asp.net open pdf : Batch reduce pdf file size SDK application service wpf html windows dnn nswreport6-part2023

47
The model is both temporally and spatially distributed, providing an advantage over less
complex models like USLE (Zhang et al. 1995). Given the large data requirements for
the model simulation, the incorporation of GIS is of increasing importance in large-scale
sediment transport or water quality prediction. The effects of rainfall intensity and spatial
variation in soil infiltration capacity, surface conditions and topography are explicitly
represented by ANSWERS (Connolly et al. 1997).
The applicability of ANSWERS is limited in most catchments by the large input data
requirements, both spatial and temporal, of the model. Given the lack of such data in
most catchments, parameters may need to be calibrated, raising problems with model
identifiability and the physical interpretability of model parameters. There are also other
potential problems with the program. Fisher et al. (1997) concluded from a spatial
sensitivity analysis of the model that many outputs were insensitive to changes in the
spatial distribution of input variables to the model. The authors proposed three possible
explanations: lack of variability of important parameters within the study catchment; key
model components unaccounted for; or variables not subjected to spatial mixing in any
run swamping the effect of mixing. These findings indicate the possible shortcomings of
the model in effectively modelling the processes addressed by the model (Fisher et al.
1997). Additionally, ANSWERS considers erodibility to be a relatively time-constant
parameter, contrary to the large variations in this parameter that have been recorded
(Govers and Loch 1993). This assumption is likely to limit the effectiveness of the model
in predicting runoff and soil erosion.
The model has been extensively used by the Queensland Department of Primary Industries
for the prediction of runoff from rainfall simulators (Silburn and Connolly 1995; Connolly
and Silburn 1995; Connolly et al. 1997) and for validation and calibration of a predictive
infiltration model and peak discharge estimation models (Silburn et al. 1990; Titmarsh et
al. 1990). The model used was modified to include the Green and Ampt infiltration
equation. The work by the Queensland Department of Primary Industries showed the
ability of physics-based models, using physically realistic representations of runoff
processes and parameter values derived from small plots, to represent hydrology over a
range of catchment complexity and scales (Connolly et al. 1990).
Apart from this, ANSWERS has not been widely used in Australia, although it has been
applied to the Adelaide Hills Catchment in South Australia (McQuade et al. 1986) and
on Whiteheads Creek in the Warragamba Dam catchment in NSW (Armstrong 1995).
The large data requirements needed to run the model are likely to limit its application to
Australian catchments in the future.
Examples of Model Users:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries
Hardware Requirements:
UNIX
Batch reduce pdf file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf page size; change page size pdf
Batch reduce pdf file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
batch reduce pdf file size; change font size pdf fillable form
48
Availability/Cost:
Distributed by C Vision Pty Ltd, 185 Elizabeth St Suite 320, Sydney NSW 2000,
Australia. Tel: (02) 9283 4000; Fax: (02) 9261 4854.
3.2.4
AQUALM
AQUALM is a stormwater quality model that generates point and non-point source
pollutants through standard or user-defined equations in addition to runoff estimations
and routing (Phillips et al. 1993). AQUALM is a conceptual model similar to HSPF in
the way that the catchment is divided into subcatchments with water and pollutants being
routed between these subcatchments, although it is simpler than HSPF, using a lesser
range of processes (Walton and Hunter 1996). The model has a rainfall-runoff
component in addition to a pollution export component and can simulate the moisture
storage characteristics for different land uses and runoff and pollutant export on a daily
basis through the consideration of daily rainfall evaporation and soil infiltration (WBM-
SKM 1997).
AQUALM consists of five modules: a daily rainfall-runoff module, point source and
non-point source pollutant export modules, Best Management Practices (BMP) modules
for sediment traps, gross pollutant traps, ponds, wetlands and lakes, a river quality and
loading module, and a graphical user interface with an embedded decision support
system (Phillips et al. 1993). The daily rainfall-runoff is simulated using a modified
version of Boughton’s model and predicts runoff from rainfall, accounting for
interception, evapotranspiration and surface soil moisture storages.
The pollutant export module supports the simultaneous estimation of pollutant loads for
up to ten pollutants, calculating non-point source pollutant loads from a subcatchment,
pollutant inputs from a point source, and direct input of time-varying runoff and pollutant
loads (Phillips et al. 1993).
The river quality and loading module is based upon a gradually varying ‘conservation of
mass flow’ type model and incorporates user-defined decay functions to account for loss
in constituent mass with flow downstream (Phillips et al. 1993).
Phillips et al. (1993) noted that a major impediment to the use of complex water quality
models, such as SWMM or HSPF in their complete form, was the common lack of data
on which to calibrate the model and the apparent large variability in the data that is
available. AQUALM incorporates a number of well-tested water quality models with
limited data requirements (Phillips et al. 1993).
The model requires the calibration of the rainfall-runoff and water quality components.
Generally, the rainfall-runoff calibration is performed for each of the land use types
featured within the catchment based on long-term rainfall and runoff data. However,
often there is a lack of appropriate water quality data and therefore the water quality
component of the model tends to be based upon characteristic export rates and data from
other areas.
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
and developers can shrink or reduce source image Therefore the batch image resizing mode is not powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf compression settings; change font size in pdf comment box
VB.NET TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to GIF Using VB.NET TIFF to GIF
page to GIF image) and batch-conversion (convert the function code "ImageFormat.Gif" to "ImageFormat.Jpeg/Pdf". impacting the image quality) to reduce the file
change pdf page size; adjust size of pdf file
49
AQUALM has been used widely throughout Australia, mainly by government agencies.
Two recent examples are in the review of the Sydney Water Proposal (1997) and the
investigation of nutrients from urban stormwater and local water quality on behalf of the
Goulburn Broken Water Quality Working Group (Anon. 1995). However, there have
been few applications of AQUALM within the scientific literature, either in Australia or
overseas.
Walden and Brodie (1995) identified that the AQUALM model had advantages over other
models for pollutant export modelling for the Trinity catchment. Reasons included the
ability to allow the application of generalised model coefficients based on previous
experience, the flexibility of the model to investigate a number of land use scenarios, and
the ability of the model to incorporate point source loading from sewerage treatment plants.
Examples of Model Users:
Goulburn Broken Water Quality Working Group; Sydney Water, Oxley Creek Co-
ordinating Committee (part of Brisbane River Management Group); Sinclair Knight
Merz (as part of Trinity Inlet Management Program)
3.2.5
CMSS
The Catchment Management Support System (CMSS) is a simple catchment-scale
empirical model developed by CSIRO Land and Water to analyse the likely impacts of
land use and land management policies on the nutrient load delivered to rivers, in
particular the effect on total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads reaching waterways
within a catchment.
The model is broken down into four modules: a database module, a policy module, a
predictive model module, and an interrogation module (Davis and Farley 1997). With
these, CMSS is able to account for the effects of land use and land management policies
on nutrient loads. It calculates the contribution of different forms of land use to nutrient
loads and allows the user to review the load and cost predictions.
The database module in CMSS contains four main files describing land uses, spatial
attributes of the catchment, nutrient generation rates and management practices. The land
use file describes the size of activities occurring within the catchment, generating a
particular nutrient load per unit of the activity. Both point and non-point pollutant
activities can be specified in this file. Areas of the catchment with the same type of land
use but with differing environmental factors such as rainfall or slope gradient must be
described as separate land uses within the CMSS structure.
CMSS calculates the average annual nutrient yield for a catchment using nutrient
generation rates specified for each land use in the land use file. The total load for nutrient
j is calculated as
Load
j
= 
A Ng
ik
i ij
k
m
i
n
=
=

1
1
(3.7)
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel This is a batch of data indicating the number of colors of array 2^n. The property is used to reduce the size
adjust size of pdf; pdf page size may not be reduced
50
where there are n land uses and m spatial units in the catchment. A
ik
is the area of land
use i in spatial unit k in the case of a diffuse source, or a count of the number of
occurrences in spatial unit k for a point source. N
i
is set to 1 for diffuse sources and is set
to the catchment-averaged size of each occurrence for point sources. The term g
ij
is the
generation rate of nutrient j for land use i.
The nutrient generation rates must be obtained through either local or expert knowledge
of the catchment, or from previous model application. Appendix I looks in more detail at
nutrient export rates in Australia as given in the literature. Nutrient generation in the
model is independent of rainfall events within the catchment. CMSS does not attempt to
model processes such as rainfall-runoff or infiltration. The model is also capable of
assessing the most important sources of nutrient load within the catchment and
performing cost–benefit analysis on various pollution policies.
CMSS produces results in the form of a GIS-like map that allows the model user to
locate land uses and land features in the catchment that produces the most nutrients,
which can then be used to design and implement appropriate management practices.
CMSS is easier to use and has fewer data requirements than conceptual or physics-based
models, but does not generally give as accurate an assessment of water quality as models
of these types according to Walton and Hunter 1996. As such, CMSS is most useful as an
initial planning tool to give relative rankings of catchments and land uses with respect to
nutrient loads.
CMSS has been widely used throughout Australia since its development, with 60
registered users throughout Australia and New Zealand by 1997 (Hook 1997). Due to the
simplicity of the model, CMSS can be used by catchment groups and government
agencies with limited data or technical knowledge about the processes involved in water
quality issues. In particular, the model has been used extensively by the NSW Algal
Management Strategy (Long and Verhoeven 1995; Verhoeven 1995; Porter and Foster
1996).
Examples of Model Users:
NSW Algal Management Strategy (Barwon region of NSW); Mount Lofty Ranges
Review Team (South Australia)
Hardware Requirements:
PC
Availability/Cost:
$1300 including 3-day training course, user manual, nutrient data book, and an expert
system for estimating nutrient generation rates (Hook 1997).
For further information contact:
Dr. Bill Young
Phone: (02) 6246 5729
Email: wjy@cbr.clw.csiro.au
51
3.2.6
CREAMS
The Chemical Runoff and Erosion from Agricultural Management Systems model
(CREAMS) was developed as a tool to evaluate the relative effects of agricultural
practices on pollutants in surface runoff and in soil water below the root zone (Knisel
1980; Lane et al. 1992; Lane et al. 1995). The model has been extended and modified in
GLEAMS, the Groundwater Loading Effects of Agricultural Management Systems (Ball
and Trudgill 1995). Both of the models consist of three components: hydrology,
erosion/sedimentation, and chemistry. The model predicts erosion, deposition and
transport of sediment on an overland flow slope profile and into first- and second-order
channels (Silburn and Loch 1991). CREAMS applies to field-sized catchments, assumed
to be uniform in soil topography and land use, of approximately 40 ha, although it can be
used on scales up to 400 ha (Lane et al. 1992).
The CREAMS model uses a physics-based approach to erosion and sediment transport,
although significant simplifications are made as a consequence of model size,
computational speed and limited hydrologic data. The erosional model is run for
individual storms and assumes quasi-steady state through the use of a characteristic
runoff rate for each storm (Silburn and Loch 1989). Additionally, slope is assumed to be
uniform and is computed on a per-unit-width basis.
Unlike many other models, such as USLE, CREAMS considers that the amount of
sediment leaving a field is limited by transport capacity or detachment. In addition,
CREAMS also considers gully erosion which, although not considered by USLE, can
produce as much sediment as that produced by sheet and rill erosion (Lane et al. 1992).
Sediment transport is calculated according to the steady-state continuity equation
dG
dx
= D
f
+ D
s
(3.8)
where G is the sediment load, x is the distance, D
f
is the detachment or deposition rate by
flow and D
s
is the rate that sediment is added to the flow from lateral areas.
Rainfall-runoff in the CREAMS model is simulated using the SCS curve number
approach as described in section 3.2.2 in the AGNPS model. Sediment yield, as with the
ANSWERS model, is calculated using Yalins’ equation.
The CREAMS model has started to be used more regularly within Australia for soil
erosion prediction over the last ten years. In particular, Silburn and Loch (Loch et al.
1989a; Silburn and Loch 1989; Silburn and Loch 1991) have assessed the validity of the
model’s predictions in laboratory and field studies. These studies have generally
indicated that the performance of the model is acceptable, although Evans et al. (1994,
1997) identified that the interrill component of CREAMS may be oversensitive to slope.
As noted previously, CREAMS accounts for gully erosion and deposition, unlike models
such as USLE. Additionally, the model allows for the erodibility factor to be updated
from one runoff event to the next (Govers and Loch 1993). As soil erodibility factors
52
have been shown to be quite variable, this could be an important aspect of the model.
However, Govers and Lock (1993) noted that the ‘dynamic nature of runoff erosion may
limit any increase in prediction accuracy that can be obtained using physics-based models
rather than statistical models, as the performance of a model such as CREAMS will
become highly dependent on the accuracy of the input data’. Another potential
disadvantage of the CREAMS model is that the plot or catchment being modelled is
assumed to be uniform in soil topography and land use, a highly unrealistic assumption.
In other words, the benefits associated with the consideration of gully erosion and
deposition processes may be nullified by the dependency of the model on data accuracy
and on assumptions of homogeneity.
Examples of Model Users:
Land Management Research Branch, Queensland Department of Primary Industries,
Toowoomba, Queensland.
Hardware Requirements:
UNIX (using Fortran)
3.2.7
HSPF
The Hydrologic Simulation Program – Fortran (HSPF) is a model developed upon the
1960s Stanford Watershed Model (WBM-SKM 1997) for the simulation of watershed
hydrology and water quality (N, P, SS and other toxic organic or inorganic pollutants)
(Walton and Hunter 1996). HSPF considers only one-dimensional flow and is suitable
for non-tidal reaches of rivers. The model is a catchment-scale, grid-based, conceptual
model whereby catchments are broken down into subcatchments and water quantity and
quality are calculated for each land use within the subcatchment. Water, sediment and
chemical fluxes are then added to the streams, and flows are routed to the catchment
outlet.
The model consists of three main modules: the pervious land module, the impervious
land module and the river / mixed reservoir module. In the pervious land module,
hydrologic processes are driven by rainfall and include interception of rainfall,
evaporation, overland flow, infiltration, interflow, soil moisture storage and groundwater
(Cheung and Fisher 1995). Surface erosion is accounted for by the processes of
detachment and transport, although dust deposition and wind-blown removal can also be
simulated. Sediment-adsorbed water quality components are treated as being washed off
with sediments and entering the receiving stream (Cheung and Fisher 1995).
The impervious land module is simpler than the pervious module, with dissolved solutes
and accumulated sediments being transported off the land surface with overland flow.
Sediment-adsorbed water quality components are treated as with the pervious land
module. Urban areas that consist of pervious and impervious surfaces are modelled by
assigning a portion of the land as impervious and the remaining land according to the
make-up of the land (Cheung and Fisher 1995).
53
The river and mixed reservoir module includes physical processes such as transport
advection, diffusion, sediment deposition and scouring. The model also considers the
following chemical processes: aeration, nitrification, denitrification, biochemical
oxidation, adsorption and desorption of solute from suspended sediment, and settlement
(Cheung and Fisher 1995). Chapman (1991) tables the specific transport and reaction, as
well as general, characteristics of HSPF and other toxicant models.
The inputs to the model include rainfall, evaporation, air and water temperature, solar
radiation, sediment grain size distribution, point source discharge volume, and water
quality data (Cheung and Fisher 1995). Streamflow and in-stream water quality variables
are used for comparison with the model results. The model is able to simulate a wide
range of water quality components. The outputs from the simulation are a temporal
history of runoff flow rate, sediment load and nutrient concentrations along with a
temporal history of water quantity and quality at any point in the catchment.
HSPF was developed as a generic model designed to apply to most catchments using
existing meteorological and hydrological data, soils and topographic information, and
information on drainage and other characteristics (Rahman and Salbe 1993). A limitation
to this model is that it relies heavily on calibration against field data for parameterisation
(Walton and Hunter 1996). With the relatively large number of parameters required to be
calibrated this raises problems associated with parameter identifiability and the physical
meaningfulness of model parameters. Although HSPF has the potential to be a useful tool
for catchment management, Cheung and Fisher (1995) note that the calibre of models
found is related to the availability and accuracy of input data and the skills of the
modeller.
HSPF has been used widely in southern Australia, particularly by Sydney Water and the
Australian Water Technologies Science and Environment Division in NSW. Particular
applications of the model have included the upper Nepean catchment, (Ball et al. 1993),
the South Creek catchment, (Fisher et al. 1993, Rahman and Salbe 1993), the Werriberri
catchment (Cheung 1993; Fisher and Deen 1993; Cheung and Fisher 1995) and the Cattai
catchment (Cheung and Fisher 1995). The HSPF model was used because of the
identified comprehensiveness and flexibility of the model and its ability to simulate
runoff and in-stream process simultaneously (Rahman and Salbe 1993; Cheung and
Fisher 1995).
Examples of Model Users:
Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Resource Management Institute;
Australian Water Technologies Ensight / Sydney Water Corporation.
Hardware Requirements:
PC (DOS) or UNIX
Availability/Cost:
Available for DOS systems from: ftp.epa.gov/epa_ceam/ or
http://www.cee.odu.edu/cee/model/hspf.html (program and user manual)
54
3.2.8
HYDRA
HYDRA is a collaborative project between CSIRO Land and Water, CSIRO
Mathematical and Information Services and Sydney Water (Rizzoli and Young 1997).
The aim of this project is to integrate current modelling approaches into an
Environmental Decision Support System (EDSS). The EDSS was designed for planning
water quality management in the Hawkesbury–Nepean and combines hydrological
modelling systems with a map interface easily used by planners and managers
(http://www.dit.csiro.au/hydra.htm). HYDRA uses a GIS-based interface to allow the
user to depict land use changes. Predicted outcomes are examined by clicking on a
particular section and generating a chart of the water quality measure (e.g. nutrients and
sediment) over the period of interest.
Examples of Model Users:
Sydney Water Corporation
Availability/cost:
Not commercially available yet
For further information contact:
Susan Cuddy
Phone: (02) 6246 5705
Email: susan.cuddy@cbr.clw.csiro.au
3.2.9
IHACRES
See STARS, 3.2.15.
3.2.10  IQQM
The Integrated Water Quantity and Quality Model (IQQM) is a conceptual model being
developed by the Department of Land and Water Conservation NSW. IQQM has
modules for in-stream water quality and quantity as well as for rainfall-runoff and
groundwater quantity (DLWC 1995; Simons et al. 1996). IQQM operates on a
continuous basis, using time steps of one day, down to one hour for some processes.
The main processes that are simulated in the instream water quantity module include
flow routing in rivers, effluent systems and irrigation channels, reservoir operation,
irrigation, urban water supply and other consumptive uses, and wetland and
environmental flow requirements. The instream water quality module is based on the
program QUAL2E, developed by the USEPA, and accounts for factors such as nitrogen,
phosphorus, dissolved oxygen and sediment, as well as coliforms and algae. IQQM also
55
has a module designed to simulate salt mobilisation in catchments where the major
source of salt is rock weathering.
Examples of Model Users:
The model has been used by the Department of Land and Water Conservation in the
Border Rivers, Barwon–Darling between Mungindi and upstream of Menindee lakes,
Macquarie, Lachlan, Clarence, Namoi, Hunter, Gwydir and Murrumbidgee river systems
(Hook 1997).
Hardware Requirements:
8 MB RAM, 80386 CPU with maths coprocessor, 40 MB hard disk, SVGA monitor
(DLWC 1995).
For further information contact:
Dr Dugald Black
Phone: (02) 9895 7421
Email: dblack@dlwc.nsw.gov.au
3.2.11  LASCAM
LASCAM, a salt and water balance model, has been adapted to include a sediment
generation and transport algorithm for modelling hydrological processes at a catchment
scale. Viney and Sivapalan (1997) incorporated a conceptualisation of the Universal Soil
Loss Equation to predict sediment generation, E, according to the equation:
E = 
γ
C q
ie
δ
(3.9)
where q
ie
is the daily infiltration-excess runoff, C is the USLE crop factor and the
variables 
δ
and 
γ
are optimisable parameters. The model has been used extensively in the
Swan–Avon River Basin in Western Australia to predict and model sediment loads,
water yields, salinity and nutrients (Viney and Sivapalan 1997;
http://www.cwr.uwa.edu.au/index2.html). The Centre for Water Research at the
University of Western Australia has undertaken much of the work involving this model.
LASCAM-WQ is a conceptual model adapted from LASCAM and uses gridded
topographic information to define a stream network and break up the catchment into a
series of subcatchments (Viney and Sivapalan 1997). The hydrological processes are
modelled at the subcatchment scale before being summed up to represent the total
catchment. The rainfall-runoff component of the model contains 22 parameters.
LASCAM requires daily rainfall, pan evaporation and land use information while
topographic data is required to define subcatchments and the stream network. The
outputs for the model are surface and subsurface runoff, actual evaporation, recharge to
the permanent groundwater table baseflow, measures of soil moisture and salt outflows
(http://www.cwr.uwa.edu.au/index2.html).
56
The conceptual nature of LASCAM-WQ requires that the model be calibrated against a
long time series of measured streamflow and water quality data. The model can use
measurements of water outflow, salinity, nutrients and sediments at one or more
locations within the stream catchments network. The model has shown considerable
potential as a sediment yield model (Viney and Sivapalan 1997) and has predicted water
yield, salinity, sediments, nitrogen and phosphorus for the entire Swan–Avon River
Basin (http://www.cwr.uwa.edu.au/index2.html). Despite the need for calibration,
LASCAM can potentially provide an advantage over the use of physics-based sediment
models, given the considerable data and parameter uncertainties identified by Viney and
Sivapalan (1997). The smaller number of parameters needed to be calibrated for the
water quality component means that this part of the model is less likely to suffer from
problems associated with identifiability than other more complex models.
Examples of Model Users:
Centre for Water Research at the University of Western Australia
Availability/Cost:
Not commercially available yet
For further information contact:
Assoc. Prof. M. Sivapalan
Phone: (08) 9380 2320
Email: sivapala@cwr.uwa.edu.au
3.2.12  LISEM
The Limburg Soil Erosion Model (LISEM) is a physics-based hydrological and soil
erosion model developed by the Department of Physical Geography at Utrecht University
and the Soil Physics Division at the Winard Staring Centre in Wageningen, the
Netherlands, for planning and conservation purposes. The LISEM model is based upon
EUROSEM. LISEM is completely incorporated within a GIS, that is, the model is
expressed completely in the GIS command structure of PCRaster.
The LISEM model does not simulate concentrated erosion in rills and gullies; rather, it
simulates flow detachment in the ponded area only. This can be seen as an intermediate
between sheet and rill erosion.
LISEM incorporates a number of different processes including rainfall interception,
surface storage in micro-depressions, infiltration, vertical movement of water in soil,
overland flow, channel flow, detachment by rainfall and throughfall, detachment by
overland flow and transport capacity of flow. Model simulation is based on the solution
of a number of physical equations describing water and sediment yield processes. LISEM
simulates the runoff and sediment transport caused by a single rainfall event.
The GIS nature of LISEM means that inputs to the model simulation are in the form of
GIS maps. Approximately 25 maps are required for simulation, including maps
describing catchment morphology, maps required by the soil water submodel and maps
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested