asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# : Can a pdf file be compressed application software tool html windows winforms online IJELLOv5p263-274Zuckerman6680-part357

Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects 
Volume 5, 2009 
IJELLO special series of Chais Conference 2009 best papers 
Editor: Alex Koohang 
An earlier, shorter version of this paper was presented at the Chais conference 2009, in Ra’anana, Israel, 
and included in Y. Eshet-Alkalai, A. Caspi, S. Eden, N. Geri, & Y. Yair (Eds.), Proceedings of the Chais con-
ference on instructional technologies research 2009: Learning in the technological era. Ra’anana: The Open 
University of Israel. http://www.openu.ac.il/research_center_eng/conferences.html
Children's Participation Patterns in Online 
Communities: An Analysis of Israeli Learners in 
the Scratch Online Community 
Oren Zuckerman  
The Interdisciplinary Center, 
Herzliya, Israel 
orenz@idc.ac.il
Ina Blau  
Open University of Israel, 
Ra'anana, Israel 
ina.blau@gmail.com
Andrés Monroy-Hernández 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA 
andresmh@media.mit.edu
Abstract  
Online participation and content contribution are pillars of the Internet revolution and are core 
activities for younger generations online. This study investigated participation patterns, users' 
contributions and gratification mechanisms, as well as the gender differences of Israeli learners in 
the Scratch online community.  
The findings showed that: (1) Participation patterns reveal two distinct participation types
 -
"project creators" and "social participators", suggesting different users' needs. (2) Community 
members gratified "project creators" and "social participators" for their investment – using 
several forms of community feedback. Gratification at the user level was given both to "project 
creators" and "social participators" – community members added them as friends. The majority of 
the variance associated with community feedback was explained by seven predictors. However, 
gratification at the project level was different for the two participation types - active "project 
creators" received less feedback on their projects, while active "social participators" received 
more. Project feedback positively correlated with social participation investment, but negatively 
correlated with project creation investment. A possible explanation is that community members 
primarily left feedback to their friends. (3) No gender differences were found in participation 
patterns or in project complexity, suggesting that Scratch provides similar opportunities to both 
genders in programming, learning, and participation.  
Keywords: content contribution, par-
ticipation patterns, Scratch, remix, 
online learning, community feedback, 
gender differences. 
Introduction 
Scratch is a visual programming envi-
ronment developed by the Lifelong Kin-
dergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab 
that enables children to create interac-
Material published as part of this publication, either on-line or 
in print, is copyrighted by the Informing Science Institute. 
Permission to make digital or paper copy of part or all of these 
works for personal or classroom use is granted without fee 
provided that the copies are not made or distributed for profit 
or commercial advantage AND that copies 1) bear this notice 
in full and 2) give the full citation on the first page. It is per-
missible to abstract these works so long as credit is given. To 
copy in all other cases or to republish or to post on a server or 
to redistribute to lists requires specific permission and payment 
of a fee. Contact Publisher@InformingScience.org
to request 
redistribution permission.  
Can a pdf file be compressed - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
advanced pdf compressor; adjust pdf page size
Can a pdf file be compressed - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf change page size; pdf paper size
Children's Participation Patterns 
264 
tive media (Scratch International site: http://scratch.mit.edu
; Scratch Israeli site: 
http://www.scratch.org.il
). Young people use Scratch to create animations, simulations, games, 
interactive art, and stories (Maloney et al., 2004). One of the goals of Scratch is to foster creative 
thinking (Resnick, 2007b) through the creation of personally meaningful digital artifacts, in the 
spirit of Papert's (1991) ideas of constructionist learning and the more general notion of construc-
tivism (Bruner, 1990; Dewey, 1916; Piaget, 1972; Vygotsky, 1978).  Using constructionist learn-
ing environments in a natural way, children can learn complex concepts - such as causal models 
of dynamic behavior (Zuckerman, Grotzer, & Leahy, 2006). Online learning environments can be 
designed using models that are based on constructivism learning theory (Koohang, Riley, Smith, 
& Schreurs, 2009). 
Scratch resonates with the youth culture by making it easy for people to use graphics and music – 
key technological interests for young people (Kafai, Peppler, & Chiu, 2007). Scratch promotes 
creative thinking (Romeike, 2008b), which influences students' motivation, concentration, and 
achievement (Fasko, 2000). Unlike other social media sites such as YouTube or Flickr, Scratch 
lets people share programmable media (Monroy-Hernández, 2007), that is, digital artifacts that 
can interact and respond to behavior programmed by its creator. Projects can be deconstructed 
and rebuilt into new ones, a process that can help children learn practical programming (Millner, 
2005). The intuitive programming offered by Scratch enables the acquisition of key programming 
concepts even in the absence of instructional interventions or highly experienced mentors (Ma-
loney, Peppler, Kafai, Resnick, & Rusk, 2008). 
The Scratch online community provides a social aspect to the Scratch environment. It promotes 
interactions between community members, the creation of original or remixed projects, and the 
sharing of outcomes on the community site (Rosenbaum, 2008). Each original or remixed project 
is associated with all of its previous creators - showing respect for authorship and fostering col-
laboration by familiarizing community members with each other's creations (Sylvan, 2007). 
Participation patterns in content communities are usually associated with content contribution, 
community involvement, and silent participation, i.e., lurking (Rafaeli & Ariel, 2008). Monroy-
Hernández and Resnick (2008), inspired by Lave and Wenger's legitimization of peripheral par-
ticipation in situated learning (1991) and Jenkins's analysis on fan communities (2006), suggested 
four different roles or states of participation in user-generated-content communities: passive con-
sumption, active consumption, passive production, and active production. In the Scratch commu-
nity context, Monroy-Hernández and Resnick (2008) map the four states of participation as fol-
lows: passive consumption - viewing projects on the community website; active consumption - 
social participation in the community such as commenting, tagging, or rating others' projects; 
passive production - project creation or remixing, while keeping the project to themselves; active 
production - project creation or remixing and sharing the project with the online community. 
The motivation for content contribution in an online community can be examined through an 
analysis of users' logs, as well as by exploring the relationship between participation and commu-
nity feedback (Rafaeli & Ariel, 2008; Rafaeli, Raban, & Ravid, 2007). Rubin's users and a grati-
fication model (1994) suggested five generic motivation clusters of needs that media could fulfill: 
cognitive, affective, personal integrative, social integrative, and diversion needs. Based on 
Rubin's approach, different participation patterns can fulfill different Scratch users' needs: users 
with salient social integrative needs may prefer social participation; users with salient cognitive 
needs for understanding or with affective needs for aesthetics, pleasure, and entertainment, may 
prefer project creation or remixing.   
Programming is traditionally perceived as a male-dominated area. The low participation level of 
school-aged female students in computer science lessons is well documented (Romeike, 2008a). 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET program, do you Originally, TIFF stands for Tagged Image File Format which can be compressed and
acrobat compress pdf; change font size in pdf fillable form
VB.NET TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to PDF in a VB.NET Doc Imaging
A TIFF file can be compressed with several methods, but this If you want to restore the file with a smallest possible size, you should choose TIFF over PDF.
batch reduce pdf file size; best way to compress pdf
Zuckerman, Blau, & Monroy-Hernández 
265 
However, no gender difference in participation was found in the study of the early Scratch inter-
national community (Sylvan, 2007). 
This study investigated the participation patterns, users' contribution and gratification mecha-
nisms, as well as the gender differences of Israeli learners in the Scratch online community. The 
study hypotheses were that (1) project creation and social participation measures would not corre-
late, (2) individual investment in the community would positively correlate with community 
feedback both at the user and project level, and (3) there would be no significant gender differ-
ences in participation patterns and project complexity. 
Method 
Participants 
The participants were a group of Israeli Scratch
community members: 65 children, 35 (53.8%) of 
them girls. The participants' ages ranged from 9 to 17; the mean age was 11.5 years, and the me-
dian 11. All the participants were registered community members and content contributors at 
some level. All the participants (except two) were Israeli elementary school students who learned 
how to use the English version of Scratch at their school (the local Hebrew version was not avail-
able at the time of this study). The other two participants were Israeli children that spontaneously 
joined the online community and interacted with other community members. We decided to not 
exclude their data from the analysis and verified that their online behavior and specifically their 
contribution levels were average - not extremely active or passive. The students were introduced 
to Scratch through guided learning in the classrooms with the same teacher. They studied the ap-
plication in a step-by-step process, registered to the online community as part of their learning 
process, and continued to use Scratch at home, both for creating new projects and for browsing 
through the community's projects.  
Instruments and Procedure 
The Scratch online community log files (September 2007 - July 2008) were used to analyze data 
concerning content contribution levels, participation patterns (we will use the terms "project crea-
tion" and "social participation" for the active production and active consumption patterns respec-
tively), community feedback to individual investment (at the user and project level), and data 
concerning a project's measured complexity and a user's stated demographic information.  
Study measures 
• Project creation
was measured by the number of original and remixed projects per user. In 
Scratch, every user can create a project using the authoring tool and then upload the project to 
the online community. Other community members can view the project, download its code, 
edit/repurpose the original project into a "remixed" project, and upload it again to the com-
munity. The online identity of the original creator as well as all following remix creators is 
kept in the project file. 
• Social participation
was calculated as the number of friends, comments, favorites, posting in 
galleries, and "love-its" rating. In the Scratch online community, members can participate so-
cially by adding other members as their friends. Note that in Scratch friendship is not sym-
metrical, member X can add member Y as his friend but member Y is not obligated to add 
member X as friend as well. In addition, members can post comments on any project, can 
mark a project as their favorite, can associate a project into a user-created gallery of projects, 
and can mark a project as "love-it" as a form of recommendation.  
C# Word: How to Compress, Decompress Word in C#.NET Projects
a C# project in your VS program, you can simply copy below to compress the Word document file to a powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjusting page size in pdf; change font size in pdf form field
C# Image: How to Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images Using C#.NET JP2
JPEG 2000 image codec SDK has provided can also help and decompress JPEG 2000 image file from local powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjust pdf size; change font size pdf text box
Children's Participation Patterns 
266 
• Community feedback at the user level
was measured as the number of participants that de-
fined a member as their friend.  
• Community feedback at the project level
was measured by the number of member's projects 
viewed, commented, marked-as-favorite, downloaded, remixed, or marked-as-love-it (by 
other community members). 
• Project complexity
was calculated per user, as the mean of all user projects' scripts and 
sprites. In Scratch, scripts are the pieces of code users assemble together, and sprites are the 
visual objects they move around the screen (i.e. characters, objects, background images etc.). 
These two complexity parameters highly correlated each with other (r = .83, < .01). Note 
that project complexity is a technical measurement and is not an assessment of the project's 
quality. A project can have very few scripts and/or sprites and still be very interesting, engag-
ing, or convey a complex interaction. 
Results 
Project Creation 
From September 2007 until July 2008 the 65 users of the Israeli Scratch community created 6454 
projects. Figure 1 shows the projects distribution. (Range: 5-1592, Mean: 99.29, SD: 232.66, Me-
dian: 49). 
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
Users
Number of projects
Figure 1: Distribution of projects created by Israeli Scratch community 
(September 2007 - July 2008)  
Figure 2 presents three levels of content contributions among the Israeli Scratch community users 
– moderate, active and very active contributors.  
VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
compressed bitonal images into PDF files and decompress images from PDF files quickly with the smallest quality loss. The encoded images in PDF file can also
best pdf compressor; change font size pdf
VB.NET Image: JPEG 2000 Codec for Image Encoding and Decoding in
For example, you can use our VB.NET image online Integrate PDF, Tiff, Word compression add-on with JPEG 2000 and lossless compression in the same file stream.
can a pdf be compressed; best pdf compression tool
Zuckerman, Blau, & Monroy-Hernández 
267 
Very active, 2, 
3%
Active, 10, 15%
Moderate, 53, 
82%
Very active = more than 1000 projects
Active = more than 100 projects
Moderate = up to 100 projects
Figure 2: Levels of content contribution among Israeli Scratch community users:  
moderate, active, and very active  
Figure 3 presents the distribution of projects created by each category of content contributors 
(i.e., moderate, active and very active users).   
Moderate, 
2151, 33%
Active, 1623, 
25%
Very active, 
2680, 42%
Very active = 3% of users
Active = 15% of users
Moderate = 80% of users
Figure 3: Number of projects created by each category of content contributors  
Salient characteristics of project creation were the number of original projects (Range: 5-1592, 
Mean: 92, SD: 229.2), remixed projects (Range: 0-85, Mean: 7.29, SD: 14.27), and projects 
downloaded by the user (Range: 0-221, Mean: 20.43, SD: 32.3). Different measures of project 
creation participation type, such as creating original or remixed projects, viewing others' projects, 
and downloading their code, significantly correlated to each other (Table 1). 
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
level model to demonstrate pages in all document file. Our .NET TIFF Processing Toolkit can be incorporated & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf files optimized; pdf page size dimensions
VB.NET Image: Free VB.NET Guide to Convert Image to Byte Array
If necessary, you can also use this VB.NET Image Conversion Control to convert Word or PDF document to image file in VB.NET application.
change font size in fillable pdf form; adjust pdf size preview
Children's Participation Patterns 
268 
Table 1: Correlations between measures of project creation participation 
Total 
Projects
Original 
Projects
Remixed 
Projects 
Views 
Views  
.356(**) 
.352(**) 
.149 
Downloads  
.664(**) 
.661(**) 
.201 
.690(**) 
** p < .01 
Social Participation 
The most salient characteristic of social participation was the number of friends a user has added 
(Range: 0-296, Mean: 11.94, SD: 47.03). As Table 2 shows, statistically significant correlations 
were found within different measures of social participation investment, such as making friends, 
posting in galleries, writing comments, giving "love-its", and favorites rating.  
Table 2: Correlations between measures of social participation 
Favorites 
Friends 
Galleries 
Comments 
Friends 
.385(**) 
Galleries 
.143 
.416(**) 
Comments 
.122 
.295(*) 
.389(**) 
"Loveits" 
.196 
.168 
.317(**) 
.642(**) 
< .05,  ** p < .01  
However, different measures of project creation and social participation did not correlate signifi-
cantly with each other (all p's > .4). 
Community Feedback 
As Table 3 shows, statistically significant correlations were found within different measures of 
the community feedback at the project level, such as the number of member's projects viewed, 
downloaded, commented, marked-as-favorite, or marked-as-love-it by other community mem-
bers.  
Table 3: Correlations between community feedback measures  
Be viewed 
Be favorite 
Be  
commented 
Be 
loved 
Be commented 
.321(**) 
.476(**) 
Be loved 
.550(**) 
.630(**) 
.638(**) 
Be downloaded 
.541(**) 
.389(**) 
.280(*) 
.326(**
p < .05,  ** < .01  
Multivariate regression analysis indicated that four types of community feedback (project viewed, 
loved, commented, and favorited by others) explained 42.2% of variance in projects downloaded, 
F(4, 60) = 10.94, p < .001. Project downloads were predicted by viewing projects by others, t(60) 
= 5.15, < .001, β = .62, marking it as favorite, t(60) = 3.45, < .001, β = .45, and receiving 
"love-it", t(60) = 2.14, < .05, β = .36.  
However, the community feedback at the user level (i.e., the number of participants that defined a 
member as their friend) did not correlate significantly with any form of the community feedback 
VB.NET PowerPoint: How to Convert PowerPoint Document to TIFF in
can be compressed to reduce the file size by using LZW compression and can be converted to many other image and document formats, such as JPEG, GIF and PDF, by
change font size in pdf; reader shrink pdf
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
JPEG to PDF Converter can be used on Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion;
change font size pdf document; change paper size in pdf
Zuckerman, Blau, & Monroy-Hernández 
269 
at the project level (all p's > .1). Since community feedback at the user and community feedback 
at the project level were not correlated, in the following section we examine separately commu-
nity gratification mechanisms for each level.  
Participation and Community Feedback: User Level 
At the user level all participants receive community feedback in the form of "befriending" - the 
number of participants who defined a user as their friend. As Table 4 shows, this variable is cor-
related with both project-creation (i.e., viewing and downloading projects of others) and social 
participation measures (i.e., making friends, marking projects of others as favorites, adding them 
to galleries, writing comments, and giving "loveits" rating).  
Table 4: Correlations between project-creation and social participation 
and the community feedback - at the user level 
Views 
made 
Downloads 
made 
Add 
friends 
Add  
favorites 
Add to 
galleries 
Add  
comments 
Add 
"loveits"
Befriended 
.557(**) 
.339(**) 
.665(**) 
.302(*) 
.786(**) 
.563(**) 
.409(**) 
< .05,  **  < .01  
In order to assess the community feedback at the user level, the number of participants defining a 
user as their friend was regressed on the number of views, downloads, user's friends, galleries a 
user participated in, comments made, favorites and "love-its" added to other projects. Those 
seven predictors explained the 81.1% of variance in community feedback, F(7, 57) = 35.04, p < 
.001. The number of participants defining a user as their friend was predicted by making friends, 
t(57) = 4.90, < .001, β = .35, participating in galleries, t(57) = 7.87, p < .001, β = .53, and writ-
ing comments to others' projects, t(57) = 2.37, < .05, β = .23. 
Participation and Community Feedback: Project Level 
As Table 5 shows, project feedback positively correlated with social participation (i.e., adding 
projects to galleries, and writing comments), but negatively correlated with the project investment 
in the community (i.e., creating original projects or remixing projects of other members).  
Table 5: Correlations between different forms of project and social investment and  
the community feedback - at project level 
Total 
projects 
Original
projects 
Remixed
projects 
Ad to 
galleries 
Ad com-
ments 
Be viewed 
-.324(**) 
-.310(*) 
-.291(*) 
.225(*) 
.199 
Be loved 
-.182 
-.176 
-.137 
.080 
.214(*) 
Be downloaded 
-.245(*) 
-.238(*) 
-.159 
.237(*) 
.287(*) 
p < .05,  ** p < .01  
Gender Differences 
No statistically significant gender differences were found in participation patterns (all p's > .20) 
or in project complexity (> .30).  
Children's Participation Patterns 
270 
Discussion 
Content Contribution – Project Creation 
Our findings indicated a long tail distribution in content contribution (see Figure 1) – typical also 
in adult content creation communities such as Wikipedia (Ravid, 2007) or educational Wiki-
books (Ravid, Kalman, & Rafaeli, 2008). Unlike Wikipedia research results (Tapscott & Wil-
liams, 2007), in this study we found a high percentage of active and very active content contribu-
tors (see Figure 2) - 15% of the users (active) shared more than 100 projects, and 3% of the users 
(very active) shared more than 1000 projects. More importantly, active and very active users to-
gether (18%) created 67% of the community's projects (see Figure 3). This differs from content 
contribution in Wikipedia where 2.5% of registered users contributed 80% of all the content 
(Tapscott & Williams, 2007).  
Possible explanations for the Scratch Israeli community’s high percentage of active content con-
tributors are: (1) youth might be more active content contributors than adults; (2) programmable 
medium can increase participations compared to non-programmable tools (such as text in 
Wikipedia or videos in YouTube); or (3) specific design features of the Scratch community site 
may increase participation (e.g. the "new projects" placement on the home page immediately after 
uploading). The findings indicate that high frequency of project uploading correlated with in-
creased project's views (r = .32, < .01), and the chance of users to receive friendship requests 
(befriending) (r = .25, < .05). These data indirectly support the third (site design) explanation 
for content contribution. 
Two Distinct Participation Types 
As hypothesized, measures of project creation and social participation were not correlated, indi-
cating that there are two distinct types of participation among Israeli Scratch community users – 
the "project creation" and the "social participation" types. These findings differ from Sylvan's 
(2007) data; it seems that relatively weak correlations between the project creation and social par-
ticipation in the international Scratch study may reach statistical significance because of the large 
sample size (effect size measures were not reported). 
Similarly to Ravid et al.'s (2008) study, our findings showed that the most active "project crea-
tors" and "social participators" were different users: when a user was very active in some partici-
pation type he or she was relatively passive in other participation types. Ravid et al. suggested 
that different participation patterns in Wikis require different abilities (subject-matter knowledge 
vs. writing skills). However, Scratch project creation does not require prior knowledge; most of 
the participants in our study started using the application at the same time, with the same teacher, 
receiving similar training. In addition, our findings indicated that project complexity was not cor-
related to participation types – meaning that the active "project creators" do not create more com-
plex project than the active "social participators". Thus, we suggest a possible explanation based 
on Rubin's (1994) uses and a gratification model. Different participation types may fulfill differ-
ent Scratch users' needs: users with salient social integrative needs prefer social participation, 
while users with salient cognitive or affective needs prefer project creation. This explanation re-
quires further research. 
Community Feedback: User and Project Levels 
As hypothesized, feedback at the user level
was given to both "project creators" and "social par-
ticipators" – community members added them as friends. The majority of the variance associated 
with community feedback was explained by the following seven predictors: number of views, 
downloads, user's friends, galleries a user participated in, comments made, favorites and "love-
Zuckerman, Blau, & Monroy-Hernández 
271 
its" added to other projects (see Table 4). A similar group of predictors accounted only for the 
37% of variance in friendship network on the international Scratch community study (Sylvan, 
2007). This difference can be explained by mixed (online and offline) communication between 
Israeli users versus online only interactions in the international Scratch website. Similarly, in 
Blau and Caspi's (2008) study online interactions through Wiki technology were affected by off-
line relationships between the classmates.   
However, feedback at the project level
was different for "project creators" and "social participa-
tors". Table 5 details the correlations between different forms of investment and the community's 
feedback. As hypothesized, community feedback at the project level positively correlated with 
social participation investment, but opposite to our hypothesis negatively correlated with project 
creation investment. In other words, an active "project creator" received less feedback on her pro-
jects, while an active "social participator" received more feedback on her projects. A possible ex-
planation is that community members
primarily left feedback on projects of their friends. 
These findings also address a possible reason why participants download projects of other users. 
On the one hand, social forms of community feedback (project viewed, loved, commented, and 
favorited by others) explained a large percentage of variance in projects downloads. On the other 
hand, there was no statistically significant correlation between downloading and remixing (p > 
.30). Those findings indicate that downloading is done mostly for social reasons and not for pro-
ject-creation reasons (i.e. downloading for remixing project). 
Gender Differences 
Consistent with a previous international Scratch study (Sylvan, 2007), we found no significant 
gender differences in participation patterns or in project complexity. It seems that Scratch opens 
similar possibilities to both genders in programming, learning and participation.  
Conclusions and Implications 
This study investigated the participation patterns, users' contribution and gratification mecha-
nisms, as well as the gender differences of Israeli learners in the Scratch online community. The 
findings supported our hypotheses: (1) Participation patterns reveal two distinct participation 
types: "project creators" and "social participators", which suggest different user needs. Project 
creation and social participation measures were not correlated. (2) Community members gratified 
"project creators" and "social participators" for their investment in the community. Feedback at 
the user level was given to both "project creators" and "social participators" – community mem-
bers added them as friends. The majority of the variance associated with community feedback 
was explained by seven predictors: number of views, downloads, user's friends, galleries a user 
participated in, comments made, favorites and "love-its" added to other projects. However, feed-
back at the project level was different for the two participation types - active "project creators" 
received less feedback on their projects, while active "social participators" received more feed-
back on their projects. As hypothesized, community feedback at the project level positively corre-
lated with social participation investment, but opposite to our hypothesis negatively correlated 
with project creation investment. Our interpretation is that project feedback is influenced by 
friendship, namely that community members primarily give feedback to projects of their friends. 
(3) No gender differences were found in participation patterns or in project complexity, suggest-
ing that the Scratch environment provides similar opportunities to both genders in programming, 
learning and participation. Further research is needed to better understand the motivation for par-
ticipation in each of the participation types. 
Looking more broadly, this study takes us one step further in our understanding of children's be-
havior, roles, and responsibilities within an online community of learners. With the increasing 
Children's Participation Patterns 
272 
time children spend online in general, and in online communities in particular, educators should 
remember that in the same way that children in a classroom have different learning styles, chil-
dren also show different participation patterns online. A good educator, or a good designer of an 
online community for learners, should support these different participation types and plan or de-
sign an appropriate learning experience for each student. For example, when dividing a classroom 
into small groups, it would be beneficial if there are members of both types (social participators 
and content contributors) in each group. In another example, an educator could identify the "very 
active" content contributors within a classroom and turn them into early adopters of an online 
community for learners by "populating" a new community with content before the rest of the 
class joins. In summary, gaining a better understanding of children's natural participation patterns 
within an online community can give educators concrete methods and tools that can maximize the 
potential of the online community as a productive and motivating learning experience. 
Online communities are proliferating and children spend more time online. As a result, there is a 
greater need for a better understanding of children's online participation patterns. Our insights are 
that online participation patterns unveil children's needs and can be a driver for quality learning 
experiences. The rich opportunities children have online, such as meeting like-minded children, 
engaging in creative activities and in intellectual discussions - should not be missed due to digital 
literacy barriers between educational systems and the connected society. 
References 
Blau, I., & Caspi, A. (2008). To edit? No, to recommend! Perception of collaborative learning and its qual-
ity as influenced by educational wiki entry editing. In D. Ben-Zvi (Ed.), Innovative e-learning in 
higher education (pp.19-23). Haifa, Israel: University of Haifa. [in Hebrew].  
Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  
Dewey, J. (1916). How we think. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.  
Fasko, D. (2000). Education and creativity. Creativity Research Journal13(3-4), 317-327.  
Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide. New York: NYU Press.  
Kafai, Y. B., Peppler, K. A., & Chiu, G. M. (2007, June). High tech programmers in low-income communi-
ties: Creating a computer culture in a community. Paper presented at the 3
rd
International Conference 
of Communities and Technologies. Michigan State University, Michigan, USA. Retrieved May 1, 
2009 from http://scratch.mit.edu/files/CandT_scratch_Fin.pdf
Koohang, A., Riley, L., Smith, T., & Schreurs, J. (2009). E-learning and constructivism: From theory to 
application. Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects, 5, 91-109. Available 
http://ijklo.org/Volume5/IJELLOv5p091-109Koohang655.pdf
Lave, L., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation (1st ed.). Cam-
bridge: Cambridge University Press.  
Maloney, J., Burd, L., Kafai, Y., Rusk, N., Silverman, B., & Resnick, M. (2004, January). Scratch: A sneak 
preview. Paper presented at the Second International Conference on Creating, Connecting, and Col-
laborating through Computing. Kyoto, Japan. Retrieved May 1, 2009 from 
http://llk.media.mit.edu/papers/ScratchSneakPreview.pdf
Maloney, J. H., Peppler, K., Kafai, Y., Resnick, M., & Rusk, N. (2008). Programming by choice: Urban 
youth learning programming with Scratch. ACM SIGCSE Bulletin, 40(1), 367-371.   
Millner, A. (2005). The Hoop-ups initiative: How youth can learn by creating their own computer inter-
faces and programs. SIGGROUP Bulletin, 24(3), 85-89. Available 
http://web.media.mit.edu/~millner/papers/Millner_Hook-ups-initiative.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested