asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# : Best way to compress pdf files Library control class asp.net azure web page ajax iif_kgpm_Douglas%20Robinson.%20Becomming_a_Translator_6-part348

3 The translator as learner 
The translator's intelligence 
49 
The translator's memory 
50 
Representational and procedural memory 
51 
Intellectual and emotional memory 
52 
Context, relevance, multiple encoding 
53 
The translator's learning styles 
55 
Context 
57 
Field-dependent/independent 
57 
Flexible/structured environment 
60 
Independence / dependence / interdependence 61 
Relationship- 
content-driven 
62 
Input 
63 
Visual 
63 
Auditory 
64 
Kinesthetic 
66 
Processing 
68 
Contextual-global 
68 
Sequential-detailed/linear 
69 
Conceptual (abstract) 
70 
Concrete (objects and feelings) 
70 
Best way to compress pdf files - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change page size of pdf document; change font size pdf
Best way to compress pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf compress; change font size in pdf form field
Response 
71 
Externally 
internally 
referenced 
71 
Matching/mismatching 
73 
Impulsive-experimental /analytical-reflective 
74 
Discussion 
75 
Exercises 
76 
Suggestions for further reading 
81 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for PDF, provides an advanced C# programming way to split PDF document into smaller PDF files in .NET
pdf font size change; pdf edit text size
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to high-fidelity PDF to TIFF conversion in an easy way. C# developers can render and convert PDF document to
change font size pdf form reader; change paper size pdf
T
HESIS: translation is intelligent activity involving complex processes of 
conscious and unconscious learning; we all learn in different ways, and 
institutional learning should therefore be as flexible and as complex and rich as 
possible, so as to activate the channels through which each student learns best. 
The translator's intelligence 
The question posed by Chapter 2 was: how can the translator maximize speed and 
enjoyment while not minimizing (indeed if possible while enhancing) reliability? 
How can the translator translate faster and have more fun doing it, while gaining 
and maintaining a deserved reputation as a good translator? 
At first glance the desires to translate faster and to translate reliably might seem 
to be at odds with one another. One commonsensical assumption says that the faster 
you do something, the more likely you are to make mistakes; the more slowly you 
work, the more likely that work is to be reliable. The reliable translator shouldn't 
make (major) mistakes, so s/he shouldn't try to translate fast. 
But increased speed, at least up to a point, really only damages reliability when 
you are doing something new or unfamiliar, something that requires concentration, 
which always takes time. "Old" and "familiar" actions, especially habitual actions, 
can be performed both quickly and reliably because habit takes over. You're late in 
the morning, so you brush your teeth, tie your shoes, throw on your coat, grab your 
keys and wallet or purse and run for the door, start the car and get on the road, all 
in about two minutes — and you don't forget anything, you don't mistie your shoes, 
you don't grab a fork and a spoon instead of your keys, because you've done all these 
things so many times before that your body knows what to do, and does it. 
And there are important parallels between this "bodily memory" and translation. 
Experienced translators are fast because they have translated so much that it often 
seems as if their "brain" isn't doing the translating — their fingers are. They recognize 
a familiar source-language structure and they barely pause before their fingers are 
racing across the keyboard, rendering it into a well-worn target-language structural 
equivalent, fitted with lexical items that seem to come to them automatically, 
without conscious thought or logical analysis. Simultaneous interpreters don't seem 
to be thinking at all — who, the astonished observer wonders, could possibly think 
that fast? No, it is impossible; the words must be coming to the interpreter from 
somewhere else, some subliminal or even mystical part of the brain that ordinary 
people lack. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
Then the best way to reach this target is to use a be divided into two separate sub-PPT files from the Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions
compress pdf; change paper size in pdf
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide a best and easy way to darken text in PDF
pdf file size; change font size in pdf
50 The translator as learner 
It should be clear, however, that even at its most "habitual" or "subliminal," 
translation is not the same sort of activity as tying your shoes or brushing your teeth. 
Translation is always intelligent behavior — even when it seems least conscious or 
analytical. Translation is a highly complicated process requiring rapid multilayered 
analyses of semantic fields, syntactic structures, the sociology and psychology of 
reader- or listener-response, and cultural difference. Like all language use, trans-
lation is constantly creative, constantly new. Even translators of the most formulaic 
source texts, like weather reports, repeatedly face novel situations and must engage 
in unexpected problem-solving. And most translation tasks are enormously more 
complex than those. As William H. Calvin writes in How Brains Think (1996: 1, 13): 
Piaget used to say that intelligence is what you use when you don't know what 
to do . . . If you're good at finding the one right answer to life's multiple-choice 
questions, you're smart. But there's more to being intelligent — a creative aspect, 
whereby you invent something new "on the fly." . . . This captures the element 
of novelty, the coping and groping ability needed when there is no "right 
answer," when business as usual isn't likely to suffice. Intelligent improvising. 
Think of jazz improvisations rather than a highly polished finished product, such 
as a Mozart or Bach concerto. Intelligence is about the process of improvising 
and polishing on the timescale of thought and action. 
This book is about such intelligence as it is utilized in professional translation. It 
seeks both to teach you about that intelligence, and to get you to use that intelligence 
in faster, more reliable, and more enjoyable ways. This will entail both developing 
your analytical skills and learning to sublimate them, becoming both better and 
faster at analyzing texts and contexts, people and moods: better because more 
accurate, faster because less aware of your own specific analytical processes. In this 
chapter we will be exploring the complex learning processes by which novices 
gradually become experienced professionals; in Chapter 4 we will be developing a 
theoretical model for the translation process; and in Chapters 5 through 11 we will 
be moving through a series of thematic fields within translation — people, language, 
social networks, cultural difference — in which this process must be applied. 
The translator's memory 
Translation is an intelligent activity, requiring creative problem-solving in novel 
textual, social, and cultural conditions. As we have seen, this intelligent activity 
is sometimes very conscious; most of the time it is subconscious, "beneath" our 
conscious awareness. It is no less intelligent when we are not aware of it — no less 
creative, and no less analytical. This is not a "mystical" model of translation. The 
sublimated intelligence that makes it possible for us to translate rapidly, reliably, and 
enjoyably is the product of learning — which is to say, of experience stored in 
memory in ways that enable its effective recall and flexible and versatile use. 
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Converting Image and Document in VB.NET
Image Conversion SDK is your best choice for supports multiple image conversions in a simple way. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change font size in fillable pdf form; can pdf files be compressed
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Best WPF PDF Viewer control for PDF annotating in .NET WPF class. 3. Wavy underline text. Click to add way underline under selected PDF text. 4.
pdf page size limit; can a pdf be compressed
The translator as learner 5
This does not mean that good translators must memorize vast quantities of linguistic 
and cultural knowledge; in fact, insofar as we take "memorization" to mean the 
conscious, determined, and rote or mechanical stuffing of facts into our brains, it 
is quite the opposite. Translators must be good at storing experiences in memory, 
and at retrieving those experiences whenever needed to solve complex translation 
problems; but they do not do this by memorizing things. Memory as learning works 
differently. Learning is what happens when you're doing something else — especially 
something enjoyable, but even something unpleasant, if your experience leaves a 
strong enough impression on you. Translators learn words and phrases, styles and 
tones and registers, linguistic and cultural strategies while translating, while inter-
preting, while reading a book or surfing the Internet, while talking to people, while 
sitting quietly and thinking about something that happened. Communicating with 
people in a foreign country, they learn the language, internalize tens of thousands 
of words and phrases and learn to use them flexibly and creatively in ways that 
make sense to the people around them, without noticing themselves "memorizing." 
Translating the texts they are sent, interpreting the words that come out of a source 
speaker's mouth, they learn transfer patterns, and those patterns are etched on their 
brains for easy and intelligent access, sometimes without their even being aware 
that they have such things, let alone being able to articulate them in analytical, rule-
governed ways. All they know is that certain words and phrases activate a flurry of 
finger activity on the keyboard, and the translation seems to write itself; or they 
open their mouths and a steady stream of target text comes out, propelled by some 
force that they do not always recognize as their own. 
Representational and procedural memory 
Memory experts distinguish between representational memory and procedural memory. 
Representational memory records what you had for breakfast this morning, or what 
your spouse just told you to get at the store: specific events. Procedural memory 
helps you check your e-mail, or drive to work: helps you perform skills or activities 
that are quickly sublimated as unconscious habits. 
And translators and interpreters need both. They need representational memory 
when they need to remember a specific word: "What was the German for 'word-
wrap'?" Or, better, because more complexly contextualized in terms of person and 
event (see below): "What did that German computer guy last summer in Frankfurt 
call 'word-wrap'?" They need procedural memory for everything else: typing and 
computer skills, linguistic and cultural analytical skills for source-text processing, 
linguistic and cultural production skills for target-text creation, and transfer patterns 
between the two. 
Representational memory might help a translator define a word s/he once looked 
up in a dictionary; procedural memory might help a translator use the word effec-
tively in a translation. Representational memory might help a student to reproduce 
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
This "Best Fit" function will help developers and users To put it in another way, after you activate powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
advanced pdf compressor; pdf text box font size
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint to searchable PDF document. Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your
reduce pdf file size; change font size in pdf file
5 2 The translator as learner 
a translation rule on an exam; procedural memory might help a student to use that 
rule in an actual translation exercise with little or no awareness of actually doing so. 
While both forms of memory are essential for translation, their importance is 
relatively specialized. Procedural memory is most useful when things go well: when 
the source text makes sense, is well-formed grammatically and lexically; when the 
translation job is well-defined, its purpose and target audience clearly understood; 
when editors and users and critics either like the translation or do not voice their 
criticisms. Representational memory is most useful when things go less well: when 
a poorly written source text requires a conscious memory of grammatical rules and 
fine lexical distinctions; when the translation commissioner is so vague about a job 
that it cannot be done until the translator has coaxed out of her or him a clear 
definition of what is to be done; when rules, regularities, patterns, and theories 
must be spelled out to an irate but ill-informed client, who must be educated to see 
that what seems like a bad translation is in fact a good one. 
To put that in the terms we'll be using in the remainder of this book: procedural 
memory is part of the translator's subliminal processing; representational memory 
is a part of the translator's conscious processing. Procedural memory helps the 
translator translate rapidly; representational memory is often needed when perceived 
problems make rapid translation impossible or inadvisable. 
Intellectual and emotional memory 
Brain scientists also draw a distinction between two different neural pathways 
for memory, one through the hippocampus, recording the facts, the other through 
the amygdala, recording how we feel about the facts. As Goleman (1995: 20) writes: 
If we try to pass a car on a two-lane highway and narrowly miss having a head-
on collision, the hippocampus retains the specifics of the incident, like what 
stretch of road we were on, who was with us, what the other car looked like. 
But it is the amygdala that ever after will send a surge of anxiety through us 
whenever we try to pass a car in similar circumstances. As [Joseph] LeDoux [a 
neuroscientist at New York University] put it to me, "The hippocampus is 
crucial in recognizing a face as that of your cousin. But it is the amygdala that 
adds you don't really like her." 
The point to note here is that amygdala arousal — "emotional memory" — adds 
force to all learning. This is why it is always easier to remember things that we care 
about, why things we enjoy (or even despise) always stick better in our memories 
than things about which we are indifferent. The strongest memories in our lives are 
always the ones that had the most powerful emotional impact on us: first kiss, 
wedding day, the births of our children, various exciting or traumatic events that 
transform our lives. 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Best WPF PDF Viewer control as well as an advanced PDF annotating software for Visual Basic .NET Click to add way underline under selected PDF text. 4.
pdf compressor; reader pdf reduce file size
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Best Visual Studio .NET PDF file edit SDK for sorting PDF or just change the position of certain one PDF page in an extremely easy and quick way using C#
adjusting page size in pdf; change font size pdf document
The translator as learner 5 3 
This also has important consequences for translators. The more you enjoy 
learning, the better you will learn. The more pleasurable you find translating, 
editing, hunting for obscure words and phrases, the more rapidly you will become 
proficient at those activities. (Really hating the work will also engrave the activities 
indelibly on your memory, but will not encourage you to work harder at them.) 
Hence the emphasis placed throughout this book on enjoyment: it is one of the 
most important "pretranslation skills," one of the areas of attitudinal readiness or 
receptivity that will help you most in becoming — and remaining — a translator. 
Context, relevance, multiple encoding 
Students of memory have also shown that what you remember well depends heavily 
on the context in which you are exposed to it, how relevant it is to your life (practical 
use-value, emotional and intellectual associations), and the sensory channels through 
which it comes to you (the more the better). 
Context 
The setting in which a thing is found or occurs is extremely important for the 
associations that are so crucial to memory. Without that context it is just an isolated 
item; in context, it is part of a whole interlocking network of meaningful things. 
For example, in Chapter 7 we will be taking a new look at terminology studies, 
based not on individual words and phrases, or even on larger contexts like "register," 
but on working people in their workplaces. Contextualizing a word or phrase as 
part of what a person doing a job says or writes to a colleague makes it much easier 
to remember than attempting to remember it as an independent item. 
The physical and cultural context in which the learner learns a thing can also be 
helpful in building an associative network for later recall. Everyone has had the 
experience of going in search of something and forgetting what they were looking 
for — then having to return to the exact spot in which the need for the thing was 
first conceived, and remembering it instantly. The place in which the item was initially 
moved to long-term memory jogged that memory and the item was recalled. 
Students tested on material in the room where they learned it tend to do better on 
the test than those tested in another room. "It seems that the place in which we 
master information helps recreate the state necessary to retrieve it, probably by 
stimulating the right emotions, which are very important influences on memory" 
(Gallagher 1994: 132). 
This phenomenon involves what is called "state-dependent learning" — the 
peculiar fact that memories retained in a given mental or physical state are most 
easily recalled in that state. People who learn a fact while intoxicated may have great 
difficulty remembering it while sober, and it will come to them immediately, almost 
miraculously, when under the influence again. It may be difficult to remember the 
54 The translator as learner 
most obvious and ordinary everyday facts about work while relaxing in the back 
yard on Saturday; when someone calls from work and you have to switch "states" 
rapidly, the transition from a Saturday-relaxation state to a workday-efficiency state 
may be disturbingly difficult. 
Winifred Gallagher comments in The Power of Place (1994: 132): 
The basic principle that links our places and states is simple: a good or bad 
environment promotes good or bad memories, which inspire a good or 
bad mood, which inclines us toward good or bad behavior. We needn't even be 
consciously aware of a pleasant or unpleasant environmental stimulus for it 
to shape our states. The mere presence of sunlight increases our willingness to 
help strangers and tip waiters, and people working in a room slowly permeated 
by the odor of burnt dust lose their appetites, even though they don't notice 
the smell. On some level, states and places are internal and external versions 
of each other. 
Interpreters have to be able to work anywhere, requiring them to develop the 
ability to create a productive mental state regardless of external conditions; 
translators tend to be more place-dependent. Their work station at home or at the 
office is set up not only for maximum efficiency, dictionaries and telephone close at 
hand, but also for maximum familiarity, at-homeness. They settle into it at the 
beginning of any work period in order to recreate the proper working frame of mind, 
going through little rituals (stacking paper, tidying piles, flipping through a dictionary, 
sharpening pencils) that put them in a translating mood. What they learn there they 
remember best there; thus the notorious difficulty of translating while on vacation, 
or at someone else's work station. It's not so much that the computer keyboard is 
different; it's that everything is different. All the little subliminal cues that put you 
A group of translation scholars from various places in North and South America 
have gathered in Tlaxcala, Mexico, for a conference on scientific-technical 
translation. One night at dinner talk turns to travel, and to everyone's surprise the 
Cuban interpreter who has told stories of the collapse of the societal infrastructure 
in Cuba has been to more exotic places than anyone else present: Bali, Saudi 
Arabia, etc., always on official (interpreting) business. She starts describing the 
places she's seen, the people she's met, the words she's learned - and is disturbed 
to discover that she has forgotten an Arabic word she learned in Riyadh. Playfully, 
a dinner companion from the US unfolds a paper napkin off the table and holds 
it in front of her mouth like a veil. Her eyes fly open in astonishment and the word 
she was looking for bursts out of her mouth; she laughs and claps her hands over 
her mouth as if to prevent further surprises. 
The translator as learner 5 5 
in the proper frame of mind are absent — with the result that it is often very difficult 
to get the creative juices flowing. Translators who travel extensively now rely 
increasingly on portable work stations, especially laptop computers; the computer 
and other related paraphernalia then become like magic amulets that psychologically 
transform any place — an airport gate area, an airplane tray table, a hotel bed — into 
the external version of the internal state needed to translate effectively. 
Relevance 
The less relevant a thing is to you, the harder it will be for you to remember it. The 
more involved you are with it, the easier it will be for you to remember it. Things 
that do not impinge on our life experience "go in one ear and out the other." This 
is why it is generally easier to learn to translate or interpret by doing it, in the real 
world, for money, than it is in artificial classroom environments — and why the most 
successful translation and interpretation (T&I) programs always incorporate real-
world experience into their curricula, in the form of internships, apprenticeships, 
and independent projects. It is why it is generally easier to remember a word or phrase 
that you needed to know for some purpose — to communicate some really important 
point to a friend or acquaintance, to finish a translation job — than one you were 
expected to memorize for a test. And it is why it is easier to remember a translation 
theory that you worked out on your own, in response to a complex translation 
problem or a series of similar translation jobs, than one that you read in a book or 
saw diagrammed on the blackboard. This will be the subject of Chapters 5—10. 
Multiple encoding 
The general rule for memory is that the more senses you use to register and rehearse 
something, the more easily you will remember it. This is called multiple encoding: 
each word, fact, idea, or other item is encoded through more than one sensory 
channel — visual, auditory, tactile, kinesthetic, gustatory, olfactory — which provides 
a complex support network for memory that is exponentially more effective than 
a single channel. This principle, as the rest of this chapter will show, underlies the 
heavy emphasis on "multimodal" exercises in this book — exercises drawing on 
several senses at once. 
The translator's learning styles 
Translation is intelligent activity. But what kind of intelligence does it utilize? 
Howard Gardner (1985, 1993), director of Project Zero at Harvard University, 
has been exploring the multiplicity of intelligences since the early 1980s. He argues 
that, in addition to the linguistic and logical/mathematical intelligence measured 
by IQ tests, there are at least four other intelligences (probably more): 
56 The translator as learner 
 musical intelligence: the ability to hear, perform, and compose music with 
complex skill and attention to detail; musical intelligence is often closely related 
to, but distinct from, mathematical intelligence 
 spatial intelligence: the ability to discern, differentiate, manipulate, and produce 
spatial shapes and relations; to "sense" or "grasp" (or produce) relations of 
tension or balance in paintings, sculptures, architecture, and dance; to create 
and transform fruitful analogies between verbal or musical or other forms and 
spatial form; related to mathematical intelligence through geometry, but once 
again distinct 
 bodily-kinesthetic intelligence: the ability to understand, produce, and carica-
ture bodily states and actions (the intelligence of actors, mimes, dancers, 
many eloquent speakers); to sculpt bodily motion to perfected ideals of 
fluidity, harmony, and balance (the intelligence of dancers, athletes, musical 
performers) 
 personal intelligence, also called "emotional intelligence" (see Chapter 6): the 
ability to track, sort out, and articulate one's own and others' emotional states 
("intrapersonal" and "interpersonal" intelligence, respectively; the intelligences 
of psychoanalysts, good parents, good teachers, good friends); to motivate 
oneself and others to direct activity toward a desired goal (the intelligence of 
all successful professionals, especially leaders). And, of course: 
 logical/mathematical intelligence: the ability to perceive, sort out, and manipulate 
order and relation in the world of objects and the abstract symbols used to 
represent them (the intelligence of mathematicians, philosophers, grammarians) 
 linguistic intelligence: the ability to hear, sort out, produce, and manipulate the 
complexities of a single language (the intelligence of poets, novelists, all good 
writers, eloquent speakers, effective teachers); the ability to learn foreign 
languages, and to hear, sort out, produce, and manipulate the complexities of 
transfer among them (the intelligence of translators and interpreters) 
This last connection, the obvious one between translators and interpreters and 
linguistic intelligence, may make it seem as if translators and interpreters were 
intelligent only linguistically; as if the only intelligence they ever brought to bear on 
their work as translators were the ability to understand and manipulate language. 
It is not. Technical translators need high spatial and logical/mathematical intelligence 
as well. Interpreters and film dubbers need high bodily-kinesthetic and personal 
intelligence. Translators of song lyrics need high musical intelligence. 
Indeed one of the most striking discoveries made by educational research in 
recent years is that different people learn in an almost infinite variety of different 
ways or "styles." And since good translators are always in the process of "becoming" 
translators — which is to say, learning to translate better, learning more about 
language and culture and translation — it can be very useful for both student 
translators and professional translators to be aware of this variety of learning styles. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested