asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : 300 dpi pdf file size Library software component asp.net winforms azure mvc intectbfrep4-part552

InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
36
Suitable information on generically classified STCs is shortly to be provided, in
intended European Standards (ENs). Examples of existing Technical Approvals that
address STCs such as Kerto are the British Board of Agreement Certificates.
Meanwhile, procedures are also being developed to establish European Harmonised
Technical Approvals that will address materials such as these.
e) Mechanically laminated timber (“mechlam”).
Mechanically laminated members are termed "mechlam" as a convenient
abbreviation in this review, although it should be clarified that this is not a universally
recognised term. Recently encountered has been an interesting example of a
mechanically laminated Greenheart bridge, which was built in Cheshire in 1915 and
which, having remained in good condition, has just been refurbished.
The modern manufacturing process, which was developed in Germany, and used
quite extensively there and in the Netherlands, has become quite familiar in the UK.
Numerous examples of bridges containing members of this type are to be found,
ranging from simple short-span beam bridges, to the more ambitious types such as
arches and cable stayed structures.
Formerly, the timber used was almost exclusively Ekki, or Azobé, as it is known in
Continental Europe. Recently, experiments and a few actual applications have
occurred using oak. The design of mechlam structures involves some special
considerations involving slip between the layers that leads to incomplete composite
behaviour. This affects ultimate limit states, as well as serviceability design. Some of
the fundamental principles are provided by Eurocode 5 Part 1-1, and STEP Lecture
B11 also explains the basis of the computations, with elementary examples, based on
this code. However, mechlam timber bridges are now offered in Western Europe,
including UK, by some half a dozen firms, on a design, supply and erect basis. All of
these types of supplier tend to guard precise details of the full basis of design from
mainstream practitioners, as well as from organisations such as BRE and TRADA
Technology.
7.2 Decks & decking – UK current practice
Structural diaphragm decks do not at present form part of the British timber bridge
designer’s vocabulary. They are an extremely significant item that needs to be
brought forward for their attention, in order to improve efficiency, as outlined in the
Introduction. For convenience however, the following only discusses decks that span
as secondary or tertiary items between transoms or stringers, and which do not act
as composite diaphragms. The latter are briefly introduced in Section 10.5 of this
report, dealing with Overseas Practice – Decks.
The commonest form of simple one-way spanning, non-diaphragm deck uses
spaced sawn planks. These are usually laid transverse, but are sometimes placed
longitudinally. The deck planks can be softwood or hardwood, with certain hardwoods
preferred for maximum wear and durability. In connection with wear, designers are in
either case advised to discount a proportion of the section, as newly-placed, when
calculating for strength and stiffness. This point is addressed specifically by prEN
Eurocode 5 Part 2.
Softwood decking planks can be specified as either GS or SS grade to BS 4978.
Suitable preservative treatment may be considered. This would tend to lead specifiers
towards timbers such as Scots pine/European redwood, Douglas fir and larch.
300 dpi pdf file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
advanced pdf compressor online; pdf page size
300 dpi pdf file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
adjust pdf size preview; adjust pdf size
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
37
Hardwood decking planks are usually from a naturally durable species, such as Iroko,
Jarrah or Ekki, and are specified as HS grade to BS 5756.
Slipperiness of timber decks in general is recognised as something to avoid. It is an
issue also related to maintenance and upkeep. It is an aspect of timber footbridges
that would merit attention that is more specific to these structures, where the question
of incline of ramps and arches also enters into the equation.
Where foot grip is especially important, profiled decking planks provide a good
solution. Hardwood profiled planks, in timbers such as ekki, are marketed extensively
as a separate purchasable item, by timber bridge suppliers, for customers’ use in
landscaping and crossing structures beyond the realm of bridges. In footbridges
specifically, at higher gradients, profiled planks are sometimes used in conjunction
with kick-plates, which are nailed down to the deck. Unless these are well executed
however, they are a notorious source of early wear and hence maintenance cost.
Recently a proprietary form of profiled, treated softwood decking board has also
become available. This has embedded inserts of non-slip material, which are grooved
into each castellation of the profile.
It is generally felt that the gaps between simple decking in rural footbridges should not
be less than 5mm, in order that dirt and debris can pass through the deck. This also
allows air to circulate around the planks, thereby avoiding damp pockets where fungal
decay can start. Larger gaps are sometimes used, and in remote country areas,
deliberate gaps of up to 25mm have been specified. For certain bridges over roads
and railways, particularly in more urban environments, gaps in the walkway are not
permitted, due to concern over vandals dropping objects onto vehicles or persons
below. This has led some designers to use glulam beams, which can provide the
spanning medium for the bridge, as well as the deck. Such laminated decks are
abutted together, to provide the walkway. An alternative solution has been to use
plywood decking with additional non-slip surfaces, but this does not seem to have had
a good record. Wear has been rapid and it has become evident that plywood decking
requires special attention to drainage details.
LVL decks, with appropriate pressure preservative treatment and added wear
protection, have started to occur in a few instances, in the UK. This type of
progressive solution is moving towards the concept of treating the deck both as a
walking surface, and as a structural diaphragm. As mentioned above, this is
discussed further in section 8.5.
7.3 Parapets & handrails
The primary function of the handrails and parapets is of course the protection of
bridge users. Occasionally, in very remote areas such as forests and moorland trails,
bridges are built with no parapet, or with only one handrail. A pair are however the
norm. Various configurations are used, with the choice primarily depending on the
following:
a) The type of footbridge user (for example – pedestrians only, or cyclists and
pedestrians).
b) The nature of the site and locality, for example whether it is a rural or urban
location, and whether it passes over a main road, railway or a stream.
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Render the page with a resolution of 300 dpi. int targetResolution = 300; Bitmap bitmap3 = page.GetBitmap The magnification of the original PDF page size.
adjust size of pdf file; best pdf compressor online
VB.NET Image: Generate GS1-128/EAN-128 Barcode on Image & Document
and three document files(including TIFF, PDF & MS EAN-128 barcode image resolution in DPI to fulfill set rotate barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw
adjust pdf page size; pdf files optimized
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
38
The first item dictates the height and strength requirements for the parapet, as
discussed in more detail below. The second affects the degree of openness that is
permitted for the handrail, intermediate rails (if any), spindles and posts.
Common solutions for bridges in rural locations involve cantilevered handrails. A
better, and very traditional arrangement in these types of location may be for the
vertical post to be triangulated, by projecting out the decking members in the vicinity of
the post, and adding a diagonal raking member. This type of design is often adopted
for short-span bridges, where the main beam is of limited depth.
For suburban bridges, it is not uncommon for mesh infill, or even solid, surface-
profiled metal sheet, to be fixed to the handrail, to prevent children from falling through
the gaps. The cheap, but somewhat inelegant solution is mesh infill. A better
alternative is light section, close centred spindles with adequate intermediate
longitudinal rails for stiffness.
In fully urban areas, an altogether lesser degree of openness is usually required,
whilst for bridges over trunk roads, motorways and railways, there is serious concern
over objects being accidentally kicked, or deliberately dropped, onto the highway, rails,
or traffic. In applications such as these, authorities will invariably stipulate the required
dimensions of enclosure that will normally prevent an open solution. This has resulted
in a number of bridges where the deck is located near the centre, or towards the base
of the main beams. These then provide the lower half or two-thirds of the parapet.
This type of arrangement is common in glulam footbridges with through decks.
Larger, girder truss bridges ( for example the type illustrated in Figure 11 c), also often
incorporate part of the structural girder depth into the parapet. This of course has
further detailing implications, but such structures tend to be offered by specialists who
have evolved practical and acceptable solutions that comply with the rules and
customs of the various European countries in which they operate.
Both softwoods and hardwoods are used for handrails, with the latter, in a suitable
species, preferred for durability and smoothness to touch. Most, if not all, of the
smoothest-to-hand timbers used in joinery are of tropical origin. External weathering
tends to aggravate splinter pick-up in open grained species. Hence, this is a particular
issue that needs to be clarified, in relation to user-inhibitions through preference for
avoiding tropical timbers, because of perceived sustainability questions. Besides
sustainability, however, is the matter of toxicity to skin of the splinters of some
species. Good detailing of parapets and handrails is thus undoubtedly an aspect of
the furtherance of timber ridges that requires co-operation between timber engineers
and wood technologists.
Regarding grade and strength class specifications, softwood handrail members will
again be GS or SS grade to BS4978, assigned to the appropriate strength class, and
with suitable preservative treatment, if required. Hardwoods are usually from a
naturally durable species, such as Iroko or Opepe, and are HS grade to BS 5756 and
thus to the appropriate hardwood strength class (D Classes).
Parapet and handrail detailing to achieve protective design against long-term
deterioration, through weathering and decay, is addressed by several Nordic and
German-language publications. Some indication of the type of guidance available can
be seen in STEP Lecture E17 (Fisher 1995). This is another aspect that will be well
worth further attention for UK design guidance.
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
0: left 1: center 2: right, Resolution, DPI. ShowText = True barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw to decode, encode and process PDF file independently.
acrobat compress pdf; pdf edit text size
VB.NET Image: Barcode Generator to Add UPC-A to Image, TIFF, PDF &
SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-a.pdf", New PDFEncoder SupSpace = 15F barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 1: left 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72.
change font size pdf; best online pdf compressor
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
39
7.4 Connections
Connections within modern timber bridge structures is an enormous subject, that
could quite easily occupy a two year applied research and “knowledge repackaging”
project, in its own right. TRADA Technology is currently engaged in a separate project
to this, under DETR Partners in Innovation funding, entitled “Connections IT Toolbox”.
Good introductory texts for engineers on mechanically fastened timber joints in
general are also contained in STEP Volume 1, Lectures C1 to C19. The TRADA
Technology Eurocode Design Guidance Documents already published also address
the topic extensively.
Mechanical fasteners and connectors for bridge structures are at present normally of
steel, and quite often of stainless steel specifications, rather than from plain carbon
steel. In virtually all instances, some form of corrosion protection is required on other
that stainless items. Where flitched or spliced joints involve the use of steel plates,
these are usually specified with a thickness of not less than 6mm, following steel
bridge design practice. Again corrosion protection is essential and the Eurocodes 5
(both Part 1-1 and Part 2), supported by the documents described above, provide an
entry point.
Signposts to research on bonded-in connections, a lot of which is highly relevant to
bridges, are given in the state of art reference cited above. Work has also been
started on bonded-in non-metallic (Fibre Reinforced Polymer, or FRP) connections
that may in future be relevant, especially in view of their potential corrosion resistance,
as well as their high tensile strength (Bainbridge et al, 2000).
Fatigue within timber structural connections for bridges is another aspect that
researchers have started to address. Some success has already been achieved,
showing this to be not a hyper-critical issue, but one that can be handled using
established timber research and code formatting techniques.
VB.NET Image: How to Create & Write UPC-E Barcode in Document
SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-e.pdf", New PDFEncoder SupSpace = 15F barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 1: left 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72.
pdf change font size in textbox; pdf compress
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Sample Code to Draw EAN-13 Barcode on Image
0: left 1: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72. barcode.SupSpace = 15; barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw & write 30+ barcode types on PDF file
best compression pdf; adjust size of pdf
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
40
8.0 DURABILITY
Timber, when suitably protected, can be remarkably durable and can outlast in certain
conditions other materials such as metals, brick, stone and concrete. Timber is
invulnerable to salt water, either from sea or de-icing salts, and freeze-thaw action.
In a timber bridge, elements which are not covered will frequently attain moisture
contents above 20% - the threshold for fungal decay. The threshold for insect attack
is even lower, at 12%, although only sapwood and decayed heartwood is vulnerable.
Preservative treatment will be necessary only if the natural durability of a timber is
insufficient to meet the required service life.
8.1 Detailing
Bridges are a particularly exacting application, and ensuring that the timber members
have adequate durability is a vital consideration. Before considering this item from the
perspective of material selection, it is important to note that much can be achieved in
terms of increased durability by means of improved detailing. Indeed the converse is
also unfortunately true, in that if poor detailing is provided then premature failure of
timber components can occur.
Table 4 identifies seven susceptible parts of a timber bridge in general. Most of these
points apply to all types of bridge, irrespective of the precise form of the structure. The
table then exemplifies poor detailing aspects and gives better alternatives. At this
stage, the items in the table are regarded as pointers for guidance, and as
suggestions for closer attention, rather than definitive solutions. It is anticipated that it
will be necessary to pay considerable attention to detailing, and that these aspects will
require discussion by timber experts and bridge manufacturers, in conjunction with
the analysis of the survey results.
The benefits of effective and well maintained finishes have been very apparent in the
survey work which has already been performed and which continues. Modern water
repellent finishes offer a considerable measure of protection to exterior timber
structures such as bridges. The prevention of weathering of the timber surface itself
has an important role in this respect. A high specification of finish and a good
maintenance programme for the same would always be advocated in addition to the
correct detailing and choice of durable species mentioned above.
VB.NET Image: How to Add Interleaved 2 of 5 Barcode to Document
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/interleaved2of5.pdf", New PDFEncoder N = 2F barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI),
change font size pdf form; batch pdf compression
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
41
Part of the structure
Examples of poor
detailing
Examples of better
detailing
End grain of members in
general
e.g. beams
Exposed end grain, leading
to fissures, unattractive and
ultimately a seat of decay
Protected end grain eg: by
attaching other timber
members having side grain,
or by ventilated
capping/sealing
Upper edges of exposed
members
e.g. beams and handrails
Flat upper edges where
water lies and which trap
dirt, especially when
weathered/ fissured
Chamfered and sloped
upper edges which freely
drain
Edges protected by
ventilated capping
Joinery details e.g.:
handrails, parapet to beam
connections
Details which trap moisture
in mortises, fixing holes,
recesses etc.
Freely draining, ventilated,
flush details
Raise parapet above splash
level with separate drained
kerb
Decking and its
attachments
Deck which is tight jointed
or with a sealed surface but
which merely traps
moisture
Attachments to beams
which form traps
DPC between deck and
beams
Deck which freely drains,
laterally and longitudinally,
even when worn
Drip mouldings beneath
deck boards
DPC between deck and
beams
Intersection points can
easily form moisture/dirt
entrapment regions.
Not easily avoided, but
detail for maximum
ventilation and drainage eg:
by drilling/arranging gaps
Member intersection points,
column bases, especially
with steelwork
Intersection points can trap
moisture and remain damp.
Design steelwork to allow
drainage and ventilation.
Avoid details which allow
the collection of water .
Bearing points, supports,
bank seats etc.
Poorly ventilated,
susceptible to silting up, dirt
and debris entrapment
As well raised from
surroundings, eg: by
masonry and supporting
steel, as possible
Table 4: Susceptible parts of timber bridge structures, with examples of
detailing weaknesses and improvements
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
42
8.2 Natural durability
The biological natural durability of timber is due to the anatomy of the timber species
and in some cases the presence of naturally occurring extractives within the
heartwood. Each timber species has its own characteristic set of these chemicals,
some of which are toxic to wood-destroying organisms. Even when the detailing is as
good as possible, for an exacting, fully exposed application of timber such as a
bridge, it is advisable to consider the use of a timber which falls into a natural
durability category which is at least as good as "moderately durable", Table 5. It is
important to note that the biological natural durability of a timber refers only to its
heartwood.
Such classifications are well-established in Britain for all of the better-known
construction timbers, both softwoods and hardwoods, including all of those listed in
BS 5268: Part 2. Table 6 shows the natural durability classifications of the twelve
tropical hardwoods listed in the code, together with European redwood and Douglas
fir, for comparison. These classifications are based principally but not exclusively
upon traditional ground contact stake tests. It should be noted that the ratings relate to
UK conditions, which do not include a termite hazard, but which represent a high risk
from fungal attack.
Exposure trials have been conducted using EN 330 "L-joint" type specimens, both to
assess natural (untreated) durability, and to evaluate various forms of preservative
treatment beneath a coating. In due course, the information from this project will be of
value to bridge designers, especially when they consider the joinery items such as
parapets and handrails. Certified, sustainable and naturally durable timbers, including,
for example, plantation teak from various sources, may be admitted for the most
exposed parts of superstructures, such as handrails and parapets, on the basis of
evidence from such tests.
Durability Category
Approximate life in ground contact, 50mm x
50mm section (years)
Very durable
More than 25
Durable
15 – 25
Moderately durable
10 – 15
Non-durable
5 – 10
Perishable
Less than 5
Table 5: Natural durability categories
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
43
Timber, Standard Name; Species
Region of Origin
Natural durability
Balau
Dense Shorea spp
SE Asia
Durable
Ekki (Azobe)
Lophira alata
W Africa
Very durable
Greenheart
Ocotea rodiaei
Guyana
Very durable
Iroko
Milicia excelsa
W Africa
Very durable
Jarrah
Eucalyptus marginata
W. Australia
Very durable
Kapur
Dryobalanops spp
SE Asia
Very durable
Karri
Eucalyptus disersicolor
W. Australia
Durable
Kempas
Koompasia malaccensis
SE Asia
Durable
Keruing
Dipterocarpus spp
SE Asia
Moderately durable
Merbau
Intsia spp
SE Asia
Durable
Opepe
Nauclea diderrichii
W Africa
Very durable
Teak
Tectona grandis
SE Asia
Very durable
Douglas fir
Pseudotsuga menziesii
N America
Moderately durable
European Larch
 Larix decidua (L. uropaea)
Europe, incl. UK
Moderately durable
Scots pine/European redwood
Pinus sylvestris
Europe, incl. UK
Non-durable
Table 6: Natural durability classifications of the twelve tropical hardwoods
listed in BS 5268: Part 2, and of Douglas fir and European redwood
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
44
8.3 Preservative treatment
In the modern philosophy of designing for durability, the use of chemicals to treat the
timber, normally through pressure application, is regarded as the third line of defence,
following good detailing and species selection. Increasingly, though, the most
sustainable use of our principal commercial timbers (i.e. non-durable softwoods) is to
extend their service lives through preservative treatment. This allows more than
sufficient time for forest growth to compensate for the consumption of timber.
However, evidence from around Europe suggests that traditional preservative active
ingredients are going to come under increasing environmental scrutiny and legislation.
In Denmark and the Netherlands, legislation has already instigated restrictions on the
use of copper/chromium/arsenic (CCA) - the most widely used wood preservative.
Amendment to the EC Marketing and Use Directive for arsenic will limit CCA to a few
derogated uses including bridges. Creosote is due to be withdrawn for
public/domestic use in the EC in 2003, but will still be available for industrial
applications such as utility poles and bridges.  Of the 150 bridges constructed
recently under the Nordic Timber Bridge Project (Nordic Timber Council, 1999), the
majority were either creosote or CCA treated. Clearly up to date guidance is needed
for timber bridge designers and certain clients may demand "environmentally friendly"
solutions.
In the United Kingdom only formulations approved under the Control of Pesticides
Regulations 1986 by the HSE Pesticides Safety Directive are used for timber
treatment, and formal authorisation procedures are in place to ensure that operations
comply with legislation relating to aspects such as employee health, safety, material
control and waste disposal. Treated timber is, of course, far more widely used in
applications such as fencing, decking and utility poles than bridges. The latter may,
however, come under greater scrutiny because of their siting over sensitive
watercourses.
For timber bridge members the principal chemical preservative treatments applicable
are either Copper Chrome Arsenic (CCA) or creosote, applied under pressure,
although there are some alternatives on the market. In general, hardwoods either do
not require treatment or are difficult to treat due to poor penetration, whilst most
softwoods are treated. Spruce and hemlock are difficult to treat, although penetration
can be improved by incising. BRE Digest 429 (1998) gives guidance on both natural
durability and resistance to preservative treatment.
Copper Chrome Arsenic:
CCA (marketed under the trademarks of "Celcure" or "Tanalith") is a water-borne
preservative with a particular application for softwood glulam bridge beams, usually in
conjunction with European redwood as the timber. Both pre-treatment of individual
laminations and treatment of the entire member after complete manufacture and
machining are known. Pressure cylinders of up to 25m length are available. Timber is
dried before application of CCA under high pressure/vacuum process and allowed to
dry again for between 7 to 14 days during which fixation occurs. The advantages of
CCA treatment are that the timber is free from odour and that paints and varnishes
can be applied. CCA treated timbers (such as off-cuts) should not be burnt in an open
fire, since this releases the preservative elements in the ash and smoke. Waste CCA
treated wood should either be burnt with flue gas recovery or put into landfill.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
45
Creosote:
Creosote is a complex mixture of over 300 substances derived from the distillation of
coal tar and tends to have a poor image due to an association with odorous garden
fences and weeping telegraph poles. In fact, creosote is a very long serving and
effective wood preservative which has low water solubility and is biodegradable when
dispersed in soil. There are many instances of creosoted timber structures and wood
piles still giving good service after 100 years of ground contact, and timber currently
treated by the pressure process can offer a service life of at least 40 years. Although
fresh creosote will burn the skin, requiring gloves to be worn during handling of treated
lumber, it is not a systemic poison. Creosote also protects wood from the
development of splits. Creosoted timber should not be used for parts of the bridge
which come into contact with unprotected skin, such as handrails. Freshly creosoted
timbers may cause the formation of on oil sheen if in contact with water.
There are two forms of creosote treatment, full cell and empty cell. In the full cell
process all the available voids in the wood structure are filled as far as possible with
creosote by first applying a vacuum to the timber, then flooding the pressure cylinder
with preservative. After the vacuum is released atmospheric pressure forces the
creosote deep into the structure. Further application of pressure after this stage
achieves even greater penetration. At the end of the cycle, a second short period
under vacuum is applied to withdraw a small amount of preservative from the surface
of the timber leaving it dry and in a reasonable state for handling. In the empty cell
process a longer period under vacuum is applied to remove a greater amount of
preservative, leaving the voids in the wood only partly filled but with the internal walls
of the wood cells coated. Although creosote is used undiluted by solvents, freshly
treated timber is normally allowed to dry for up to 7 days to allow the more volatile
components to evaporate.
Alternatives:
Many preservative products have been developed over the last 10 years that have
aimed to provide alternatives to CCA whilst providing equivalent performance in the
field. A number of these have focused on removing the arsenic compound from the
preservative formulations, such as CCB systems that use boron. There are also
systems available that are both chromium and arsenic free where tebunconazole and
boron based preservative have replaced those ingredients. These preservatives still
provide the timber with its characteristic green colouration, and are increasing used in
markets such as garden decking. All these products are approved for use in
Pesticides 2001.
Selection system for timber bridges:
Selection of an appropriate system for timber bridge component should follow the
European Standards below:
1. Design bridge (timber components in contact with the water, soil and out of
ground contact)
2. Assess the hazard class of the end use of the timber (EN 335-1). For example a
timber in freshwater contact is Hazard Class 4. Out of ground contact timber is
Hazard Class 3 and is a less challenging environment for the timber component.
3. Select wood species (EN 350-1 Natural durability)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested