been used in Australia for estimating non-point source loads. AQUALM is an
example of a model that generates runoff and pollutant exports using daily time steps,
then routes them through a stream network. Pollutant generation relies on area and
distribution of broad land use categories and therefore the model does not take into
account nutrient and sediment generation from streambank erosion, gullies, or other
potential catchment specific sources (Wasson et al. 1996).
A comparison of nutrient and sediment loads generated by computer models and loads
calculated using field data reveals large discrepancies for a range of catchments on the
east coast of Australia (Table 2.8). For catchments in south-eastern Queensland,
AQUALM both underestimated and overestimated nutrient loads by up to a factor of
10.8 ×. In the case of sediment loads, AQUALM estimates can be in error by up to 9 ×
compared to field measured loads. Typically AQUALM was found to overestimate in
near-natural catchment and underestimate in disturbed catchments (Wasson et al. 1996).
In contrast, Eyre and McKee (1998) found that AQUALM overestimated nutrient loads
in south-eastern Queensland in all cases but two (Table 2.8). Wasson et al. (1996)
suggested that the reason for the poor predictive ability of models when applied to
Australian catchments was the lack of consideration for channel and gully erosion (which
are important nutrient and sediment sources in many Australian systems) and the large
overlap of phosphorus generation from native pasture, improved pasture, and dryland
cropping, three common Australian farming practices.
The comparisons between real loads and CMSS were reasonable in the Richmond River
catchment (Bungawalbin, Richmond, Wilsons, and Coastal subcatchments), but in this
case a knowledge of the real loads was used to ‘calibrate’ the CMSS output. During the
calibration process both the areas of each land use and the nutrient generation rate for
each land use were adjusted. The CMSS handbook contains a number of comparisons
between measured and CMSS estimated loads for Onkaparinga, SA, Hawkesbury–
Nepean, NSW, Peel–Harvey, WA, and Wyong, NSW. In these examples CMSS both
over- and underestimated loads of nitrogen and phosphorus by up to 43 times. However,
loads for large catchments were estimated more accurately.
Another reason for poor correlation between modelled and measured nutrient and
sediment loads may derive from inaccurate measurement and interpretation of areas in
each land use class. Both AQUALM and CMSS rely on nutrient generation rates applied
to a particular land use category. The area of each land use is usually interpreted from
areal photographs and / or satellite imagery with little or no ground truth. There can be
overlap between land use classes. For instance, low-intensity grazing may occur under
open-canopy forest; closed-canopy rainforest may be either logged or undisturbed; rural
grazing may be in part rural residential. The majority of land use data available has not
been collected with the objectives of nutrient and sediment generation rates in mind, and
land use patterns are dynamic. Further problems can occur by grouping land use in broad
categories. For instance, urban areas may have concrete or grass swale drainage systems
and may be sewered or unsewered; dairy farming on clay soils that adsorb phosphorus
may release less phosphorus and nitrogen than low-intensity grazing on sandy soils with
a high leaching potential. Some grazing or cropping areas may have intact riparian
vegetation on streams whereas other areas will be closely connected to the stream with
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested