asp.net open pdf file in web browser using c# vb.net : Change paper size in pdf Library control class asp.net azure web page ajax intectbfrep2-part550

InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
16
USA and Canada:
Timber, which was readily available in enormous quantities, played a major role as a
construction material in the development of North America since the early pioneer
days. Indeed, it is estimated that by 1900 half of the total forest area of the continent
was felled. Timber trestles were used extensively to span gorges and rivers for the
transcontinental railways. Many century old covered road bridges are still in service
and are considered to be heritage items. With a main span of 64m, the Sioux
Narrows bridge, built in 1936 in Kenoria, Ontario, is one of the worlds longest single
span wood highway bridges (Figure 9)
Figure 9: Sioux Narrows Bridge - Howe trusses formed from solid sawn Douglas
fir 
(photo Canadian Wood Council)
Currently in the USA there are nearly 600,000 bridges, 7% of which are timber and a
further 7.3% have timber decks. Recent studies have shown that 240,000 of these
bridges are classified structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.  This critical state
of affairs prompted Congress into introducing the Timber Bridge Initiative (TBI) in 1989
and another similar programme which promotes demonstration bridges, research
and information transfer. Under the programme a 50% grant in available to build a
bridge which demonstrates modern technology.
Timber structures declined in number from 50 years ago when large trees became
scarce and concrete technology became reliable. However the modern materials,
concrete and steel, have not been without their problems and since the middle 70’s
much research effort has been undertaken to utilise smaller wood sections to build
large structures. It was in Canada in the 1970’s the real pioneering work was carried
out on the stress-laminated decks which has become important to the new bridge
initiative in the USA and could become a very useful concept in the UK.
Timber engineering and technology has benefited greatly through these programmes
and many hundreds of bridges have been built although much remains to be done.
Change paper size in pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in pdf fillable form; adjust size of pdf
Change paper size in pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf compression settings; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
17
There are so many avenues of help in the USA especially as these initiatives were
taken by government agencies but personal contacts will be crucial to ensure the
accelerated programme necessary in the UK, in order to catch up.
Australasia:
In Australia and New Zealand the increased production of plantation timber has
generated a modern timber engineering industry. The UK should have been
shadowing these recent impressive developments. Many are the same as those in
America and are necessary in the UK to catch up and create some high value
markets for our new increasing production. Although there are many initiatives in
transportation structures, there are also significant ideas in building, from which UK
practice could benefit.
Developing World:
There has been substantial experience involving the UK timber research
organisations, and TRL (see website http://www.trl.co.uk/bridges.htm), in the
overseas development uses of timber for bridges. These have been carried out
through assistance provided via organisations such as United Nations Industrial
Development Organization (reported in  Anon 1985) and the UK Department for
International Development (DFID, formerly ODA).
For example, prefabricated modular timber road bridges have been successfully
introduced into a significant number of developing countries on four continents. The
first of a series of standard designs for modular timber road bridges was prototyped in
Kenya, some thirty five years ago. Further development work continued in Central
America the Far East and elsewhere. This development included contributions of
local expertise, and associated professional training. Similar road bridges are still
being produced, in accordance with well-tried design manuals and drawings, using
local timbers and labour, to the great advantage of rural communities in more than
two dozen countries, in all of the tropical continents. Extensions to the original
designs, and substantially new types of standard design, have subsequently been
added.
Figure 10: UNIDO prefabricated bridge 
(photo UNIDO)
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. printing orientation, PDF document printing paper size and PDF document printing
pdf compressor; change font size pdf form reader
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD control; Capable of detecting word, font, line size, location; money in archiving, filing and paper storing
change pdf page size; 300 dpi pdf file size
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
18
It has been found that by giving ministry departments, and their associated
professionals, renewed confidence in timber in communally important, heavy-duty
applications such as these, there is spin-off resulting in an enormously improved
usage for smaller-scale applications. These are initiated and executed entirely by
communities themselves, on their own initiative. This is another important lesson that
the timber industry needs to take on board, here in our own country.
3.2 The Way Forward to Make use of International Research
When specific areas of research are identified and funding is in place for individual
projects, the initial literature search will be extended using references and contacts.
Research partnerships will be explored and when the missing knowledge is identified
work will begin. Much will be assimilation of past international work to accord with UK
timber species. There are a number of codes of practice in existence which will be of
use but climatic conditions, safety regimes, species differences etc will create many
transfer problems. The mission of InTeC is not just to carry out the research, solve
the problems and show that things can work but also to produce the codes and
guidance so that the ideas are taken up. This part of InTeC’s work will be time
consuming, but if the past successes of concrete and steel as construction materials
are to be emulated then the information circle must be closed. Young designers will
not adopt timber unless it is made easy, logical and sensible.
Some Specific International Ideas likely to be Transferred to the UK:
Stress laminated bridge decks are certain to become a useful solution for minor rural
bridges and they are a timely product of recent ability and need. Accurate sawing is
essential.  Safe bacteriological treatment is demanded and high tensile stressing of
steel tendons is the key to the structure. All of these are now available at low cost.
The technology level is not high and their production could become a cottage industry.
This idea has arrived at a time when UK softwood timber production is about to
double again for the second successive decade and funds for rural bridging are low.
Abutments for bridges and retaining walls have traditionally been constructed from
‘permanent materials’ like concrete and masonry but the question of  ‘life cycle’ needs
to be addressed. A public road bridge in the UK is designed for a 120 year life but
forestry bridges are designed for 50 years as that is the economic cycle of the
industry, being the growth time from plant to mature tree. We have, in the past,
expected buildings to last forever given enough maintenance, but supermarket
buildings are now financially appraised over 7 years, that being the predictable trading
projection limit. Perhaps it is time to look at structures with a shorter life, provided that
short life gives a unit cost per year less than the more permanent structure. A timber
bridge deck and abutments could be constructed for a 20 or 30 year life, require no
maintenance and be replaced within the unit annual cost of the ‘permanent structure’.
Appraisal of Timber Structures:
Overseas countries have realised that timber structures enhance the environment,
local economies, society, aesthetics etc. factors which must be introduced into any
appraisal. Energy values are used in appraisals, where the inputs to refine the
component materials and the energy to carry out the construction and demolition are
evaluated to calculate a whole life cost. Timber structures excel in all of the
components of appraisal. A local timber industry creates stable rural employment
which tourism can latch onto. Timber structures are popular with rural people and
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
19
their visitors. The western society accepts that timber structures in the countryside
make sense.
An international research check has proved that we are behind the rest of the
developed world in this area of applied engineering. This does, however, mean that
with careful planning and study of current research we can catch up quickly and then
concentrate our efforts on the most relevant areas. It means that much of our
research will be to assimilate ideas developed for other species. The most valuable
gain however will be in finding the ways to extend already good ideas. This is much
easier when a fresh mind takes up a partly developed piece of work. InTeC
researchers bring that quality and with the correct funding many exciting extensions of
existing work that could bring benefits to the UK. A programme similar the Timber
Bridge Initiative in the USA would be welcomed in the UK and could become the
cornerstone for future development while bringing forward the many bridge
replacements necessary in the UK.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
20
4.0 CURRENT UK POSITION
Unfortunately, the official bridge design scene, viewed from the position of the average
civil and structural consulting engineer in the United Kingdom, includes nothing to
encourage the use of timber. There is no British Standard dealing specifically with
design. The BS 5400 series only covers steel, concrete, and steel-concrete
composite bridges. This absence of a British Standard is thought to have inhibited the
specification of timber as the structural medium for many footbridges, as well as
having resulted in a number of designs whose performance has not been entirely
satisfactory. Although authorities such as Highways Agency (HA) have their own
standards, recognising timber in footbridges to a small degree, the absence of a main
code of practice and accompanying support standards, is a serious deterrent.
Awakening awareness by some influential specialists within authorities of the
development of new Eurocodes relating to bridges, is likely to provide better hope for
the future, provided that this is seized as an opportunity by the timber industry itself.
Timber interests in the UK were extremely impressed by the manner in which the US
National Timber Bridge Initiative was launched (USDA 1983), and by its subsequent
success. Their programme involves many demonstration timber bridges, together
with research and technology transfer. Starting from a relatively small financial basis,
it was difficult to see how anything comparable could possibly be started in the United
Kingdom.
However, there are now some positive signs. Work was carried out about seven
years ago, with support by DETR. This led to two preliminary study reports (Mettem
1993) and  (Mettem 1994). A pilot project, termed “Innovative Timber Engineering for
the Countryside”, has been initiated involving BRE, TRADA Technology, and Forestry
Civil Engineering, with support from the Forestry Commission, and this report relates
to this particular project. The second positive step is that active work has now been
started on an EN version of Eurocode 5: Design of Timber Structures Part 2: Bridges.
This is scheduled for issue for public comment in 2003, with the target of a final draft
for printing in 2004. The principal Eurocode 5 for timber structures, to which the
bridges part refers for all of its main technology, is ahead of this, and has already
been strongly promulgated and supported by design guidance, involving TRADA
Technology and its various industrial and research partners. BS DD ENV 1995-1-1
was issued in 1994 and is already used in practice mainly by more experienced
timber engineering designers. A BS EN version is expected to be published early in
2004, before which, training will be given to all practising designers and new students.
Current Requirements:
Current requirements for bridges are generally formulated independently of the
materials to be used. In general terms, bridge design has to fulfil certain main
requirements which can be related to timber and wood-based materials as follows:
Load Capacity & Vehicle Clearances:
Modern timber bridge designs for vehicular traffic are perfectly possible, and are in
fact already being designed and constructed in a number of countries and regions.
Appropriately designed timber and composite deck systems can provide for
increasing traffic loads.  Clearances, given in regulations, are taken into account
wherever necessary.  For road bridges, vehicle size obviously affects the design of
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
21
both the carriageway widths, and also, in the case of covered and arched bridges, the
overhead clearance.
Long Spans:
Earlier limitations of timber brought about by its availability only in the sawn form no
longer apply.  Glued laminated timber, structural timber composites - STCs (Mettem
1996) improved strength grading procedures, reliable connection techniques and the
use of other materials acting compositely in conjunction with timber, all help to make
long spans possible.
Roadway Surface Conditions:
Normally there is a requirement that there shall be no difference in the surface
conditions and levels between the bridge and the connecting road pavements. With
appropriate deck systems and sealed wearing surfaces, such requirements can be
fulfilled using timber structures.
Routing of the Bridge:
Modern bridges have to be integrated into the general route-planning scheme.
Consequently skew, cambered and curved deck bridges are often required. Such
forms are attainable with timber bridges.
Recent Developments in Timber Bridge Decks:
Timber & Concrete Composite Decks
Timber and concrete composite decks have existed in regions such as New Zealand
and North America for decades. Early systems comprised nailed laminated decking
with un-reinforced concrete and a thin asphalt surface. More recently, thicker
reinforced-concrete layers and shear connectors have been added, giving greater
composite action.  The effective width of the concrete flange is determined as for a
concrete T-Section.  All of the shear force transmission between the two materials
takes place via special, strength-calculated connectors, and not by natural bonds.  No
tensile strength is recognised within the concrete layer.  Some design rules for this
form of construction are given in Eurocode 5 Part 1-1, the general design document,
whilst supplementary rules are contained within prEN Eurocode 5 Part 2, Bridges.
Developments in the composite timber/concrete deck continue, for example:
· More stable laminated timber decking, using post-tensioning systems.
· More efficient shear connecting systems between concrete and timber, to achieve
more reliable composite action during the service life of the deck.
· 
Better systems to seal the concrete surface, and to provide protective and hard
wearing road surfaces.
Laminated timber deck plates are made of individual laminations which are held
together by nailing or adhesive bonding.  In the case of pre-stressed plates,
discussed below, there is in addition a permanent lateral pressure, which guarantees
continued friction between the faces of the laminations, and according to the type of
construction, between any un-bonded adjacent faces which may exist between the
individual slabs.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
22
P
re-Stressed Timber Decks
Pre-stressing in a timber bridge deck is defined as a permanent effect due to
controlled forces and/or deformations imposed upon the structure.  The plates are
normally pre-stressed by means of steel bars or tendons.  Pre-stressed decks in
timber bridges first appeared in Canada, where they were introduced as a repair
method for nailed timber-laminated decks.  The correct choice of materials and
specification of moisture contents overcame early problems with loss in pre-stressing
force due to timber shrinkage.
These forms of deck are now very common in North America, and their use has been
spreading to other regions where modern timber bridge developments are occurring.
These include Australia, and Finland, Norway and Sweden.  The additional step of
using glued laminated timber rather than solid sawn timber for the decks was
probably taken first in Switzerland.  Recently in Australia and Scandinavia, progress
has been made in utilising other modern STCs such as Laminated Veneer Lumber
(LVL), for which reliable pressure preservative treatment processes have now been
developed.  Glued laminated timber and STCs are always supplied at low, factory-
conditioned moisture contents, and with these, early problems in loss of pre-stressing
have been completely overcome. Decks with no re-stressing requirements are being
achieved by following design recommendations such as those given in prEN
Eurocode 5 Part 2, Bridges.  Pre-stressing bars are also now sometimes bonded in,
resulting in a high degree of corrosion resistance and good load carrying capacity.
Dowel-Type Fasteners & Mechanically Laminated Bridge Structures:
The term “dowel-type fastener” is used throughout the structural timber Eurocodes,
and in the latest edition of BS 5268 (BSI 2002), to refer to fasteners whose cross-
section is essentially of a cylindrically prismatic form, and whose function is to
transmit forces in lateral shear between adjacent layers of the timber.  In the context
of current codes, such fasteners essentially consist of steels of adequate and defined
strength, although research is now in progress on the use of non-metallic, and in
particular Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP) dowels.  Bolts, lag screws and plain steel
rods acting in transverse shear are all examples of dowel-type fasteners that are
commonly employed in bridge design.
Over the past twenty-five years, timber engineering researchers have extensively
explored the design theories associated with these types of device, and the theories
are now well adapted to reflect real fastener behaviour in actual structures.
Essentially, the theories depend upon a knowledge of the behaviour of the fastener as
a rod-like device, which tends to embed itself elasto-plastically into the surrounding
timber.  The response of the latter is modelled as a yielding elastic foundation.  At the
same time, allowance is made for the tendency for the steel of the fastener itself to
yield plastically, and to form plastic hinges at various points, whose locations depend
upon the exact interface arrangements.
The development and use of such theories for the design of dowel-type fasteners,
along with methods enabling designers to predict changes in the effective section
modulus, due to slip between adjacent layers, has enabled the accurate design of
large and impressive modern mechanically laminated timber bridge designs.
Mechanically laminated timber bridges are designed
and constructed throughout
Europe, but are particularly prevalent in the UK, Netherlands and Germany.  Very
dense, durable tropical hardwood timbers are normally used for these designs, with
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
23
one particular timber , being found to be very successful. This is the hardwood named
“Ekki” in the UK, and “Azobé” in Continental Europe (the same species of timber in
either case, namely Lophira Alata).
5.0 CATEGORIES OF TIMBER BRIDGES
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
24
5.1 Categories of use
Three broad categories of use can be considered, as follows:
a) Highway and adopted road bridges.
b) Footbridges.
c) Footbridges with occasional vehicular access (e.g. farm, golf-course and parkland
bridges).
Category a) in timber is extremely rare in the UK, and in the main restricted to special
and historic structures. The present volumes of use in categories b) and c) are
modest, but growing, with opportunities for bridge and associated timber suppliers
and engineers, especially in the light of the positive factors mentioned in the
introduction. Even in category b) however, there are significant obstacles to the
procurement of timber, where influential authorities are involved. The Highways
Agency inventory for England, for example, contains only one timber pedestrian
crossing bridge over the roads for which they are responsible. It is the intention of the
present project to conduct more thorough market research, costing studies and
business potential investigations.
5.2 Locations
Generically, locations for footbridges and light vehicular bridges can be divided into
the following four types of crossing:
· Over roads – general access.
· Over rivers, canals and other water features.
· Associated with the leisure industry, various crossings, including the three types
above.
· Over railways– general access.
Bridges associated with alternative modes of transport, such as cycling, might
arguably be regarded as a separate category. However, provision of routes and
facilities for serious and mundane access to work, education, and other aspects of
daily life by such means can hardly be argued to have reached the stage to warrant
separation from the leisure category.
a) Road crossings
Many footbridges are used to provide safe pedestrian crossings. Timber is permitted,
as well as steel and concrete. However, the Highways Agency (formerly, through a
Department of Transport document, currently undergoing revision) points out the
following, in its Standard BD 29/87 (DoT/HMSO 1987):
"A footbridge is the least suitable form of crossing for disabled people and should only
be provided when other forms of crossing – e.g. a crossing at grade or a subway are
deemed to be unsuitable."
Timber has only a small share of this market. Furthermore, its share is probably even
smaller, as a result of some unfortunate instances of glulam bridges de-laminating
during the 1980’s. These were manufactured by firms that were not members of the
Glued Laminated Timber Association (GLTA). Lack of independent third party
manufacturing control and certification is recognised to have been part of the
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
25
problem. However, the failures achieved notoriety for the timber industry as a whole,
causing a major setback to information dissemination and promotional exercises.
b) Crossing rivers, canals and other water features
This is an important market, with timber footbridges, boardwalks and piers having a
sizeable portion of the total. Often the surroundings and environment are such as to
suggest the choice of timber as the most sympathetic material. Timber weathers
particularly well in marine environments compared with steel or reinforced concrete.
c) Associated with the leisure industry.
This is generally an expanding and promising market for timber bridges and other
landscape features. Example applications include golf courses, theme parks, visitor
centres, wildlife and animal sanctuaries and nature reserves.
d) Crossing railways
Timber has only a very small share of this market. Historically, the extensive facilities
for iron and steelwork available to railway builders tended to facilitate the choice of
metal in the first instance. There are some modern examples of timber station
structures, and a few of timber footbridge crossings. Not all of the engineers
concerned are opposed to this material, but railway structural engineers have a
cautious approach, and need assistance to specify in performance terms, rather than
by prescription. Reorganisation of the administration of the national rail network has
also made it difficult, in recent years, to decide where best to focus impact.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested