asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# vb.net : Reader compress pdf Library software component .net winforms web page mvc intectbfrep0-part548

INNOVATIVE TIMBER ENGINEERING
FOR THE COUNTRYSIDE - InTeC
Timber Bridges and
Foundations
Reader compress pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size pdf form; change pdf page size
Reader compress pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best online pdf compressor; acrobat compress pdf
Timber Bridges and Foundations
A report produced for the Forestry Commission
PREPARED BY:
G Freedman - FCE (InTeC chairman)
C Mettem, P Larsen, S Edwards - TRADA Technology
T Reynolds, V Enjily - BRE
November 2002
BRE Ltd, Bucknalls Lane, Garston, Watford, WD2 7JR
01923 664000
TRADA Technology Ltd, Stocking Lane,  Hughenden Valley, High Wycombe, HP14 4ND
01494 563091
Forestry Civil Engineering, Greenside, Peebles, EH45 8JA
01721 720 448
© Building Research Establishment Ltd 2002
© TRADA Technology Ltd 2002
©  Forestry Civil Engineering 2002
Front Cover Picture - Footbridge at Garpenburg, Sweden, with timber caisson foundations (photo BRE)
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
VB.NET: Convert PDF to Jpeg; VB.NET File: Compress PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for
pdf edit text size; change font size on pdf text box
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
can a pdf file be compressed; advanced pdf compressor online
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Bridges are one of the highest forms of civil engineering - few other structures
command the same combination of functionality and visual impact. In the United
Kingdom bridge building in timber has been very limited. This is in marked contrast to
the initiatives which have taken place in North America (USDA Forest Service Timber
Bridge Initiative), Canada, and Northern Europe (Nordic Timber Bridge Programme).
World-wide, the use of timber for bridges is experiencing a major revival. In most
industrialised countries other than the UK, timber is widely and increasingly being
used, for vehicular, as well as for pedestrian bridges. The strength, lightness in
weight, energy absorption and environmental features of timber make it highly
desirable for bridge construction.
Although there is an established history, and a continued use, of timber for bridges in
the United Kingdom applications tend to be limited both in span and capacity, than is
merited by the virtues of this aesthetic, sustainable material. Experience elsewhere in
the world is showing that with correct design, timber is also a durable material for
vehicle carrying bridge structures and, additionally, piled foundations. Nevertheless,
this aspect remains a significant query in the minds of many mainstream designers,
both engineers and architects, who advise UK clients. Revitalised timber bridge
activities elsewhere are impressing UK specialists. Nevertheless, there is a great
need to disseminate awareness and knowledge to mainstream designers,
commissioners of projects and the public. At present, timber bridge producers in the
UK are a small, niche sector of the UK timber industry, and some firms are really only
representatives of producers that are adding the main value elsewhere in Europe.
Timber engineers have the expertise to provide aesthetically exciting, well-protected,
and durable bridge structures. To achieve impact, economic drivers must be
harnessed, to unlock consumer and specifier indifference. Key motivators include:
· National cycle routes
· City regeneration, calling for aesthetically exciting, well-performing links.
· Canal and rail regeneration
· Marina and dockside development
· Housing developments, with associated bridging needs.
· Forest roads and infrastructure maintenance in remote regions.
· Linking to value-added forest products.
The use of sustainably grown and locally produced timber for bridge, foundation and
sea defence engineering will increasingly be seen as favourable. In addition there are
concerns and moves in Europe away from the use of timber treatments such as
creosote and Copper Chrome Arsenic. Applied research and development,
demonstration projects, and benchmarking involving the use of domestic grown
timber are seen as vital. Above all, however, well-informed promotion is recognised
as of paramount importance in unlocking demand for timber bridges as flagship
projects in sustainable development, environmental protection, and improvements to
the quality of life.
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
On this page, besides brief introduction to RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document viewer & reader for Windows Forms application, you can also see the following aspects
best way to compress pdf files; best pdf compression tool
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK - PDF Reader. Flexible PDF Reading and Decoding Technology Available for .NET Framework.
change font size pdf document; pdf change font size in textbox
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
1.0
INTRODUCTION AND PROJECT BACKGROUND
1
2.0       THE HISTORY OF TIMBER BRIDGES 
5
2.1
Bridges in ancient history
5
2.2 
Mediaeval bridges 
6
2.3
The Renaissance and the growth of trade
6
2.4
Long spans - the triumphs of bridge carpentry
7
2.5
The dawning of industrialisation
8
2.6
Laminated timber - from mechanical to reliable adhesive technology
8
2.7
The railway era
9
2.8
Protective design lessons from history
11
2.9 
Maintenance of historic timber bridges in Britain
11
2.10
New materials
12
3.0
THE OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT OF TIMBER BRIDGES
13
3.1 
Relevant history
14
3.2
The way forward to make use of international research
18
4.0
CURRENT UK POSITION
20
5.0
CATEGORIES OF TIMBER BRIDGES
24
5.1
Categories of use
24
5.2
Locations
24
6.0
STRUCTURAL FORMS
26
6.1
General
26
6.2
Beams, including bowed types, no arch action
29
6.3
Arches
29
6.4
Girder beams & trusses
29
6.5
Lift & swing bridges
29
6.6
Further design fundamentals
29
7.0
MATERIALS
31
7.1
Principal elements
31
7.2
Decks & decking – UK current practice
36
7.3
Parapets & handrails
37
7.4
Connections
38
8
DURABILITY
40
8.1
Detailing
40
8.2
Natural durability
42
8.3 
Preservative treatments
44
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
pdf compression; best way to compress pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
VB.NET: Convert PDF to Jpeg; VB.NET File: Compress PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for
batch pdf compression; pdf file size limit
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
9.0
TIMBER FOUNDATIONS
47
9.1
History and overseas Use
47
9.2 
Durability of timber piles
48
9.3
Traditional timber species and treatments
49
9.4
Marine structures
49
9.5
Pile driving and design
50
9.6
Other geotechnical uses for timber
52
10.0
BRIDGE DESIGN PRACTICE
55
10.1
General practice for design of bridges in the UK
55
10.2
Deflection limits
60
10.3
Eurocode 5
60
10.4
Overseas practice - Decks:
61
11.0  FUTURE CHALLENGES
65
11.1
High efficiency composite materials
65
11.2
New adhesive bonding technologies
65
11.3
Steel reinforced timber
66
11.4
Timber concrete composites
66
11.5
Deck protection systems
66
12.0
PRIORITY WORK AREAS
67
12.1
Innovative Timber Engineering for the Countryside
67
12.2
prEN Eurocode 5, Part 2
67
13.0
CONCLUSIONS
68
REFERENCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
69
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET: Convert PDF to Jpeg; VB.NET File: Compress PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; batch reduce pdf file size
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET: Convert PDF to Jpeg; VB.NET File: Compress PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for
change font size in pdf form; change font size pdf text box
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
1
1.0  INTRODUCTION
Bridges are one of the highest forms of civil engineering - few other structures
command the same combination of functionality and visual impact. In the United
Kingdom bridge building in timber has been very limited. This is in marked contrast to
the initiatives which have taken place in North America (USDA Forest Service Timber
Bridge Initiative), Canada, and Northern Europe (Nordic Timber Bridge Programme).
World-wide, the use of timber for bridges is experiencing a major revival. In most
industrialised countries other than the UK, timber is widely and increasingly being
used, for vehicular, as well as for pedestrian bridges. The strength, lightness in
weight, energy absorption and environmental features of timber make it highly
desirable for bridge construction.
Although there is an established history, and a continued use, of timber for bridges in
the United Kingdom applications tend to be quite limited - although some very fine
short span timber footbridges are constructed. Experience elsewhere in the world is
showing that with correct design, timber is also a capable material for vehicle carrying
bridge structures and, additionally, piled foundations. Nevertheless, this aspect
remains a significant query in the minds of many mainstream designers, both
engineers and architects, who advise UK clients. Revitalised timber bridge activities
elsewhere are impressing UK specialists. Nevertheless, there is a great need to
disseminate awareness and knowledge to mainstream designers, commissioners of
projects and the public. At present, timber bridge producers in the UK are a small,
niche sector of the UK timber industry, and some firms are really only representatives
of producers that are adding the main value elsewhere in Europe.
To illustrate the extent of use elsewhere, the United States Department of Agriculture
reports that approximately 41,700 road bridges of over 6 m span are made of timber,
and improvements are continually being introduced, through the federal Highway
Administration Timber Bridge Programme. Also in North America, a number of
significant modern timber bridge innovations were first introduced in Canada, in the
1970’s. These included the stressed laminated deck, details of which were added to
the Ontario Bridge Code at that time. Since then, use of the material has continued,
and the technologies have further improved, with several additional innovations such
as new types of structural deck, and prefabrication systems. North American
experience has been that in situations where salts and other de-icing chemicals are
extensively applied, modern timber bridges are more durable than concrete
structures.
In Finland, about 700 timber bridges are owned by the Finnish Road Administration,
and along with other Nordic countries, (Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden), a
development programme has been in progress since 1994, to extend relevant
techniques and experience. Due to the investments into research activities applied to
timber bridges in the Nordic Region, and the increase of the general interest in the
use of natural materials, timber bridges have become again a real alternative in bridge
engineering (Figure 1). In continental Europe, particularly but not exclusively the alpine
regions, impressive modern bridge structures are also to be seen, and major
contributions have been made to developing harmonised codes and guidance
documents, spearheaded by the new bridges Eurocode itself.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
2
Figure 1: Modern timber road bridge - Evenstad, Norway; 5 spans of bowstring
trusses; 180m total length; creosote treated pine glulam; internally flitched steel
gusset plates, attached with stainless steel dowels. 
(photo CM/Trada)
The advantages of timber for bridges is also recognised by quite a large number of
emerging countries, such as the West African territories, notably Ghana; countries in
Central and South America, as well as a number of Asian regions. In developing
countries, the revival of interest in timber bridges in the fully industrialised zones of the
world encourages a futuristic view, rather than a “poor material” attitude. For those
with rapidly growing populations, this is eminently appropriate, not only from an
environmental viewpoint, but also in order to be able to avoid expensive imported
technologies and materials.
Bridge clients, engineers and architects are beginning to become aware once more
that bridges using this traditional material can be designed, fabricated and constructed
in exciting new ways, as well as being created in forms sensitive to past traditions.
Developments such as new, efficient connection techniques, and the introduction of
modern wood-based composites which can be preservatively treated in
environmentally acceptable ways, are further encouraging innovations.
To re-establish timber bridges in the UK, a great deal needs to be done, especially in
terms of “Knowledge Re-Packaging” and technical dissemination. Architecturally
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
3
pleasing solutions need to be backed up by the ability and confidence to provide good
protective design measures and to overcome prejudices about lack of longevity.
Modern timber bridges need to be seen as more than just a routine, and possibly
poorer alternative to concrete or steel bridges. Timber is a renewable construction
material with impeccable "green" credentials. Trees, while they grow, absorb carbon
dioxide and release oxygen. 1 cubic metre of dry softwood represents around 611kg
of carbon dioxide that has been removed from the atmosphere. In addition, forests
also provide areas for wildlife and recreation. Timber is light to transport, easy to
handle and work with on site, and has a natural empathy with the landscape.
To ensure a viable future timber supply chain for engineered, exterior structures,
including bridges, the industry needs to grow both the high-profile, spectacular
projects, and also the bread-and-butter access structures and smaller bridges that are
of great amenity and community value. Producers and advocates of timber bridges
also need to establish, sustain and grow their abilities to meet exacting performance
requirements, in terms of safety, serviceability, and design life, as well as providing
client satisfaction through elegance, tactility, warmth and craftsmanship. Contractors,
looking for rapid delivery, and even faster erection, seek standard solutions. The
importance of minimising road or track closures is paramount, and competing
answers, especially steel footbridges, are fully geared up to these demands.
Softwood timber production in the UK has doubled in the last 10 years and is about to
double again in the next 10 years but pulp, paper and board markets are so saturated
that new markets need to be developed. The structural market is poorly penetrated by
home grown products and timber is the UK’s second biggest import. The focus of this
research is to utilise poorer quality home grown timber for the high quality structural
market. The timber-housing sector is growing steadily but needs a boost and any
structural developments will be welcome. Rural structures e.g. bridges, towers and
crash barriers are high profile uses will help move timber into the public eye and act
as a catalyst for other developments. Research is essential to support these uses in
the UK.
To compound an already serious situation the value of the raw material has dropped
dramatically over the last 5 years and this has led to a drop in harvesting and a
general weakness in the industry at a time, ironically, when Forestry has been granted
‘Industry Cluster’ status in Scotland. This means that it is one of the country’s 5 ‘core
industries’ employing a large number of people and as such, requires to flourish for
the sake of the economy. These factors point to the desperate need for the creation of
new initiatives, in the knowledge that they will be well supported by Government
agencies.
Innovative Timber Engineering for the Countryside:
Against this background Forestry Civil Engineering (FCE) of Forest Enterprise (FE)
and the two major players in timber research, Building Research Establishment
(BRE) and Timber Research and Development Association (TRADA), came together
to gather ideas. It was during initial meetings that agreement was quickly reached on
the focus being “Countryside and Highway” and that to utilise lower quality home
grown timber in high value added products “Engineering” would be required.
Innovative ideas for research projects were put forward and immediately some
common factors surfaced. Timber has some very desirable properties but it is
relatively low in stiffness compared with steel. In the interest of sustainability and
optimal utilisation of existing forest and woodland resources, there is a desire to
include the use of lower grade material. This led us to accept that composites with
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
4
steel, high quality timber or fibre reinforced polymer composites (FRPs) would be
required to develop a product in which timber could display its best value.
The objective of the InTeC project is to stimulate by research and demonstration the
use of timber for road bridges as well as pedestrian traffic, and the use of timber for
other related civil engineering including abutments, retaining walls and foundations.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
5
2.0 THE HISTORY OF TIMBER BRIDGES
2.1 Bridges in ancient history
Timber is a traditional bridge building material, with examples in authenticated records
dating to as long ago as 600 years BC. It is suspected that even before this, ancient
cultures, including those in China, Persia, the Asian subcontinent and around the
Mediterranean rim, had quite sophisticated timber bridge structures. Roman bridges
are recorded in works quite accessible today. Julius Caesar himself, for example,
records a large timber bridge in Italy, whilst Padillio (1518 – 1580) discusses another
big bridge which was used by the Romans to cross the Rhine into Germany. There is
also some evidence that the Roman bridge in London was by no means a crude or
simple structure (O'Connor, 1993).
One of the largest and best documented of the Roman timber bridges was built over
the Danube, in what is now Bulgaria, in 104 AD.  This is often known as
“Trajan’s
Bridge” (Figure 2), because its images are recorded on Trajan’s Column, now
standing in Rome. This bridge consisted of 20 piers up to 45m high, each joined by a
semi-circular timber arch of about 52m span. The thrusts in the triangulated
timberwork, correctly transmitted into the masonry piers according to modern
engineering concepts, seemed to be fully understood by the Roman engineers, who
constructed and rapidly erected this prodigious feat. Methods of timber conversion
and treatment for durability were also recorded in contemporary Latin texts.
Figure 2: An arch of Trajan's bridge, modelled by architectural historians,
Florence University.
(photo CM/Trada)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested