67
The hydraulic processes component computes the hydraulic shearing forces exerted on
the soil surface by the surface runoff. This requires information regarding surface runoff
volumes, hydraulic roughness, and approximations of runoff duration and peak rate.
The final component of the model, the soil processes module, deals with the temporal
changes in soil properties important in soil erosion, considering the effect of management
practices, weathering, consolidation, and rainfall on soil and surface variables, including
random roughness, bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and the erodibility
factors of the rill and interrill (Laflen et al. 1991).
As can be seen from the above description, WEPP requires a large amount of input data.
The outputs of the model can be summarised as spatial and temporal distributions of soil
loss, sediment yield, sediment size characteristics, runoff volumes and soil water balance.
The WEPP profile also considers sediment deposition and is applicable from the top of a
hillslope to a channel.
Zhang et al. (1995) noted that the individual processes and components which affect
erosion, including the complex interactions between various factors and their temporal
variabilities, are simply and effectively described. In addition, the ability of WEPP to
accurately predict where detachment and deposition will occur will be useful in
establishing appropriate conservation or management practices.
There are a number of possible criticisms of the WEPP model. Firstly, the large
computational requirements of the model may limit its applicability in studies of
Australian catchments where there is often little data or available resources. Many of the
model parameters may need to be calibrated against observed data in such studies,
creating problems with model identifiability and the physical interpretability of model
parameters. Secondly, the model was developed for the hillslope scale. With increasing
recognition of the importance of a catchment-based approach to land management,
WEPP may not be adequate. WEPP may conceivably be extended to a larger scale by
using a grid-based approach, that is, a series of hillslopes, however, this is likely to lead
to problems associated with cumulative error. Thirdly, the WEPP model does not
account for gully erosion or erosion from continuously flowing streams and thus may
underestimate the impact a land use will have on erosion. In many Australian river
systems, such as the Murrumbidgee, in-stream processes and gully erosion are the largest
contributors to sediment load, yet these are ignored within the WEPP model. Finally, the
rill–interrill concept of erosion used by WEPP may not be applicable in soils that have
not been cultivated and do not initially exhibit rill formations.
The application of WEPP within Australia has been very limited, due to the complex
model code and large parameter requirements. Fogarty (1997) carried out some initial
testing of the model, concluding that WEPP could reliably predict runoff from disturbed
forest land, and had the potential to predict sediment yield from the land. WEPP could
potentially serve a useful role in predicting sediment yields, principally from disturbed
forest land. However, there is very little literature, apart from the above, from Australia.
Most likely this reflects the large computational requirements and inadequacy of the
WEPP model within much of Australia due to the highly recognised lack of data.
Pdf change font size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf reduce file size; adjust size of pdf in preview
Pdf change font size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf form change font size; best pdf compression
68
Realistically, it would seem that the main use of WEPP within Australia will be limited
to specific applications where there are sufficient data and funds to run the model.
Examples of Model Users:
Department of Land and Water Conservation, Queanbeyan.
Hardware Requirements:
PC under DOS operating system—at least 80386 CPU with a maths coprocessor. At least
10 MB free space on hard drive (more depending on simulations).
Availability/Cost:
Partial installation of v98.4 at ftp://soils.con.pursue.edu/pub/wepp/weppnpg.984. Beta
version of WEPP Windows 95/NT Interface available from
http://topsoil.nserl.purdue.edu/weppmain/wpslp.html.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; pdf text box font size
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
best pdf compressor online; pdf compress
69
4 IMPLEMENTATION OF MODELLING APPROACHES
Implementation of different modelling approaches in specific situations relies on a
number of factors. Firstly the quality of fit of models, in particular conceptual and
physics-based models, depends on the calibration acceptance criteria used by the
modeller. The choice of model and its suitability to different tasks will also affect the
quality of model fit and the usefulness of model implementation. This section provides
an overview of calibration acceptance criteria, as well as a discussion of the factors
affecting the predictive capacity of models, such as model complexity and modelling
objectives.
4.1 Calibration acceptance criteria
Where calibration of model parameters against observed data is necessary, such as for
conceptual and physics-based models and for some empirical models, two main types of
approaches may be employed. The first is a subjective approach, relying on the modeller
using a trial and error approach to estimate parameters. Certain statistics of fit are used to
choose between sets of model parameters. This process is completed when the
parameters are sufficiently accurate for the purposes of the model, according to the
calibration criteria being used, not necessarily when the parameters are optimal. The
second method is an objective approach, applying an algorithm to optimise parameter
values using some single measure of goodness of fit, which may be a composite of
several measures. As noted by Sorooshian and Gupta (1983), the main difficulty in this
approach is that of finding a global optimum, as the non-convexity of the response
surface may lead to the existence of a number of local optima. Generally parameter
values are not unique (identifiable) and may not be physically realistic. This can lead to
poor predictive ability on data periods independent of the calibration period in conceptual
and physics-type models. The calibration process introduces an empirical element to the
models, and limits the physical relevance of model parameters.
Generally model calibration is controlled by the use of one or more measures of
‘goodness of fit’ of modelled values to observed streamflow discharge and/or
nutrient/sediment concentration or load data. It will not always be the case that these
statistics are optimised for the same set of parameter values. An additional difficulty in
finding optimal parameter sets is presented by the dependence of optima on the
calibration criteria or objective function used for model calibration (Johnston and Pilgrim
1976). A parameter set that is optimal for one criterion is not necessarily, and indeed is
unlikely, to be the same as the optimal parameter set using a different criterion.
Calibration criteria are generally chosen subjectively. These need to be chosen to best
suit the requirements of the model being calibrated. Questions on the intended use of the
model and the nature of the catchment and problems being considered must be
considered when choosing appropriate calibration criteria. Also some trade-off between
the values of different statistics is usually necessary. Often it is best to optimise
parameter values using a set of such measures rather than a single measure. When using
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change paper size pdf; change font size in pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
advanced pdf compressor; advanced pdf compressor online
70
such a set of measures it is not normally possible to optimise with respect to all measures
simultaneously; rather, acceptable boundaries for each measure may need to be set.
Generally these calibration criteria are calculated on individual values of streamflow
and/or sediment/nutrient discharge. However it is also possible to calculate these
measures for different data sets, such as for hydrographs and sediment graphs of
observed and modelled values or for different time periods, such as weeks and months,
than used for modelling the original data series. The choice of which of these data sets to
use will depend on the needs of the modeller and the characteristics of the data and
catchment under consideration.
4.1.1
Mean and standard deviation
The most basic requirement of a model is generally that it describes the mean and
standard deviation of observed data well. Thus a very simple measure of the fit of a
model is to look at the agreement between the mean and the standard deviation of
observed and modelled values. This simple measure does not distinguish between
random and systematic errors and does not indicate how well individual estimated values
fit observed values (Aitken 1973). Thus its usefulness in model calibration is limited
when used alone.
4.1.2
Coefficient of Determination
The coefficient of determination is given by:
D = 
(
)
(
)
=
=
n
i
i
n
i
est
i
i
O
O
O
O
1
2
1
2
1
(4.1)
where O
i
are individual observed values, 
O is the mean of the observed values, P
i
are
individual modelled (or predicted) values and O
i
est
is determined from regression of O
i
on P
i
.
The coefficient of determination measures the degree of association between observed
and modelled values. It has value less than one for all models. High values of the
coefficient indicate that the model is of good fit, however, by itself the coefficient is not
able to reveal the presence of systematic errors.
4.1.3
Coefficient of Efficiency
The coefficient of efficiency (E) was described by Nash and Sutcliffe (1970) as
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files;
pdf change font size; reader pdf reduce file size
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
can a pdf file be compressed; change file size of pdf
71
E = 
=
=
N
i
i
N
i
i
i
O
O
P
O
1
2
1
2
)
(
)
(
1
(4.2)
This coefficient is analogous but not identical to the coefficient of determination. It
describes the degree of association between the observed and modelled values of the data
series. As for the coefficient of determination, values of E are less than or equal to1. The
coefficients of determination and efficiency can be used together to determine whether
model results are biased. If the model results are highly correlated but biased, then the
value of E is less than that of D.
4.1.4
Least squares criteria
One common method for model calibration is to minimise the sum of squares of model
error; that is, to choose model parameters such that
L = 
(
)
2
1
=
n
i
i
i
P
O
(4.3)
is a minimum. The use of such a criteria to optimise model fit can be based on the
assumptions that these errors are uncorrelated and that they have constant variance with
zero mean. These assumptions are generally not satisfied.
This measure is equivalent to maximising the value of the coefficient of efficiency.
4.1.5
Absolute mean deviations
A more general technique is to minimise
A = 
j
n
i
i
i
P
O
=
1
(4.4)
where j is some exponent. The case where j = 2 is the least squares criterion of 4.1.4.
Changing the value of the exponent j merely changes the vertical scaling of the
optimisation space, not the position of the minimum point (Johnston and Pilgrim 1976).
However, values of j smaller than 1 generally make it difficult to optimise the parameter
set as the observation space becomes flatter and more discontinuities are generated.
Johnston and Pilgrim (1976) suggest that generally j = 2; that is, the least squares
criterion described in 4.1.4 is the best value of j for optimisation.
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16 provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
optimize scanned pdf; best pdf compressor
C# Image: Use C# Class to Insert Callout Annotation on Images
including GIF, PNG, BMP, JPEG, TIFF, PDF & Word projects; Easy to set annotation filled font property individually an easy way; C# demo code to change the filled
change font size pdf document; advanced pdf compressor
72
4.1.6 Transformed deviations
It may be preferable in some cases to minimise deviations of transformations of the
original and modelled values, using an objective function of the form
T = 
=
n
i
j
i
i
f P
f O
1
( )
( )
(4.5)
where f is a function transforming observed and modelled values. Chiew and McMahon
(1994) use the function f(x) = x
0.5
. This provides weighting to reflect the performance of
the model in simulating low flows. In an earlier paper Chiew et al. (1993) used a similar
function, f(x) = x
0.2
, for evaluating hydrological models. Generally when using a power
transformation of the form f(x) = x
a
a > 0, the smaller the value of a, the more weight is
given to model performance on low flows. Thus this calibration criterion may be most
useful where the fit to low flows is at least as important as the fit of the model to peak
flow events, such as in ephemeral catchments or in situations where low flows may
determine important ecological characteristics of the catchment being modelled.
Other transformations commonly used include log transform functions.
4.1.7
Model bias
Model bias (B) is given by:
B = 
)
(
1
1
=
n
i
i
i
P
O
n
.
(4.6)
The model bias measures the average difference between the model outcome and the
observed data. The magnitude of the bias must be near minimum to improve the model
fit; that is, the closer the model bias is to 0 the better the model fits the observed data.
A similar measure to the model bias is the deviation in volumes (DV), given by:
DV = 
=
=
n
i
i
n
i
i
O
P
1
1
.
(4.7)
The closer the value of DV to 1, the better is the model fit. Minimising model bias is
equivalent to maximising the value of DV.
These measures are most useful when the modeller is mainly concerned with
approximating the total volume of flow or pollutant over longer time periods, rather than
with closely fitting the model to each observed value. This may be the case where model
73
outputs are to be used to calculate monthly or yearly volumes of flow or pollutants, rather
than for estimating daily or hourly flows of water or pollutants as a result of a rainfall
event.
4.1.8
Serial correlation coefficient
A method occasionally used by hydrologists to indicate the presence of systematic errors
is to compare the first order (and other orders) of serial correlation coefficient for
observed and modelled values. It is doubtful whether this test is significantly powerful
for this purpose (Aitken 1973). Thus this measure is probably best avoided when
selecting calibration criteria.
4.1.9
Sign tests
Sign tests are not widely used by hydrologists. They are very simple tests of whether a
modelled time series contains systematic errors. One possible sign test is to allocate a
positive sign to overestimated values, and negative signs to underestimated values, then
to count the number of runs of positive and negative signs and compare this with the
expected numbers using a Chi Square test
1
. If this test indicates that the number of runs
is significantly less than expected for random errors then it can be concluded that the
model introduces systematic bias.
Such simple sign tests are the most suitable to quickly determine the existence of
systematic errors. Aitken (1973) suggests that, as an initial step in testing for systematic
errors, these tests should always be used in addition to more commonly used statistics
when calibrating a model.
4.1.10  Maximum range of the residual mass curve
The residual mass curve for both modelled and observed values can be calculated by
subtracting the mean value from each individual value, then summing the results
sequentially. These curves for observed and modelled values can then be compared using
such measures as the percentage error in the maximum range of the modelled residual
mass curve. This method is not currently widely used within hydrology.
1
A chi square test consists of constructing a test statistic of the form
X = 
(
)
o
e
e
j
j
j
j
k
=
2
1
where o
is the observed number of runs of length j, and e
j
is the expected number of runs of length j; then
comparing this with the chi square distribution to determine whether the number of runs is less than
expected for random errors, i.e. the value of X is too large.
74
4.1.11  Residual mass curve coefficient
The residual mass curve coefficient describes the association between the observed and
modelled residual mass curves. It is given by:
R = 
(
)
(
)
1
2
1
2
1
=
=
d
d
d
d
i
i
e
i
n
i
i
n
(4.8)
where d
i
is the departure from the mean for the observed residual mass curve, d is the
mean of departure from the mean of the observed residual mass curve and d
i
e
is the
departure from the mean of the modelled residual mass curve.
The residual mass curve coefficient is better than the coefficients of determination or
efficiency in describing model fit, as it measures the relationship between sequences of
values, not simply between individual values. This coefficient should also indicate the
presence of systematic errors. However, this coefficient is not currently widely used
within hydrology, unlike the coefficient of efficiency (Aitken 1973).
4.1.12  Average relative parameter error
The average relative parameter error is given by
ARPE = 
=
n
i
i
i
a
n
1
2
2
ˆ
1
σ
(4.9)
where
σ
i
2
is the estimated variance of the ith element in the n parameter set (a
1
,a
2
.. ,a
n
).
The ARPE is a measure of the average relative error in the model parameters. When
calibrating a model the goal is to achieve the lowest possible magnitude of ARPE; that is,
the value of the ARPE must be as close to 0 as possible. This measure is generally used
to identify the number of parameters that are appropriate in a model. A high value of the
ARPE indicates a high degree of uncertainty in parameter estimates, which implies a
poorly defined model.
4.1.13  Summary
The most commonly used of the calibration criteria described is the coefficient of
efficiency. In practice, almost all model calibrations depend on this or a least squares
criterion. Many of the other criteria described here have not been used within hydrology,
or have been used only for modelling specific catchments, where particular factors such
as model fit to low flows or model fit to total yearly observations are important.
75
Generally it is best to use a combination of several criteria that best fit the particular
modelling situation.
4.2 Predictive capacity
A wide range of models exist for use in sediment transport and water quality modelling.
These models differ in terms of complexity, the nutrients and processes considered and
the data required for model use. There is no ‘best’ model; rather, the most appropriate
model will depend on the intended use and the characteristics of the catchment being
considered. A number of additional factors need to be considered in order to choose the
appropriate model for an application. These can be summarised as the suitability of the
model to Australian conditions, the ease of use and data requirements, the hardware
requirements, the accuracy and validity of the model, the model assumptions, the spatial
and temporal variation of model inputs and outputs, the components of the model, and
the objectives of the model users, including the scale at which model outputs are
required.
Table 4.1 shows a general description for many of the sediment transport and water
quality models available for use. Of the models in the table, AEAM, AQUALM, CMSS,
HYDRA, IHACRES, Rose and Hairsine Approach, SOILOSS, STARS, THALES and
TOPOG are Australian-developed or -adapted models. Many of the other models were
developed in the USA or Europe and have been used in Australia. Most of these models
were developed by excluding or including processes appropriate to certain environments.
Some, like EUROSEM/ LISEM, have had limited applications under Australian
conditions and consequently would require a period of extended testing, validation and,
if required, calibration to ensure that they are capable of accurately modelling Australian
conditions.
Classification of models as empirical, conceptual or physics-based is subjective. Most
models do not fit neatly into these categories; rather, they are likely to contain a mix of
modules from each of these categories. For example, whilst the rainfall-runoff
component of a model may be physics-based or conceptual, empirical relationships may
be used to model erosion or sediment transport. The classification given for each model
in Table 4.1 reflects the main processes in the model and does not mean that there are not
components of the model better classified in another category. Where the mix of modules
is fairly even, a model is classified as a hybrid between two or more classes.
4.2.1
Model complexity and ease of use
Ease of use is of considerable importance when choosing an appropriate model, the
importance of which is driven largely by the objectives and capabilities of the model
user. Rizzoli and Young (1997) identified two main categories of users with respect to
user requirements: the ‘scientist’ (also known as the modeller or systems analyst) and the
‘manager’ (otherwise referred to as the decision-maker). With the development of
Landcare and community-based catchment groups there is a trend towards the use of
76
simple decision support systems as tools for establishing appropriate management
practices. Subsequently, there has been an increase in the development and use of models
such as CMSS, HYDRA and AEAM. These models, often termed Environmental
Decision Support Systems or EDSSs, can be used to solve problems relating to a specific
domain of knowledge, such as water quality in streams (Rizzoli and Young 1997). Often
these models do not attempt to describe the physical processes involved. Rather, they rely
on the use of simple, empirically determined relationships. The outputs of such models
are often used as a basis for developing catchment management plans.
Such models tend not to require large quantities of data and are computationally simple.
In contrast, the physics-based models such as WEPP, ANSWERS, and MIKE-11 require
a large amount of input data and consequently can be difficult to use. This can be a
particular problem in Australian catchments where input data is typically sparse. A large
number of parameters in these models will have to be determined through calibration in
such sparse data situations, raising difficulties with identifiability, model uniqueness,
physical interpretability of calibrated parameters, and user friendliness. Conceptual
models require calibration against observed data. They are also likely to suffer from
problems of non-uniqueness and model identifiability. They too are most appropriate for
use by an experienced modeller (Hook 1997). Some conceptual models have a small
number of parameters making them more easily identifiable. The IHACRES rainfall-
runoff model contains only six parameters and has been shown to work well across
different climates and catchment sizes. While the LASCAM rainfall-runoff model
contains around as many as 20 parameters, its sediment component contains only 6
parameters.
In addition, many conceptual and physics-based model users aim to incorporate
components of other models into their own to tailor the model to their requirements.
Some users of the WEPP model have found it very difficult to integrate its components
with other models due to the complex structure of WEPP and the difficulty in penetrating
the model code. This indicates another potential problem with complex conceptual and
physics-based models. Generally, these models tend to be used for research or by
experienced model users while the simple empirical or conceptual models or EDSSs are
used by managers with limited data or modelling experience, or those who require
flexibility in the modelling process.
4.2.2
Hardware requirements
Also of relevance to the model user is the hardware requirements of a model. This is
determined by the complexity of the model, the processes that are represented in the
model and the extent to which these processes are considered. Physics-based models,
being based on the solution of fundamental physics equations, often require numerical
solutions that have greater hardware requirements than empirically based models like
USLE, which are computationally relatively simple and require little in the way of
technically advanced hardware. In addition, many of the research models available use
hardware and platforms (e.g. UNIX) not widely used by non-research groups. To make
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested