—41— 
Whenever a CGEA is not applicable to an export, an EU Member State must issue a license to export 
nuclear commodities and technology outside of the EU.  There are three types of export licenses in 
France.  Two of these licenses, similar to those available under the Russian, Japanese and ROK regimes, 
allow for multiple exports of specified categories of items to specific destinations.  The availability of 
these licenses lessens the burden on exporters. 
Individual Export Authorization 
 License granted by France to one exporter for exports to one specified end-user, if none of the 
below license types is applicable. 
 Validity:  two years, or as specified. 
National General Export Authorization (NGA) 
 License granted by France to one exporter for unlimited exports of certain specified categories of 
items (industrial goods, chemical products and graphite) and to specified destinations, but may not 
conflict with existing CGEAs or cover any items listed in Part 2 of Annex II to EC No. 428/2009.  
 Validity:  one year; automatically renewable for same exporter. 
Global Export Authorization 
 License granted by France to one exporter covering unlimited shipments of specific items to 
specific recipients (end-users or distributors) or countries. 
 Validity:  two years. 
b. Conditions for Granting a License 
The conditions for granting a license for nuclear exports are similar to those specified under other 
regimes.  Unlike the U.S. regime, however, these conditions do not include the existence of a bilateral 
nuclear cooperation agreement with the government of the end-user.  Export licensing conditions include: 
 Obligations and commitments accepted under relevant international non-proliferation regimes and 
export control arrangements or relevant international treaties. 
 Obligations under sanctions imposed by a common position or a joint action adopted by the European 
Council or the OSCE, or by a binding resolution of the United Nations Security Council. 
 Considerations of national foreign and security policy. 
 Considerations of intended end-use and the risk of diversion. 
c. Requirement for Nuclear Cooperation Agreement 
As discussed above, French export laws do not expressly require a bilateral nuclear cooperation 
agreement to satisfy applicable criteria in France for obtaining licenses to export nuclear and nuclear-
related materials, equipment and technology from France.  France, however, does routinely conclude 
cooperation agreements with nations to which it seeks to supply nuclear materials, equipment and 
technology.  For example, France has concluded bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements with such 
countries as Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Egypt, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Japan, Jordan, 
ROK, the Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Russia, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Ukraine, the UAE and Vietnam.  
However, some of these agreements apparently stemmed from French foreign policy and trade objectives 
and were not necessary to satisfy French export licensing criteria.   
5. Export and Re-Export Restrictions 
a. Restrictions by Country 
Pdf form change font size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf reduce file size; adjust size of pdf file
Pdf form change font size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf optimized format; pdf files optimized
—42— 
Nuclear material, equipment and technology may be transferred freely within the EU, except for items 
listed in Annex IV to EC No. 428/2009, which are subject to prior authorization.  All other exports are 
subject to licensing requirements. 
For purposes of the Regulation, there are two embargoed countries:  Iran (Annex II to Regulation 
423/2007) and North Korea (Regulation 329/2007). 
b. Restrictions by End-Use 
SBDU may require the exporter to provide an end-user certificate that should include: (1) a confirmation 
of item’s end-use location and purpose/application, and (2) a confirmation of no re-exports to third 
countries. 
In addition, as with all internationally accepted regimes, a catch-all control requires the exporter to obtain 
authorization to export non-listed items if they are believed to be destined for a weapons program or to 
countries subject to an arms embargo. 
c. Restrictions by End-User 
France’s export licensing process requires examination of existing denials or prohibitions of other 
member states to determine if such denials were for an essentially identical transaction. 
d. Technology-Specific Restrictions 
Unlike U.S. regulations, the EU Regulation and the accompanying French decrees do not include any 
indication of a deemed export concept.  
The Regulation does provide controls over nuclear technical data and assistance in accordance with the 
NSG Guidelines.  Exports of nuclear technology from France generally require individual or global 
export authorization.  Controlled exports of technology include transmissions of technology by electronic 
media, including fax, telephone, electronic mail or any other electronic means to a destination outside the 
European Community; making technology available in an electronic form to legal and natural persons 
outside the European Community; and oral transmission of technology when described over the 
telephone. 
However, EU and French controls do not apply to supply of services or transmission of technology 
involving cross-border movement of persons where such persons are only providing their expertise and 
services. 
e. Retransfer Restrictions 
A model end-user certificate, as required by SBDU, contains a provision specifying the country of 
intended end-use and stating that the item(s) are not intended to be re-exported to third countries.  In 
addition, the SBDU may require the submission of a certification of no re-exports that in some cases must 
include a supporting statement by the government of the end-user. 
6. License Application Requirements 
The application requirements for the various export licenses available under the French system are as 
follows: 
a. Individual Export Authorization 
 Application form 
 Pro forma invoice 
 Form for nuclear material 
 If requested, end-user certificate 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change font size pdf fillable form; change font size pdf text box
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
compress pdf; change font size in pdf comment box
—43— 
 If requested, technical documentation 
 If requested, a certification of no re-exports 
b. National General Export Authorization (NGA) 
 Application form 
 Exporter’s written certification to comply with the rules governing the type of NGA sought 
c. Global Export Authorization 
 Exporter must be able to show a steady stream of external supply of controlled dual-use items 
 Exporter must file a document describing its internal audit and due diligence program 
 Application form 
 List of dual-use items and recipients for which license is sought 
d. Community General Export Authorization (CGEA) 
 Application form 
7. Processing Time 
The statutory processing period for licensing application submitted through the French system is within 
nine months after filing of application.  This is by far the longest processing period when compared to 
application processing times mandated by the Russian, Japanese and ROK regimes.  It is also more 
lengthy than export processing times for DOC license applications (~45 days), but equivalent to 
turnarounds for NRC and DOE applications, although the latter can often take more than nine months to 
be processed and approved. 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
adjust pdf size preview; batch reduce pdf file size
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change font size in pdf form; pdf file compression
—44— 
V. 
CONCLUSION 
Although the export control regime of the United States shares common elements with those of France, 
Russia, ROK and Japan, in practice the U.S. regime has many features that make it more complex, 
restrictive and time-consuming from the perspective of U.S. suppliers.  The trifurcated jurisdiction of the 
U.S. regime poses a confusing maze of regulations to U.S. exporters and contributes to the U.S. regime’s 
inefficiency.  Unlike the NSG-based technology transfer controls of other countries, the Part 810 
regulation lacks specificity and clarity, resulting in an application of technology controls that is more 
expansive and less predictable than in the foreign regimes surveyed.  The U.S. export control regime is 
also distinguished by a legal requirement for bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements for transfers of 
source and special nuclear material, and U.S. consent rights for certain equipment and material retransfers 
and reprocessing activities included in these agreements.  The U.S. regime is unique in lacking a statutory 
or regulatory time deadlines for processing export licenses.  The absence of a time requirement in the U.S. 
regime, combined with its bureaucratic complexity, has resulted in approval times that far exceed those of 
the other regimes surveyed – typically over one year.  Putting U.S. suppliers at a further disadvantage, the 
U.S. government’s promotion of commercial nuclear exports has been much more limited than the strong 
export coordination role played by the governments of other supplier countries.   
The Obama Administration has recognized that the complexity of the archaic U.S. export control system 
often defeats its own purposes to facilitate legitimate trade with partners and prevent the diversion of 
sensitive technologies from intended users.  In remarks on the U.S. export control system made on April 
20, 2010, to the Business Executives for National Security, then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates 
stated:   
The problem we face is that the current system, which has not been significantly altered 
since the end of the Cold War, originated and evolved in a very different era with a very 
different array of concerns in mind. … The current arrangement fails at the critical task 
of preventing harmful exports while facilitating useful ones. 
Following Secretary Gates’ remarks, the Administration launched the Export Control Reform (ECR) 
Initiative, with a stated objective of fundamentally reforming the U.S. export control system.  The 
cornerstone of the ECR Initiative is to rebuild the two U.S. export control lists:  the CCL, which forms 
part of the Export Administration Regulations, and the ITAR’s U.S. Munitions List.  The ECR Initiative’s 
goal is to create a single control list, single licensing agency, unified information technology system, and 
enforcement coordination center.
26
The Administration’s export control reform, however, is focused solely on controls administered by the 
BIS and the DOS, which are applicable only to a small percentage of exports of nuclear power-related 
commodities and technologies.  The NRC and DOE export control regimes, which control most U.S. 
exports of nuclear material, components and related technical data for nuclear power reactor and fuel 
cycle facilities, fall outside the ECR Initiative. 
The DOE is in the process of revising its Part 810 regulations.  A proposed revision of the rule published 
September 7, 2011, would not improve the features that harm the competitiveness of U.S. commercial 
nuclear exporters.  Rather than focus DOE’s efforts on controlling the technologies of greatest 
proliferation concern, the proposed rule would significantly expand the scope of technologies covered by 
the regulation.  Although the proposed rule provides an expanded list of definitions, many of which are 
now consistent with the NSG Guidelines, the proposed rule would introduce several terms that are not 
defined or not consistent with the definitions in other U.S. export regulations.  The proposed rule would 
harmonize definitions with the NSG guidelines, but DOE also proposes an explicit deemed export 
provision, which would cause the United States to differ from almost every other NSG member.  Finally, 
26
See President’s Export Control Reform Initiative, discussed in detail at http://www.export.gov/ecr/index.asp.  
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf file size limit; pdf page size limit
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files; Compress & Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition & Processing
reader compress pdf; pdf text box font size
—45— 
the proposed rule would not address the relative inefficiency of the Part 810 process and would, in fact, 
exacerbate delays by requiring specific authorizations for technologies not now covered, and for many 
more countries. 
The DOE has indicated that it will issue a revised proposal to amend the Part 810 regulation.  Whether the 
revised proposal will effectively address the burdens on U.S. exporters remains to be seen. 
Apart from needed changes to U.S. export law and regulations, a promising area for reform in the U.S. 
nuclear export control regime is establishment of new procedures and priorities to substantially reduce the 
time U.S. agencies require to process license applications.  Although the current time frames for licensing 
stem in part from the inter-agency coordination and public notice-and-comment processes, U.S. agencies 
should be able to increase the efficiency of their license processing through stronger Executive Branch 
coordination and emphasis on adherence to the time periods currently specified in the Executive Branch 
procedures.   By signaling to potential customers that U.S. exports may be licensed on a schedule 
comparable to those of foreign export control regimes, such an improvement could significantly “level the 
playing field” for U.S. exporters in the near-term. 
 
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
for example, a VB.NET Windows Form application. Please note that you can change some of the provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf edit text size; change page size of pdf document
Generate Image in .NET Winforms Imaging Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & JPEG 2000 Files; Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition
adjusting page size in pdf; pdf page size may not be reduced
—46— 
APPENDIX A:  NUCLEAR EXPORT CONTROL LEGAL REGIMES BY COUNTRY 
A. RUSSIA  
Primary Legislation 
Federal Law No. 114-F3 on Military-Technical Cooperation of the Russian Federation with Foreign 
States of Jul. 19, 1998 (amended on Oct. 25, 2006)  
Federal Law No.183-F3 on Export Control of Jul. 18, 1999 (amended by Law. No. 196-F3 (Dec. 30, 
2001), Law No. 58-F3 (Jun. 29, 2004), Law No. 90-F3 (Jul. 18, 2005), Law No. 318-F3 (Jan. 12, 
2007))  
Government Resolutions 
Resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 973 of Dec. 15, 2000 on the Export and 
Import of Nuclear Materials, Equipment, Special Non-Nuclear Materials and Related Technology 
(amended by Resolution No. 612 of Aug. 21, 2001, Resolution No. 731 of  Oct. 3, 2002, Resolution 
No. 54 of Feb. 4, 2005, Resolution. No. 771 of Dec. 15, 2006, Resolution. No. 724 of Oct. 31, 2007, 
Resolution No. 806 of Nov. 6, 2008, Resolution No. 266 of Mar. 31, 2009, Resolution No. 484 of Jun. 
15, 2009, Resolution No. 560 of Jul. 26, 2007, Resolution No. 826 of Oct. 12, 2010) 
Resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 1030 of Oct. 11, 1993 on the Control of  
Compliance with Obligations of the Use of Imported and Exported Dual-Use Goods and Services for 
Stated End-Uses (amended by Resolution No. 556 of June 3, 1995, Resolution No. 1548 of Dec. 11, 
1997, Resolution No. 853 of Jul. 24, 1999, Resolution No. 635 of Aug. 29, 2001, Resolution No. 54 of 
Feb. 4, 2005) 
Resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 296 of April 16, 2001 on Approval of 
Regulations on Control over Foreign Trade Activities with Respect to Equipment, Materials and 
Technologies That Can be Used to Develop Missiles (amended by Resolution No. 704 of October 1, 
2001, Resolution No. 731 of October 3, 2002, and Resolution No. 54 of February 4, 2005) 
Resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 447 of June 7, 2001 on Approval of 
Regulations for the Control over Foreign Trade Activities with Respect to Dual-Use Equipment, 
Materials and Technologies That Can be Used to Produce Weapons and Military Equipment 
(amended by Resolution No. 704 of Oct. 1, 2001, Resolution No. 731 of Oct. 3, 2002, and Resolution 
No. 54 of Feb. 4, 2005) 
Resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation No. 462 of June 7, 2001 on Approval of 
Regulations for the Control over Foreign Trade Activities with Respect to Dual-Use Equipment, 
Materials and Related Technologies Used for Nuclear Purposes (amended by Resolution No. 731 of 
Oct. 3, 2002, Resolution No. 241 of May 15, 2004, and Resolution No. 54 of Feb. 4, 2005) 
Presidential Decrees 
Decree No. 202 of Feb. 14, 1996 of the President of the Russian Federation on Approving the List of 
Nuclear Materials, Equipment, Special Non-Nuclear Materials and Related Technologies Subject to 
Export Controls (as amended by Decree No. 32 of Jan. 21, 1997, Decree No. 468 of May 12, 1997, 
and Decree No. 1151 of May 5, 2000, and Decree No. 141 of Feb. 4, 2004). 
Decree No. 36 of Jan. 13, 2003 of the President of the Russian Federation on Approving the List of 
Equipment and Dual-Use Materials and Technologies Used for Nuclear Purposes, Subject to Export 
Control 
Control List 
List of Nuclear Materials, Equipment, Special Non-Nuclear Materials and Related Technologies 
—47— 
Subject to Export Controls (corresponds to the NSG Trigger List). 
List of Equipment and Dual-Use Materials and Technologies Used for Nuclear Purposes, Subject to 
Export Control (corresponds to the NSG Dual-Use List). 
B. JAPAN  
Primary Legislation 
Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act (amended 2009) 
Orders and Ordinances 
Export Trade Control Order (amended 2008) (applicable to commodities) 
Export Trade Control Ordinance (amended 2005) 
Foreign Exchange Order (amended 2008) (applicable to technology) 
Ministerial Ordinance on Trade Relation Invisible Trade, etc. (amended 2007) 
Ordinance of the Ministry Specifying Goods and Technologies Pursuant to Provisions of the 
Appended Table 1 of the Export Control Order and the Appended Table of the Foreign Exchange 
Order (amended 2008) (“Ordinance Specifying Goods and Technologies”) 
Control Lists 
Article 1 of the Ordinance Specifying Goods and Technologies provides a list of nuclear material and 
equipment subject to Japanese export controls. 
Technology for the design, manufacture, or use of the goods listed in Article 1 is controlled pursuant 
to the appended Table to the Foreign Exchange Order.   
C. REPUBLIC OF KOREA 
Primary Legislation 
Foreign Trade Act (Amended by Act No. 8852, Feb. 29, 2008) 
Technology Development Promotion Act (Amended by Act No. 8852, Feb. 29, 2008) 
Decrees 
Enforcement Decree of the Foreign Trade Act (Amended by Presidential Decree No. 21104, Nov. 5, 
2008) 
Enforcement Decree of the Technology Development Promotion Act (Amended by Presidential 
Decree No. 19719, Dec. 27, 2006) 
Public Notices 
Consolidated Public Notice for the Export and Import of Strategic Goods and Technology (Ministry 
of Knowledge Economy Public Notice No. 08-118) (“Consolidated Public Notice on Export and 
Import”) 
Consolidated Public Notice (Ministry of Knowledge Economy Notice No. 08-184, Dec. 11, 2008) 
D. FRANCE 
Primary Legislation 
European Council Regulation (EC) No. 428/2009 (adopted 2009) 
—48— 
Decrees and Orders 
Decree No. 292 of March 18, 2010 on licensing procedures for export, transfer, brokering and transit 
of goods and dual-use technology and skills transfer 
Order of March 18, 2010 on export licensing, import and transfer of goods an dual-use technologies 
Decree No. 293 of March 18, 2010 on the general direction of competitiveness, industry and services 
Decree No. 294 of March 18, 2010 establishing an interministerial commission of dual-use 
Order of March 18, 2010 establishing a national service called “Service of dual-use” 
Order on Decree of December 13, 2001 on the control of exports to third countries and the transfer to 
the Member States of the European Union of dual-use goods and technologies 
APPENDIX B: COMPARISON OF NUCLEAR EXPORT CONTROL REGIMES 
Country 
Export Control Agencies 
Country-Specific Restrictions 
Nuclear Cooperation 
Agreement 
Requirements 
Restrictions on Exports of Nuclear 
Technology 
Retransfer Restrictions 
Export Application 
Processing Time 
United States 
 Department of Energy (DOE) 
(nuclear-related technology and 
assistance) 
 Nuclear Regulatory Commission 
(NRC) (nuclear reactors, fuel cycle 
facilities, components and materials) 
 Department of Commerce (DOC) 
(balance of plant and dual-use 
commodities and technology) 
 Department of State (DOS) (military 
items, including nuclear weapons and 
commodities for use in nuclear 
submarines) 
 DOE – 810.8(a) list – specific authorization required for 
exports of non-public commercial nuclear technology and 
assistance  
 NRC – Specific license required for all commercial nuclear 
exports, except for exports of minor reactor components to 
26 countries listed at 10 CFR 110.26; exports restricted to 
Afghanistan, Andorra, Angola, Myanmar, Djibouti, India, 
Israel, Libya, Oman, Pakistan; exports prohibited to Cuba, 
Iran, Iraq, N. Korea, Sudan, Syria 
 DOC – BOP exports to Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Libya, North 
Korea, Pakistan, Sudan and Syria require a license; EAR99 
exports to unsafeguarded facilities (e.g. in India, Pakistan) 
require a license 
 DOS – exports of nuclear weapons and commodities for use 
in submarines restricted to most destinations 
Nuclear Cooperation 
(Section 123) 
Agreement required for 
exports of major 
nuclear components, 
source material 
(natural uranium and 
thorium) and special 
nuclear material 
(enriched uranium, 
plutonium and U-233) 
to any country. 
 Deemed export rule applies (DOE, 
DOC and DOS). 
 U.S. citizens providing Part 810-
controlled assistance directly to 
foreign entities must obtain Part 
810 specific authorization / file 
reports. 
 DOC has similar controls over 
technology transfers by U.S. 
individuals.  
 Prior DOE approval required 
before Part 810-controlled 
technology can be 
retransferred to 810.8(a) 
countries or citizens of these 
countries. 
 USG consent required before 
U.S. nuclear components or 
fuel can be retransferred to 
third countries. 
 DOC may on a limited basis 
place certain retransfer 
conditions on licensee or 
end-user; reporting 
requirements may apply.  
 Part 810 specific 
authorization: 6-14 
months 
 Part 110 specific 
license: 12+ months for 
initial exports 
(substantially more if 
intervention, but 
inventions are very 
rare); >12 months for 
subsequent exports 
 DOC license: 45-60 
days 
France 
 Ministry of Economy, Industry & 
Employment – Dual-Use Goods 
Control Office (SBDU) (general 
licensing agency) 
 Inter-Agency Committee on Dual-Use 
Items (CIBDU) (sensitive applications 
and export policy) 
 Other EU countries – dual-use items may be transferred 
freely within the EU, except for certain enumerated items 
(including nuclear technology) 
 Community General Export Authorization (CGEA) – general 
license for export of most controlled items applicable to 
U.S., Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, 
and Norway 
 Embargoed countries – Iran, North Korea 
Nuclear cooperation 
agreement not 
necessary to export 
controlled items. 
 No deemed export rule. 
 Export of nuclear technology 
generally requires individual or 
global export authorization. 
 Controls apply to technology 
transfers by phone, fax, email, any 
other electronic means. 
 Controls do not apply to in-person 
supply of services or transmission 
of technology. 
 SBDU may require execution 
of end-user certificate 
prohibiting re-exports. 
All applications: 9 months 
Republic of 
Korea 
 Ministry of Knowledge Economy 
(MKE) (dual-use equipment, material 
and technology) 
 Ministry of Education, Science and 
Technology (MEST) (NSG Trigger 
List equipment, material and 
technology) 
 More restrictive application and licensing requirements for 
exports to countries (“Region B countries”) not parties to all 
of the following regimes: Wassenaar Arrangement; Nuclear 
Suppliers Group; Missile Technology Control Regime; 
Australia Group; Convention on the Prohibition of the 
Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical 
Weapons and on Their Destruction; and Convention on the 
Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling 
of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on 
Their Destruction. 
Laws and regulations 
do not expressly 
require nuclear 
cooperation agreement 
to export controlled 
items. 
 No deemed export rule. 
 Application for export of 
controlled technology requires 
submission of export contract and 
detailed statement of features of 
exported technology. 
 End-user 
certificate/government 
assurance requirement 
prohibits re-exports without 
prior ROK consent (but not 
required if exporting dual-
use items to Region A 
countries or NSG member 
countries). 
 Generally: 15 days 
 Application for export 
of specified items to 
Region A countries: 5 
days 
Japan 
 Ministry of Economy, Trade and 
Industry (METI) 
 26 “White” countries – bulk export license applicable, 
catch-all control inapplicable unless informed otherwise 
 Non-”White” countries – individual export license applies 
Laws and regulations 
do not expressly 
require nuclear 
cooperation agreement 
not necessary to export 
controlled items. 
 Deemed export rule applies for any 
transfers of controlled technologies 
by a Japanese national to a non-
resident.   
 Controls also broadly apply to any 
cross-border transfer of sensitive 
technologies by any persons 
(Japanese residents or non-
residents). 
 METI may require provision 
of governmental assurances 
and execution of end-user 
certificate prohibiting re-
exports without original 
exporter’s prior written 
consent. 
Standard processing 
period: 90 days 
Russia 
 Federal Service for Technical and 
Export Control (FSTEC) - issues 
export and import licenses 
 Rosatom - takes part in the 
examination of the contract for supply 
of controlled commodities 
 Additional licensing requirements apply to exports to India 
and to countries that do not have a full scope safeguards 
agreement in place with the IAEA. 
Nuclear cooperation 
agreement not 
necessary to export 
controlled items. 
 Deemed export rule applies. 
 The same assurances that 
apply to the original transfer 
must be obtained for 
subsequent retransfer to 
third countries. 
 Single Export 
License: up to 45 days 
 Multiple Export 
License: up to 25 days 
—50— 
APPENDIX C: NUCLEAR AGREEMENTS FOR COOPERATION BETWEEN SUBJECT SUPPLIER AND CUSTOMER COUNTRIES 
C
USTOMER 
C
OUNTRIES
S
UPPLIER 
C
OUNTRIES
India 
Czech Republic 
United Kingdom 
Republic of Korea 
Japan 
United States 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Aug. 3, 2007 
Agreement for Cooperation between the 
European Atomic Energy Community 
(EURATOM) and the U.S. (Jul. 11, 1995) 
Agreement for Cooperation between 
EURATOM and the U.S. (Jul. 11, 1995) 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Nov. 24, 1972 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, 
signed Nov. 4, 1987 
France 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Sept. 30, 2008 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
May 19, 2011 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Feb. 15, 1965 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Apr. 4, 1981 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, 
signed 1981  
Russia 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Mar. 12, 2010 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Dec. 4, 1994 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Sept. 3, 1996; supplementary agreement June 
26, 2003 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
May 31, 2001 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, 
signed May 12, 2009 
Republic of Korea 
Agreement for Cooperation signed Jul. 25, 2011 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed  
Mar. 16, 2001 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Nov. 27, 1991 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, 
signed Dec. 12, 2010 
Japan 
No agreement in force 
Agreement for Cooperation between the 
Government of Japan and EURATOM, signed 
Feb. 27, 2006 
Agreement for Cooperation between the 
Government of Japan and EURATOM, signed 
Feb. 27, 2006 
Agreement for Cooperation in force, signed 
Dec. 12, 2010 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested