asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# vb.net : Best pdf compression software Library cloud windows asp.net web page class Instituto2010_HowToBuildBridgePrograms%20final3-part542

A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
29
concepts of the healthcare industry, laws, regulations, 
and especially the different career tracks in the 
healthcare industry (therapeutics, diagnostics, health 
informatics, and biomedical) and professions within 
each of those tracks. As the students increase their 
English proficiency and/or basic academic skills, they 
will demand more details on the profession, which 
warrants the micro context. If the instructor does not 
switch to a micro context, students may lose interest 
and even withdraw from the class.
Micro Context 
Micro context focuses on a particular profession  
within an industry or sector. For example, in the 
healthcare sector the micro context focus can 
be therapeutics, diagnostics, health informatics, 
biotechnology research and development, or support 
services. Micro contextualized curricula are very 
effective with students at the intermediate ESL skill 
level. These students are able to process technical 
materials related to a particular profession. They  
have the capacity to use computers for research and 
to solve simple mathematical problems. At this level 
the students are looking for a more focused class with 
more detailed information in a particular profession 
and the skills needed to successfully perform the duties 
required by the position.
In Carreras en Salud, Pre-LPN Bridge students are at 
the intermediate ESL level and are introduced to the 
specific technical skills needed by a LPN. Students 
improve their ESL and ABE skills within the context of 
Anatomy, Physiology, and Health Psychology, and are 
introduced to EKG and Phlebotomy skills. The micro 
context at this level helps students relate their more 
general skills acquisition to the specific job they want.
Vocationalization  
Vocationalization focuses on aptitudes required to 
develop or improve skills needed for a specific job, 
emphasizing academic and vocational education, as 
well as the higher order of thinking and interpersonal 
skills demanded in that job. The use of project-based 
learning is a good example of vocationalization. 
Bringing real work situations and projects to the 
classroom helps students to enhance their vocation 
for a particular profession. Vocation includes the use 
of methods, techniques, regulations, and assessment 
of a profession. An employee with a good vocation 
is synonymous with a productive employee. 
Vocationalization works well with students at the 
advanced ESL and basic skills level. These students are 
deeply interested in a specific job within a profession 
and understand its requirements, skills, and demands. 
These students understand and feel comfortable with 
the profession, and want to learn as much as possible 
about it.
周e most common mistake  
in contextualizing curricula  
occurs when the wrong context  
is used. Using a micro context 
with students who are at the 
beginning basic skill level will 
confuse and frustrate students, 
who may quit because they 
cannot understand the technical 
material. On the other hand, if  
the general context is used with 
students at a high basic skill 
level, they can lose interest  
and motivation.
Best pdf compression - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
adjust size of pdf file; adjust pdf size
Best pdf compression - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size pdf form; 300 dpi pdf file size
30 
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
Teaching Paradigm And Instructor Qualities 
When contextualizing curricula, it is very important 
to take into consideration the teaching paradigm to 
be used in instruction. Pedagogy and andragogy, 
summarized in Figure 12, need to be tactically 
applied, depending on the basic skill level of the 
student. Andragogy is most effective for adult learners, 
although pedagogy can be applied at the “literacy” 
basic English skill level. The pedagogical method 
assumes that students have no knowledge of the 
basic skill being taught, and that they need to learn 
the fundamentals before they can process technical 
materials. Here, the student depends on the direction 
of the instructor to learn new materials. 
In teaching with a contextualized curriculum, instructors 
design lesson plans in which students move from 
engaging in pedagogical in-class activities at the low 
basic skill levels to progressively more andragogical 
exercises and applications as their English language 
and/or basic academic skills improve. By the time 
students are advanced ESL speakers and ready for 
college-level work, the teaching paradigm should  
be an andragogical one. See Figure 13 to see  
this progression.
Teaching Paradigm
use of standard vs. Project-Based Assessment
The contextualized model also advises curriculum 
developers about the importance of appropriately  
using the different assessments tools available.  
The best use of standard assessments and project-
based or problem-based assessments depends on 
the skill levels of the student. As described above, 
the contextualized model advises the use of general 
context and pedagogical activities to teach students  
at low basic skill levels, and to increase the use  
of context and andragogical activities as students  
improve their skills. Similarly, in terms of assessments, 
Dependent.  Teacher directs what, when, and how a 
subject is learned and tests that it has been learned.
PEDAgogY
ANDrAgogY
the Learner
Moves towards independence and is self-directing.  Teacher 
encourages and nurtures this movement.
Of little worth.  Hence teaching methods are didactic.
the Learner’s 
Experience
A rich resource for learning.  Hence teaching methods 
include discussion, problem solving, etc.
People learn what society expects them to.  So that the 
curriculum is standardized.
readiness  
to Learn
People learn what they need to know.  Learning programs 
are organized around life applications.
Acquisition of subject matter.  Curriculum is organized  
by subjects.
orientation 
to Learn
Learning experiences should be based on experiences.  
Because people are performance-centered in  
their learning.
Figure 12  
Pedagogy vs. Andragogy
Source: Knowles, M. S. (1970, 1980) The Modern Practice of Adult Education. Andragogy versus Pedagogy. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall/Cambridge 400 pages.
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to Tiff in page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection.
pdf change font size in textbox; change font size in fillable pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB can be compressed and uncompressed by using lossless compression. image is regarded as the best image format
best way to compress pdf file; apple compress pdf
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
31
the model advises the use of standardized testing 
instruments (such as true and false, multiple choice) 
to evaluate student knowledge at the lower levels of 
basic skills, but as students improve their basic skills the 
assessment instruments should become more applicable 
to real life issues with the use of project-based or 
problem-based assessments. In Carreras, by the time 
students reach the advanced English literacy level, they 
are assessed with project-based or problem-based 
assessments to better evaluate the presence of the 
expected competencies at that level.
use of technology in Context-Based Learning/teaching
The use of technology in teaching basic skills can 
be a motivating factor, but can also be a distraction 
that interferes with the students’ learning process. 
Technology use should be appropriate to the skills 
of the students. At the lower skill levels, traditional 
teaching tools, such as blackboard exercises, use of 
posters with figures, textbooks, and workbooks, are 
more effective. At this level, technology should be 
limited to short sessions covering the general context 
used in class with a small touch of real life application, 
such as very short videos and audio presentations. 
Students are only beginning to learn how to work 
on computers, and if computer applications are a 
major part of the curriculum, students may become 
intimidated. On the other hand, students at the high 
basic skill levels are very motivated by the use of 
technology in a daily lesson plan. Technology brings 
real life applications to the classroom, and students  
can use technology to enhance material covered in 
class. The use of job-related computer simulations 
can close the gap between what is learned in the 
classroom and what happens in a real work setting. 
Students at the advanced basic skill level will see 
clearly the relation between the skills learned in class 
and their work and life experiences.
The relationship of basic skill levels to the progressive 
use of context, credentials, teaching/learning 
paradigms, and assessments strategies are presented 
in Figure 13. This table presents the degree to 
which contextualization, interaction, technology, the 
androgogical learning paradigm, homework, and 
project-based assessments are used in relation to 
students’ basic skill levels. 
Technology brings real life applications to  
the classroom, and students can use technology to  
enhance material covered in class.
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Best and free C# tiff to adobe PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Description: Convert to PDF with specified compression method and save it on the
optimize scanned pdf; pdf optimized format
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF to Microsoft Office Word The magnification of the original PDF page size. DocumentType targetType, ImageCompress compression, String filePath).
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf file size limit
32 
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
Figure 13: Adult education Curriculum Contextualizing Model
This table shows the intensity of contextualization and other important course features in relation to the ESL or ABE skills level of the students.  
The progression shows the least contextualization at the most basic education levels, with it increasing as students improve their skills.
LITERACY
ACADEMIC GRADE 2-3
BEGINNING
ACADEMIC GRADE 3-6
INTERMEDIATE
ACADEMIC GRADE 7-10
ADVANCED
ACADEMIC GRADE 10-12.9
GENERAL CONTEXT
TRADITIONAL CLASS
INTERACTION
TRADITIONAL CLASS
INTERACTION
TRADITIONAL CLASS
INTERACTION
INTERACTIVE
CLASS
USE OF TECHNOLOGY
PEDAGOGY
PEDAGOGY
PEDAGOGY
ANDRAGOGY
ANDRAGOGY
ANDRAGOGY
ANDRAGOGY
MANDATED HOMEWORK
PROJECT-BASED
HOMEWORK
VOLUNTEER HOMEWORK
MANDATED HOMEWORK
VOLUNTEER HOMEWORK
MANDATED HOMEWORK
VOLUNTEER HOMEWORK
STANDARD
PROJECT-BASED
PROJECT-BASED
STANDARD
PROJECT-BASED
STANDARD
PROJECT-BASED
COMPUTER
ENGLISH
MATH
COMPUTER
ENGLISH
MATH
COMPREHENSION
READING
WRITING
COMPUTER
ENGLISH
VOCATIONALIZATION
Transferable Skills: Critical Thinking, 
Personal Skills, and Time Management
MATH
USE OF TECHNOLOGY
Transferable Skills: Critical Thinking, 
Personal Skills, and Time Management
COMPUTER
ENGLISH
MATH
COMPUTER
ENGLISH
MATH
COMPREHENSION
READING
WRITING
COMPUTER
ENGLISH
MATH
MACRO CONTEXT
Transferable Skills: Study Habits, 
Test-Taking Skills, and Time Management
MICRO CONTEXT
Transferable Skills: Critical Thinking, 
Personal Skills, and Time Management
USE OF TECHNOLOGY
Transferable Skills: Study Habits, 
Test-Taking Skills, and Time Management
USE OF TECHNOLOGY
Transferable Skills: Critical Thinking, 
Personal Skills, and Time Management
LEVELS:
CONTEXT
&
BASIC
SKILLS
INTERACTION
&
TRADITIONAL
CLASS
SETTING
TECHNOLOGY
&
TRADITIONAL
CLASS
MATERIALS
LEARNING
PARADIGM
MANDATED
HOMEWORK
&
VOLUNTEER
HOMEWORK
TESTING
&
EVALUATION
ESL
ABE
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Best C# Microsoft Office PowerPoint to adobe PDF file converter SDK for Visual Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and save
adjust size of pdf file; pdf compression settings
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Best Microsoft Office Excel to adobe PDF file converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and
reader compress pdf; pdf edit text size
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
33
Developing a Contextualized Curriculum
Contextualized curricula are difficult to find. Traditional 
adult education programs tend to teach in a general 
context, and use a pedagogical teaching paradigm, 
standardized testing, and technology without 
consideration for students’ basic skill level. To develop 
a contextualized curriculum, the curriculum developer 
must be aware of the elements shown in Figure 13  
and understand how each element plays a specific  
role in the learning process of the adult student 
depending on the basic skill level of the students. 
The curriculum developer must be familiar with 
the contextualized model and the different levels 
of basic skill competencies at the literacy, beginning, 
intermediate, and advanced levels. The curriculum 
developer needs to have access to resources specific 
to the industry or sector to be contextualized and be 
clear as to the technical context to be incorporated 
in the curriculum at each skill level. If the curriculum 
developer is not an expert in the industry or sector, 
s/he should team up with a practitioner or technician 
in the sector. It is also important that the curriculum 
developer, if not in the sector, become familiar with the 
tasks involved at each point in the career ladder, the 
specific credentials needed to perform those tasks, and 
the competencies needed to acquire the credentials 
and certifications required by the industry.
19
The best scenario in developing a contextualized 
curriculum is one in which a basic skills (math, 
language, computer, and/or ESL) specialist teams  
up with an industry or sector practitioner, and both 
work on the lesson plans and class activities. Similarly, 
the most effective way to teach a contextualized 
curriculum is by teaming a basic skills teacher with 
a sector practitioner, both of them coordinating the 
implementation of the lesson plans, corresponding 
activities, and assessments. It is important to note 
that at the lower basic skill levels the contextualized 
curriculum can be effectively taught by a basic skills 
teacher who only has information on the general 
context of the industry, but as the students advance 
in their basic skills the need for greater context, 
technology, technical materials, and project-based 
assessments increases and the need for team teaching 
becomes more evident. 
Lesson Plans 
A curriculum is made of lesson plans. The lesson plan 
describes the class objectives, the materials needed 
to carry out the different activities, the assessment 
tools, the evaluation tools and methods, the learning 
inventory (which serves as an indicator that the 
objectives have been achieved), and the connection 
with the next class. Lesson plans should be developed 
by day and coded by week and day (for example, 
week one, day two is coded lesson 1.2). The lesson 
plan needs to clearly show the activities related to the 
learning of the basic skills and the use of a context.  
A sample lesson plan from the Carreras en Salud  
Pre-LPN Bridge is provided in Figure 14.
Program Evaluation
Bridge curricula need to be evaluated based on 
their outcomes and according to how well they meet 
the demands of the industry at the specific points  
of employment. Students are evaluated to determine 
the presence of the expected competencies, using  
a combination of in-class and workplace activities.  
The use of project-based assessments in the classroom, 
with the help of technology, determines the level of 
knowledge of the student, but it is in the workplace, 
via internships, job shadowing, or practicum, that the 
industry itself assesses the presence of the technical 
skills demanded by the industry. Industry participation  
is essential to student evaluation in a bridge program. 
Beyond evaluating student performance within a 
particular course, bridge programs need to be 
evaluated in terms of their overall effectiveness in 
moving low-income, low-skill individuals into better 
paying jobs. Aspects that should be examined include 
student rates of retention in the program, advancement, 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Best Microsoft Office Word to adobe PDF file converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and
change font size pdf; adjust size of pdf
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Best C# OpenOffice to adobe PDF file converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and save it
change font size in pdf form; advanced pdf compressor
Figure 14: Sample Lesson Plan
34 
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
Pre-LPN I – Language Arts 
Lesson 2.2 
LANGUAGE THEME: Vocabulary Skills, Understanding Sentences 
CONTENT: Introduction to Human Body Systems
oBJECtIVEs 
MAtErIALs
• Use roots and suffixes to analyze medical terms 
• Index cards with suffixes from Chapter 3 of The Language of Medicine in a bag or hat
• Identify subjects and predicates 
• Index cards with root words from Chapter 3 of The Language of Medicine in a bag or hat
• Differentiate between whole sentences and sentence fragments 
• List of mixed sentences and sentence fragments from Human Biology, Chapter 4
• Strengthen critical thinking and problem-solving skills  
• Blank index cards
• Dictionaries
ACtIVItY A
: Introduce noun and adjective suffixes for word analysis
• Review list of root words in Chapter 3 of The Language of Medicine, Section II Combining Forms, p. 76. Write each root and each definition on the board.  
Have different students explain each meaning. 
• Review entire list of suffixes from Chapter 3 of The Language of Medicine
combined with the roots on the board.
• 
• ing of the root and the meaning of the suffix.
• , ask them to look for it in a dictionary. If the word does exist, ask students 
to add it to their medical terminology notebook. If the word does not exist, remind the students that this game is meant to help them learn that learn roots and 
suffixes are often the key to understanding complex medical terminology. 
• Repeat this until all the roots and suffixes are used.
ACtIVItY B
: Identify subject and predicate
• ntences are full sentences.
• Ask: What is a sentence? What is a subject? (the noun the sentence is about) What is a predicate? (the rest of the sentence) What is always in the predicate? 
a verb).
• .
ACtIVItY C
: Differentiate between whole sentences and sentence fragments
• Ask a student for a full sentence from the list. W
predicate. Write the skeleton sentence.
• 
• es and three fragments on the cards.
• s deck and write it on the board.
• Ask the student: Is this a sentence? How do you know?
• Give a point for each correct answer.
• ce? Does it have a noun for a subject? Does it have a verb in 
the predicate?
• 
LEArNINg INVENtorY 
HoMEWork
• Understanding the use of suffixes to analyze word meaning. 
• Define 10 more terms from original list. 
• The ability to identify the subject and predicate of a sentence. 
• Write definition and pronunciation in medical terminology
•  
section of notebook.
• Use problem solving and critical thinking skills to analyze medical terms and find their  
• Create flashcards for all the vocabulary words that are
not familiar to you already.
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and can fulfill different users' needs best, which include corresponding information, such as Tiff compression mode, color
change page size pdf acrobat; adjust pdf page size
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
35
academic progress, completion, graduation, licensing 
and certification, job placement, job retention, and 
earnings. Carreras en Salud has been very effective in 
demonstrating success in these areas, with a retention 
rate of over 85%, advancement rate of over 80%, 
graduation rate of over 80%, a licensing rate of over 
90%, and a job placement rate of 100%.
Employer Feedback on Curricula
An important component of contextualizing curricula 
is to have approval from the industry. Even if the 
curriculum is developed by a sector or industry 
practitioner, it should be reviewed by a group of 
employers in the sector for recommendations and 
feedback. Each program should create an industry 
advisory council. These are the best vehicle for 
employer feedback and advice on the basic  
and technical skills, credentials, and attitudes and 
behaviors students need to acquire to become 
employed in the industry. A contextualized 
curriculum cannot be effective without significant  
input from the industry.
Instructor Qualities
A successful contextualized bridge program must be 
taught by a nontraditional instructor who believes in 
and is able to use the many techniques described  
here. Characteristics of the nontraditional instructor  
are contrasted with those of the traditional instructor  
in Figure 15. 
Figure 15: Traditional vs. Nontraditional instructor
 
周e teacher believes each student owns enough  
life experience to contribute to the learning  
process of the students in the class
 
周e teacher asks advice from students based on  
the students’ experiences
 
周e teacher is always open to questions
 
The teacher prepares classes using everyday 
situations, rather than simply following  
a textbook
 
周e teacher uses real life and work-related 
materials in class assessments
 
周e teacher uses project-based and problem-based 
evaluation methods
 
周e teacher shares control, is adaptable and 
respectful, and provides leadership
NoNtrADItIoNAL INstruCtor
trADItIoNAL INstruCtor
 
周e teacher is always educated, the student 
becomes educated
 
周e teacher has the knowledge, the student does 
not have any knowledge
 
周e teacher is the thinker, the subject of the 
process, the student is the thinking object
 
周e teacher has the voice, the student listens
 
周e teacher disciplines, the student gets disciplined
 
周e teacher decides and prescribes the options, the 
student follows the prescription
 
周e teacher is the one who acts, the student has the 
illusion of acting by seeing the teacher
 
周e teacher selects the content for the curriculum, 
the student must adapt
 
周e teacher identifies the authority of the 
knowledge with his functional authority, 
the student must adapt to all decisions and 
determination of the teacher
 
周e teacher is the subject of the process, the 
student only the object of the process
Source: Paulo Freire, 1974
36 
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
Instructor Development 
It is difficult to find nontraditional instructors with 
experience in applying the contextualized model 
as describe here, therefore instructor development 
is critical to program success. Instructors new to the 
contextualized model should be able to implement 
it, mastering the learning paradigms, the different 
assessment tools, the level of context, and the use 
of technology. It is also important that the instructor 
become familiar and stay current with the industry, 
watching for new trends that might affect the 
curriculum. Contextualizing a curriculum, as in  
Carreras en Salud, demands that the instructor 
constantly add new materials and activities to the 
lesson plans in response to the demands of the  
students and the industry. Professional development 
activities also help instructors understand the 
requirements of the certifications and licensing  
exams and the competencies needed to pass them.
In Carreras en Salud, the majority of instructors 
were new, with little teaching experience but great 
potential, open minds, and flexibility in trying new 
concepts in adult education. Ongoing professional 
development and frequent meetings on the application 
and evaluation of the contextualized program 
promoted instructor effectiveness, as indicated by  
the advancement, retention, and completion of  
students in the program.
Instructional Meetings
Bridge program curriculum changes as the industry 
changes, so it is important that bridge instructors 
meet frequently to exchange information related to 
new developments in the sector or industry. These 
developments can be new equipment, new technical 
skills needed, new regulations, or new requirements  
for licensing and certifications. The contextualized 
bridge curriculum needs to be flexible enough to be 
able to incorporate this new material into the lesson 
plans as needed. It is also important for instructors 
to meet to discuss student progress and the need for 
improvements in the teaching paradigms, materials, 
and other class elements. In Carreras en Salud, 
instructors meet monthly.
A Step-by-Step Guide Based on the Carreras en Salud Program in Chicago 
37
How to Develop Bridge Program Logistics
Student Recruitment
The characteristics of nontraditional adult learners 
and the limited time they have available for activities 
outside of their work and family responsibilities make 
this population difficult to reach. Bridge programs must 
go beyond traditional educational marketing tools to 
recruit students. Carreras en Salud has been effective 
promoting its programs within the adult immigrant 
Latino community, using multiple strategies described 
below. These strategies are applicable to a wide 
variety of bridge programs from different sectors.
Internal recruitment
Instituto offers an adult education program for ESL 
learners at the literacy level. The first entry point in 
Carreras en Salud requires students to be at the fifth 
or sixth academic grade level and at the literacy ESL 
level to enter, so students completing the ESL program 
become excellent candidates for the program. These 
students hear about the program in their ESL class 
and are invited at completion to take the TABE test 
required to enter the program. Students interested in 
the program who meet the entrance requirements are 
encouraged to register and continue their ESL classes 
within the healthcare context.
Instituto’s Center for Working Families (CWF) is 
responsible for all student and participant intake and 
offers services in three main areas: financial coaching, 
applications for income supports and public benefits, 
and employment. A large percentage of CWF clients 
who are seeking employment lack the skills needed by 
employers, so the CWF employment coach advises 
them to enter a training program offered at Instituto 
or by other providers. Those applicants interested in 
healthcare are referred to Carreras en Salud.
External recruitment
Adult learners, especially immigrants, are hard to 
reach through traditional channels of communication. 
They do not have the means to read newspapers 
and magazines, and flyers distributed in their living 
or working areas are not very effective for recruiting. 
Carreras en Salud uses three main outlets to reach this 
community: religious institutions, local ethnic festivals, 
and ethnic television.
In reaching out through religious institutions, Carreras 
en Salud contacts the priest or minister of the local 
churches and asks them for five minutes to present 
at the end of the services. The religious leader will 
introduce the academic counselor, giving credibility 
to the program. The announcements are general, but 
emphasize program benefits and how it differs from 
other education or training programs. The message 
ends by inviting parishioners to a more detailed 
information session at a specific day, time, and 
location, and to meet with the advisors who are  
also at the church that day for one-on-one information 
about the program. This strategy is especially  
important because it enables Carreras to reach  
many people at once in a situation that gives the 
program credibility. In just one Sunday, for example, 
the program can reach over 3,000 people (six 
services of 500 parishioners each).
Local ethnic festivals offer the opportunity to inform 
a large number of people about the program at one 
time. Nonprofits can usually set up an information  
table free of charge. Bringing marketing materials  
and success stories of graduates who continue to  
do well, wearing their professional nurse’s uniform,  
will attract people to the table. The strategy at  
these events is to invite the interested people to  
an information session at a specific day, time,  
and location. 
Another channel to communicate the program and to 
promote the information sessions is ethnic television 
announcements. They will be even more effective if a 
story is aired about the program and its successes. 
38 
How to Build Bridge Programs that Fit into a Career Pathway
Information Sessions
Information sessions are held in the community, 
at the Instituto site. They cover multiple topics, 
including background, the career pathway, entrance 
requirements, and placement opportunities.
In the background presentation, prospective students 
learn how the program was created and its purpose, 
with special emphasis on the sustainability and 
continuity of the program, reassuring prospective 
students that the program is secure. They hear statistics 
demonstrating the need for bilingual (English/Spanish) 
nurses in the metropolitan area and about opportunities 
to get good jobs in healthcare.
Prospective students watch a PowerPoint presentation 
on the Carreras en Salud career pathway. It includes 
a flowchart showing the different bridges and modules 
of the career pathway that clearly demonstrates how 
the bridges connect with each other, the requirements 
to enter and exit each bridge, the technical skills and 
competencies required to become employed at each 
point of the career ladder and its compensation by 
function, and the time required to become a LPN 
and RN, depending on the level of the student when 
entering the program. 
Prospective students learn how to qualify and apply 
to the program, what documents they need to submit 
to the academic advisor, and what documents are 
needed for financial aid. Students are invited to 
schedule an appointment to take the placement test 
and to see a counselor at the CWF.
An important part of orientation is the discussion on job 
placement, as potential students are most motivated 
by their need to gain better employment. Any effective 
program must end with a job for each graduate, and 
Carreras en Salud has a 100% placement rate, in 
part due to the shortage of nurses nationwide, but also 
because Carreras en Salud is one of the few programs 
in the region graduating bilingual/bicultural nurses. 
The majority of the Carreras en Salud students receive 
offers from hospitals and nursing homes a semester 
before they even complete the class load. During the 
orientation session, the students learn of the industry 
trends in hiring program graduates.
Scheduling Classes for Nontraditional Students
Contact Hours
In traditional adult education and basic skill courses, 
students meet four days a week for two hours a day, 
and in some courses two days a week for two hours a 
day. Administrators of adult education programs with 
those schedules believe that adult students do not have 
time for more than eight hours of classroom learning 
per week, and rely heavily on homework assignments 
to cover all the materials required by the curriculum. 
However, adult learners with the characteristics 
described in this manual do not have time for extensive 
homework assignments, so they need more time in 
class and little or no homework.
A study by Carreras administrators determined that 
to teach the three basic skills — math, language, 
and computers — the students need to be in class a 
minimum of 256 hours per term. Therefore, in the  
pre-college bridge programs, students meet four days  
a week for four hours a day for a total of 16 weeks  
for a total 256 hours per term. Carreras en Salud 
students advance a minimum of two grade levels 
in math and language per term, and become 
computer literate in one term, versus the one level of 
advancement in a traditional adult education program. 
Carreras has found this heavy reliance on class time 
(versus homework) to be quite successful.
Class Frequency and schedule
Classes should be scheduled at a time of day when 
nontraditional, usually working, students are available. 
They should be at a location most appropriate for  
the students. Responding to the availability of students 
and because most of them are working, Carreras en 
Salud classes meet from 5:30 to 9:30 pm weekdays 
and on weekends, which works especially well  
for students who are on variable work schedules. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested