asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# vb.net : Change font size in pdf form software SDK dll winforms windows .net web forms Instituto2010_HowToBuildBridgePrograms%20final0-part539

How to Build Bridge Programs 
that Fit into a Career Pathway
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the  
Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago
Dr. rICArDo A. EstrADA 
Vice President for Education  
and Programs
with contributions by 
tom DuBois 
Director of New Initiatives
Change font size in pdf form - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf change font size; pdf page size dimensions
Change font size in pdf form - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best compression pdf; change font size pdf document
Carreras en Salud 
Leadership Partners
Founded in 1968, the 
National Council of La raza
(NCLR) is the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United 
States. Through its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations, NCLR reaches millions of Hispanics each year in 41 states, Puerto 
Rico, and the District of Columbia. To achieve its mission, NCLR conducts applied research, policy analysis, and advocacy, providing a Latino perspective  
in five key areas: assets/investments, civil rights/immigration, education, employment and economic status, and health. In addition, it provides  
capacity-building assistance to its affiliates who work at the state and local level to advance opportunities for individuals and families. 
Instituto del Progreso Latino
(Instituto) was founded in 1977 to meet the needs of Latino immigrants to learn English, find employment, 
accustom their children to the U.S. educational systems, and adjust to life in Chicago in a myriad of ways. Since its inception, Instituto has been a story 
of hope, perseverance, and community triumph. Today, Instituto is a recognized leading city and state educational center serving more than 14,000 
participants annually to advance their basic academic skills, obtain a high school diploma, pass the GED exam, become U.S. citizens, increase their job skills, 
and provide assistance with employment opportunities. Its goal is to instill that sense of hope, motivate perseverance, and provide the tools for success. 
Association House of Chicago
(AHC) is a 110-year-old settlement house in Chicago that serves a multi-cultural community through programs 
in English and Spanish that promote health and wellness, and create opportunities for educational and economic advancement. The agency offers over 
30 programs in five divisions: Child Welfare, Behavioral Health, Out of School Time Programs, El Cuarto Año High School, and Community Services, 
which includes a Center for Working Families, income support, job readiness for youth and prisoner re-entry populations, adult education, technology, and 
citizenship. AHC partners with over 21 public schools and is a co-founder and fiscal agent for the Greater Humboldt Park Community of Wellness,  
a coalition of more than 50 organizations that work together to promote community health. 
the Humboldt Park Vocational Education Center (HPVEC) of Wilbur Wright College
, one of the City Colleges of Chicago, 
is a community-oriented adult learning center whose primary mission is to provide training in business, health, and manufacturing that teach the skills 
necessary for employment and career advancement. HPVEC is accredited through Wilbur Wright College by the North Central Association of Colleges 
and Schools and is approved by the Illinois Community College Board and the Illinois Office of Education Department of Adult, Vocational, and Technical 
Education. HPVEC opened in spring 1995, offering adult basic education (ABE) and some limited vocational training to at-risk youth and underserved 
adults. The neighborhood population it serves is two-thirds Latino and predominantly young and low-income. Most do not have a high school diploma. 
The percentage of people in this neighborhood who never reached the ninth grade is nearly three times higher than in Cook County as a whole. Besides 
needing specific job skills training, many community residents also face a language barrier and lack the economic resources to pursue a vocation. 
Instituto del Progreso Latino would like to thank the Illinois Community College Board, the Illinois Department  
of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and The Joyce Foundation for making this report possible.
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
pdf reduce file size; change font size in pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
pdf page size may not be reduced; advanced pdf compressor online
Dear Reader:
about the enormous challenges and opportunities for preparing adult workers for better jobs.  
et the current system 
worker needs. T
changing skill requirements.  
In 2006, staf
way. Education and 
workforce leaders are partnering in new ways with employers, offering accelerated educational pathways for 
workers, articulated programs with credit for prior learning and work-based learning, and academics coordinated 
with internships and other work experience in the relevant field of study. Financial aid is being rethought and 
par
ving relatively small numbers of workers. 
W
suppor
Foundation launched the Shifting Gears Initiative. This multi-year, multi-million dollar policy and systems change 
effor
post-secondar
.
Over the past three years, the Illinois Shifting Gears effort has resulted in the creation of numerous state policies 
that are already enabling adult education, workforce, and post-secondary institutions to develop occupationally-
focused bridge programs like the ones Instituto and its partners operate. Now that these policies are in place, 
state leaders are turning toward implementation. Through learning communities, regional forums, and this “how to” 
guide, Illinois hopes to see bridge programs offered in every Illinois community within the next two years.
If you would like to follow the progress of the efforts in Illinois or any of the other states, visit Shifting Gears at 
www 
your area.
Whitney Smith 
Program Manager 
The Joyce Foundation
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change page size pdf; pdf compressor
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adjust file size of pdf; pdf files optimized
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
300 dpi pdf file size; change font size in pdf form
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
change font size pdf fillable form; batch reduce pdf file size
Table of Contents
Overview ...............................................................................5 – 6
Carreras en Salud as a Model ..................................................................7
How to Conceive of a Career Pathway .......................................................8 – 9
How to Identify and Develop Successful Partnerships ...........................................10 – 16
How to Design a Career Pathway and its Bridges .............................................17 – 21
Understanding the Essential Elements of a Bridge Program ......................................22 – 26
How to Contextualize a Bridge Curriculum ..................................................27 – 29
Teaching Paradigm and Instructor Qualities ..................................................30 – 36
How to Develop Bridge Program Logistics ...................................................37 – 40
How to Budget for a Bridge Program .......................................................41 – 42
How to Sustain a Bridge Program ..........................................................43 – 44
How to Expand the Bridge Program Model .......................................................45
Conclusion ................................................................................46
Endnotes ..................................................................................52
FIgurEs
Figure 1: Carreras en Salud: Nontraditional Student Characteristics ....................................9
Figure 2: Role of Higher Education Partners .......................................................11
Figure 3: Role of Employers ...................................................................12
Figure 4: Sample Partners and Roles ............................................................13
Figure 5: Roles of Community-Based Organizations  ................................................14
Figure 6: Healthcare Career Ladder .............................................................19
Figure 7: Healthcare Academic Ladder ..........................................................19
Figure 8: Carreras en Salud Career Pathway Model  ...............................................20
Figure 9: Carreras en Salud Pre-CNA Bridge Flow Chart ...........................................23
Figure 10: Carreras en Salud Pre-LPN Bridge Flow Chart ...........................................24
Figure 11: Industry-Required CNA Technical Skills .................................................27
Figure 12: Pedagogy vs. Andragogy ............................................................30
Figure 13: Adult Education Curriculum Contextualizing Model ........................................32
Figure 14: Sample Lesson Plan .................................................................34
Figure 15: Traditional vs. Nontraditional Instructor ..................................................35
Figure 16: Example of a Multiple Cost Center Budget ..............................................42
APPENDICEs
A: Sample Memorandum of Understanding ..................................................47 – 48
B: Health Science Careers ....................................................................49
C: ESL Skill Levels and Competencies .......................................................50 – 51
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Select "Generate" to process barcode generation; Change Barcode Properties. Select "Font" to choose human-readable text font style, color, size and effects;
change paper size pdf; change page size pdf acrobat
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Please note that you can change some of the example, you can adjust the text font, font size, font type (regular LoadImage) Dim DrawFont As New Font("Arial", 16
best way to compress pdf; change file size of pdf
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
5
Overview
In December 2009, the Illinois unemployment rate was 
11%, an increase of 3% over the 9% unemployment 
rate of December 2008. The poverty rate for the state 
is 9%. Unemployment and poverty are much higher 
in the City of Chicago, where the overall poverty rate 
is 17%. These statistics become even more dramatic 
when focusing on low-income communities and 
communities of color within the city.
1
Latinos account for one in four Chicago area 
residents.
2
An analysis of 2006 U.S. Census data  
by the Chicago Community Trust in 2008, based 
on data from a period of national economic growth, 
found that the labor force participation rate of Latinos 
was 68%, just slightly below the 70% rate for White 
non-Hispanics, yet Latinos had a median household 
income of $43,266, which is 40% below the  
White median income of $71,440, and 22% lived  
in poverty compared to 10% of Whites.
Occupations that are in demand increasingly  
require higher level skills that are acquired through 
post-secondary education and training.
3
In 2008,  
there were 88 million adult workers nationally who 
were not prepared for these positions, including 25 
million adult workers who lack a high school degree  
or its equivalent.
4
Of those who do have a diploma, 
45% score “Below Basic Prose” in literacy, which 
means they have “no more than the most simple and 
concrete literacy skills.”
5
This population represents 
a huge potential reservoir of workers to meet the 
workforce needs of employers. How can this potential 
become reality? Career pathways and their “bridge” 
programs have been developed as one possible 
solution, providing low-skill adults with a realistic 
opportunity to attain post-secondary education and  
family-sustaining levels of employment.
A career pathway consists of a connected series of 
education programs, with integrated support services, 
work experience, and on-the-job learning that enables 
adults to combine work and learning. Bridge programs 
move people along this pathway by preparing adults 
who lack adequate basic skills to enter and succeed 
in post-secondary education and training, leading 
to career-path employment. Bridge programs seek to 
enable students to advance both to better jobs and to 
further education and training, and thus are designed 
to provide a broad foundation for career-long learning 
on the job and for formal post-high school education 
and training.
6
The Illinois Community College Board provides a 
compatible definition of a bridge program: Bridge 
周is manual is useful to anyone interested in the  
challenge of tapping into the reservoir of talent 
represented by low-skill adults, whether the skills  
they need are English as a Second Language (ESL)  
or adult basic education (ABE).
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
programs prepare adults with limited academic or 
limited English skills to enter and succeed in credit-
bearing post-secondary education and training 
leading to career-path employment in high-demand, 
middle- and high-skill occupations. The goal of bridge 
programs is to sequentially bridge the gap between  
the initial skills of individuals and what they need 
to enter and succeed in post-secondary education 
and career-path employment. Bridge programs 
assist students in obtaining the necessary academic, 
employability, and technical skills through three 
required components — contextualized instruction, 
career development, and support services.
The Shifting Gears Initiative, initiated and funded by 
The Joyce Foundation, is a multi-year, multi-million  
dollar state policy initiative to promote regional 
economic growth by improving the education and  
skills training of the workforce in five Midwestern  
states, including Illinois. Shifting Gears was formed,  
in part, to facilitate the further development of effective 
adult education approaches, including career bridge 
programs. Successful bridge programs across the 
country helped fuel the determination to do this. 
Examples include the Automobile Career Pathways 
Project in Seattle, Washington; Capital IDEA/ACC 
Partnership in Austin and Round Rock, Texas; Flint 
Healthcare Employment Opportunities Project in  
Flint, Michigan; Logistics/Transportation Academy  
in Los Angeles, California; NOVA-NVFS Training 
Futures “Steps to Success” Model in Fairfax County, 
Virginia; and one in particular that is home grown 
— Carreras en Salud. These programs demonstrate 
that the career pathway/bridge model is a particularly 
effective strategy to improve the employment potential 
of low-skill adults.
7
Carreras en Salud (English translation is Careers in 
Health) is an early bridge prototype that has achieved 
significant outcomes. With seed funding from the state’s 
Critical Skills Shortage Initiative,
8
this model has been 
operating since April 2005. As of summer 2009, 
Carreras had a cumulative completion rate of 94% 
across all its bridge programs, which together served 
1,197 participants, had a licensing/certification rate 
of 95% for its 358 Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) and 
Certified Nursing Assistance (CNA) graduates, and a 
placement rate of 100% for the 343 LPNs and CNAs. 
LPNs had an average wage gain of 150%, from an 
average annual salary of $18,720 as a CNA to 
$46,800 as an LPN.
The purpose of this manual is to provide the tools 
and information needed to develop successful bridge 
programs, drawing on the specifics of the development 
and implementation of Carreras en Salud. This 
manual is useful to anyone interested in the challenge 
of tapping into the reservoir of talent represented by 
low-skill adults, whether the skills they need are English 
as a Second Language (ESL) or adult basic education 
(ABE). This can range from administrators of adult 
and vocational programs to instructors, employers, 
and others. This manual summarizes the key elements 
of the Carreras en Salud program experience in 
order to assist others to adopt similar initiatives. Every 
situation is unique, but analysis and learning from prior 
experience is essential for future successes.
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
7
Carreras en Salud as a Model
By the beginning of the new millennia, it was well 
established that focusing economic and educational 
energy on a carefully selected set of industries and 
communities is a valuable strategy for economic and 
workforce development. Sectors chosen for focus 
demonstrate strong projected growth in the region 
based on labor market analysis and employer focus 
groups, have good quality jobs (i.e., provide a family 
sustaining income and good benefits), and are a 
good fit with the community’s available workforce. 
With strong participation by employers, education 
and training can be demand-driven, incorporating 
specific competencies for positions that fit employers’ 
requirements. With a sector focus, workforce 
development providers can build the in-depth 
knowledge of the industry that is a critical asset to link 
employers with community organizations, community 
colleges, and local government.
Instituto del Progreso Latino (Instituto) began one of 
the first of these sector initiatives in 1997 with a focus 
on the demand for skilled positions in manufacturing 
and the concentrated participation of the local Latino 
population in lower-skilled manufacturing positions. 
This program, called the Manufacturing Bridge, was 
developed with critical technical assistance from  
Dr. Davis Jenkins, then based at the Great Cities 
Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  
Dr. Jenkins helped to design this program to “bridge” 
limited English speaking immigrants into higher levels 
of both employment and education. The model was 
based on the “tech prep” experience of linking two 
years of high school to two years of community 
college, with a seamless pathway focused on 
careers in a particular industry. This model included 
contextualized learning in applied academic courses 
taught simultaneously with technical specialty courses.
9
In 2000, the Workforce Strategies Initiative (WSI) of 
the Aspen Institute published an analysis of existing 
sector-based programs, finding strong outcomes in 
terms of program graduates’ earnings and entry into 
positions with higher than normal job quality, as 
measured in terms of benefits like health insurance, 
vacation, and career ladders.
10
At the time, the 
National Network of Sector Partners was conducting 
“Sector 101” training sessions across the country, 
including in Chicago. Then in December 2002 the  
Workforce Boards of Metropolitan Chicago, based 
on an extensive industry analysis, sponsored the 
Healthcare Workforce Summit. There, Dr. Jenkins 
presented “Creating Pathway Maps for Healthcare: 
Models and Templates,” which drew on the experience 
of several programs across the country, including 
Instituto’s Manufacturing Bridge program. Among 
several templates in his presentation was the Nursing 
Services Career Pathway Map that illustrated the 
possible progression from Certified Nursing Assistant 
to Patient Care Technician to Licensed Practical Nurse 
to Registered Nurse. The State of Illinois was also in 
the process of conducting a labor market analysis 
and, drawing on the experience of workforce boards 
and community colleges across the state, launched the 
Critical Skills Shortage Initiative. 
All these activities created a body of knowledge 
and growing momentum, which led the National 
Council of La Raza (NCLR) to initiate a sector 
analysis and program design project with two of its 
Chicago affiliates — Instituto del Progreso Latino and 
Association House of Chicago — to discover local 
training gaps for Latinos in high-growth sectors. The 
partnership to develop and offer the Carreras en Salud 
program grew out of this effort.
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
How to Conceive of a Career Pathway
The first step in conceiving of a career pathway and 
developing a successful bridge program is to identify 
an employment sector and a suitable target population. 
These steps are to be taken together, because the 
needs and skills of the population must be compatible 
with the chosen sector. Additionally, in selecting a 
sector to focus on, employment growth, possible career 
paths, demand for workers, and existing training or 
educational programs are important considerations. 
While you may identify several potential sectors, 
consider the one that presents the most opportunities  
for growth and career pathways.
Although Carreras en Salud began as an idea for  
a specific bridge program, this process could also 
begin with developing the career pathway concept.  
In Carreras, a consultant conducted the labor market 
data analysis, drawing on multiple data sources. 
Initially, three sectors (healthcare, transportation,  
and construction) were considered because of their 
positive growth projections, good paying career 
path opportunities, and because they do not require 
advanced degrees. Construction showed strong growth 
and high earnings, but much of the employment is 
seasonal and has high barriers to entry into the 
skilled trades. Transportation had strong projections 
over the 10-year period, but showed a consistent 
decrease in the number of employees over the previous 
couple of years. Healthcare presented the following  
unique characteristics:
1. Employment growth projections were stronger and 
more consistent than in any other growing sector 
in the local economy. This was driven not only by 
overall population gains, but also by the aging  
of the population. 
2. Possible career paths existed with entry for low-skill 
employees and opportunities to advance. Not only 
would hospitals need growing numbers of new 
employees (as driven also by the aging of their 
workforce), but there was a projected increase in 
the number of long-term healthcare facilities and 
home-based healthcare — both requiring increasing 
numbers of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) and 
Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). 
3. A significant demand for bilingual healthcare 
professionals existed with the large and growing 
Spanish-speaking population to be served in the 
metropolitan Chicago area. 
4. High quality healthcare training was available at  
the local community college, but it was not 
meeting the industry need for higher numbers of 
graduates, nor the higher numbers of bilingual 
healthcare professional graduates. Moreover, it 
was not meeting the community’s need for residents 
to be able to enter the higher level skills training 
programs. The most significant finding of the 
sector analysis was the training gap between the 
Humboldt Park Vocational Education Center’s CNA 
training program and Wright College’s approved 
advanced certificate LPN program. While Latino 
residents entered, completed, and were hired  
from the CNA program, virtually no Latinos  
entered Wright College’s highly respected and  
very successful LPN program.
These characteristics of the healthcare industry  
offered the most opportunity for a successful bridge 
program that fit within a distinct career pathway,  
so healthcare was selected as the target sector for the 
new program. 
Target Population
The target population may be driven by the community 
area represented by your college or organization. For 
Instituto and Association House, the target population 
seemed to be the Latino community in general, given 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested