Steer clear of “respectively” 
How easy is it to read the following sentence once and understand what 
it means? 
before 
The Senior Notes and the guarantee (the “Guarantee”) of the 
Senior Notes by Island Holdings will constitute unsecured senior 
obligations of the Issuer and Island Holdings, respectively. 
after 
The senior notes are an unsecured senior obligation of the issuer, 
while the guarantee of the senior notes is an unsecured senior 
obligation of Island Holdings. 
Whenever you use “respectively,” you force your reader to go back and 
match up what belongs to what. You may be saving words by using 
“respectively,” but your reader has to use more time and read your 
words twice to understand what you’ve written. 
• 
“Many shortcuts are self-
defeating; they waste the 
reader’s time instead of 
conserving it.” 
Strunk and White 
The Elements of Style 
a plain english handbook 
35 
Pdf reduce file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
acrobat compress pdf; pdf font size change
Pdf reduce file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf file size; reader compress pdf
36 a plain english handbook 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
easy and developers can shrink or reduce source image NET Image SDK supported image file formats, including & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf paper size; pdf custom paper size
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
jpeg), gif, bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc. the web viewer will instantly enlarge or reduce the source file until the file size fits the
best online pdf compressor; change font size pdf
Designing 
the Document 
A plain English document reflects thoughtful design choices. The 
right design choices make a document easier to read and its informa­
tion easier to understand. The wrong design choices can make even a 
well-written document fail to communicate. 
Some documents suffer because no one knew how basic design deci­
sions, like typeface selection, dramatically determine whether or not a 
document is easy to read. Other documents suffer because expensive 
design features give them artistic appeal, but at the cost of obscuring 
the text. In a plain English document, design serves the goal of commu­
nicating the information as clearly as possible. 
a plain english handbook 
37 
How to C#: Special Effects
filter will be applied to the image to reduce the noise. LinearStretch. Level the pixel between the black point and white point. Magnify. Double the image size.
change file size of pdf document; adjust pdf page size
VB.NET Image: Compress & Decompress Document Image; RasterEdge .
reduce Word document size according to specific requirements in VB.NET; Scanned PDF encoding and decoding: compress a large size PDF document file for easier
can a pdf file be compressed; pdf markup text size
Beginning the design process 
Check with your in-house printing or graphics department—your 
company may have already dealt with design issues in other documents 
or may have skilled designers who can help you with your document. If 
your company or underwriter has a style manual, it typically will define 
a required “look” that specifies typefaces and layouts. 
Since some standards or guidelines in your style manual may have been 
adopted when plain English was not a concern, review them to ensure 
they contribute to good design and ease of reading. 
If you are using a designer, keep the following in mind: 
• Good design requires clear communication between the writer and 
the designer. Keep the lines of communication open and flowing. 
• Take the time to explain the nuances of your document to your 
designer. 
• Don’t move into the design phase until your text is final. Once the 
document is put into page layout software, or once it is at the printer, 
making text changes can be tedious and expensive. 
If you don’t have a design professional, fear not. You can apply many 
of the simple concepts discussed in this chapter to produce a readable, 
visually appealing document. 
While the field of design extends broadly, this chapter covers five basic 
design elements and how they contribute to creating a plain English 
document: 
• hierarchy or distinguishing levels of information 
• typography 
• layout 
• graphics 
• color 
38 a plain english handbook 
VB.NET Image: How to Zoom Web Images in Visual Basic .NET Imaging
and also some file types like PDF and multi out" functionality allows VB developers to easily reduce the size of web image or document file being displayed
optimize scanned pdf; pdf compression
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
page document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF to help developers to decrease and reduce current zooming Reset the Size of Currently Viewed File via btnFit
best pdf compressor; change font size in pdf
Hierarchy  
Much like an outline, a document’s hierarchy shows how you’ve orga­
nized the information and helps the reader to understand the relation­
ship between different levels of information. 
A typical hierarchy in the prospectus might include: 
• the document title 
• section headings (first level) 
• subsection headings (second level) 
• paragraph headings (third level) 
• general text (fourth level) 
Designers use different typefaces in the headings to distinguish these 
levels for the reader. As a rule of thumb, there should be no more than 
six levels in the document, excluding the document’s title. 
You can signal a new level by varying the same typeface or by using 
a different typeface. Here’s a demonstration of how we’ve used different 
typefaces to distinguish levels in this handbook: 
Section headings 
Subsection headings 
General text 
Example headings 
a plain english handbook 
39 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Compact rich image editing functions into several small-size libraries that are VB.NET programmers the API to scale source image file (reduce or enlarge image
pdf page size limit; adjusting page size in pdf
C# Word: How to Compress, Decompress Word in C#.NET Projects
Efficiently reduce Microsoft Office Word document size using C# code; to compress the Word document file to a & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf text box font size; change font size in pdf fillable form
“Serif type is more readable 
and is best for text; sans serif 
type is more legible and is best 
used for headlines.” 
Robin Williams 
The Mac Is Not a Typewriter 
Typography 
Although it may seem like a minor decision, your typeface selection 
will be one of the elements that most strongly defines the design and 
readability of your document. 
Kinds of typefaces 
Typefaces come in two varieties: serif and sans serif. 
serif 
sans serif 
All serif typefaces have small lines at the beginning or ending strokes 
of each letter. Virtually all newspapers and many magazines use some 
read than sans serif. This handbook uses a serif typeface called Scala 
for general text. Other popular serif typefaces are: Caslon, Century 
Schoolbook, Garamond, and Times. Here are some examples: 
serif 
This is an example of Scala. 
This is an example of Caslon. 
This is an example of Century Schoolbook. 
This is an example of Garamond. 
This is an example of Times. 
S
most headings throughout this document is a sans serif typeface, Scala 
Sans. Franklin Gothic, Frutiger, Helvetica, and Univers are examples of 
sans serif typefaces. 
sans serif 
Thi
s
i
s
an example of Franklin Gothic. 
This is 
a
e
x
a
mpl
e
of Fru
t
ig
e
r. 
This is an example of Helvetica. 
Thi
s
i
s
a
e
x
a
mpl
e
of Univ
e
r
s
Generally, serif typefaces are easier to read in documents like this than 
eye more quickly and smoothly over text. It is best to use sans serif 
typefaces in small quantities—for emphasis or headings, but not for 
general text. Both serifs and sans serifs work well for headings. 
40 a plain english handbook 
Selecting the right typeface 
When choosing a typeface, think carefully about where the typeface 
will appear in the document. For example, will it be general text, or will 
it apply to information that needs to be highlighted? Will it introduce 
a section? 
Some typefaces are harder to read than others and were never intended 
for text. Typefaces like Bodoni Poster or other bold, italic, or condensed 
typefaces were designed for headlines or for large display type. These 
examples show how difficult it is to read text in these typefaces. 
Bodoni Poster 
Justi
f
ied text was the style 
f
o
r
 many year
s
we 
g
rew up on it. 
B
ut there has been a 
g
reat deal o
f
research on 
readability (how easy somethin
g
 is to 
read) and it shows that those dis
ruptive, inconsis
­
tent 
g
aps between the wo
r
ds inhibit the 
f
low o
f
readin
g
B
esides, they look dumb. Keep your
 eyes 
open as you look at p
r
o
f
essionally
-
p
rinted wo
r
k... 
and you
ll 
f
ind there
s a very str
on
g
 trend now to 
ali
g
n type on the le
f
t and leave the 
ri
g
ht 
ra
gg
ed. 
Robin 
W
illiams, The 
M
ac Is 
N
ot a Typewriter 
Franklin Gothic Condensed 
Justified text was the style for many years—we grew up on it. 
But there has been a great deal of research on readability (how easy 
something is to read) and it shows that those disruptive, inconsistent 
gaps between the words inhibit the flow of reading. Besides, they look 
dumb. 
K
eep your eyes open as you look at professionally-printed 
work...and you’ll find there’s a very strong trend now to align type on 
the left and leave the right ragged. 
Robin Williams, 
The Mac Is Not a Typewri
ter 
You can mix different typefaces, but do so with discretion; not all type­
faces work well together. Mixing a serif and sans serif, as we have done 
in this handbook, can look good and create a clear contrast between 
your levels. Mixing two serif or two sans serif typefaces can look like a 
mistake. As a general rule, do not use more than two typefaces in any 
document, not including the bold or italic versions of a typeface. 
a plain english handbook 
41 
Type measurement 
All typefaces are measured in points (pts). But don’t assume that differ­
ent typefaces in the same point size are of equal size. For example, here 
are four typefaces set in 11pt: 
Thi
s
i
s
an example in 11pt. Franklin Gothic 
This is an example in 11pt. Century Schoolbook 
This is an example in 11pt. Garamond 
This is an example in 11pt. Helvetica 
This is an example in 11pt. Times 
Choose a legible type size 
A point size that is too small is difficult for everyone to read. 
A point size that is 
too large is also hard to read. 
Generally, type in 10pt–12pt 
is most common. But as you can see from the examples above, some 
typefaces in 11pt will strain some readers. If you have special concerns 
about legibility, especially for an elderly audience, you should consider 
using 12pt or larger. 
42 a plain english handbook 
Emphasizing text 
reader’s attention. Unfortunately, those capitals make the text difficult 
because the shapes of words disappear, causing the reader to slow down 
and study each letter. Ironically, readers tend to skip sentences written 
in all uppercase. 
To highlight information and maintain readability, use a different size 
or weight of your typeface. Try using extra white space, bold type, 
shading, rules, boxes, or sidebars in the margins to make information 
stand out. In this handbook we use dotted rules to highlight the exam­
ples. Whatever method you choose to highlight information, use it 
consistently throughout your document so your readers can recognize 
how you flag important information. 
before 
THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION HAS 
NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES 
OR DETERMINED IF THIS PROSPECTUS IS TRUTHFUL OR 
COMPLETE. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY 
IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE. 
after 
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or 
or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. 
after 
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved 
or disapproved these securities or determined if this prospectus 
is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a 
criminal offense. 
“...words consisting of only 
capital letters present the 
most difficult reading— 
because of their equal height, 
equal volume, and, with most, 
their equal width.” 
Josef Albers 
Interaction of Color 
a plain english handbook 
43 
“…when everything 
(background, structure, 
content) is emphasized, 
nothing is emphasized; 
the design will often be 
noisy, cluttered, and 
informationally flat.” 
Edward Tufte 
Visual Explanations 
Layout 
Designers think carefully about white space, column width, linespacing, 
and paragraph length. These design elements determine whether read­
ing is easy or becomes too much of a physical or mental chore. 
Use white space effectively 
Generous use of white space on the page enhances readability, helps 
to emphasize important points, and lightens the overall look of the 
document. White space especially affects the readers of disclosure 
documents because these documents usually feature dense blocks of 
impenetrable text. 
You should fight the impulse to fill up the entire page with text or 
graphics. A wide left or right margin can make the document easier 
to read. The use of white space between sections or subsections helps 
readers recognize which information is related. 
Use left justified, ragged right text 
Research shows that the easiest text to read is left justified, ragged right 
text. That is, the text is aligned, or flush, on the left with a loose, or 
ragged, right edge. The text in this handbook is set left justified, ragged 
right. 
Fully justified text means both the right and left edges are flush, or 
even. When you fully justify text, the spacing between words fluctuates 
variable spacing on each line. Currently, most disclosure documents 
are fully justified. This, coupled with a severe shortage of white space, 
makes these documents visually unappealing and difficult to read. 
Be especially wary of centering text, or using text to form a shape or 
design. Uneven margins may make a visual impact, but they make 
reading extremely difficult. 
44 a plain english handbook 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested