asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# vb.net : Change font size on pdf text box software control dll windows web page asp.net web forms InData2UserGuide7-part459

Placing the prototype into a pasteboardtext frame on the first document page
has several advantages over locating it within the text frame containing the main
text thread:
u
It makes it easy to re-import your data: once you’ve imported some data, you
can just edit the prototype on the pasteboard, select the entire target story,
and import again over the previously-imported data, all without copying and
pasting the prototype.
u
It lets you prepare the prototype in a “congenial” environment. Complex pro-
totypes can be quite lengthy, much longer than any individual formatted
record. Using this method, you can create the prototype in larger text frames
that accommodate the extra length without spilling over onto multiple pages.
Using a larger text frame for the prototype than for the imported data has no
effect on the final results.
u
In a related vein, you’ll often use “new frame” characters in your prototype to
force page or column breaks. Creating the prototype in several linked frames
on the pasteboard allows you to keep the entire prototype in one place, rather
than having it spread out over several pages.
You may select a text frame and designateit as the prototype with the 
Use Story
as Prototype
option as many times as you like. The most recently designated text
frame is the one that will be used when an import option is chosen. This means
you could create several alternate prototypes, choosing the appropriate one just
before any given import operation.
Anytime you select the text frame currently designated as the prototype, the 
Use
Story as Prototype
menu item will be checked when you pull down the 
InData
menu.
Alternate Prototype Placement
Prototypes may also be placed directly within the text frame that is the target for
the imported records (this was the method we used in the tutorials in Chapter 3).
In this case, designating the prototype is done slightly differently. If the prototype
is the only text within the target text frame, then you may simply place the cur-
sor within that story, without selecting any text, and the entire story will be
replaced by the import operation. If, on the other hand, there is any additional
text within the target text frame that is not part of the prototype  (a title or table
heading, for example), then you must select the prototype portion of the story,
including any trailing carriage returns or paragraph marks, prior to selecting an
import menu option. Then, only the selected text will be replaced when data is
imported.
The following example will illustrate not only the highlighting method of select-
ing the prototype, but also the fact that InData need not be used only for the high-
ly regular, repeating documents, containing large numbers of records that we
have considered so far. It may be used anytime you wish to format data in a com-
Basic InData Operations
InDataPrototype Fundamentals
InData User’s Guide
59
Change font size on pdf text box - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf page size may not be reduced; pdf edit text size
Change font size on pdf text box - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size pdf fillable form; can a pdf be compressed
plex way. For example, InData may be used to create tables from data stored in
spreadsheets (or in text data files, or even just in a text frame on the InDesign
pasteboard) which take full advantage of InDesign’s sophisticated typographic
features. Consider the following table:
The reversed typeeffects are beyond the capabilities of most spreadsheet pro-
grams, and InDesign paragraph styles cannot specify multiple character formats
within a single paragraph; the boldface and italic styles would need to be applied
by hand to each line of the table. However, InData can handle all of these styles
automatically.
Here is the prototype structure (minus the header lines):
«fields name, species, s1, s2, pj¶
«name» «species»
«s1»
«s2»
«pj»
Note that the fields statement follows the header lines on the page. To import
data into this prototype, it is necessary to use the selectionmethod; the whole
prototype must be selected since the header lines should appear only once. If the
cursor were simply placed in this text frame before importing, every imported
record would be preceded by the header lines.
Romar V Sentience Development Level (0-14)
Sector 42,A9X
Common
SpeciesÆ First Survey
Second Survey
Projected Level¬
Name
(c. 2200 C.E.)
(c. 2500 C.E.)
at 5000 C.E.¶
«fields name, species, s1, s2, pj¶
«name»
«species»
«s1»
«s2»
«pj»
»
»
»
InDataPrototype Fundamentals
Chapter 4:
60
InData User’s Guide
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
pdf files optimized; can a pdf file be compressed
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf optimized format; pdf page size
Note that the final paragraph mark is included in the selection, since it is part of
the prototype. It ensures that each record of data becomes a separate line in the
table. Even though there are only a relatively small number of records of data
in this example, InData is still of great help in ensuring consistent, accurate for-
matting.
Choosing Field Names
As we’ve noted, field names are completely arbitrary, and need not have any rela-
tionship to the field contents or the actual field names in the original application
database (or spreadsheet), although it’s generally a good idea to make them sim-
ilar. Field names may be up to 1,024 characters in length and must consist entire-
ly of letters (defined to include the underbar—aka underscore—character) and
numbers, and must begin with a letter.
The table below lists examples of legal and illegal InData field names:
LEGAL
ILLEGAL
lastname
last name
verylongname
very-long-name
_very_long_name
Farenheit451
39steps
MiddleInitial
–balance
city_state
city,state
Field names are not case sensitive; any combination of upper- and lower-case let-
ters may be used to refer to the same field. Thus, a field named 
last
may also be
referred to by the forms 
Last
lAst
LAST
lasT
, and so on. (It’s wise, however, to
choose one particular and meaningful capitalization and stick with it.)
Although most of the prototypes in this manual will contain one, the 
fields
state-
ment is completely optional for data files containing less than 27 fields. The first
26 fields in any data file are always automatically assigned the names 
a
through
z
. However, if the data file contains more than 26 fields, and the prototype does
not contain a 
fields
statement, then there is no way to access the 27th and later
fields in each record (which in many cases poses no problem).
Thus, all three of the following prototypes are exactly equivalent and will produce
the same results when used to import a data file:
«fields last, first, addr, city, sta, zip¶
«first» «last»
¬
«addr»
¬
«city», «sta» «zip»¶
«b» «a»
¬
«c»
¬
«d», «e» «f»¶
Basic InData Operations
InDataPrototype Fundamentals
InData User’s Guide
61
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Support to change font size in PDF form. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; List<BaseFormField
best way to compress pdf; change font size in pdf form field
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color.
apple compress pdf; adjust size of pdf in preview
«fields first, last, addr,ci,sta¶
«last» «first»
¬
Looks tricky, but it’s still the same 2 fields…
«addr»
¬
«ci», «sta» «f»¶
The third example illustrates two important points about prototypes. First, it
underscores the fact that the defined field names are arbitrary. It names the first
field in each record—holding the person’s last name—
first
, and names the second
field 
last
. However, since it still places their respective field placeholders in the
same order on the first line of each record; the second field in each record comes
first, followed by the first field. Thus, the final output will be the same as for the
first prototype, which uses more intuitive (and sensible) field names.
Second, it illustrates the fact that you can mix automatic and user-defined field
names within the same prototype, in this case by using a 
fields
statement that
specifies only the first five fields in each record. The prototype must use the auto-
matic name 
to refer to the sixth field, since it didn’t name any field past the fifth.
Skipping One or More Fields in the Data File
Fields
statements need not contain a field name for every field in the data file. For
example, the following 
fields
statement doesn’t name the fourth field in each
record:
«fields last, first, initial, , room, phone»
All fields are always imported, however, so it is still possible to refer to the fourth
field of the data file in the rest of the prototype by using its automatic name, in
this case
d
:
«last», «first» «initial»
¬
«phone»
¬
«d»
«room»¶
Data fields at the end of a record may be ignored without any special handling;
thus, the previous 
fields
statement will assign names to the first, second, third,
fifth, and sixth fields in each record regardless of the actual number of fields in
the records in the data file.
Inserting Fields More Than Once
Imported fields may be used as many times as desired within the prototype.
There is no restriction that each be used only once. Similarly, fields need not be
used at all even though they are defined in the 
fields
statement.
For example, if you wanted to create two address labels for each record in a data
file, you could use a prototype like this one:
InDataPrototype Fundamentals
Chapter 4:
62
InData User’s Guide
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change page size of pdf document; pdf file compression
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Save text font, color, size and location changes to Other robust text processing features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
change font size in fillable pdf form; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
«fields last, first, initial, addr, city, state, zip¶
«first» «initial». «last»
¬
«addr»
¬
«city», «state»  «zip»
«first» «initial». «last»
¬
«addr»
¬
«city», «state»  «zip»
The character at the end of the first label is a next frame character (Shift-Enter),
which forces the second label into the next text frame. Similarly, the new frame
character at the end of the prototype will force the subsequent label created by
the next data record into the next text frame.
A similar technique could be used to create two or more slightly different labels
for each incoming data record.
Field Placement Flexibility
Fields also need not be placed into the document in the order in which they are
defined in the 
fields
statement (and that they appear in the data file). They may
be placed in any order, regardless of their actual position in original data records.
In general, the 
fields
statement merely defines names for the corresponding data
file fields. It does not prescribe or control how those fields are imported or placed.
Missing and Empty Fields
If some records in the data file do not contain information in every field, then the
corresponding position for that record in the final output will be empty (blank).
The rest of the prototype will be completed normally. For example, the following
formatted record has no data in its 
city
field:
Smith, John
124 Wayside Heights Rd.
, TX 67344
111-222-3344
Methods of handling empty fields in the imported data are covered in Chapters
3 and 6.
When to Omit the Right Chevron Mark
You may have noticed that 
fields
statements in example prototypes often omit the
final » mark. The reason for this is illustrated clearly by the following example.
The illustration shows the different document forms resulting from two proto-
types which differ only by the presence or absence of the closing chevronmark on
the 
fields
statement.
Basic InData Operations
InDataPrototype Fundamentals
InData User’s Guide
63
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
change font size fillable pdf; adjust size of pdf file
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
pdf text box font size; pdf change page size
PROTOTYPES:
«fields last,first,ext¶
«fields last,first,ext»¶
«last», «first»
«ext»
«last», «first»
«ext»
SAMPLEOUTPUT:
Crashaw, Richard
2213
Grenville, Fulke
2543
Crashaw, RIchard
2213
Howard, Henry
8732
Jonson, Ben
2311
Grenville, Fulke
2543
… and so on …
In the right prototype, the 
fields
statement is terminated by the » mark. The
paragraph mark—which we’ve underlined—is a literal character in the proto-
type, exactly like the comma after the last name. Thus, it is reproduced as the
first character in every imported record, producing the extra spacing between
records in the final document.
By contrast, the 
fields
statement in the first prototype is terminated by the para-
graph mark itself; here, the paragraph mark serves the same function as a »
mark. Thus, it is part of the 
fields
statement and not a literal character in the pro-
totype, and accordingly, it does not appear in the formatted records in the result-
ing document.
In general, any closing chevron mark may be replaced by a paragraph mark (cre-
ated by entering a carriage return). However, if a closing chevron mark is used,
and a new paragraph is not desired, then the next portion of the prototype should
be placed on the same line with no intervening text. For example, if a 
fields
state-
ment is closed with the »mark, then the initial line of the formatting specifica-
tions should be placed in the sameparagraph with it, as in this example:
«fields first, last, title, room, ext»«last», «first»
«title»
¬
Ext. «ext»  (Room «room»)
Replacing the closing »mark with a paragraph mark may often be helpful in
making prototypes clearer and easier to understand. Further examples of these
considerations will be given later in this manual.
More Examples of Formatting Prototypes
InData’s advantage over the built-in report generation capabilities of database
and spreadsheet packages is its ability to bring the publishing power of InDesign
to your data. InData may be used to format the same data in many different
ways, limited only by your imagination and available time. The prototypes to fol-
low illustrate some alternate treatments of some employee name and address
data, having the following fields:
u
last name
u
first name
»
»
»
InDataPrototype Fundamentals
Chapter 4:
64
InData User’s Guide
u
address
u
city
u
state
u
zip code
u
title
u
department
We’ve already seen that address labelsare easy to format using InData. The basic
procedure when creating a label document is to create text frames on the master
page for each label on the sheet and then to enter the prototype into the first
frame on page one of the document (don’t make the mistake of placing the pro-
totype on the master page!). Here is a sample prototype:
«fields last,first,addr,city,state,zip,title,dept¶
«title» «first» «last»¶
«addr»¶
«city», «state»   «zip»
Notice the InDesign “new frame” character at the end of the prototype (created
by typing Shift-Enter). Placing it at the end of the prototype ensures that each
record will be in a separate text frame, corresponding to its own label. Set text
frame vertical alignment to 
Center
(by selecting the frame and then using the
Text Frame Options
command from the 
Object
menu) to center the text vertically
on the label.
Form letters are also easily produced with InData. For example, the prototype
below creates an invitation for each person in a data file:
The Board of Directors¶
The Board of Directors
of the Poole Asteroid Mining Company¶
of the Poole Asteroid Mining Company
cordially invite¶
cordially invite
«g» «b» «a»¶
å
Mr. Richard Crashaw
to our 50th Anniversary Celebration¶
to our 50th Anniversary Celebration
Saturday, June 12, 2077¶
Saturday, June 12, 2077
2:00 to 6:00 p.m.¶
2:00 to 6:00 p.m.
The Beachfront Hotel 
The Beachfront Hotel
The majority of this prototype is literal text, with the last name and first name
fields from the data file inserted in the fourth line (the second and first field per
record, respectively). Like the previous example, the prototype concludes with a
next frame mark to ensure that each invitation is placed properly on the page.
Basic InData Operations
More Examples of Formatting Prototypes
InData User’s Guide
65
The same data file can also be used to create signs for office doors. Signs could be
printed on heavy card stock and then cut to fit existing holders. Here is one pos-
sible prototype, along with one of the signs it produces (both greatly reduced in
size):
å
As you can see from this example, InData prototypes may be used with nearly
any set of InDesign features, like the shaded and rotated text frames illustrated.
Forcing Text to the Next Column,
Frame, Page and Even/Odd Page
We’ve seen several different ways to force text to start in the next column or next
text frame in this and the previous chapter:
u
Follow it by a new column character(Enter). This will force text to the top
of the next column in multi-column text frames and into the next text frame
in single column text frames.
u
Follow it with a new frame character(Shift-Enter), which always begins sub-
sequent text in the next text frame.
u
If you want a break before a given paragraph, you can make the paragraph’s
Space Before
setting a value larger than the depth of the text frame. For
example, to forceeach record on to its own address label without using a final
new frame character within the prototype, set the 
Space Before
value for the
paragraph containing the first line of each label to some value that is longer
than an individual label (
6”
for example).
And there are several other break-control methods you can use with InDesign:
u
If you want a break after a given paragraph, you can make the paragraph’s
Start Paragraph
setting (in the 
Keep Options
) one of 
In Next Column
In
Next Frame
On Next Page
On Next Odd Page
On Next Even Page
.
More Examples of Formatting Prototypes
Chapter 4:
66
InData User’s Guide
u
InDesign also has special break characters for next column, frame, page, even
page, and odd page, and you can use the appropriate break character for your
situation in an InData prototype.
The InData Menu
We will now turn to a brief consideration of each of the items on the 
InData
menu.
Import from File…
Import data records from an external file.
Import from Clipboard…
Import data records that are currently residing on the system clipboard.
Import from Pasteboard…
Import data records residing in a unique text story on the pasteboard.
Make Header/Footer…
Create a mark reference for use in generating automatic headers and
footers.
Update Headers/Footers…
Update any relevant headers and footers on the current story to match
the current state of edited, imported text.
Use Story as Prototype
Designate the currently selected text story  as the prototype.
Name Story…
Assign a name to a text story within the document for later Apple-
Scripting.
Name Substory…
Assign a name to a subset of a named story for later use with Apple-
Scripting.
Find Story/Substory…
Locate a specified story and possibly substory within the current InDe-
sign document.
Preferences
Edit InData preferences. Contains a submenu consisting of 
Data…
,
View…
Range…
, and 
General…
, which are used to set specific types of
preferences.
Basic InData Operations
The InData Menu
InData User’s Guide
67
About…
Display an informational window describing this copy and version of the
InData plug-in.
The various InData  menu items will be discussed frequently throughout this
manual.
Data Import Options
Normally, InData imports records from an external data file, but there are other
potential source locations for the raw data records. For example, data may come
from the system clipboard. You import clipboard records by simply selecting
Import from Clipboard…
rather than 
Import from File…
from the 
InData
menu.
Any formatting information in the data—italics for example—is ignored and will
notbe carried over into the formatted records. Rather, as always, each field’s for-
mat will be the same as that of its field placeholder. If there is not currently any
text on the system clipboard, then this menu item will be dimmed.
Data records may also reside in a text frame on the pasteboard. If you choose the
Import from Pasteboard…
option from the 
InData
menu, then the data records
will be assumed to be in a text frame on the pasteboard of the current spread.
This text frame must reside entirely on the pasteboard and be the only text frame
placed there (except for a text frame which has already been designated as hold-
ing the prototype). As for text imported from the clipboard, all formatting infor-
mation in the data is ignored.
Once an import option is selected and a data file is specified (if applicable), the
InDatacontrol panelappears on the screen:
Status messages 
appear in this area.
Import progress is 
indicated by the bar 
and record number.
Selects which 
records in the 
data file are to
be imported.
Controls when
the screen is
updated during
importing.
Specifies format 
of the incoming 
data records.
Data Import Options
Chapter 4:
68
InData User’s Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested