asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Change font size fillable pdf software Library cloud windows .net azure class International_ReportV911-part562

International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
102 
Figure 64 Netherlands Gas Fields  
Source: NAM (2011)
103
Given the discovery of the Groningen field in 1959, Dutch gas production was 
almost entirely concentrated in this gas field. However, a growing awareness 
of the need to preserve this field
104
and the necessity for exploration of 
smaller fields led to the development of the small fields policy. This policy was 
formalised in the Gas Act which obliges Gasunie to purchase all gas produced 
from small fields
105
. This regime acts as a safety net for oil companies by 
assuring them that they will be able to sell their gas at market prices and also 
providing them with a choice to either sell their gas to Gasunie or to another 
buyer. The Groningen field acts as a buffer stock, balancing the differences in 
supply and demand, as well as seasonal differences.  
The high dependence on small fields for Dutch gas production is shown by 
the fact that, approximately two thirds of the total gas currently produced 
comes from small fields. The small fields policy has lowered the risk of gas 
103
Available at: 
http://www.nlog.nl/resources/Jaarverslag2009/NL/2009_map_gas_oil_reservoirs_NL.pdf 
104
Not only because of its size but also its good capabilities for acting as a flexible producer 
to balance supply and demand 
105
Ministry of Economic Affairs, Dutch Government (2011) Gas production in the 
Netherlands, available at: http://www.sodm.nl/sites/default/files/redactie/gas_letter_eng.pdf 
Change font size fillable pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
can pdf files be compressed; best pdf compression
Change font size fillable pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change pdf page size; pdf page size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
103 
supply in the Netherlands. Given the same analogy of small fields and the 
Groningen field usage, both onshore and offshore, the Netherlands will be 
able to continue production at the same rate until approximately 2030. 
11.4. Gas Export and Import Facilities 
Since the beginning of gas production in the Netherlands, the level of 
production was around twice the level of consumption. The Netherlands have 
always been a gas exporting country and more than 55 bcm were exported to 
other EU member states in 2010.  
There are three import and export points:  
 Germany interconnector (Trans Europa Naturgas Pipeline, capacity 
15.5 bcm)  
 Belgium interconnector (WEDAL, capacity 10 bcm) 
 Uk interconnector (Bacton-Balgzand Line, capacity 16 bcm) 
Gas Transport Services (GTS) is responsible for these interconnectors. An 
‘entry/exit’ system applies to the gas transportation system.  The entry and 
exit licences are granted on an individual basis, without the need to report the 
specific transport route for the gas. In this way, the system is more accessible, 
which facilitates the trading of gas. 
Gasunie is responsible for the operation of the high- pressure transmission 
which is illustrated in Figure 65. The network consists of 11,500 km of 
pipeline.  
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in to add text field to specified PDF file position Support to change font size in PDF form.
advanced pdf compressor; batch pdf compression
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
can a pdf file be compressed; best way to compress pdf file
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
104 
Figure 65 Netherlands Gas Pipeline System 
Source: ECN 
The key position of the Netherlands in the gas market is attributed to its 
existing infrastructure, the rich gas supplies and its central location within 
Europe. In 2010 gas imports amounted to approximately 17 bcm, the transit 
volumes being a significant part of this
106
. The main suppliers of gas imports 
are Norway (48% of imports in 2010) and Russia (24% of imports).
Netherlands does not currently possess any operating LNG terminal. 
However, an LNG terminal, for importing purposes, with a 12 bcm annual 
potential is under construction near Rotterdam. A number of foreign 
companies – Dong Energy, OMV Gas International, Essent and E.On 
Ruhrgas – have each taken a 5% share in the terminal
107
11.5. Industry Organisation 
The gas market in the Netherlands is divided into the production sector of the 
natural gas industry, which is privately owned, and the wholesale sector which 
106
Ministry of Economic Affairs, Dutch Government (2009) Gas production in the 
Netherlands, available at: http://www.sodm.nl/sites/default/files/redactie/gas_letter_eng.pdf 
107
Global Legal Group (2011) The International Comparative Guide to: Gas regulation 2011, 
available at: http://www.iclg.co.uk/khadmin/Publications/pdf/4168.pdf 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
reader pdf reduce file size; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
pdf compression settings; adjust pdf page size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
105 
is partly private and partly state owned. The structure of the production of 
natural gas, in 2008, was characterised by monopolistic competition. The 
market was controlled by eleven producers with the dominant player being 
NAM accounting for about 75% of the domestic market
108
.  
GasTerra, a half state owned company (Shell 25% and Esso 25%) is 
responsible for buying gas from all NAM fields and selling the produced gas to 
downstream companies.  
The high-transmission transport network is owned by Gas Transport Services 
(GTS, 100% state owned). The gas market comprises of sixteen registered 
regional network operators, the majority of which were state owned (51%), 
and the rest privately owned (49%). The network and trading activities are 
legally unbundled, while tariffs are regulated by the Dutch regulator (DTe)
109
Energie Beheer Nederland B.V. (EBN) which is fully state owned plays an 
important role in the upstream sector.  EBN is always the designated joint 
venture partner of any private company in the gas production sector and 40% 
of production activities  belong to EBN. EBN has also the right to participate in 
exploration activities of off shore fields, given the request from the exploration 
company
110
The downstream gas sector in the Netherlands is fully regulated by the 
market, since 2004, with no state intervention. There are approximately thirty 
parties currently involved in this market, but Essent, Eneco, Nuon and Delta 
together represent 85% of retail market share and are the dominant players.  
11.6. Gas Regulatory Structure 
The Dutch gas system is often referred to as the ‘Gas Building’ (Gasgebouw).  
The Gas Building was first established given the discovery of the Groningen 
field and its vast size.  A production licence for the Groningen field was issued 
to NAM under the obligation that NAM would enter into a general partnership 
(the Maatschap Groningen) with EBN
111
. NAM has the majority of financial 
shares of the partnership (60%), but the voting rights are shared equally 
between the partners. The Maatschap Groningen entered into a gas sales 
agreement with Gasunie, which was a joint venture of Shell and ExxonMobil 
108
Energy Delta Institute (2011) Country Gas Profile: Netherlands, available at: 
http://www.energydelta.org/mainmenu/edi-intelligence-2/our-services/Country-gas-
profiles/country-gas-profile-netherlands 
109
Energy Delta Institute (2011) Country Gas Profile: Netherlands, available at: 
http://www.energydelta.org/mainmenu/edi-intelligence-2/our-services/Country-gas-
profiles/country-gas-profile-netherlands 
110
Dutch Ministry of Economic and Agricultural Affairs (2010) Economic Impact of the Dutch 
Gas Hub Strategy on the Netherlands, available at:  
http://www.brattle.com/_documents/UploadLibrary/Upload899.pdf
111
Global Legal Group (2011) The International Comparative Guide to: Gas regulation 2011, 
available at: http://www.iclg.co.uk/khadmin/Publications/pdf/4168.pdf 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page
change paper size pdf; pdf custom paper size
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET RasterEdge.Imaging. Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf files optimized; best way to compress pdf files
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
106 
(each 25%) and the state of Netherlands (50%), which covers the whole level 
of production from the Groningen field. 
The exploration and production activities of gas in the Netherlands are 
dictated by the Mining Act, which came into effect in 2003. According to the 
Act, exploration and production of Dutch gas should be done with the 
participation of EBN, which has a 40% share in the production of gas
112
Concerning the transmission of gas, GTS is fully responsible for the 
maintenance and operation of the national high pressure transmission 
network. GTS is now fully state owned, given its unbundling from Gas Terra in 
2005
113
.  
The regional gas networks are operated by 12 regional network operators. In 
most cases these operators are held by the original energy distribution 
companies, which in turn are held by regional authorities.  The Gas Act 
dictates the access to the networks.  
In 1970s the Small Field Policy (SFP) became the regulatory framework which 
called for the maximisation of production from small fields. According to SFP, 
Gasunie was obliged to buy gas from any producer of a small gas field at a 
high load factor at a reasonable price related to the market value of gas and 
producers were obliged to sell the gas to Gasunie. Since 1996, the producers’ 
obligation changed into an option, Gasunie (and since 2006 GasTerra, 50% 
state owned, Shell 25% and ExxonMobil 25%), however, still has the 
obligation to offer a market value price for all Dutch small fields. Gasunie 
started importing gas through long-term contracts in 1980s, price based on 
coal-parity. The SFP has proven to be highly successful.  
11.7. Similarities to Israel 
There are similarities between the Netherlands and Israel: 
 Gas demand in both countries is growing rapidly primarily through 
increased use of gas for power generation 
 The population density of the Netherlands is very similar to that of 
Israel although the population level in the Netherlands is about twice 
that of Israel 
 Both Israel and the Netherlands have a state-owned gas transmission 
system 
 Large gas discoveries early on vastly exceeded domestic 
requirements. The value of gas exports is (potentially in the case of 
Israel) very large in relation to the economy and can have a deleterious 
112
Global Legal Group (2011) The International Comparative Guide to: Gas regulation 2011, 
available at: http://www.iclg.co.uk/khadmin/Publications/pdf/4168.pdf 
113
Global Legal Group (2011) The International Comparative Guide to: Gas regulation 2011, 
available at: http://www.iclg.co.uk/khadmin/Publications/pdf/4168.pdf 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
107 
impact on other industries through the effect on exchange rates (‘Dutch 
disease’) 
11.8. Differences to Israel 
There are differences between the Netherlands and Israel: 
 Gas plays a much more important role in the economy of the 
Netherlands than does in Israel. Looking at the energy mix of Israel 
and the Netherlands gas represented 20% of Israel’s energy mix in 
2010, while the relevant figure for the Netherlands was 39%.  
 The Netherlands has open borders between it and its neighbours in the 
European Union allowing it freely to export and import gas and acting 
as a European gas trading hub 
11.9. Lessons Leant 
The following are the main lessons: 
 The use of a large field (Groningen) in the Netherlands as initially and 
exporter and later a swing producer may have some relevance for the 
potential development of the large Leviathan field in Israel 
 Exports – as in the small fields policy - are needed to encourage further 
exploration when reserves are already high, together with designating 
a strategic reserve 
 Although initially the Netherlands took no action in conserving its gas 
supplies and commenced exporting, eventually the small fields policy 
has succeeded in prolonging the life of Dutch gas production 
 Despite the initial currency appreciation that resulted from gas exports, 
which initially reduced the competitiveness of manufacturing and 
service exports (i.e. Dutch Disease), empirical evidence suggests that 
the increase in gas exports did not have a long lasting negative effect 
on economic growth, nor on total exports. Exports of total goods and 
services increased from less than 40% of GDP in the 1960s to 65% in 
the 1980s 
12. Norway 
12.1. Key Issues 
Norway is a major producer and exporter of gas, but not a large consumer. 
Norway is the second largest gas exporter in Europe (2010). Norway provides 
much of Western Europe's gas requirements
114
.Domestic use of gas amounts 
to a very small percentage of the country’s gas production (around 
5%)
115
.Consumption of natural gas in Norway is limited to offshore power 
114
Kingdom of Norway, U.S Department of State, July 2011
115
Norway Oil and Gas Security, IEA, 2011. 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
108 
generation (3.5 bcm) and onshore methanol production and gas processing (1 
bcm). 
Norway has an abundance of two forms of energy: hydroelectric power and 
petroleum resources. The former provides the bulk of domestic energy use 
while the latter is exported. About half of Norway’s 65,000 largest lakes are 
situated at elevations of at least 1,650 feet (500 metres); about one-fifth of the 
country lies 2,950 feet (900 metres) or more above sea level; and 
predominantly westerly winds create abundant precipitation. As a result, 
Norway has tremendous hydroelectric potential
116
and hydroelectricity meets 
virtually all Norway’s electrical consumption needs.  
12.2. Basic Data 
12.2.1. 
Proven Reserves 
As at 31 December 2010 Norway had 2000 bcm of proven gas reserves 
which compares with 1700 bcm as at 31 December 1990. 
12.2.2. 
Exports 
Total exports in 2010 were 100.59 bcm of which 95.88 bcm were via pipeline 
and 4.71 bcm were via LNG. The two largest export markets were United 
Kingdom (26.57 bcm via pipelines and LNG) and France (14.15 bcm via 
pipelines and LNG). 
12.2.3. 
Production 
Gas production in 2010 was 106.4 bcm and has doubled over the last ten 
years. Details of the production are shown in Table 31 and Figure 66 
Table 31 Norway Gas Production (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
53.9 65.5 73.1 78.5 85.0 87.6 89.7 99.3 103.7 106.4 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
116
Norway Encyclopaedia Britannica
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
109 
Figure 66 Norway Gas Production 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
12.2.4. 
Consumption 
Gas consumption in 2010 was 4.1 bcm and consumption has been 
reasonably stable since 2001 as shown in Table 32 and Figure 67. 
Table 32 Norway Gas Consumption (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
3.8 
4.0 
4.3 
4.6 
4.5 
4.4 
4.3 
4.3 
4.1 
4.1 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
0.0
20.0
40.0
60.0
80.0
100.0
120.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm/year
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
110 
Figure 67 Norway Gas Consumption 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
12.2.5. 
Reserves/Production 
The reserves/production ratio is 2000/106.4 = 19 years. 
12.2.6. 
Reserves/Consumption 
The reserves/consumption ratio is 2000/4.1 = 488 years 
12.2.7. 
Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
Contributions from natural gas rents to Norway’s GDP are as shown in Table 
33 and Figure 68. 
Table 33 Norway Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2.7 
4.5 
4.4 
6.6 
5.8 
5.1 
7.3 
3.6 
Source: World Bank 
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm/year
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
111 
Figure 68 Norway Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP)
Source: World Bank 
12.3. Gas Production Facilities 
All of the oil and gas production in Norway is offshore. The gas is transported 
by pipeline to land-based receiving terminals for processing before further 
transport to Continental Europe. In a few instances the gas is processed 
offshore and transported directly to the UK and the Netherlands.  
There are three major receiving terminals in Norway, at Kårstø north of 
Stavanger, at Kollsnes west of Bergen and Tjeldbergodden some distance 
west of Trondheim. The Kårstø terminal is the oldest and largest and 
processes natural gas and gas condensate. The Kollsnes terminal processes 
natural gas from the very large Troll-field (non-associated gas field). The 
Tjeldbergodden terminal receives natural gas from the Heidrun field and is the 
site of a methanol plant. Natural gas to Continental Europe is compressed 
and transported from Kårstø and Kollsnes
117
 
12.4. Gas Export and Import Facilities 
The Norwegian gas transportation system is shown in Figure 69. The 
Norwegian gas transport system is extensive and consists of a network of 
seven 800 km of pipelines with a capacity of about 120 bcm.  
117
Ministry of Petroleum and Energy; Natural Gas in Norway and the Mid-Nordic Gas Pipeline 
Study, Jon Steinar Guomundsson. 2001 
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Year
Natural Gas Rent Contribution (% of GDP)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested