asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# vb.net : Change file size of pdf software SDK project winforms windows wpf UWP INTECHwp090-part545

Technology, Firm Size
and Export Behaviour
in Developing Countries:
The Case of Indian Enterprises
By Nagesh Kumar and N.S. Siddharthan
UNU/INTECH Working Paper No. 9
September 1993
Change file size of pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in pdf comment box; adjusting page size in pdf
Change file size of pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size on pdf text box; change paper size in pdf document
CONTENTS
1. Introduction
1
2. Technology and Exports
3
2.1
The Literature
3
2.2
Technology and Trade Behaviour in Developing Countries
4
3. Hypotheses
7
3.1
Technology
7
3.2
Firm Size
7
3.3
Advertising and Promotion
8
3.4
Capital Intensity
8
3.5
MNE Association
8
3.6
Policy Factors
9
4. Empirical Analysis
11
4.1
Sample, Data and Period
11
4.2
Empirical Findings
12
5.
Concluding Remarks
15
Endnotes
17
Annex
19
References
25
iii
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Split PDF file by output file size.
can a pdf be compressed; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split Split PDF File by Output File Size Demo Code in VB.NET. This
pdf text box font size; reader pdf reduce file size
iv
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
2) Dim FormSizeY As Integer = (Me.Size.Height / 2 Height * zoomFactor))) End Sub ' Save The File Private Sub sfd.FileName) End If End Sub ' Change Zoom Level
acrobat compress pdf; can pdf files be compressed
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online in ASP.NET. Ability to change text size in PDF text box.
change font size pdf comment box; pdf form change font size
1. INTRODUCTION
A growing body of literature has addressed itself to an analysis of export performance of
enterprises in industrialised and developing countries. The neo-factor endowment and
neo-technology theories of international trade have generally provided the theoretical
framework for most of these studies. As the predictions emanating from these theories
are about industry characteristics, most of the studies have been made in an inter-industry
context. A great variation in export performance across firms within an industry suggests
that firm characteristics also play an important role in explaining it. The studies analyzing
export performance using firm level observations have generally focused on an exami-
nation of the role of firm-size variable.  Little attention has been paid to the examination
of the potential role played by different aspects of firm behaviour including technological
activities. 
This paper analyzes the interfirm variation in export behaviour in 13 Indian manufactur-
ing industries using panel data for 640 firms for the period 1987/88 to 1989/90. The tenets
of neo-technology theories are adapted for explaining the trade behaviour of developing
country enterprises. It is argued that the technology factor could be important for
explaining the export performance of Indian enterprises in the case of low and medium
technology industries. This contention is then put to empirical verification. The analysis
is conducted in the framework of Tobit models in view of the fact that a large number of
Indian enterprises do not export and hence the dependent variable has a zero value in
many cases. It examines in particular the role of firm size, in-house innovation and
technology imports,  relative advertising and capital intensity of operations, controlling
affiliation with multinational enterprises (MNEs), and export incentives and concessions
offered by the Indian government.
1
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change font size pdf text box; best compression pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Ability to change text font, color, size and location and page, we will demonstrate how to use C#.NET class code to add and insert text to PDF file page.
pdf compress; pdf font size change
2
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
no change for image size. Able to adjust and customize image resolution to meet various C# PDF conversion requirements. Conversion from other files to PDF file
change font size in fillable pdf form; pdf markup text size
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Jpeg
C# class code to convert Dicom image to Tiff image file. are suggested to keep the actual size for conversion will tell C# programmers how to change and convert
best pdf compressor online; pdf files optimized
2. TECHNOLOGY AND EXPORTS
2.1 The Literature
The recent theoretical and empirical literature on international trade has emphasised the
contribution of technology and skills to countries’ relative competitiveness. The neo-
technology theory, in particular, highlights the role of technology gap in determining a
country’s international trade pattern [Posner 1961; Vernon 1966; Hufbauer 1966; Krug-
man 1979]. Among the empirical studies, Gruber, Mehta and Vernon [1967] have found
the ’technology factor’ to be important in explaining international trade and have
observed that U.S. industries associated with a relatively high ’research effort’ also tend
to export a relatively high proportion of their output. Caves et al. [1980] found net exports
of Canadian industries to be significantly related to the industry’s R&D intensity.  Soete
[1981, 1987] in his studies of 40 industries found OECD countries’ export performance
to be a function of their share of patents. Sveikauskus [1983] found technology to be a
more important factor in explaining U.S. competitiveness than skill and capital intensity.
Hughes [1986] found the export intensity of U.K. industries to be significantly related to
their R&D and skill intensities and inversely with average R&D intensity of industry in
U.S., France, Germany and Japan.  In the same study, the export intensity of German
industries was also found to be related to their R&D intensity. In a more recent study
probing the role of technology, van Hulst, Mulder and Soete [1991] found the patterns
of export specialisation to be quite similar to those of technological specialisation in the
case of Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands. Cotsomitis et al.[1991] using a technology
stock variable and time series data, however, found technology gap theory unable to
predict the direction of high technology trade. Verspagen and Wakelin [1993] in a recent
study of 22 sectors in 9 OECD countries  found technology (either R&D or patents) and
labour costs to be important influences on trade. Siddharthan and Kumar [1990] found
R&D intensity to be an important variable in explaining the inter-industry pattern of
intra-firm trade of U.S. MNEs.
Few studies have examined the role of technology in developing countries’ trade.
Dasgupta and Siddharthan [1985] have found that Indian exports consist largely of
standardised goods with a low skill and technological content. In a study explaining
export performance of 100 engineering and 45 chemical firms, Lall [1986] found R&D
expenditure (and not its intensity) to be significant with a negative sign in the case of
engineering firms but with a positive sign in the case of chemical firms. Royalty payments
proxying the extent of technology imports and skill intensity had an insignificant
coefficient throughout. Kumar [1990, chap.6] in a study of 43 Indian industries found the
technology variable (capturing intensity of R&D and technology imports) to be not
significant in explaining export performance. Willmore [1992] in a study of 3764
exporters and 2826 importers in Brazil found the existence of R&D to be significant in
explaining neither the probability of export nor the export performance of exporters. The
3
average wage employed as a proxy of skill intensity turned out with a negative sign but
not significantly different from zero in explaining the probability of export but was
significant with the same sign in explaining export performance of exporters.
2.2 Technology and Trade Behaviour in Developing Countries
The empirical literature reviewed above generally confirms the importance of technology
in explaining the trade performance of industrialised countries.  In the case of developing
countries, however, the neo-technology models have had a limited success in explaining
export performance. The limitation of neo-technology models in explaining trade of
developing countries is now widely recognised. This is because early versions of these
models were constructed with the purpose of explaining trade among countries at a similar
development level [Goglio, 1993]. Krugman [1979] in his version of the technology gap
model brought in the possibility of technology diffusion to explain the North - South
trade. New technology is primarily created in the North but soon gets diffused to the
South. The gap between creation and diffusion creates the possibility of trade. Therefore,
this model assumes the existence of certain imitative, adaptive or absorptive capability
in the South to allow for diffusion of technological innovations. There is, however, a great
variation across the developing countries in terms of local technological capability for
imitation, adaptation or absorption. Even within a developing country, industry firms
generally differ vastly in terms of extent of technological capability. Hence, it may not
be possible to deduce a relationship at the industry level.
Developing countries are likely to be in an apparently disadvantageous position in the
export of high technology or knowledge intensive goods. The bulk of the R&D activity
in most developing countries with the exception of newly industrialising economies such
as South Korea, is adaptive rather than creative in nature. In high technology industries,
the competitive advantage is determined by product innovations which are not the focus
of technological activity of developing country enterprises. The product life cycles in
these industries are usually short making it difficult to achieve a competitive advantage
on the basis of imitation. By the time such product technology diffuses to developing
countries it may already be outdated. 
The entry of developing country enterprises into international markets for high technol-
ogy goods is also deterred by other barriers such as vertical integration and geographical
diversification. Manufacture of high technology goods contains a significant element of
proprietary and firm specific knowledge (hence these are referred to as S-products by
Aharoni and Hirsch, 1993). Marketing of many such products is also associated by a
range of highly specialised services such as instruction, installation, repairs etc. which
depend on proprietary knowledge originating with the manufacturer of the goods. The
firm specific nature of the knowledge involved in the product, process and associated
services make unbundling difficult. Hence, these industries are dominated by vertically
integrated firms that undertake R&D, manufacturing, distribution and servicing in-house
or through associated organizations [Aharoni and Hirsch, 1993]. The importance of
vertical integration thus acts as an entry barrier in these industries.
Furthermore, exporters of high technology products generally have to organize to provide
product specific services such as instruction, installation, repairs, maintenance etc. in the
potential markets abroad. It could either be done through an unaffiliated licensee or
through an affiliate such as a subsidiary or a branch. If the services are provided through
4
unaffiliated licensees the transaction or governance costs are high because of the risk of
losing proprietary knowledge and need of supervision of quality standards [Dunning,
1993; Kumar 1990]. The transaction costs can be minimized if the services are provided
by own affiliates. Multinational enterprises, therefore, enjoy an inherent competitive
advantage in international markets for high technology goods because of their in-house
ability to provide associated services at geographically diverse locations and savings on
transactions costs.
To sum up the above discussion, developing country enterprises are unlikely to achieve
competitive advantage on the basis of their own technological activities in high technol-
ogy industries because of their inability to compete through product innovations, shorter
product life cycles, firm specific nature of the knowledge and hence significant economies
of vertical integration and geographical diversification. The industrialised country enter-
prises many of which are multinational in terms of coverage of their operations and
integrated vertically to handle all the tasks related to production and marketing of high
technology products reap these economies. The imitative capability that technology gap
models assume, therefore, is expected to provide a competitive edge to developing
country products only in low or medium technology industries. This contention is also
consistent with the product cycle theory of Vernon which predicts exports from devel-
oping countries to take place in maturing phases of a product’s life when competitive
advantage is determined more by factor costs rather than by innovation. That proposition
can be generalised to hold good for industries that have reached a relative maturity in
terms of technological opportunities viz. low and medium technology industries. 
5
6
3. HYPOTHESES
The export behaviour of an enterprise can be influenced by a number of other factors
besides technology. A growing volume of literature has debated the role of firm size in
determining export performance. In addition, other aspects of firm behaviour such as
advertising and promotion and capital intensity of operations, and affiliation with
international chains of companies are likely to influence export behaviour. The export
performance of enterprises is also likely to be determined by government policy factors
such as incentives in the form of export linked imports etc., tax concessions and export
obligations. The factors potentially influencing the export behaviour of Indian enterprises
considered in this study are identified below along with predictions.
3.1 Technology
As discussed above, technology factor is expected to be important in explaining inter-firm
variation in export behaviour in the case of developing countries such as India in low and
medium technology industries only. Technology factor will be captured with the help of
two variables viz. in-house R&D activity : RDS, and skill intensity of operations: SKIL,
as a proxy of potential of informal R&D. Indian firms widely resort to importing to fulfil
their technology requirements.  Hence, a measure of import of technology: TECHIM will
be included to examine its role in strengthening export competitiveness
1
.
3.2 Firm Size
The export marketing literature has treated firm-size as a proxy of firm resources that are
considered important for venturing in the international markets. The industrial organisa-
tion literature has posited a positive role of firm size in view of economies of scale in
production and marketing. The empirical findings on the relationship, however, have been
mixed [Bonaccorsi 1992, for a recent survey]. Lall [1986] found firm size to be significant
with a positive sign in case of engineering firms but insignificant for chemical firms.
Patibandla [1988] in the case of Indian engineering industry, and Bonaccorsi [1992] in
the case of Italian industry found small and medium firms to be quite active in exports.
Kumar [1990, chap. 6] found the firm size - export performance relationship to be
significant with a positive sign in the case of foreign controlled firms but insignificant in
the case of local firms in Indian manufacturing industries. Willmore [1992] in his
Brazilian study found firm size and its quadratic term to be significant with positive and
negative signs respectively in explaining the probability of exporting and an opposite
result while explaining export performance of exporters.
The mixed findings about firm size - export behaviour relationship for Indian enterprises
could possibly  be due to non-linearity. Exporting may be beyond the capacity of too
small enterprises. On the other hand very large oligopolistic enterprises enjoying captive
7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested