77
these models accessible either a modified version of the model or a Windows interface is
required.
The hardware requirements are also determined by the detail of the catchment processes
simulated. Not only do the number of equations requiring solution increase in a model
with a large number of detailed processes, but so do the number of input parameters. For
example, the detachment of soil particles, either through raindrop impact or the flow of
water across the soil surface, is affected by a number of factors, including soil properties,
topographical features and land use or land management practices, particularly those that
influence the vegetation cover in the catchment. This has a profound impact on the
modelling of sediment transport and water quality. An attempt to quantify the effect of all
the parameters that affect sediment yield will result in a computationally exhausting
process. Physics-based models, such as WEPP and ANSWERS, and many conceptual
models require a large amount of input data, much of which is unavailable in most
Australian catchments.
4.2.3
Accuracy and validity of model predictions
An important consideration in choosing models is the accuracy and validity of the model.
This relates back to the issue of the suitability of a model to a particular environment. For
example, in the USA, more than 10 000 plot years of data has been collected and
incorporated into the USLE erosion models, such that it is applicable at the plot scale to
those environments (Lane et al. 1992). In Australia, by contrast, the use of USLE has
been limited due to the perceived lack of data. As such, the validity of the model under
Australian conditions has been questionable. SOILOSS, a local adaptation of parts of a
revised USLE model (RUSLE), attempts to address this problem to some extent.
Similarly, PERFECT was developed for application in environments typical of north-
eastern Australia. Nonetheless, Littleboy et al. (1992) recommended that the model be
calibrated against suitable field data before being used in other environments.
Another common misconception is that model accuracy invariably increases with model
complexity. This is not the case. Complex models such as WEPP suffer from problems
with error accumulation and model identifiability. The lack of available input data for
such models means that many of the model parameters must be determined through
calibration. This leads to problems of non-uniqueness and means that the physical
interpretability of parameter values is questionable. Additional errors may come from the
use of unrealistic assumptions about the physics controlling the catchment system. For
example, the MIKE-11 model is based on the solution of one-dimensional equations of
flow. However, these equations are being used to represent a three-dimensional physical
system. The accuracy of a model based on such unrealistic assumptions is questionable.
4.2.4
Model assumptions
The accuracy of any model will be determined in part by the assumptions underlying the
model. For example, the USLE and WEPP hillslope and small-catchment models have
Pdf file compression - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
best way to compress pdf files; pdf form change font size
Pdf file compression - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf page size limit; pdf change page size
78
been designed to study erosion in situations of overland flow. Thus they are intended to
be used to model sheet and rill erosion, and are not suitable for situations where erosion is
by channels that cannot be removed by tillage, such as gullies or streams. In situations
where significant amounts of erosion occur by gully or stream, application of such models
is likely to lead to large inaccuracies in model simulations. The use of a model that
considers only rill and sheet erosion, such as WEPP, is likely to lead to a large
underestimation of sediment and nutrient loads in areas where gully and in-stream erosion
processes are important, such as in the Murrumbidgee River catchment. Such models
would be inappropriate as they do not consider the main source of sediment and nutrients
in such catchments. Similarly, the field-scale CREAMS and EPIC models assume that the
site being modelled is uniform in soil, topography and land use. Application of these
models at scales over which these characteristics are heterogeneous may lead to
substantial errors. Finally, ANSWERS assumes erodibility to be a relatively time-constant
parameter, contrary to the large variations that have been recorded (Govers and Loch
1993).
Hairsine and Rose (1992) noted that in past literature, soil erosion processes occurring
during overland flow were considered to be very similar to those occurring during
streambed erosion, and subsequently sediment transport equations derived for deep flow
conditions have been used to describe the movement of sediment in the shallow flows
characteristic of soil erosion on the field scale. However, the authors identified
differences between the two erosion types in terms of the sedimentary material and the
processes at work.  At the field-scale, sediment is usually cohesive, having both
interaggregate and interparticle strength; soils are commonly composed of a wide range
of aggregate and particle sizes; and shallow surface flows that occur at field scales are
influenced by the impact of raindrops on both the shallow water layer and the exposed
soil surface (Hairsine and Rose 1992). Given these differences, it is not necessarily
appropriate to use stream-based models for the prediction of overland flow erosion.
These examples show the types of assumptions common in environmental modelling.
These assumptions have been made to simplify the model, but the modeller needs to keep
them in mind, as they are likely to affect the accuracy of the model. Likewise, the
simplification of in-stream processes in models like MIKE-11, such as the neglect of
secondary currents and bank erosion processes, are likely to reduce the accuracy of the
model. As previously stated MIKE-11 uses a one-dimensional approach to represent
three-dimensional processes. Physics-based models such as WEPP and MIKE-11 tend to
be based on equations that have been derived in laboratory conditions. These equations
may not be applicable in real-world situations, where many of the initial conditions are
likely to be different and a number of the assumptions are likely to be violated.
4.2.5
Topographic effects and spatial and temporal variability
The previous section indicates the importance of identifying the key hydrologic and
erosion components in water quality modelling. There are, however, a number of other
factors that need to be accounted for prior to choosing a model. These include the
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C# Demo Code for TIFF File Compression. Add references; RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
pdf compression; change font size in pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for word file.
adjusting page size in pdf; pdf edit text size
79
problems associated with spatial and temporal variability, topographic effects and the
suitability of the model to the study objective of the site in question.
Jakeman et al. (1997) noted that the difficulties in environmental modelling can be
characterised as problems of natural complexity, spatial heterogeneity and the lack of
available data. The complexity of natural systems is due to the differences in dimensions,
temporal and spatial scales and thresholds of water flow, and sediment and nutrient
transport through and within the media. Natural systems, from plot to catchment scale,
tend to show a great deal of variation. Grayson and Moore (1993) noted that the scale at
which uniformity is assumed in hydrologic models is generally greater than the scale at
which directly measurable parameters are measured in the field, although it is smaller
than shown by the outflow hydrographs. Thus, model predictions are subject to errors as
a result of the inconsistency of scale between measured parameters and the way they are
used in the model.
Moore et al. (1991) suggested that a deficiency in many hydrologic and water quality
models is the lack of representation of the effects of three-dimensional terrain on flow
process and spatial variability of hydrologic processes with large and often unrealistic
simplifications. Topographical features can potentially have a large effect on hydrologic
and erosion processes and as such are an important consideration in water quality
modelling. With the development of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and GIS,
topographical attributes can be, and are increasingly, incorporated into water quality or
hydrologic models (e.g. LISEM, THALES).
Many physics-based and conceptual models attempt to account for topographic effects.
However, these models are often highly complex, containing large numbers of
parameters often varying both spatially and temporally, and thus are used more by
research organisations rather than by government departments or community groups.
4.2.6
Model components
Many models are designed to target a particular component of an environmental problem,
such as the erosional, hydrologic or water quality component. For example, both USLE
and WEPP are erosion models, and like THALES, a hydrologic model, fail to account for
the ‘whole picture’ of erosion issues. Depending on the structure of the model, additional
components, whether from other models or not, may be incorporated to further validate
the model predictions. It should be noted that this may add to the complexity of the
model. The PERFECT productivity–erosion model is an example of the flexibility of a
model structure which can allow the incorporation of additional modules. The model,
although currently used more as a model for identifying the effects of crop management
on erosion and yield, may be able to incorporate a water quality component that could
predict the impact of crop management practices on water quality.
Recently there has been an increase in the number of models developed for water quality
and pollution issues (e.g. AGNPS, ANSWERS, AQUALM, HSPF, CMSS, MIKE-11).
These models tend to incorporate a number of modules covering the hydrological,
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
DocumentType.PDF. compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file. The type listed in the ImageCompress.cs.
batch reduce pdf file size; best pdf compression tool
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file. The type listed in the ImageCompress.cs. filePath, The output file path
change font size pdf text box; change font size pdf
80
erosional and other components affecting water quality. These models tend to incorporate
other models that are specifically designed for one purpose. For example, models like
AGNPS and EPIC incorporate USLE-based erosional modules into the overall model
structure. Likewise, PERFECT uses components from both USLE and CREAMS for
erosion and sediment transport.
4.2.7
Objectives of the model user
Finally, the objectives of the modeller will perhaps be the largest factor influencing the
choice of model. This will largely determine complexity and depth of understanding of
the model structure and purposes required. Model types can be broadly categorised into
empirical, conceptual and physics based models. Physics-based models tend to be
complex models, aimed at furthering knowledge of some of the processes involved in
sediment and nutrient generation. These models (e.g. WEPP and MIKE-11) tend to be
used more by researchers for detailed projects.
Simpler empirical or conceptual models are not specifically aimed at fully understanding
the processes involved in sediment and nutrient generation. The complexity of the model
will determine how the model is used. For example, a common approach in water quality
catchment management programs is to use empirical models, often referred to as
Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSSs), such as CMSS and AEAM. CMSS is
based on a simple nutrient load model using empirical relationships between nutrient
generation and land use. It is generally used to assist land use and land management
planning for water quality improvement at catchment scale. The model has been used by
60 registered users throughout Australia and New Zealand by state and local government
agencies, Total Catchment Management or Integrated Catchment Management groups
and consultancy firms (Hook 1997). This illustrates the importance of these simpler
management models that do not give a definitive solution to a problem but allow the
model user to develop best management practices for the site. The most appropriate
model for a given situation will therefore depend on whether the aim of the modeller is to
accurately predict catchment yields in gauged or ungauged catchments, to better
understand the processes generating sediment and nutrients in the catchment, or to assess
the likely impacts of a change in catchment management. The best model will depend on
the resources available to the modeller as well as the required accuracy and outputs of
model simulation.
Thus the choice of the model most appropriate in any situation is dependent on a number
of factors unique to the modelling situation. Consideration needs to be given to the
requirements of the situation and the resources, including the input data, computing
resources and modelling expertise, available. Section 3.2 gives a concise description of a
number of erosion and sediment/nutrient transport models available. It also provides a
description of model inputs and outputs, a discussion of model limitations and
advantages, and information on hardware requirements and availability for each model.
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file. The type listed in the ImageCompress.cs. filePath, The output file path
pdf files optimized; pdf page size may not be reduced
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file. The type listed in the ImageCompress.cs. filePath, The output file path
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf change font size
81
4.2.8
Synthesis
The data sets on sediment and nutrient concentrations are typically available only at large
catchment scales of the order of 100 to 1000 km
2
, as well as for a limited temporal
period, often only up to a few years. Such information is inadequate to support the
application of complex models which contain large numbers of parameters and/or which
make detailed assumptions about the physical processes driving transport. Only the key
catchment processes warrant description in such data-poor circumstances.
Complex conceptual and physics-based models also place high demands on the user, who
must be very experienced technically in using models. Even for the experienced, the
unique calibration of so many parameters is not possible. Different users will therefore
obtain different parameter sets.
In addition, physics based models are typically designed to be applied only at small
scales. Their application to larger scales brings attendant problems of high computational
requirements and error accumulation.
Therefore, it is only empirical models and simple conceptual models which can be
considered as suitable for modelling catchment exports at catchment and basin scales.
Conceptual models typically have two components, one for routing rainfall-runoff
processes and one linking the routing of water to solute concentration. Such models
include LASCAM and HSPF, but both these models contain unnecessarily complex
descriptions of the rainfall-runoff process. LASCAM does, however, contain a runoff-
sediment component of reasonably low complexity (only six parameters). The model
IHACRES contains a parsimonious rainfall-runoff description of six parameters, which
has been shown to work well in hundreds of catchments in predicting streamflow
discharge across a range of scales and hydroclimates. To predict catchment exports it has
been augmented with empirical models (e.g. power law relations) of discharge and
suspended sediment, and suspended sediment and nutrient concentrations. The
conceptual runoff-sediment component of LASCAM could also be augmented with
IHACRES to provide a conceptual model of catchment exports with reasonable
complexity.
However, any conceptual modelling approach needs to take into account the fact that, in
many Australian catchments, streambank erosion is a major source of sediments and
phosphorus. The STARS model was specifically developed to model this process,
allowing the identification of sources (bank erosion, tributary inflows) and sinks (bed
deposition) within river reaches. Its structure was designed to be simple, containing only
five parameters, so that it could be calibrated successfully on time series of upstream and
downstream discharge and pollutant concentrations.
Of the empirical approaches, direct load estimation techniques must be considered
seriously. These are particularly suitable if the observations available for estimation span
a climatic range covering wet and dry periods so that loads can be calculated as long-
term values accompanied by a measure of their variability. As discussed in Chapter 2, the
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for word file.
reduce pdf file size; adjust size of pdf in preview
C# Create PDF from CSV to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
compression, The target compression of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file. The type listed in the ImageCompress.cs. filePath, The output file path
best compression pdf; can a pdf be compressed
82
appropriate load estimation technique will vary with the nature of the data and the
catchment conditions.
Another type of empirical approach that is useful for its potential in being applied to
ungauged catchments or subcatchments is that based on land use/landscape attributes.
Here the classification of land use must be sufficiently broad so that the export results are
sensitive to members of the classification (such as pristine, cropping, grazing). These
models, such as the multi-factor approach of Moss et al. (1993) or approaches embodied
in CMSS, have the disadvantage that the export values produced are not directly
sensitive to climate variability (of events and antecedent conditions). They tend to yield
long-term averages only. However, it is possible for these multi-factor models to be
integrated with either direct load estimation techniques or simple conceptual models so
that the resultant export outputs are climate-sensitive.
In conclusion, given the problems with complex conceptual and physics-based models—
i.e. those of model parameter identifiability, computational demands and necessary levels
of user expertise—the most practicable approach is one integrating the use of direct load
estimation, multi-factor and simple conceptual models. Direct load estimation will work
best when predicting exports at sites which have lengthy but intensive data, and will
provide information to calibrate and/or corroborate the other two model types. Multi-
factor models will be useful when predicting at ungauged sites, such as when direct load
estimation or conceptual models require predictions at subcatchment or even landscape
scales where no measurements are available. That is, they will be useful for
disaggregating the exports predicted at larger catchment scales and lend themselves to
being incorporated in conceptual models as subcatchment-scale predictions. Conceptual
models will be useful especially to link subcatchment exports and route them through
catchment and basin networks. As runoff and discharge are the major drivers of
catchment exports, a good conceptual model will be one which:
 predicts runoff from catchments and routes discharge and pollutants through an
instream component
 incorporates the key processes (quick flow, slow flow, stream advection, suspension
and resettling) in a parametrically efficient manner. With climate being the major
determinant of long-term variability of catchment exports, a conceptual model, which
allows forcing from rainfall and other climate variables (such as temperature), is
essential to help characterise the variability of exports.
Table 4.1: Erosion/Sediment Transport Models
Model
Type
Scale
Output
Event/ Non-
event
Part or complete
GIS integration
Spatially
distributed
Comments
AEAM
Empirical/
Conceptual
catchment
depends on model
application or user
requirements
non-event
depends on
particular model
no
Modelling process rather than set model
structure. Environmental Decision
Support System. Similar to CMSS,
although slightly more complex
equations
AGNPS
Conceptual
catchment
(up to
50 000 ha)
runoff volume, peak
rate, eroded and
delivered sediment,
N, P and COD
concentrations in
runoff and sediment
event
yes (can be
linked)
yes
One of few models whose output is site-
and management-specific
ANSWERS
Physical
< 4000 ha
sediment yield,
nutrient loads in
water and sediment
runoff
event
yes
yes
AQUALM
Conceptual
catchment
nutrient load
event
yes
In-stream model, similar to HSPF with
simpler algorithms and explains fewer
processes
CMSS
Empirical
catchment
nutrient load
non-event
no (though land
use attributes
may be obtained
by GIS)
yes
Aimed at catchment managers,
community awareness
CREAMS
Physical
field size
40–400 ha
erosion, deposition,
transport (slope to
2nd-order channels)
event
no
no
Catchment assumed to be uniform in
soils, topography and land use
EPIC
Conceptual
field size,
< 100 ha
nutrients, sediments,
runoff, pesticides,
plant growth
event
yes
Weather, soils and management
considered homogenous; considers N,
P, pesticides, sediment; USLE based
Model
Type
Scale
Output
Event/ Non
event
Part or complete
GIS integration
Spatially
distributed
Comments
EUROSEM/
LISEM
Physical
catchment
runoff, sediment
yield
event
LISEM linked to
PCRaster (GIS)
yes
Does not model erosion in rills and
gullies
GUEST
Physical
field
soil loss predictions
event
Uses the Rose and Hairsine approach
(1997)
HSPF
Conceptual
catchment
runoff, flow rate,
sediment load,
nutrient
concentration, water
quality
both
(different
versions)
yes
yes
Developed from Stanford Watershed
model. Relies heavily on calibration
against field data
HYDRA
Empirical/
conceptual
catchment
water quality
management
non-event
uses GIS based
interface
Aimed to integrate current modelling
practices into an Environmental
Decision Support System
IQQM
Conceptual
river basin
BOD, coliforms,
nitrogen cycle,
phosphorus cycle,
flow routing
non-event
MIKE-11
Physical
catchment
sediment yield,
runoff
event
yes
One-dimensional water quality model
PERFECT
Physical
field
runoff, erosion, crop
yield
event
Incorporates a crop growth simulation
module
Modified
LASCAM
Conceptual
catchment
rainfall runoff, salt
fluxes, sediment
event
no
can be
Modified by inclusion of USLE
component
Rose and
Hairsine
Approach
Physical
small scale
sediment yield
event
Problems occur when there is an
attempt to parameterise over large
scales; model implemented in other
models e.g. GUEPS.
SOILOSS
Empirical/
conceptual
hillslope
average annual soil
loss
non-event
yes
no
Australian (NSW) adaptation of RUSLE
Model
Type
Scale
Output
Event/ Non
event
Part or complete
GIS integration
Spatially
distributed
Comments
STARS-IHACRESConceptualcatchment
runoff, sediment,
nutrient
concentrations
event
can be integrated
can be
IHACRES is the upland runoff
component and STARS is the instream
water quality component
SWMM
Physical
catchment
overall assessment
of urban runoff,
prediction of flows,
stages and
pollutants
both
can be integrated in
similar way to
AGNPS
yes
Rainfall runoff simulation model,
primarily for urban areas (i.e. point
source)
THALES
Physical
catchment
wide range of
hydrological
processes
yes
yes
Using TAPES-C computer program,
accounts for 3D terrain. Assumptions
underlying THALES are extensive
TOPOG
Physical
catchment
water, solute, carbon
balance
event
Uses DEM
yes
Three components: DEM, topographical
analysis model, suite of hydrological and
process models. Model based on spatial
analysis and mathematical models of a
wetness index and stream power
USLE/RUSLE/
MUSLE/ USLE-M
Empirical/
conceptual
hillslope
average annual soil
loss due to rainfall
non-event
(modified
versions
may be
event based)
yes
no (can
model
spatial
variation
when
considered
in grid)
Many modifications of the original model
(MUSLE, USLE-M). Model was revised
to include new information (RUSLE).
This revised USLE was implemented
locally in the SOILOSS model. Does not
model gully or in-stream erosion
WEPP hillslope
model
Physical
hillslope
runoff, sediment,
form of sediment
loss
both
yes
yes
Does not account for gully erosion or
mass movement
WEPP watershed
model
Physical
hillslope
runoff, sediment,
form of sediment
loss
both
yes
yes
Watershed model comprises hillslope
model with channel erosion component,
impoundment component, and irrigation
component
89
REFERENCES
Chapter 1
1. Attiwill, P.M., and Leaper, G.W. (1987). ‘Forest soils and nutrient cycles.’
Melbourne University Press, Carlton, Victoria.
2. Bennett, J. P. (1974). ‘Concepts of mathematical modelling of sediment yield.’ Water
Resources Research10, 485-492.
3. Brizga, S.O., and Finlayson, B.L. (1990). ‘Channel avulsion: its role in river
metamorphosis.’ Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 15, 391-404.
4. Conner, T.C. (1986). ‘The impact and economic effects of soil conservation practices
on river aggregation.’ In Hadley, T.F. (ed.). Drainage basin sediment delivery‘ IAHS
publication No. 159. IAHS Press, Wallingford, U.K. pp. 81-91.
5. Correll, D.L. and Ford, D. (1982). ‘Comparison of precipitation and land runoff as
sources of estuarine N.’ Estuarine Coastal Shelf Science15(1), 45-56.
6. Cosser, P. R. (1989). ‘Nutrient concentration – flow relationships and loads in the
South Pine River, South-Eastern Queensland. 1. Phosphorus loads.’ Australian
Journal of Marine and Fresh Water Research, 40, 613-630.
7. Eyre, B. (1997). ‘Water quality changes in a well flushed Australian estuary: A 50
year perspective.’ Marine Chemistry, 59, 177-187.
8. Finlayson, B., and Silburn, M. (1996). ‘Soil, nutrient and pesticide movements from
different land use practices, and subsequent transport by rivers and streams.’ In
Hunter, H.M., Eyles, A.G., and Rayment, G.E. (eds.). Downstream Effects of Land
Use. Department of Natural Resources, Queensland, Australia.
9. Frissel, M. J., (ed.). (1978). Cycling of Mineral Nutrients in Agricultural
Ecosystems., Elsevier Scientific, Amsterdam.
10. Gerritse, R.G. (1995). ‘Effect of reaction-rate on leaching of phosphate through
sandy soils in Western Australia’, Australian Journal of Soil Research33(1), 211-
219.
11. Grayson, Gippel, C. J., Finlayson, B. L., Hart, T. B., Hawken, R., McMahon, T.A.,
and Tilleard, J. (1994). Mitigation of sediment sources in the Latrobe River
catchment into the Gippsland Lakes. Completion Report on LWRRDC Project
UME8. Centre for Environmental Applied Hydrology, University of Melbourne.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested