asp.net open pdf : Change font size pdf document SDK Library API .net asp.net web page sharepoint nswreport5-part2022

37
farming on the riverbanks. For example, a greater nutrient generation rate was chosen for
areas < 50 m from the riverbank than for areas of similar land use > 50 m from the river
when modelling nutrient loads in a catchment in southern England (Heathwaite et al.
1996). Choosing the right generation rate is therefore always problematic.
There are many problems associated with modelling nutrient and sediment loads from
catchments with no data available, evidenced by the comparisons made in Table 2.8. It
would seem difficult to justify the cost of modelling when order-of-magnitude estimates
or better can be made using empirical methods E1, E2, E3, E8b (Table 2.7). The
empirical methods also allow relative ranking of catchments or subcatchments so that
areas at risk of higher nutrient and sediment loads are easily determined. In catchments
with no data collection, the empirical model E6 (Moss et al. 1993) shows the best
potential for nutrient and sediment load estimation in the Richmond River test
catchment. There are a number of existing data sets held at Southern Cross University
which could be used to develop a NSW-specific empirical model (similar to Model E6)
that is capable of predicting nutrient and sediment export. There are 11 data sets listed in
the CMSS handbook for the Hawkesbury–Nepean and one from the Wyong catchment,
NSW. There are also published data from Lake Burley Griffin (Cullen 1978), the Hunter
Valley, and the Southern Tablelands (Wasson 1998). The advantages of models like E6
is that they are fast, cost-effective and reasonably accurate, require little data, and allow
catchments to be ranked in terms of risk of nutrient and sediment export.
Change font size pdf document - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf font size change; best way to compress pdf
Change font size pdf document - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf change font size in textbox; change file size of pdf document
38
Table 2.8: Comparisons of modelled nutrient and sediment loads with loads
generated using field data collection and discharge
(Factor difference is the modelled estimate divided by the sampling estimate.
N—nitrogen; P—phosphorus; SS—suspended sediment)
Model
Catchment, year r Parameter
Model
estimate (t)
Sampling
estimate (t)
Factor
difference
Reference
AQUALM Logan, 1996
N
1400
777
1.8
Eyre and McKee
(1998)
P
140
203
0.7
Logan, 1997/98
N
550
51
10.8
P
79
20
4.0
Brisbane, 1996
N
4500
2220
2.0
P
620
342
1.8
Caboolture, 1996
N
190
348
0.5
P
29
24
1.2
AQUALM L.Goodradigbee
SS
1990
260
7.7
Wasson et al.
(1996)
L. Yass
SS
9250
24000
0.4
Woodstock
SS
260
1110
0.2
Sturt
SS
120
260
0.5
L. Queanbeyan
SS
330
2290
0.1
Uriarra
SS
930
5900
0.2
Williamsdale
SS
1130
2660
0.4
Buchan
SS
400
3710
0.1
L. Numeralla
SS
1380
980
1.4
Adaminaby
SS
800
410
2.0
Yaouk
SS
40
170
0.2
Bungawalbin
P
49
26
1.9
McKee (unpubl.);
Anon. (1998)
Richmond
P
187
211
0.9
Wilsons
P
130
172
0.7
Coastal
P
118
89
1.3
CMSS
Brunswick, N.
NSW
N
20
25
0.8
Pont and Eyre
(1997)
P
3.4
1.6
2.1
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
pdf custom paper size; change font size in fillable pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
can pdf files be compressed; change paper size in pdf
39
3.
EROSION AND SEDIMENT/NUTRIENT TRANSPORT
MODELLING
3.1 Types of models
A large number of sediment transport / water quality models exist. These models differ
both by the types of water quality issues they address (e.g. phosphorus, suspended
sediment), and by the level of physical processes simulated by the model. In general,
models fall into three main categories, depending on the physical processes simulated by
the model and the data dependence of the model.
1. Empirical/metric models—these models are based on simple empirical relationships
between sediment and nutrient generation and catchment characteristics such as
climate and land use, with little or no attempt being made to describe the physical
processes occurring within the catchment system. (e.g. CMSS).
2. Conceptual models—these models are based on a generalised concept of the
catchment as a configuration of internal storages through which flows and pollutants
pass. The level of sophistication in the description of physical processes, both
hydrological and hydrochemical, varies between models (e.g. LASCAM, HSPF,
IHACRES-STARS).
3. Physics-based models—these models are based on the solution of so-called
fundamental equations of sediment transport and catchment response, and usually
assume detailed representations of the processes driving sediment and nutrient
generation and transport (e.g. ANSWERS, WEPP).
All three model types have inherent limitations and advantages in their application. The
best model for a problem will depend on factors such as the scale of the problem, the
availability of data, the intended use of the model, and the user’s skills and resources.
The distinction between models is not sharp. For example, some conceptual models may
have empirical components, whilst other models may be much more physically based
while still falling into the category of conceptual models. For this reason there may be
disagreements in the literature as to which category a particular model belongs to.
Models may also be described as hybrids between two of these classes, e.g. hybrid
metric/conceptual when the model consists of significant empirical and conceptual
components. Also, the classification categories and definitions are not universally agreed
upon by the modelling community, so different authors may use different classifications
of models.
Erosion, sediment and nutrient transport models generally consist of both hydrological
and nutrient/sediment transport components. One major difference between specific
models is the complexity of treatment of rainfall-runoff in the sediment and nutrient
generation process. Models such as CMSS do not attempt to model the hydrology of the
catchment system, whereas other models, such as WEPP, include a rainfall-runoff model
within their structure.
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Note is a necessary feature in PDF annotation, which bring users quick and efficient working with PDF Document.
pdf file size limit; pdf edit text size
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
target PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color
pdf optimized format; change font size pdf text box
40
Different types of models are also subject to different sources of uncertainty and error.
Errors produced in model outputs may be either systematic or random. A systematic error
is non-random and introduces bias into model outputs. For example, a model suffering
from the presence of systematic errors will often consistently underpredict or overpredict
outcomes. Errors in model output can arise from a number of sources, including
misspecification of physical processes within the model structure and inaccurate
measurement of model inputs such as sediment and nutrient concentrations and flow
discharges, or from uncertainties involved with sediment and nutrient load estimations
used for model calibration. Some sources of error will be a problem with any type of
model selected, whereas other sources may be eliminated or reduced by using a different
model type.
3.1.1
Empirical/metric models
Empirical models are generally the simplest of all three model types. This means that the
computational and data requirements for such models are usually smaller than for
conceptual and physics-based models, empirical models generally being capable of being
supported by coarse measurements. Jakeman et al. (1997) state that ‘the feature of this
class of models is their high level of spatial and temporal aggregation and their
incorporation of a small number of causal variables’. Many empirical models are based
on the analysis of catchment data using statistical techniques, and as such are ideal tools
for the analysis of data within catchments. Such models are particularly useful as a first
step in identifying sources of sediment and nutrient generation.
Most empirical models do not attempt to represent the physical processes involved in
sediment generation. For this reason many empirical models tend to be catchment-
specific, that is, they apply only to the catchment for which they have been developed,
and often under the specific land use conditions existing within the catchment at that
time. This means that the ability of empirical models to predict the effects of changes in
catchment characteristics, such as land use, on water quality and sediment yields can be
limited. Empirical models also tend not to be event-responsive (or responsive to
antecedent conditions), ignoring the processes of rainfall-runoff in the catchment being
modelled.
Empirical models are often criticised for employing unrealistic assumptions about the
physics of the catchment system, ignoring the heterogeneity of catchment inputs and
characteristics, such as rainfall and soil types, and the inherent nonlinearities in the
response of the catchment system. Such models are also generally based on the
assumption that underlying conditions remain unchanged for the duration of the study
period.
Walton and Hunter (1996) mention two empirical models, CMSS and AEAM. They state
that these models rely on estimation of parameters through either local knowledge or
expert knowledge or from previous model application. They suggest that these models
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A best C#.NET PDF document SDK library for PDF form field Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
reader compress pdf; acrobat compress pdf
C# PDF: Use C# Code to Add Watermark to PDF Document
into your C#.NET class application, developers can easily add a transparent watermark with desired font color, size and position onto target PDF document page.
adjust file size of pdf; change font size in pdf
41
are intended only as initial planning tools and state that ‘they do not provide highly
accurate prediction of water quality or quantity’.
3.1.2
Conceptual models
Conceptual models are typically based on the representation of the catchment as a
configuration of internal storages and pathways. Conceptual models usually incorporate
the (catchment-scale) underlying physical mechanisms of sediment and runoff generation
within their structure, representing flow paths within the catchment as a series of
storages, each requiring some characterisation of its dynamic behaviour. Conceptual
models are not generally spatially distributed, although this is not necessarily the case
(Jakeman et al. 1997). Rather, conceptual models tend to lump representative processes
over the scale at which outputs are simulated. Parameter values for conceptual models
have typically been obtained through calibration against observed data such as stream
discharge and concentration measurements.
Due to the requirement that parameter values be determined through calibration against
observed data, conceptual models tend to suffer from problems associated with the
identifiability of their parameter values. Most calibration techniques used for conceptual
models of medium complexity (say more than half a dozen parameters) are capable of
finding only local optima at best. Often calibration of parameters in a conceptual model
identifies only a set of sufficiently accurate parameter values which reproduce observed
behaviour in some sense, not necessarily a globally optimal set. This means that there are
many possible ‘best’ parameter sets available. Spear (1995) notes this problem in large
simulation models stating that ‘there is not a single point in the parameter space
associated with good simulations, indeed there generally is not even a well-defined
region in the sense of a compact region interior to the prior parameter space’. Thus the
likelihood of identifying a unique ‘best’ parameter set, in terms of goodness of fit, is very
small. Increasing model complexity tends to decrease a priori model identifiability
(Kleissen et al. 1990). This means that in general, simpler conceptual models have fewer
problems with model identification than more complex models. Thus problems with
model identification can be minimised through limiting the number of parameters to be
estimated through calibration and possibly identifying additional parameters using a
priori knowledge of the system. However this reduction in problems associated with
identifiability through simplification of models may come at the expense of goodness of
fit to calibration data. More complex models are more likely to provide a better fit to
calibration data, although this does not necessarily extend to providing better predictions
of future behaviour, as complex models run the risk of overfitting calibration data (see
the end of section 3.1.3).
The lack of uniqueness in parameter values for conceptual models means that the
parameters in such models have limited physical interpretability. However, this problem
can also be associated with empirical and physics-based models. Physics-based models in
particular are often over-parameterised whereas empirical models tend to be naturally
much simpler in their level of parameterisation.
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
best way to compress pdf files; change font size pdf comment box
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
change font size on pdf text box; best online pdf compressor
42
3.1.3
Physics-based models
Physics-based models are grounded on the solution of fundamental physical equations
describing streamflow and sediment and nutrient generation within the catchment.
Standard equations used in such physics-based models are the equations of conservation
of mass and momentum for flow and the equation of conservation of mass for sediment
(e.g. Bennett 1974).
In theory, the parameters used in physics-based models are measurable within the
catchment and so are ‘known’. However, in practice, the large number of parameters
involved and the heterogeneity of important characteristics within the catchment means
that these parameters must typically be calibrated against observed data. This creates
additional uncertainty in parameter values. Also, even in situations where parameters can
be ‘measured’ within the catchment, errors in the measurement of important
characteristics will create additional uncertainty as to the veracity of model outcomes.
Where parameters cannot be measured within the catchment they must be determined
through calibration against observed data. Given the large number (possibly hundreds) of
parameter values needed to be estimated using such a process, problems with the lack of
identifiability of model parameters and non-uniqueness of ‘best fit’ solutions can be
expected. There is likely to be a large number of parameter values for which the model
gives an adequate fit. Thus the physical interpretability of model parameters is
questionable. In the case of large simulation models, where many possible ‘best’
parameter sets are available, there are ‘clear limitations on how one might interpret the
technical or scientific significance of any particular set of parameters that lead to a good
fit’ (Spear 1995). In the case of physics-based models this means that the necessity to
calibrate some or all parameter values will undermine the physical interpretability of the
entire parameter set.
An additional problem with estimating model parameters in physics-based models is the
necessity to lump together spatially distributed variables into data at a single point. Lane
et al. (1995) state that ‘model parameters derived in this manner represent nothing more
than fitted coefficients distorted beyond any physical significance’. In general the
equations governing the processes in physics-based models are derived for small-scale
models under very specific physical conditions. However, in physically based models
these equations are used at much greater scales, and under different physical conditions.
The equations are generally derived for use with continuous spatial and temporal data, but
the data used in these models is often point-source data taken to represent an entire grid
cell within the catchment. The derivation of mathematical expressions describing
individual processes in physics-based models is subject to numerous assumptions that
may not be relevant in many real-world situations (Dunin 1975). The viability of lumping
up small-scale physics to the scale of the spatial grid used in many physics-based models
is also questionable (Beven 1989). Specifically there is a lack of theoretical justification
for assuming that equations apply equally well at the grid scale, at which they are
representing the lumped aggregate of heterogeneous subgrid processes (Beven 1989).
Physics-based models also tend to have greater data and computational requirements than
other model types. Parameter values must be measured both spatially and temporally
43
within the catchment. The use of such models has been limited by the lack of observed
physical and biological data within catchments, and by the larger computing costs
involved in their use.
The tradeoff between model complexity and accuracy is not simply that increased model
complexity increases model accuracy. Simpler catchment models perform equally well or
at least are not substantially outperformed by more complex models (Loague and Freeze
1985). Jakeman and Hornberger (1993) confirmed this result for different levels of
complexity in conceptual models.
3.2 Specific erosion and sediment/nutrient models
Many different erosion and sediment/nutrient transport models are currently available.
These models differ in complexity, the catchment processes modelled and the
assumptions on which they are based. This section provides an outline of a number of
currently available models, including information on their cost, availability and hardware
requirements.
3.2.1
AEAM
The Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Measurement program (AEAM) is a
process for the development and exploration of management options for complex
systems. One of the main outcomes of the AEAM process is the development of a model
based on expert knowledge of the system. The complexity of the model developed
depends on the relationships within the system considered to be necessary by the expert
groups consulted. Grayson et al. (1994) identifies AEAM as being ‘a philosophical and
methodological framework designed to deal with the uncertainties inherent in
environmental changes’. The AEAM approach relies on expert knowledge along with
historical variability and patterns of change to characterise the system. The initial
simulation model developed from this characterisation is used to design management
programs which measure responses to management actions, which are used to refine the
initial model. In this way, the model is an adaptive approach to catchment management.
There is not a set model structure for AEAM. Instead, the program can be thought of as a
guideline for catchment management groups to approach their water quality problem.
The basic design of the AEAM program is in two parts. The ‘shell’ handles the
input/output and provides the structure to manage the spatial and temporal data, while the
‘dynamic simulation’ performs the numerical simulation of the system (Grayson et al.
1994). The shell tends to be generic between AEAM models, while the dynamic
simulation is developed for the specific application.
AEAM, although widely used elsewhere, has not been used to a large extent in Australia
(Grayson et al. 1993; Grayson et al. 1994). AEAM models of catchment behaviour are
generally simple balance-type representations based on rainfall and evaporation input
data. The models developed do not normally attempt to quantify the processes involved
44
in water quality and are not formulated as predictive or forecasting tools. Instead, they
are a more trial-and-error approach to catchment management, generally relying on
empirical and simple conceptual models. Like CMSS, these models rely on calibration of
parameter estimates and are intended only as planning tools (Walton and Hunter 1996).
The model has been used for integrated catchment management on the Latrobe and
Goulburn River catchments (Grayson et al. 1994 and Grayson and Doolan 1995
respectively) and for the improved integration of planned riparian-zone research in the
North Johnstone catchment in Queensland (Argent and Wilson 1996).
Examples of model users:
LWRRDC; Centre for Environmental Applied Hydrology at the University of Melbourne
Hardware Requirements:
Run under QuickBASIC or VisualBASIC on PC
Availability/Cost:
Models are generally adapted from a model used in a similar AEAM application elsewhere.
LWRRDC and the Centre for Environmental Applied Hydrology at the University of
Melbourne have prepared Occasional Paper 01/95, ‘Adaptive Environmental Assessment
and Measurement [AEAM] and Integrated Catchment Management’ ($28), providing more
detailed information and two Victorian applications for the Latrobe River and Goulburn
and Broken Rivers catchments on PC-format floppy discs.
For further information contact:
Dr Rodger Grayson
Phone: (03) 9344 7305
Email: rodger@civag.unimelb.edu.au
3.2.2
AGNPS
The Agricultural Non-Point Source model (AGNPS) is an event-based, non-point source
pollution model developed by the US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research
Service (USDA-ARS) in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and
the US Soil Conservation Service (SCS). The model was developed to predict and
analyse runoff water quality from rural catchments ranging from a few to over 20 000 ha.
AGNPS uses a grid cell representation of the catchment, with cell resolution ranging
from 0.4 to 16 hectares. Runoff and transport of sediment, nutrient and chemical oxygen
demand are simulated for each grid cell, with potential pollutants being routed through
cells to the catchment outlet.
Runoff within the catchment is simulated using the SCS curve number method, an
empirical rainfall-runoff modelling technique. This method deals with baseflow
separately and combines channel runoff, surface runoff and subsurface flow into ‘direct’
runoff. The rainfall-runoff equation is
45
R
a
= 
(
)
(
)
Q
I
Q
I
S
m
a
m
a
m
+
2
(3.1)
where R
a
is the annual rainfall, Q
m
is the potential maximum runoff, I
a
is the initial
abstraction (often assumed to be 0.2S
m
) and S
m
is the potential maximum retention. The
value of S
m
is related to a curve number CN by the relationship:
CN = 
1000
10
S
m
+
(3.2)
Erosion and sediment transport are modelled using a modified version of the Universal
Soil Loss Equation (USLE), which is discussed in sections 3.2.14 and 3.2.17. Two
different versions of the AGNPS model have been developed by the USDA-ARS. One
uses the USLE, the other the RUSLE (AGNPS98). A version is currently being
developed using the USLE-M (Kinnell and Risse 1998, Kinnell, 1998a and 1998b). Soil
loss is calculated within AGNPS for each cell in the catchment. The chemical transport
component of AGNPS models the transport of nitrogen, phosphorus and chemical
oxygen throughout the catchment, using relationships adapted from the CREAMS model
and from a feedlot evaluation model. The nitrogen cycle is considered explicitly in
AGNPS (Ball and Trudgill 1995). The model treats nutrients and chemical oxygen
delivered from feedlots as point sources, and routes them with contributions from non-
point sources. Other point source inputs of pollutants and water are modelled by
inputting incoming flow and nutrients to the cells in which they occur.
Input data for the AGNPS model includes variables describing catchment morphology,
land use variables and precipitation data, generally input for each cell in the catchment
grid. The model outputs total volumes associated with runoff, sediment yield and
chemical output in a number of different forms, including graphical and numerical
representations.
AGNPS was developed and tested on catchments in the USDA but has been applied in a
number of different studies on catchments in Australia (Rosewell 1995) and around the
world.
AGNPS is generally more accurate in its predictions and analysis of sediment yield than
models such as CMSS, but the greater data requirements and computational complexity
of AGNPS must be weighed against this improvement in accuracy.
Examples of Model Users:
Department of Conservation and Land Management - Gunnedah Research Station
Hardware Requirements:
PC or Unix/Solaris 2.5×
Availability/Cost:
Freely available from USDA-ARS via the Internet at
http://www.coe.odu.edu/cee/model/agnps.html.
46
For further information contact:
Mr. Richard Beecham
Phone: (02) 9895 7169
Email: fchs@engineering.unimelb.edu.au
3.2.3
ANSWERS
From the mid 1980s, advances in sediment and nutrient transport modelling included the
development of a grid or cellular approach, dividing the landscape into cells which were
modelled individually and totalled for the catchment. This approach subsequently
provided a common basis for the structure of process-based hydrologic and water quality
models (Moore and Gallant 1991). The pioneering model was the Areal Non-Point
Source Watershed Environment Response Simulation (ANSWERS) program, a precursor
to GIS (Zhang et al. 1995). The primary outputs of model simulation are runoff and
erosion (Fisher et al. 1997), although the model has been extended to include nutrients
(Moore and Gallant 1991).
The model uses four main categories of landform parameters: soil, land uses, elevation-
based slope and aspect, and channel descriptions in addition to the storm event details
(Fisher et al. 1997). Within these broad categories many parameters are required. For
example, for each soil type the following eight variables are required: total porosity, field
capacity, steady state infiltration, the difference between steady state and maximum
infiltration, the rate of decrease in infiltration with an increase in soil moisture,
infiltration control zone depth, antecedent soil moisture, and erodibility.
The erosion module in ANSWERS is governed by the continuity equation
dM
dx
D
cf
q
1
(3.4)
where D
cf
is the net detachment or deposition rate and q
1
is the lateral inflow of sediment
load to the channel. Detachment of soil particles by raindrop impact is calculated using
the relationship
R
d
= 0.027 C K A
R
r
2
(3.5)
where R
d
is the rainfall impact detachment rate, C is the cropping and management factor
of the USLE, K is the soil erodibility factor, A
i
is the area increment and R
r
is the rainfall
intensity.
ANSWERS uses a form of the Yalins’ (1963) bedload transport equation to predict the
transport of cohesionless grains over a movable bed for steady uniform flow of a viscous
fluid (Loch et al. 1989b). The extended version of ANSWERS is capable of simulating
the transport of individual particle size classes (Rose and Ghadiri 1991).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested