asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Adjust size of pdf SDK Library service wpf .net winforms dnn International_ReportV95-part568

International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
42 
One of the key issues with Canada could be the management of natural gas 
reserved within the country over the next decade, with regards to 
consumption and export of the resource. 
6.2. Basic Data 
6.2.1. Proven Reserves 
As at 31 December 2010 Canada had 1700 bcm of proven gas reserves 
which compares with 2700 bcm as at 31 December 1990. 
6.2.2. Exports 
Total exports in 2010 were 92.40 bcm of which all 92.40 bcm were via 
pipeline. The only export market was the United States of America. 
6.2.3. Production 
Gas production in 2010 was 159.8 and it has been reasonably stable over the 
last ten years. Details of the production are shown in Table 11 and Figure 25. 
Table 11 Canada Gas Production (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
186.5 187.9 184.7 183.7 187.1 188.4 182.5 176.4 163.9 159.8 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
Figure 25 Canada Gas Production 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
0.0
20.0
40.0
60.0
80.0
100.0
120.0
140.0
160.0
180.0
200.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm/year
Adjust size of pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size fillable pdf; pdf file size limit
Adjust size of pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
adjust size of pdf in preview; change file size of pdf
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
43 
6.2.4. Consumption 
Gas consumption in 2010 was 93.8 bcm and consumption has been 
reasonably stable since 2001 as shown in Table 12 and Figure 26. 
Table 12 Canada Gas Consumption (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
88.2 90.2 97.7 95.1 97.8 96.9 95.2 95.5 94.4 93.8 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
Figure 26 Canada Gas Consumption 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
6.2.5. Reserves/Production 
The reserves/production ratio is 1700/159.8 = 11 years. 
6.2.6. Reserves/Consumption 
The reserves/consumption ratio is 1700/93.8 = 18 years 
6.2.7. Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
Natural gas contributes to Canada’s GDP as shown in Table 13 and Figure 
27. 
0.0
20.0
40.0
60.0
80.0
100.0
120.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm/year
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file that, you are also able to adjust various image control the annotation shapes, the outline size (width and
best compression pdf; optimize scanned pdf
C# Image: Zoom Image and Document Page in C#.NET Web Viewer
jpeg), gif, bmp (bitmap), tiff / multi-page tiff, PDF, etc. APIs for Visual C# .NET developers to adjust the image & document page viewing size with this
change font size in pdf file; change paper size pdf
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
44 
Table 13 Canada Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
1.0 
2.0 
1.9 
3.0 
2.4 
2.0 
2.8 
0.6 
Source: World Bank 
Figure 27 Canada Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
Source: World Bank 
6.3. Gas Production Facilities 
In Canada, the main gas-producing area is the Western Canadian 
Sedimentary Basin, with Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan 
accounting for 83%, 13% and 4% of its production respectively. In Ontario, the 
southern Yukon and Northwest Territories, minor onshore established 
reserves also exist.  
Offshore production at Sable Island, Nova Scotia) commenced in 1999. The 
Hibernia Project (offshore Newfoundland and Labrador) also produces natural 
gas, which is used for on-site operations and reservoir injection.  
There is a large gas pipeline network in Canada shown in Figure 28 which is 
regulated by the National Energy Board (NEB). 
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Year
Natural Gas Rent Contribution (% of GDP)
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
font type "Times New Roman", size "16", and style "Bold"), and then adjust brush color provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf files optimized; change font size in fillable pdf form
C# PowerPoint: How to Set PowerPoint Rendering Parameters in C#
this SDK to render PowerPoint (2007 or above) slide into PDF document or Generally, you are allowed to set image resolution, image size, batch conversion and
change font size pdf; change font size in pdf comment box
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
45 
Figure 28 Canada Natural Gas Pipelines 
Source: National Energy Board 
6.4. Gas Export and Import Facilities 
Figure 29  shows the exports of gas from Canada to the USA. The main 
destinations for the exports are the Central, Midwest and Pacific Northwest 
regions. Canada also imports natural gas from the United States (for example, 
in Ontario) where and when it is cheaper to obtain than from Western Canada 
and to take advantage of existing pipeline infrastructure and storage 
facilities
47
47
Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resources, Natural Resources Canada: Atlas of Canada
C# PDF: Use C# APIs to Control Fully on PDF Rendering Process
PDF document PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(@"c:\sample.pdf"); // compute zoom new Rectangle(0, 0, originalWidth, originalHeight), size); // adjust with a
change font size pdf form reader; change page size of pdf document
VB.NET Excel: VB Methods to Set and Customize Excel Rendering
on the fixed image size ration that the size is limited by Adjust Image Scaling Factor. supports converting Excel to other document files, like PDF with online
pdf font size change; pdf page size limit
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
46 
Figure 29 Canada Natural Gas Exports (bcfd) 
Source: National Energy Board. 
Although gas production in Canada is much lower than that of the USA, 
Canada consumes significantly less than it produces allowing it to export the 
surplus to the USA. 
Canada currently has one operating LNG import facility, the Canaport terminal 
in Saint John, New Brunswick.  There is a proposed LNG export facility in the 
Port of Kitimat, British Columbia
48
 
Canada first exported natural gas in 1891 from the Bertie-Humberstone field 
in Welland County to Buffalo, New York. Gas was later exported to Detroit 
from the Essex field through a 20cm diameter pipeline under the Detroit River. 
In 1897, the pipeline stretched the Essex gas supply to its limit with the 
extension of exports to Toledo, Ohio. This prompted the Ontario government 
to revoke the licence for the pipeline and in 1907 the province passed a law 
prohibiting the export of natural gas and electricity. 
By early 1930, there was talk of a pipeline from Turner Valley to Toronto.  A 
parliamentary committee looked into ways to inject gas down old wells, set up 
carbon black plants or export the gas to the United States. Another proposal 
called for the production of LNG. 
48
Liquefied Natural Gas, Natural Resources Canada, www.nrcan.gc.ca
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
Support rendering image to a PDF document page, no change for image size. Able to adjust and customize image resolution to meet various C# PDF conversion
adjust size of pdf file; batch reduce pdf file size
C# Word: How to Draw Text, Line & Image in C#.NET Word Project
copy the sample codes below to adjust text properties such as image color, picture size, location of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change font size in pdf; best way to compress pdf file
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
47 
Further discoveries in Alberta led to the demand from the producers to export 
gas to the USA. Before giving approval, the provincial government appointed 
the Dinning Natural Gas Commission to inquire into Alberta's likely reserves 
and future demand. In its March 1949 report, the Dinning Commission 
supported the principle that Alberta should have first call on provincial natural 
gas supplies, and that Canadians should have priority over foreign users if an 
exportable surplus developed. Alberta accepted the recommendations of the 
Dinning Commission, and later declared it would only authorise exports of gas 
in excess of a 30-year supply. 
Shortly thereafter, Alberta's Legislature passed the Gas Resources 
Conservation Act, which gave Alberta greater control over natural gas at the 
wellhead, and empowered the Conservation Board to issue export permits. 
This led to the creation of the Alberta Gas Trunk Line (AGTL), which gathered 
gas from wells in the province and to deliver it to exit points. 
There were many reasons for the creation of AGTL. One was that the 
provincial government considered it sensible to have a single gathering 
system in Alberta to feed export pipelines, rather than a number of separate 
networks. Another was that pipelines crossing provincial boundaries and 
those leaving the country fall under federal jurisdiction. By creating a separate 
entity to carry gas within Alberta, the provincial government stopped Ottawa's 
authority at the border. 
The federal government, like Alberta, treated natural gas as a resource that 
was so important for national security that domestic supply needed to be 
guaranteed into the foreseeable future before exports would be allowed. 
Westcoast Transmission Co. Ltd. was the first applicant to receive permission 
to export gas from Alberta in 1951 although its initial application was rejected. 
Westcoast received permission in 1952 to take 1.4 bcm/year of gas out of the 
Peace River area of Alberta for five years. The company subsequently made 
gas discoveries across the border in British Columbia which further supported 
the scheme. However, the United States Federal Power Commission (later 
the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) rejected the Westcoast proposal 
for imports to the USA. Westcoast returned with a revised proposal, found a 
new participant in the venture, and received FPC approval. Construction 
began on Canada's first major gas export pipeline. 
The regulatory process for Transcanada Pipeline Ltd (TCPL) proved long and 
arduous. After rejecting proposals twice, Alberta finally granted its permission 
to export gas from the province in 1953.  
At first, the province waited for explorers to prove gas reserves sufficient for 
its thirty-year needs, intending to only allow exports in excess of those needs.  
C# Word: Set Rendering Options with C# Word Document Rendering
& raster and vector images, such as PDF, tiff, png rendering application still enables users to adjust and set developers can choose a target size or resolution
adjust pdf size preview; 300 dpi pdf file size
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Code for Adjusting Image Size. In order to resizer control add-on, can I adjust the sizes of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change paper size in pdf; reader compress pdf
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
48 
After clearing this hurdle, the federal government virtually compelled TCPL 
into a merger with Western pipelines. When this reorganized TCPL went 
before the Federal Power Commission for permission to sell gas into the 
United States, the Americans welcomed it 
49
50
51
Not until the implementation of the Canada-United States Free Trade 
Agreement (signed in 1988) did natural gas become a freely traded 
commodity between the US and Canada. 
NEB prepared a forecast of the future use of Canada’s gas
52
which is shown 
in Figure 30. This indicated that supply would be reduced in the future 
although demand continues to rise slowly giving an overall reduction in net 
exports. 
Figure 30 Canada NEB Gas Forecast 
Source: NEB 
6.5. Industry Organisation 
There are hundreds of oil & gas companies operating inside Canada varying 
from large international players such as Encana to small junior players based 
in Alberta. 
The process of rights issuance is based on a bidding system. It is an industry-
driven process and the bidding system is based on a single criterion; 
generally the amount of money a company will commit to explore a particular 
parcel and drill an exploration well in the first five years. The company bidding 
the greatest amount of money for a parcel is awarded the license. 
49
Earle Gray. Ontario's Petroleum Legacy: The birth, evolution, and challenges of a global 
industry (Edmonton: Heritage Community Foundation) 2008
50
Quoted in Peter McKenzie-Brown, Gordon Jaremko, David Finch, The Great Oil Age, 
Detselig Enterprises Ltd., Calgary; 1993
51
History of the Petroleum Industry in Canada. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_petroleum_industry_in_Canada
52
Canada's Energy Future: Infrastructure Changes and Challenges to 2020 - Energy Market 
Assessment 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
49 
When an operator decides that it is appropriate to develop a hydrocarbon 
discovery, it must convert the rights into a Production Licence and get 
approval to develop from the regulator by submitting a Development Plan. 
6.6. Gas Regulatory Structure 
In Canada's federal system of government, jurisdiction over energy is divided 
between the federal and provincial and territorial governments. NEB is an 
independent federal regulatory agency that regulates the Canadian energy 
industry. Its primary responsibilities include: 
 Inter-provincial and international oil and gas pipelines and power lines 
 Export and import of natural gas under long-term licenses and short-
term orders 
Provincial regulation of oil and natural gas activities, pipelines, and distribution 
systems is administered by provincial utility boards. The producing provinces 
impose royalties and taxes on oil and natural gas production; provide drilling 
incentives; and grant permits and licenses to construct and operate facilities. 
The consuming provinces regulate distribution systems and oversee the retail 
price of natural gas to consumers. 
6.7. Similarities to Israel 
There are limited similarities between Canada and Israel: 
 In the early days of the development of the industry there were calls for 
domestic consumption to be protected and exports limited 
 Canada has a neighbour with large requirements for gas (USA) which 
is similar to the situation in Israel (Europe)  
6.8. Differences to Israel 
There are some differences between Canada and Israel: 
 Producers are subject to both federal and provincial regulation in 
Canada whereas in Israel there is a single level of regulatory authority 
 Canada has extremely cold winters and gas is very important in 
heating 
 Canada has limited requirements for its gas and is able therefore to 
export significant quantities 
 There are no controls on export from Canada to the USA now as there 
is a single free trade area whereas Israel has no such obligation 
 Canada is reaching the point at which exports would be reduced into 
order to maintain domestic requirements 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
50 
6.9. Lessons Leant 
The following are the main lessons: 
 Alberta maintained a policy of protecting its own gas consumption by 
requiring a reserve of 30 years to be kept. This policy was in force from 
1953-88 and was only ended when Canada and the USA formed a free 
trade area. 
 Public pressure in the early days of the industry forced producers only 
to export gas when domestic markets were ensured. 
7. Egypt 
7.1. Key Issues 
With an annual domestic consumption of 45.1 bcm and LNG exports of 15.1 
bcm in 2010, the Egyptian gas market is large. Domestic gas demand has 
seen rapid growth over the last decade and has more than doubled since 
2000. The power generation sector, accounting for 55 % of total demand in 
2010 and industrial sectors (through fuel switching and dual fuel usage) 
accounting for close to 25 % have been the key drivers of gas demand in 
Egypt over the past two decades.  
Recent discoveries of large domestic natural gas reserves and falling oil 
production since the mid 1990’s have been the main reasons for the 
government to promote the expansion of domestic natural gas markets. 
Traditionally an oil exporting country, Egypt was a net crude oil importer for 
the first time in 2010.  
Egypt’s natural gas production today far exceeds its domestic consumption 
and it has been a natural gas exporter since 2005, exporting between 25% 
and 30% of domestic production over the last few years. In 2010, 15.2 bcm 
were exported.  
The initial decision to export gas was made as early as 1999 through the 
Government of Egypt’s (GoE) Integrated Gas Strategy until 2017. Falling oil 
exports, the associated reduced inflow of foreign currency and growing global 
natural gas demand were the main drivers for the decision to be taken. 
Increased gas exports would enable the petroleum sector to meet its liabilities 
to foreign partners and the additional revenues allowed Egypt to import the 
rest of the domestic market needs of LPG and gasoil. The policy of actively 
exporting gas would also significantly increase Foreign Direct Investment in 
Egypt. 
However, the priority of the government is to ensure that domestic gas market 
needs are met and to pursue an increased gasification strategy. The initial 
Gas Strategy therefore limited gas exports at 25% of domestic gas production 
capacity and only allowed exports for foreign investors under the premise that 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
51 
they also invest in local distribution companies. The Strategy was revised in 
2000 and now sets the limits of gas exports to 33% of the gas reserve base. 
The remaining gas reserves have to be equally split between domestic 
consumption (33%) and strategic reserve (33%). These limits are set out in 
the constitution and are valid until 2020.  
More recently the GoE has reaffirmed its strategy to ensure that supplies to 
domestic market should be prioritised over exports. In 2008, amid increasing 
domestic demand levels and growing public pressure against gas exports 
(particularly to Israel), GoE announced that no new gas exports would be 
made until the end of 2010. This has lead to delayed plans for export 
infrastructure expansion, most notably the delay to the expansion of the LNG 
plant at Damietta. To date, the freeze on new export agreements is still in 
place and Egypt is seeking to renegotiate tariffs on existing export contracts 
with Israel and Jordan. Drilling activities in Egypt have been falling since 
2008
53
, it is likely that much of this can be attributed to export restrictions, 
although the period has also seen continuing low domestic gas prices, a 
global economic downturn and unprecedented political instability in Egypt.   
A key issue for GoE is that domestic gas market prices are heavily 
subsidised. With increasing domestic demand levels, GoE will have to 
purchase a greater share of gas from its joint venture upstream partners. 
Even though the purchase price is reported to be capped at favourable (to 
GoE) prices (between $/MMBTU 3.5 and 3.65)
54
, the low domestic gas 
tariffs
55
mean increasing budgetary pressures on GoE. 
With proven reserves of 2,200 bcm and considering that 33% of strategic 
reserves have to be kept, sufficient gas reserves are in place until 2035
56
. If 
however, the allowed export limits are reached every year, the reserves would 
only last until 2025.   
Besides the Levant region, the main potential export markets for Egyptian gas 
at the time the export decision was taken were South European gas markets. 
This resulted in the construction and expansion of LNG liquefaction plants at 
Damietta and Idku which have been in operation since 2004 and have a 
combined capacity of 18 bcm. Export pipelines to Israel and Jordan have a 
capacity of 9 and 10 bcm per year respectively. The pipeline export facilities 
are currently very underutilised, while the LNG facilities are operating at below 
average utilisation of around 80%.  
53
http://www.egyptoil-gas.com/read_article_issues.php?AID=404 
54
However, the recent discoveries and developments are in deep offshore waters where 
drilling and development is very expensive, in contrast to the very low cost onshore gas fields 
initially developed in Egypt 
55
Gas prices range between $/3MMBTU (energy intensive customers) and $0.9 /MMBTU 
(residential users) 
56
This assumes a compound annual growth rate of 1.7 % until 2030 based on Potential of 
Energy Integration in Mashreq and surrounding countries (ESMAP, June 2010). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested