asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : 300 dpi pdf file size Library software class asp.net winforms .net ajax intectbfrep6-part554

InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
56
An Outline Procedure For The Design Of Timber Footbridges Over Roads Or
In Urban Areas
In outline, the procedure may be considered in three stages, as follows:
1. 
Establish the general arrangements for the bridge, taking note of the 
requirements for layout and minimum dimensions given in DoT Departmental 
Standard BD29/87.
2. 
Evaluate the loads acting on the bridge, using the unfactored loads of BS 
5400: Part 2, unless these are made more onerous by an HA Standard.
3. 
Design the members of the bridge in accordance with BS 5268: Part 2 which 
is a permissible stress code, used principally for timber members in buildings.
BS 5268 does however contain sufficient basic materials properties, fastener 
design information and member design procedures for simpler types of 
timber bridge, as explained above in the section dealing with materials.
An Outline Procedure For Design Of Timber Footbridges In Suburban Or Rural
Areas
Many engineers specialising in timber bridges consider the BS 5400/HA provisions for
minimum dimensions and loading too severe for lightly trafficked footbridges in
suburban and rural areas. For such footbridges, typical alternative procedures are
exemplified as follows:
1. Establish the general arrangements for the bridge taking note of the minimum
dimensional recommendations given in publications such as "Footbridges in the
Countryside, Design and Construction" (Countryside Commission for Scotland,
1989).
2. Evaluate the loads acting on the bridge using the unfactored loads of BS 5400:
Part 2, or consider making them less onerous on the basic of recommendations
given in publications such as the above.
3. Design the bridge members in accordance with BS 5268: Part 2.
Examples of how the "Countryside Commission for Scotland" publication
recommends less onerous minimum dimensions and loadings are given in Tables 7
and 8 below:
Source of data
DoT Standard
BD29/87
"Countryside Commission for
Scotland" publication
Location of bridge
Urban area
Accessible
rural area
(two-way
traffic)
Inaccessible
rural area (one-
way traffic)
Pedestrians only
1800
1200
900
People with disabilities s 2000
1700
1200
Table 7: Recommended deck widths (mm) for alternative bridge locations
300 dpi pdf file size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in pdf form field; best way to compress pdf files
300 dpi pdf file size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size in pdf file; change font size pdf document
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
57
Source of data
BS 5400: Part 2
"Countryside Commission for
Scotland" publication
Location of bridge
Urban Area
Rural Area
Vertical imposed
uniformly distributed
load on bridge deck
(kN/m‘)
5.0
2.3 – 3.2
Horizontal load per
metre (kN/m)
perpendicular to
handrail
1.4
0.74 – 1.4
Table 7: Recommended imposed loadings for alternative bridge locations
Highways Agency criteria for layout and dimensions of footbridges
Layout of Footbridge
The HA (former DoT) Standard BD29/87 stipulates several criteria relating to the
layout of footbridges, some of which are quite fundamental to the bridge design.
These may be summarised as follows:
Access: Access to footbridges located adjacent to carriageways should be sited so
that pedestrians walking down the access face on-coming traffic. Plain ramped
access is preferred to stairs as it is more satisfactory for people in wheelchairs and
pedestrians pushing prams. However wherever possible both forms of access
should be provided.
Layout: The main span of a footbridge should, wherever possible, be at right angles to
the road carriageway.
Supports: Where a footbridge crosses a dual carriageway, preference should be
given to spanning both carriageways in a single span, to avoid the need for a support
in the central reserve. Supports which may be subject to collisions by errant vehicles
shall be designed to resist collision loading.
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Render the page with a resolution of 300 dpi. int targetResolution = 300; Bitmap bitmap3 = page.GetBitmap The magnification of the original PDF page size.
change file size of pdf document; advanced pdf compressor online
VB.NET Image: Generate GS1-128/EAN-128 Barcode on Image & Document
and three document files(including TIFF, PDF & MS EAN-128 barcode image resolution in DPI to fulfill set rotate barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw
adjust pdf page size; pdf form change font size
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
58
Dimensions for footbridges
Width of bridges for pedestrians only:
The dimensions of the clear widths of the main span, ramps and stairs of a footbridge
would be derived on the basis of the information in Table 9 (below) meet the peak
pedestrian traffic.
Gradient
Clear width (mm)
< 1/20
300mm per 20 persons per minute
Steps or > 1/20
300mm per 14 persons per minute
Table 9: Recommended clear widths (mm) for alternative bridge gradients
Minimum widths of 1800mm for general purposes, or 2000mm stipulated for bridges
enhanced for use by disabled persons. Where bridges are to be designed for the
combined use of pedestrians and cyclists, further width requirements apply. These
range from a 1200mm wide footpath separated by a white line from a 500mm wide
cycle track, to a 1950mm wide lane for each, separated by railings. The DoT criteria
for heights of parapets vary according to the types and combinations of bridge user.
They are summarised in Table 10, below.
Type of footbridge
Parapet height (m)
Pedestrians only, where bridge is in area of
high prevailing winds or with headroom
under bridge greater than 10m
1.15 – 1.30
Pedestrians and cyclists
1.4
Table 10Height requirements for bridge parapets
Stairway requirements may be summarised as follows:
Maximum number of stairs in a flight is 20
Riser dimension < 150mm
Tread dimension > 300mm.
It is a preference that ramps should not be steeper than 1 in 20. However if limitations
of space dictate then steeper ramps may be used, up to a maximum gradient of 1 in
12. For ramps with gradients greater than 1 in 20, landings must be provided in order
that the rise of any ramp section does not exceed 3.5m
Evaluation of loads using BS 5400: Part 2
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
0: left 1: center 2: right, Resolution, DPI. ShowText = True barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw to decode, encode and process PDF file independently.
apple compress pdf; reader pdf reduce file size
VB.NET Image: Barcode Generator to Add UPC-A to Image, TIFF, PDF &
SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-a.pdf", New PDFEncoder SupSpace = 15F barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 1: left 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72.
change font size pdf text box; pdf page size limit
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
59
As mentioned above, timber footbridges are designed using the unfactored nominal
loads of BS 5400: Part 2. Interestingly, the use of unfactored nominal loads in
structural design is not only limited to timber, with the design of foundations and that
for aluminium structures also being based on unfactored loads. Where adequate
statistical distributions are available, the nominal loads in BS 5400: Part 2 are those
appertaining to a return period of 120 years.
The following types of nominal load relating to footbridges are considered by BS 5400:
Part 2
1. Permanent loads
· Dead-weight of structural elements
· Superimposed dead – road surfacing, etc.
2. Live loads from pedestrian traffic
· Nominal vertical live load
· Nominal load on pedestrian parapets
3. Wind loads
· Transverse
· Longitudinal
· Vertical
4. Loads from temperature effects
5. Erection loads
BS 5400: Part 2 suggests that in most cases snow loads can be ignored. This is
logical since the full pedestrian design load is improbable under heavy snow falls of
the duration likely to be experienced in the UK.
The maximum wind gust speed is evaluated by applying gust factors to mean hourly
wind speeds extracted from a map of isotachs. The magnitude of the gust factor
depends on the height of the bridge, and the horizontal wind loaded length. For
footbridges only, BS 5400: Part 2 allows the following reductions in wind load:
1. The mean hourly wind speed is reduced by 0.94, which is a conversion factor to
obtain 50-year return period values from 120-year return period values.
2. A reduction in the gust factor when the bridge is located in urban areas or a rural
environment with many windbreaks.
To use BS 5268: Part 2 for the design of bridge members, the designer has to decide
upon the service conditions for the bridge. This mainly involves deciding the exposure
and duration clauses that are appropriate for the member concerned. Experience has
shown that designers usually are on the conservative side by choosing to design
members using wet exposure stresses. With BS 5268, the threshold moisture
content between wet and dry exposure conditions is 18%. Hence this is often
unnecessarily conservative. For a vertical imposed uniformly distributed loading which
VB.NET Image: How to Create & Write UPC-E Barcode in Document
SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/upc-e.pdf", New PDFEncoder SupSpace = 15F barcode.DrawBarcode( reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 1: left 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72.
pdf markup text size; pdf page size dimensions
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Sample Code to Draw EAN-13 Barcode on Image
0: left 1: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI), 72. barcode.SupSpace = 15; barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw & write 30+ barcode types on PDF file
change font size in pdf comment box; change font size in fillable pdf form
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
60
represents a crowded bridge, experience has shown that designers usually select
medium-term duration. This is the duration class used with BS 5268 for snow loading
in the UK. Horizontal loads on handrails or parapets are usually designated as short-
term. This is the same load duration class as that arising from the case of a man
standing on a roof member.
10.2 Deflection limits
The limited guidance given in BS 5268: Part 2 regarding deflection limit is of little
relevance to the design of bridge members. Enquiries indicate that a static deflection
limit of Span/200 under imposed load only is often used for beam members. The
"Countryside Commission for Scotland" publication recommends a tighter limit of
Span/240 under total loading. Lightly precambered glulam bridge beams are often
designed using a deflection limit for live load only, which is permitted in principle by
BS 5268.
10.3 Eurocode 5
As explained above, it has proven possible to design acceptable timber footbridges
using BS 5268: Part 2 recommendations, supplemented by additional guidance from
elsewhere. The eventual publication of EC5, Part 2 will be a great step forward and
will be welcomed by everybody involved. Meanwhile, EC5, Part I is shortly to be
available. Thus even at this stage, the Eurocodes will bring advantages to the more
sophisticated aspects of timber engineering such as bridges.
EC5 introduces limit states design to timber for the first time in the UK. It is therefore
a more radical change for timber than the introduction of Eurocodes for other major
structural materials. EC5 contains the essential rules for design, but unlike the British
Code, BS 5268, it does not include material properties, tables of fastener loads and
other such other design information. An immediately obvious change is that wherever
possible, EC5 uses equations rather than tables. Also much of the nomenclature and
terminology is considerable different.
As in all instances of limit states design codes, EC5 will require clear thinking about
the distinction between ultimate and serviceability limit states. The latter are, of
course associated with deflections, deformations and vibration. EC5 treats these
matters in a considerably more sophisticated manner than their coverage in BS 5268.
As has already been pointed out, BS 5268 gives no adequate guidance related to
deflection limits for bridges. Furthermore it is likely that the Working Group dealing
with EC5, Part 2 will require to give considerable thought to the serviceability topics.
EC5 offers a number of advantages over BS 5268. It provides the opportunity to
design with a wide selection of materials and components. The use of characteristic
values for materials, based directly on test results, means that new materials and
components, which have achieved suitable technical approval can more easily be
assimilated, thus facilitating development and innovation. More guidance is given on
the design of built-up components than in BS 5268, and EC5 provides a unified
design and safety basis for laterally loaded dowel-type joints (nails, staples, screws,
bolts and steel dowels). The ENV contains no information on the design of joints using
connectors such as toothed plates, shear plates and split rings, but a procedure is
being developed through other sponsored research programmes. Interim guidance on
the design of such joints is contained in the UK NAD.
VB.NET Image: How to Add Interleaved 2 of 5 Barcode to Document
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/interleaved2of5.pdf", New PDFEncoder N = 2F barcode.DrawBarcode(reImage, 300, 450) 'draw 0: center 2: right, Resolution(DPI),
pdf files optimized; change font size pdf form
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
61
10.4 Overseas practice - Decks
The principal function of a deck is to distribute the loads produced by the traffic to the
supporting elements of the bridge. If the deck is designed as a structural diaphragm, it
can be used as a major spanning element in its own right. It can also brace other
main components, and transfer horizontal wind or brake loads through to other parts
of the structure, and ultimately to the foundations.
Dependent on its location, a secondary function of the deck may be to protect the
main structure from moisture and mechanical damage from traffic. An effective and
durable protection of substantial parts of the timber structure may be achieved with
closed, high-level  decks.
Structural timber decks have been used in North America since at least the 1930s.
Initially, nailed laminated construction was used. Timber-concrete composites were
also introduced at quite an early stage. Later, glued laminated beams connected with
shear devices started to be used extensively.  Nowadays, structural timber decks
exist in many designs, using half-round timbers, sawn timber, glued laminated timber,
and structural timber composites of various types.
In parts of Europe, particularly the German-speaking countries, structural decks of all
the types mentioned above are found. A more traditional type, used on lighter bridges,
including footbridges, is the two-layer herringbone boarded pattern. This does not
make a major structural diaphragm contribution, in comparison with stressed
laminated decks, for example, but it does contribute to the lateral bracing of the
structure. A good example is in the large Main-Donau Canal 190 m long tension
ribbon bridge, described in STEP Lecture E17. There is significant coverage of
structural deck design in prEN Eurocode 5 Part 2.
Research and practise in structural decks of various forms has also occurred in the
Nordic countries and in Australia and New Zealand.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
62
Common Timber Deck Types In Canada:
Longitudinal and transverse nail-laminated (LNL/TNL) decks:
In longitudinal laminated decks, the timber laminations are orientated parallel to the
direction of the traffic, whereas in transverse laminated decks the laminates are
orientated perpendicular to the direction of the traffic flow.
Figure 16:  Longitudinal laminated deck (left) and transverse laminated deck
(right)
Nailed laminated decks consist of planks of timber laid on edge side by side.  The
laminations are nailed together to form a slab.  Nails are driven through the faces of
the planks to fix them together laterally.
1. Timber-concrete composite (TCC) decks:
A concrete topping is applied to a timber deck, traditionally a longitudinal nail
laminated type, giving the slab a concrete compression zone and wearing course.
Shear keys are required between the timber and the concrete layers.
2. Longitudinal or transverse stress laminated (LSL/TSL) decks:
In addition to nails, post tensioning is applied using high strength steel to improve the
load transfer of the deck.  Although the stiffness of the timber is low perpendicular to
the grain, pre-stressing allows a plate action in the deck.  Edge members are often
made of hardwood or steel, in order to avoid damage due to high bearing stresses
perpendicular to the grain at the pre-stressing points.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
63
Figure 17: Tension rods
3. Floor beam ( or timber tie) decks:
This type is a beam and plank deck. the planks overlay heavy transverse beams or
ties.
4. Two layer plank decks:
As above, but with two layers of heavy planks.
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
64
Primary
highways
subjected to
high volume
of traffic
New bridges
on
secondary
roads with
medium
volume of
traffic
New bridges
on
secondary
roads with
low volume
of traffic
Lightly used
park and
forest
access
roads with
occasional
heavy
vehicles
Very low
volume roads
with little or
no
commercial
traffic
Deck
replacement on
steel truss
bridges
Longitudinal
nail laminated
Economical
when
supported on
timber pile
bents
Economical
alternative to
replacing
concrete
Can give higher
live load capacity
Speedy
replacement
Transverse
nail
laminated
On steel or
timber
girders
Timber-
concrete
composite
Spans up to
7m
Longitudinal
stress
laminated
Viable option
Will span up
to 8m for
286mm deep
decks and
longer for
larger timber
sizes
Transverse
stress
laminated
Not yet used,
but shows
promise
On steel or
timber
girders
Floor beam
Economical
Two layer
plank decks
Economical
Table 11:  Summary of the principal applications for various combinations of
timber decks, beams and other structures used for highway bridges in Canada
InTeC                                                                        Timber Bridges and Foundations
Nov 2002   
ÓTTL, BRE, FCE
65
11.0 FUTURE CHALLENGES
Fresh challenges constantly arise, both for timber engineering in general, and
specifically for bridges. Salient aspects of timber engineering materials and design
relating to timber bridges which are still under development are outlined as follows:
11.1 High efficiency composite materials
Although timber provides high specific strength and stiffness, until recently, its natural
variability remained a challenge.  However, through efficient strength grading
procedures and associated quality assurance measures, timber and wood-based
composites offer variability levels as low as those attained in metallic engineering
materials, and certainly much lower than in many commonly used grades of
concrete.
High-strength softwood glued laminated beams, using laminations of adequate
controlled quality and regulated end jointing techniques, can be produced with
characteristic bending strengths up to typically 36 N/mm
2
.  By substituting STCs for
the outer laminations, composite elements of 15~25% higher bending strength may
be guaranteed, without increase in weight. Such composite materials are comparable
in strength to high-performance reinforced concrete, but have a mass of only one-
quarter of the latter.  European research is also in progress in which, by utilising
structural composites based on temperate hardwood veneers, bridge beams with
characteristic bending strengths greater than 60 N/mm
2
are feasible, with weight
increases of only 15%.
11.2 New adhesive bonding technologies
The classical timber engineering adhesives have been proven adequate for small and
medium spans in buildings. However new technical and economical requirements
have been driving towards improved adhesives and new bonding techniques.
Adhesive bonding is only now becoming accepted in the field of bridge engineering in
general, with strides having been made in resin bonding technologies for the
refurbishment and upgrading of steel and concrete structures. Until recently, these
techniques have depended upon the use of steel as the bonded-on reinforcing
medium.  Recently however, field trials and in situ monitoring have commenced on
bridges reinforced with Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRPs), involving such advanced
materials as Carbon Fibre.
In the light of such developments, the climate of acceptance has grown for the
possibility of the greater use of bonding technologies in timber bridge engineering.
prEN Eurocode 5 Part 2 Bridges contains an Informative Annex on the use of “Glued-
in Steel Rods”.  These rules have recently been supported by a major European
Collaborative research Programme, known as “GIROD”. This will permit bonded-in
rods to form safety critical connections in timber bridge structures, and also provide
the basis for calculations concerning bonded-in reinforcements for applications such
as large structural deck plates.
At present, the Eurocode Informative Annex design recommendations apply only to
steel rod-type reinforcements and connections, these having already been subjected
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested