asp.net open pdf : Change font size pdf text box control application platform web page azure winforms web browser olanrewaju-kassim0-part2091

The Impact of Trade Liberalisation on Export Growth and Import 
Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Lanre Kassim
Abstract 
This empirical paper adopts panel data methodologies to investigate the impact of trade 
liberalisation on export growth and import growth across 28 Sub-Saharan African countries 
from 1981 to 2010. The results show that trade liberalisation increases the growth of exports; 
however, imports grow faster by approximately two percentage points which gives a prima 
facie evidence that the trade balance in the region deteriorated in the post-liberalisation era. We 
also find that trade liberalisation significantly raises the price elasticity of demand for exports 
and imports; however, it does not significantly affect income elasticity of demand.  
Keywords
Trade liberalisation, Export growth, Import growth, Price and Income elasticities 
of demand, Sub-Saharan Africa. 
JEL Classification
C23, F13, F14, O55. 
School of Economics, University of Kent, Tel: +44(0)1227-824-3936, E-mail: omk6@kent.ac.uk. 
Acknowledgement: I would like to thank Chris Heady, Tony Thirlwall and an anonymous reviewer for helpful comments on earlier versions 
of the paper. I would also like to thank Miguel Leon-Ledesma and seminar participants at the 2013 African Economic Conference and at the 
University of Kent. Financial support from the School of Economics at the University of Kent is also acknowledged. All remaining errors are 
mine.
Change font size pdf text box - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf compression settings; pdf edit text size
Change font size pdf text box - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best pdf compressor; change file size of pdf document
1. Introduction  
In the 1960s and 1970s, Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries adopted interventionist policies 
aimed at protecting their domestic market from foreign competition. These policies were also 
seen as a feasible approach to achieving structural transformation and reducing the region’s 
dependence on primary commodities. Unfortunately, however, the 1979 oil shock, together 
with the debt crisis and global recession of the early 1980s, left SSA in the doldrums: non-fuel 
primary commodity prices plummeted, debt to GDP ratio rose to 70 per cent while per capita 
income declined by 14 per cent between 1980 and 1987 (UNCTAD, 2004). This precarious 
state prompted international financial institutions such as the World Bank and the International 
Monetary Fund (IMF) to offer financial aid to the region on condition that countries open up 
their trade regime. By the mid-1980s and early 1990s, free trade policies in the context of 
Structural Adjustment Programmes had started dominating the SSA region. Early liberalisers 
include Niger and Ghana while countries such as Angola, Burundi and the Democratic 
Republic of Congo (DRC) only embarked on significant trade reforms in the early twenty-first 
century owing to decades of political and social crises.  
The removal or reduction of barriers to trade such as import tariffs, export duties and 
quantitative restrictions stimulates the growth of exports and imports. However, if imports 
grow relatively faster than exports, then an economy is at risk of balance of payments problems 
which could create a binding constraint on output growth.
1
This is the trade liberalisation 
conundrum which has not been adequately researched in the literature on Sub-Saharan Africa. 
Most empirical studies on trade liberalisation adopt the narrow approach of analysing its 
impact on output (GDP) growth, without considering whether growth is sustainable and 
consistent with long-run balance of payments (BOP) equilibrium. While we do not examine the 
impact of trade liberalisation on the trade-off between output growth and BOP in this study, we 
investigate how the adoption of outward-oriented policies has affected export growth and 
import growth. This analysis will show whether imports grew faster than exports in the post-
liberalisation era and will also give a preliminary indication of the trade balance position in 
SSA. Furthermore, we assess the impact of trade liberalisation on the price and income 
elasticity of demand for exports and imports, respectively.
2
1 See Thirlwall (1979). 
2 See Appendix 1 for the list and classification of countries
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
300 dpi pdf file size; adjust pdf size
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color.
change paper size in pdf document; can pdf files be compressed
We focus on a panel dataset of 28 SSA countries from the period 1981 to 2010.
3
Export and 
import growth equations are specified to include explanatory variables such as domestic 
income growth, foreign income growth and a measure of price competitiveness. Static and 
dynamic panel models are employed. Trade liberalisation is measured quantitatively and 
qualitatively: first, the average duties applied to exports and imports are used, where an export 
duty represents export taxes as a percentage of total exports while an import duty denotes 
import taxes as a percentage of total imports.
4
Second, we apply a dummy variable which takes 
the value of one when uninterrupted trade reforms began in a SSA country and zero 
beforehand. The duty variable captures the direct impact of trade tariffs while the liberalisation 
dummy captures the effect of non-tariff barriers. Liberalisation dates are constructed from a 
careful examination of the trade policy reviews of SSA countries.
5
The empirical studies on the impact of trade liberalisation on export performance have 
produced mixed results. World Bank studies of Michealy et al (1991) and Thomas et al (1991), 
Joshi and Little (1996), Bleaney (1999), Ahmed (2000), Pacheco-Lopez (2005), and Santos-
Paulino (2002 and 2007) all found a significant positive relationship between trade 
liberalisation and export performance. On the other hand, Clarke and Kirkpatrick (1992), 
Greenaway and Sapsford (1994), Jenkins (1996), Ratnaike (2012) and the UNCTAD studies of 
Agosin (1991) and Shafaeddin (1994), found little or no evidence of any favourable impact of 
trade liberalisation on export performance. 
Furthermore, only a few studies have analysed the relationship between trade liberalisation and 
imports.
6
In the study by Melo and Vogt (1984), two hypotheses were proposed regarding the 
impact of import liberalisation on the behaviour of import elasticities. One is that the income 
elasticity of demand increases as the degree of import liberalisation increases, while the other 
suggests that as economic development continues, the price elasticity of import demand rises 
owing to progress in import substitution. Using disaggregated annual data, their results 
provided support for the two hypotheses in Venezuela. Santos-Paulino (2002) found empirical 
evidence of these hypotheses across a group of developing countries while Boylan and Cuddy 
(1987) rejected the hypotheses in an investigation of the elasticities of import demand in 
3 Choice of time period and countries are based on the availability of data. 
4
The export duty and import duty measures are chosen because they denote one of the trade policy instruments used across Sub-Saharan 
Africa. Moreover, they are easily calculated and there is sufficient data for the countries analysed.  
5
A summary of the different trade reforms taken by each country in the sample are available on request. 
6
See Melo and Vogt (1984), Bertola and Faini (1990), Faini et al (1992) and Santos-Paulino (2002 and 2007).
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
batch reduce pdf file size; change font size pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change page size pdf acrobat; change file size of pdf
Ireland. Mah (1999), on the other hand, found that income elasticity of demand increased as a 
result of import liberalisation in Thailand but price elasticity did not rise.  
In SSA, there is a dearth of empirical studies on the relationship between trade liberalisation 
and export growth, and to the best of our knowledge there are no studies on the impact of trade 
liberalisation on import growth in Sub-Saharan Africa. A plausible explanation for the scarcity 
of studies may be the paucity of data in the region. The United Nations Conference on Trade 
and Development (2008) conducted a study on the post-liberalisation export performance of 34 
African countries. Using a liberalisation dummy in accordance with the Wacziarg and Welch 
(2008) classification and applying the Generalised Methods of Moment (GMM) estimator, they 
found that trade liberalisation increased the ratio of exports-to-GDP by 0.09 percentage points. 
Although the impact is very minimal, it is surprising that the exports-to-GDP ratio is used as 
the dependent variable in contrast to the growth of exports.
7
Babatunde (2009) examined the 
impact of trade liberalisation on export performance across 20 SSA countries from 1980 to 
2005. Using fixed and random effects estimation techniques, he found no significant 
relationship between trade liberalisation and export performance. This finding is rather not 
unexpected as Babatunde used average tariff rates (which may not directly affect exports) as 
the indicator of trade liberalisation in his export equation. In addition, Olofin and Babatunde 
(2007) examined the price and income elasticities of Sub-Saharan African exports from 1980 
to 2003. Applying a fixed effects estimation technique on a panel dataset of 20 countries, they 
found that the calculated long run income elasticity of demand for exports ranges between 0.94 
and 1.33 while the estimated long-run price elasticity of demand varies from -0.01 to -0.17. 
They also found that the real income of trading partners and price competitiveness of exporting 
countries are significant determinants of SSA exports.  
This paper departs from the aforementioned studies by constructing liberalisation dates for 
sample countries instead of relying on the Dean et al (1994) or Wacziarg and Welch (2008) 
classifications. We also adopt a measure of relative prices for tradable goods only while our 
specifications analyse whether the short-run impact of trade liberalisation on export and import 
growth is instantaneous or not. Indeed, there is no study on SSA that has adopted this 
approach.  
The remainder of this study is organised as follows. Section 2 shows simple descriptive 
statistics on export growth and import growth before and after liberalisation. Section 3 and 4 
7
Since the independent variables are specified in growth forms, it is more appropriate for the dependent variable to be in growth form and not 
in level. 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Support to change font size in PDF form. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; List<BaseFormField
reader shrink pdf; pdf font size change
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Save text font, color, size and location changes to Other robust text processing features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
change font size in pdf; adjust size of pdf in preview
explains the methodology and empirical results on the impact of trade liberalisation on export 
growth and import growth, respectively. Section 5 is dedicated to discussions and comparisons 
of results while section 6 concludes. 
2. Export growth and Import growth before (from 1981) and after (until 
2010) Liberalisation 
We begin the analysis in this study by examining simple descriptive statistics on the growth of 
exports and imports before and after liberalisation (see table 1 below). The aim of this 
approach is to have preliminary information on export growth and import growth in the post-
liberalisation era. This method has the weakness that no other variables have been controlled 
for; hence, liberalisation alone cannot be accountable for the changes in the growth of exports 
and imports. 
Table 1: Average export and import growth before and after liberalisation in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Average Export 
growth 
Average Import 
growth 
Country (28) 
Lib 
Year 
Before 
Lib (%) 
After 
Lib (%) 
Increase/ 
Decrease 
Before 
Lib (%) 
After Lib 
(%) 
Increase/ 
Decrease 
Benin 
1988 
-1.13 
2.06 
Increase 
-6.24 
3.53 
Increase 
Botswana 
1994 
8.84 
2.85 
Decrease 
5.65 
5.63 
Same 
Burkina Faso 
1991 
2.64 
6.98 
Increase 
0.96 
3.12 
Increase 
Burundi 
2003 
5.30 
21.56 
Increase 
1.09 
37.14 
Increase 
Cameroun 
1989 
7.89 
1.55 
Decrease 
8.88 
3.79 
Decrease 
Cote d’Ivoire 
1994 
1.01 
4.33 
Increase 
-2.19 
6.24 
Increase 
DRC 
2001 
4.66 
6.24 
Increase 
6.53 
15.37 
Increase 
Ethiopia 
1992 
0.67 
10.02 
Increase 
3.99 
10.70 
Increase 
Gabon 
1994 
5.14 
-1.39 
Decrease 
2.35 
1.66 
Decrease* 
Gambia 
1986 
8.24 
2.08 
Decrease 
-11.13 
2.61 
Increase 
Ghana 
1983 
-46.70 
10.43 
Increase 
-4.5 
11.78 
Increase 
Kenya 
1993 
4.07 
4.35 
Increase* 0.06 
8.85 
Increase 
Lesotho 
1994 
6.30 
9.67 
Increase 
4.26 
7.37 
Increase 
Madagascar 
1988 
-5.44 
6.30 
Increase 
-9.91 
7.34 
Increase 
Malawi 
1988 
1.55 
3.69 
Increase 
-5.57 
3.67 
Increase 
Mali 
1988 
4.33 
8.97 
Increase 
6.38 
4.77 
Decrease 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
change font size pdf form; change font size in pdf text box
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
best pdf compression; pdf compressor
Mauritius 
1985 
2.51 
5.64 
Increase 
-1.48 
6.13 
Increase 
Namibia 
1994 
2.82 
0.57 
Decrease 
1.21 
4.28 
Increase 
Nigeria 
1986 
-6.72 
3.45 
Increase 
-3.02 
4.72 
Increase 
Rwanda 
1995 
-4.77 
20.36 
Increase 
10.27 
1.98 
Decrease 
Senegal  
1986 
7.68 
3.37 
Decrease 
6.84 
3.70 
Decrease 
Sierra Leone 
1989 
-4.1 
-0.56 
Increase 
-8.04 
2.90 
Increase 
South Africa 
1994 
2.20 
3.90 
Increase 
1.38 
6.05 
Increase 
Swaziland 
1994 
4.25 
6.23 
Increase 
3.20 
5.05 
Increase 
Togo 
1994 
-2.58 
3.01 
Increase 
-2.57 
6.04 
Increase 
Uganda 
1987 
0.63 
14.12 
Increase 
0.94 
9.52 
Increase 
Zambia 
1991 
-3.39 
14.99 
Increase 
-4.14 
15.47 
Increase 
Zimbabwe 
1990 
5.31 
-1.76 
Decrease 
6.23 
1.27 
Decrease 
Sources: WTO policy reviews for various countries; (*) denotes a marginal increase or decrease while all values are the author’s calculations. 
We observe that in twenty-one countries, export growth increased after liberalisation while in 
seven countries export growth decreased. Also, the post-liberalisation period witnessed an 
increase in import growth in twenty-one countries while in six countries, import growth 
decreased. In Botswana, the growth of imports remained the same after liberalisation. 
Furthermore, the table indicates that post liberalisation imports grew faster than exports in all 
countries except Burkina Faso, Lesotho, Mali, Rwanda, Swaziland and Uganda. Again, we 
cannot attribute these results to liberalisation alone as simple descriptive statistics do not show 
a causal link between two variables. To find such causal evidence, an econometric analysis is 
required in the form below. 
3. The Impact of Trade Liberalisation on Export growth 
3.1. Model Specification 
We adopt the conventional export demand equation which relates the level of exports to world 
real income and a measure of price competitiveness. Assuming constant price and income 
elasticities of demand, the export equation can be expressed as:  
t
t
im
ex
t
W
P
EP
A
EXP
*
(1) 
where EXP is the level of exports; A is a constant; E is the nominal exchange rate measured as 
the foreign price of domestic currency while
*
im
ex
P P
represents the ratio of domestic export 
prices to foreign import prices so that the real exchange rate (ReR) is measured as 
*
im
ex
P
EP
.
8
is the level of world real income while γ denote the income elasticity of demand for exports 
which is expected to be positive.
A decrease in the foreign price of domestic currency 
(devaluation) or a fall in export prices relative to import prices should reduce ReR and hence, 
increase export growth so that the expected sign for the price elasticity of demand (δ) is 
negative. Taking logs and differentiating with respect to time, equation (1) becomes: 
( )
)
(
*
t
t
im
ex
t
w
p
e p
a
x
 
(2) 
Equation (2) can be transformed into a static panel specification in the form of: 
it
it
it
i
it
wgdpg
rer
epg
2
1
(3)
where 
epg
is the growth of real exports, 
i
is the country-specific effect, 
rer
measures the 
rate of change of the real exchange rate, wgdpgis the growth of world real income while 
it
is 
the idiosyncratic error term. Also,
1
and 
2
denotes the price and income elasticity of demand 
for exports, respectively.
9
We augment equation (3) to include the two measures of 
liberalisation as follows: 
it
it
it
it
it
i
it
epd
libdum
wgdpg
rer
epg
4
3
2
1
(4) 
where libdum is the liberalisation dummy which takes the value of 1 from the year significant 
trade reforms began in an SSA country and zero beforehand. Since trade liberalisation reduces 
the degree of anti-export bias, the variable libdum is expected to have a positive impact on real 
export growth. epd is measured as the rate of change of export duties. 
Furthermore, we are interested in the impact of trade liberalisation on the price and income 
elasticity of demand for exports. It is expected that the implementation of trade reforms should 
raise the income elasticity of demand for exports which implies structural change in the form 
of resources being transferred to sectors with high income elasticities. Hence, we create two 
interaction variables to examine whether trade liberalisation has significantly increased or 
decreased the responsiveness of export growth to world income and relative price changes: 
8
The real exchange rate is defined this way as we are interested in the relative price of tradable goods only. 
9
δ and γ in equation (2) corresponds to β
1
and β
in equation (3)
it
it
it
it
it
it
it
i
it
wlib
rerlib
epd
libdum
wgdpg
rer
epg
6
5
4
3
2
1
(5)
wherererlib
represents an interaction between the rate of change of the real exchange rate and 
the liberalisation dummy, while wlibdenotes an interaction between world income growth and 
the liberalisation dummy.
10
The expected signs of the coefficients of equation (5) are:
1
(-); 
2
(+); 
3
(+); 
4
(-); 
5
(-); 
6
(+).  
3.2 Panel data results (I): Random effects 
Table 2 presents the random effects (RE) results as the Hausman test indicates that it is the 
appropriate estimator for equations (4) and (5). 
Table 2: Trade Liberalisation and Export Growth (Random Effects) 
Dependent Variable: 
Export Growth 
Independent variables 
RE (I) 
RE (II) 
rer
-0.24 
(4.44)* 
-0.13 
(1.80)*** 
wgdpg 
1.12 
(2.40)** 
0.99 
(1.38) 
libdum 
3.32 
(2.33)** 
2.81 
(0.87) 
epd 
-0.02 
(0.05) 
-0.02 
(0.03) 
rerlib 
-0.26 
(2.41)** 
wlib 
0.21 
(0.22) 
Diagnostic statistics 
R
2
0.069 
0.083 
F-stat [p-value] 
[0.0000] 
[0.0000] 
Joint Sig 
[0.0532] 
No. of Observations 
399 
399 
Hausman [p-value] 
[0.4099] 
[0.6741] 
*,** and *** indicate that a coefficient is statistically significant at 1%, 5% and 10% significance level, respectively. The figures in parenthesis 
( ) are absolute t/z ratios while figures in brackets [ ] are p-values. “Joint Sig” is a F-test for the joint significance of the two slope dummies 
Liberalisation significantly increases export growth by 3.32 percentage points while a 10 per 
cent decrease in export duties will increase export growth by 0.2 per cent, albeit insignificant. 
The income elasticity of demand for exports is 1.12 which means that a change in world 
income will cause a marginally higher change in the demand for SSA exports. In addition, the 
10 See Appendix 2 for the definition and sources of variables used. 
price elasticity of demand is -0.24, implying that exports are much less responsive to changes 
in relative prices. In other words, SSA countries are still major exporters of primary 
commodities.  
The second RE regression includes the two interaction terms rerlib and wlib. The price 
elasticity of demand for exports drops to -0.13 while there is also evidence that trade 
liberalisation increased the price elasticity of demand for exports by 0.26 percentage points. 
There is no significant evidence of the impact of trade liberalisation on income elasticity of 
demand for exports. We also test the joint significance of the two interaction terms and the 
results show they are jointly significant. 
3.3 Panel data results (II): Generalised Method of Moments (GMM) 
Furthermore, we specify a dynamic panel model (DPM) to examine the effect of trade 
liberalisation on export growth. The generalised method of moments (GMM) is employed for 
econometric analysis. This estimator not only allows an instrumental variable (IV) estimation 
of parameters, but also long run and short run effects of variables can be estimated. Moreover, 
an IV approach helps control for measurement error which might be present in static panel 
models.
11
Thus, equation (4) and (5) are specified in dynamic form as follows: 
it
it
it
it
it
it
i
it
epd
libdum
wgdpg
rer
epg
epg
5
4
3
2
1
1
(6) 
it
it
it
it
it
it
it
it
i
it
wlib
rerlib
epd
libdum
wgdpg
rer
epg
epg
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
1
(7) 
where 
it1
epg  is the lagged export growth variable, 
i
is the fixed effect while 
it
is the 
idiosyncratic error term. The regressors are still the same as defined in section 3.1. Long-run 
price and income elasticities of demand for exports can be calculated as
1
2
/1
and
1
3
/1
, respectively; while long run liberalisation effect can be estimated as
1
4
/1
The GMM results are shown in table 3.  
11
The use of DPM can also be regarded as a test to know whether results are robust to different estimation techniques. 
10 
Table 3: Trade liberalisation and Export growth (GMM) 
Dependent Variable: 
Export Growth 
Independent variables 
GMM (I) 
GMM (II) 
l.epg
0.17 
(1.13) 
0.15 
(0.89) 
rer
-0.28 
(3.22)* 
-0.15 
(3.22)* 
wgdpg 
1.43 
(3.25)* 
1.55 
(1.69)*** 
libdum 
2.67 
(1.95)*** 
3.65 
(1.01) 
epd 
-0.12 
(0.18) 
-0.03 
(0.04) 
rerlib 
-0.25 
(2.08)** 
wlib 
-0.25 
(0.23) 
LR income elasticity 
1.72 
1.82 
LR price elasticity 
-0.34 
-0.18 
LR Lib effect 
3.22 
4.29 
No. of Observations 
380 
380 
Diagnostic statistics 
Joint Sig  
[0.1065] 
Wald test 
[0.000] 
[0.000] 
1st-Order serial correlation 
[0.015] 
[0.032] 
2nd-Order serial correlation [0.133] 
[0.172] 
Sargan Test 
[0.477] 
[0.539] 
*,** and *** indicate that a coefficient is statistically significant at 1%, 5% and 10% significance level, respectively. The figures in parenthesis 
( ) are absolute t/z ratios while figures in brackets [ ] are p-values. 
Lagged export growth variable has a low coefficient which implies a small difference between 
short run and long run estimates. Trade liberalisation raised the growth of exports by 2.67 
percentage points in the short run with this figure increasing to 3.22 percentage points in the 
long run. The short run income elasticity is 1.43 while in the long run, the income elasticity is 
1.72. The short run price elasticity of demand is -0.28 while the long run figure stands at -0.34. 
This figure is above the estimated range of long run price elasticity of demand for SSA exports 
by Olofin and Babatunde (2007). The differences in estimates can be, plausibly, attributed to 
the different measures of real exchange rate adopted. Again, the export duty variable remains 
insignificant.  
The second GMM regression produces similar results to the RE regression. Liberalisation 
increases the price elasticity of demand for exports by 0.25 percentage points while there is no 
significant evidence of the effect of trade liberalisation on income elasticity of demand. The 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested