International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
92 
Figure 57 Malaysia Peninsular Gas Utilisation System 
Source: Gas Malaysia website 
The distribution network of natural gas is vested with PGB, which is 
responsible for processing and distributing the gas to customers. To date, 
there are only two other companies licensed by the Energy Commission to 
distribute gas¸ which are Gas Malaysia Sdn Bhd in Peninsular Malaysia and 
Sabah Energy Corporation Sdn Bhd for Sabah. 
Malaysian International Shipping Company Berhad (MISC) serves as 
Petronas’ primary LNG transportation provider. MISC transports LNG from the 
Bintulu LNG facility to export destinations. 
Bintulu port is the only export gateway for Malaysia’s LNG and is under the 
jurisdiction of the Bintulu Port Authority (BPA), a Federal statutory body under 
the purview of the Ministry of Transport. BPA’s responsibilities include the 
overall supervisions of all the activities at Bintulu port, including the utilisation 
of port utilities and operations and acting as trade facilitator. 
Pdf page size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in pdf fillable form; pdf optimized format
Pdf page size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size pdf form reader; adjust pdf size preview
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
93 
10.6. Gas Regulatory Structure 
As prescribed by the Petroleum Development Act 1974, the entire ownership 
inclusive of the privilege rights for exploring, exploiting, winning and obtaining 
petroleum is vested solely on Petronas, with direct purview of the Prime 
Minister. Nonetheless, the rights may be delegated to the interested entities 
by contracting the production sharing agreements with Petronas and 
authentication by the Petroleum Authority. Effectively, Petronas also acts as 
the regulator in the upstream gas sector, while it also plays a significant role in 
the downstream sector. 
In January 1991, the Act was amended and the responsibility to regulate all 
activities in the downstream sector of the petroleum industry is to be shared 
by the Ministry of Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs (“MDTCA”) and the 
Ministry of International Trade and Industry (“MITI”) Thereafter, MITI is 
responsible for the issuance of licences for the processing and refining of 
petroleum and the manufacture of petrochemical products, whilst MDTCA 
issues licences for the marketing and distribution of petroleum products. A 
licence for retail of LNG is issued by MDTCA. 
The Gas Supply Act 1993, on the other hand, is gazetted to provide local 
guidelines for the licensing of the supply of gas for domestic consumers, and 
the price, installation and appliances with respect to transportation and gas 
consumption. The Energy Commission is empowered to enforce the Act and 
to ensure that the interest of the consumer is safeguarded besides carrying on 
all requisite tasks such as to secure the licence, regulate the composition, 
pressure, purity and volume of gas supplied through pipelines. 
The Energy Commission of Malaysia, created under the Energy Commission 
Act 2001, is responsible for all matters relating to the supply of gas through 
pipelines and the use of gas as provided under the Gas Supply Act. 
10.7. Similarities to Israel 
There are similarities between Malaysia and Israel: 
 Both countries have offshore gas fields that border with other countries. 
Malaysia’s experience with dealing with offshore gas fields may be 
relevant to Israel in the future. 
 Both countries have neighbouring countries which can export or import 
gas 
 Both Malaysia and Israel have offshore gas fields that straddle borders 
with other countries. Malaysia has formed an agreement with Thailand 
to develop a defined gas field area together. The Memorandum of 
Understanding (MOU) was signed in 1979 between the two 
Governments on the establishment of a Joint Authority for the 
exploration and exploitation of the resources. Israel has a joint field 
with Cyprus 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. control, C# developers can easily and accurately disassemble multi-page PDF document into two
pdf page size limit; pdf change font size in textbox
C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.
public override Bitmap ConvertToImage(Size targetSize). Description: Convert the PDF page to bitmap with specified size. Parameters:
adjusting page size in pdf; pdf paper size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
94 
10.8. Differences to Israel 
There are differences between Malaysia and Israel: 
 Although both Malaysia and Israel were initially net gas importing 
countries, Malaysia’s initial gas consumption was very low at around 1 
bcm per annum, and when gas production activities begun, it was 
geared towards export. 
 Primary energy consumption fuel mix of the two countries is also quite 
different with Israel using a significantly higher proportion of coal than 
Malaysia. 
10.9. Lessons Leant 
The following are the main lessons: 
 Malaysia’s unique geographical location presents difficulties in diverting 
offshore gas production from Sarawak and Sabah to where domestic 
demand is the highest, in Peninsular Malaysia, creating a shortfall in 
domestic supply. This problem is enhanced by the low domestic prices, 
which further provide disincentives for producers to sell to the domestic 
market and encourage LNG imports, despite being the world’s third 
largest LNG exporter. 
 Connecting domestic demand with supply is essential to ensure 
domestic demands are met. 
 Setting domestic prices close to export prices will give incentive to gas 
producers to meet both export and domestic market demands. 
11. Netherlands 
11.1. Key Issues 
After the discovery and development of the Groningen field in the early 1960s, 
which is one of the largest gas fields in Continental Europe, the Netherlands 
became one of the biggest gas producing countries in Europe.  Today Dutch 
gas reserves account for approximately 29% of all the European natural gas 
reserves and 0.7% of global natural gas reserves
94
 
Although domestic gas production (73.7 bcm) could easily cover the national 
gas requirements (45.3 bcm), only 46.4% of the Dutch natural gas 
requirements are met through domestic natural gas production as a result of 
the large exports. Approximately 52.7 bcm of 73.7 bcm natural gas produced 
is exported. 
Back in 1963, the Government of the Netherlands (GoN) was under the 
impression that nuclear power would become the dominant source of energy 
94
Global Legal Group (2011) The International Comparative Guide to: Gas regulation 2011, 
available at: http://www.iclg.co.uk/khadmin/Publications/pdf/4168.pdf 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Separate source PDF document file by defined page range in VB.NET class application. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size.
pdf text box font size; change font size in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Define the size of the
change file size of pdf; 300 dpi pdf file size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
95 
generation, replacing natural gas. In that respect, GoN decided to export a 
significant part of the reserves, without worrying about the depletion of gas 
reserves. However, in 1974, when it was clear that energy generation could 
not depend on nuclear energy alone, the small fields policy was adopted in 
order to increase the life of the Groningen gas field and domestic production 
for as long as possible. After this, Groningen was no longer allowed to export 
gas. 
Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM), an ExxonMobil-Shell joint 
venture, initiated the exploration of potential smaller fields and succeeded in 
discovering dozens of new gas fields
95
. The strategy followed by the 
Netherlands in order to prolong the lifespan of the current gas resources, and 
continue the transformation of the country into a net importer was to rely 
primarily on the small fields for the domestic production of gas. At the same 
time the Groningen field has been kept as a swing producer to account for 
any seasonal fluctuations. As a result, only a third of the domestic gas 
consumption now comes from the Groningen field. 
It is estimated that most of the reserves in the, non-Groningen, small fields will 
be depleted by 2040, as shown in Figure 58. The Groningen field will not be 
depleted by that time, but it will not be able to act as swing producer. With no 
further action taken, the Netherlands may become a net importer of gas within 
15 years
96
. With that in mind, the Netherlands is taking steps to ensure greater 
sustainability of domestic gas resources, as well as making the necessary 
preparations for the time when, to meet gas demand, it will need to import 
from outside the EU.  
The preparations for large-scale imports of gas from Russia are partly 
bilateral, for instance by Gasunie (the publicly owned natural gas company of 
Netherlands) entering into contracts with the Russian company Gazprom. 
Another action taken to ensure adequate gas supply is the construction of 
LNG terminals, started in 2009, for the import of LNG in the future.  
A major problem that Netherlands faced right after the discovery of the 
Groningen field was the accompanying appreciation of the currency, which 
reduced the profitability of manufacturing and service exports, known as 
Dutch Disease. Total exports from the Netherlands decreased markedly 
relative to GDP during the 1960s. However, the problem proved short-lived; 
from 1960s onwards, exports of goods and services have increase from less 
95
NAM website (2011) Natural gas in the Netherlands, available at:  
http://www.nam.nl/home/content/nam-en/general/natural_gas_in_the_netherlands/
96
Ministry of Economic Affairs, Dutch Government (2009) Gas production in the Netherlands, 
available at: http://www.sodm.nl/sites/default/files/redactie/gas_letter_eng.pdf 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Using this C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion library component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a
best way to compress pdf files; reader compress pdf
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
adjust file size of pdf; adjust pdf size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
96 
than 40% of GDP to 65%
97
, and therefore the fears of de-industrialisation did 
not materialise. 
Figure 58 Netherlands Gas Production: Small Fields 
Source: Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (2009)
98
11.2. Basic Data 
11.2.1. 
Proven Reserves 
The Netherlands is one of the biggest gas producing countries in the world.    
Proven reserves are 1,200 bcm as at 31 December 2010 compared to 1,800 
bcm as at 31 December 1990. The majority of the reserves, around 75%, ar
contained in the Groningen gas field whose original reserves were 2,800 bcm, 
making it the largest field in Europe. The total proven reserves in various 
small fields, both offshore and onshore, amount to approximately 300 bcm. In 
addition to the current proven reserves, the future producible reserves (i.e. 
reserves that can be expected on the basis of seismic surveys, but have not 
been confirmed by drilling), are estimated to add another 200-570 bcm. Out of 
the estimated future reserves one third is estimated to be located onshore and 
two thirds offshore. 
11.2.2. 
Exports 
Total exports in 2010 were 53.33 bcm, all of which were via pipeline.  
Approximately 44% of the exported volumes in 2010 went to Germany, 
followed by Italy (15%) and UK (14.5%) as shown in Figure 59. The 
97
Institute of Economic Studies (2001), Lessons from the Dutch Disease: Causes, Treatment, 
and Cures, Working paper series W01:06, available at: 
https://ioes.hi.is/publications/wp/w0106.pdf 
98
Ministry of Economic Affairs, Dutch Government (2009) Gas production in the Netherlands, 
available at: http://www.sodm.nl/sites/default/files/redactie/gas_letter_eng.pdf 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
adjust size of pdf file; best pdf compressor
C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft
Support fast Word and PDF conversion with original document page size remained. Microsoft Office Word 2003 (.doc) and 2007 (.docx) versions are available.
change paper size in pdf; batch reduce pdf file size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
97 
production of gas from the Groningen field was used to absorb seasonal 
fluctuations
99
. All of the excess gas produced was exported to EU countries. 
Even though domestic production always exceeded domestic gas 
consumption needs, Gasunie has decided to import gas. This was because 
the commitments agreed for exports and domestic consumption structurally 
exceeded the average production ceiling of 80 bcm
100
. This ceiling was set by 
the third Energy Policy Paper, in 1995, and concerns all Dutch fields. Since 
the production from the Groningen field was the difference between the 
national production ceiling and the expected production from the small fields, 
the ceiling acted as a production limit for the Groningen field. The production 
ceiling was part of the small fields policy to prolong the life of the Groningen 
gas field.  
Figure 59 Netherlands Gas Export Markets 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011 
Exports of total goods and services increased from less than 40% of GDP in 
the 1960s to 65% in the 1980s, as shown in Figure 60
101
99
Ministry of Economic Affairs, Dutch Government (2009) Gas production in the Netherlands, 
available at: http://www.sodm.nl/sites/default/files/redactie/gas_letter_eng.pdf 
100
Ministry of Economic Affairs, Dutch Government (2009) Gas production in the 
Netherlands, available at: http://www.sodm.nl/sites/default/files/redactie/gas_letter_eng.pdf 
101
T Gylfason, 2001, Natural resources and economic growth what is the connection, 
available at:  https://notendur.hi.is/gylfason/pdf/kievshort.pdf 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
98 
Figure 60 Exports of Goods and Services in the Netherlands, 1960-1996 
11.2.3. 
Production 
Gas production in the Netherlands was 71 bcm in 2010. Gas production was 
at relatively low levels in 1970, but during the following seven years 
production increased almost exponentially reaching more than 80 bcm in 
1976. However, after 1977, production was falling gradually reaching 55 bcm 
in 1988. Thereafter, production of gas increased gradually reaching a high 
level of 77 bcm in 1996, while remaining stable around 60 cm from 2000 until 
2009, as shown in Table 28 and Figure 61. 
Table 28 Netherlands Gas Production (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
62.4 60.3 58.1 68.5 62.5 61.6 60.5 66.6 62.7 70.5 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
99 
Figure 61 Netherlands Gas Production 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
11.2.4. 
Consumption 
Gas consumption in 2010 was 44 bcm, which represents an increase of 13% 
compared to the 2000 consumption level (39 bcm). The change in gas 
consumption in the Netherlands is shown in Table 29 and Figure 62. The 
biggest gas consumer is the power generation sector. 
Table 29 Netherlands Gas Consumption (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
40.0 39.8 40.0 40.9 39.3 38.1 37.0 38.6 38.9 43.6 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
0.0
10.0
20.0
30.0
40.0
50.0
60.0
70.0
80.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm / year
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
100 
Figure 62 Netherlands Gas Consumption 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
11.2.5. 
Reserves/Production 
The reserves/production ratio is 1200/70.5 = 17 years. 
11.2.6. 
Reserves/Consumption 
The reserves/consumption ratio is 1200/ 43.6 = 28 years 
11.2.7. 
Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
Contributions of natural gas rents to Netherlands’ GDP are as shown in Table 
30 and Figure 63. 
Table 30 Netherlands Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
1.1 
1.5 
1.7 
2.4 
2.1 
1.8 
2.6 
1.1 
Source: World Bank 
32.0
34.0
36.0
38.0
40.0
42.0
44.0
46.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm / year
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
101 
Figure 63 Netherlands Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP)
Source: World Bank 
11.3. Gas Production Facilities 
Since the start of gas production in the Netherlands 3,000 bcm of gas has 
been produced. Despite this, the reserves and resource base remains large; 
this is largely explained by the vast size of the Groningen gas field
102
The distribution of gas fields and their areal extent can be seen in Figure 64.  
102
EBN (2011) Focus on Dutch gas, available at: 
http://www.ebn.nl/files/2011_06_01_ebn_focus_on_dutch_gas_2011.pdf 
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Year
Natural Gas Rent Contribution (% of GDP)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested