asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Can a pdf file be compressed application control utility azure web page .net visual studio International_ReportV98-part571

International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
72 
intended to add a third train to Tangguh’s first two trains, but has not yet 
proceeded with plans for this project. 
The next anticipated addition to Indonesia’s liquefaction capacity is the 
Donggi-Senoro LNG plant in Central Sulawesi. The project developers 
(Mitsubishi, Kogas, Pertamina, and Medco) signed a final investment decision 
in early 2011, and the 3 bcm/year plant is expected to be commercial in 2014. 
Inpex received government approval at the end of 2010 for the Masela 
liquefaction terminal in the Arafura Sea, but has delayed the expected start-up 
date of the floating LNG liquefaction terminal until 2018. 
8.5. Industry Organisation 
Most of the large international oil and gas companies are present in 
Indonesia’s upstream gas sector, with Total, ConocoPhillips and the state-
owned enterprise Pertamina producing than 50% of total gas production.  
Participation in the upstream gas sector requires the companies to sign a 
production sharing contract with BP MIGAS (the regulator). The contracts 
allocate the revenue shares between the production companies and the 
Government of Indonesia. Typically, the production companies will receive 30-
40% of revenue after deductions to cover operating costs.  
The New Oil and Gas Law No.22/2001 introduced a Domestic Market 
Obligation (DMO) for oil and gas, and require producers to set aside up to 
25% of production for domestic use. However, there are some uncertainties 
over the requirements, as the Constitutional Court in 2004 stated that the 
DMO should be equal to or more than 25%.  
Indonesia’s gas distribution utility Perusahaan Gas Negara (PGN) currently 
operates more than 3,500 miles of natural gas transmission and distribution 
pipelines. PGN operates around 82% of transmission network, while 
transmission network for exports to Singapore and Malaysia is operated by 
Pertagas, a subsidiary of the state-owned enterprise Pertamina. PGN also 
operates around 87% of all distribution networks, with the rest owned and 
operated by small private retailers, mostly for industrial use. 
8.6. Gas Regulatory Structure 
The Government institution responsible for overall policy and sector planning 
of the gas sector is the Directorate General of Oil and Gas (DGO&G) under 
the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (MEMR). The DGO&G is also 
responsible for allocating acreage through bidding rounds.  
After the reform and the implementation of the Oil and Gas Law No.22/2001, 
two new regulatory bodies were established: BP MIGAS to regulate upstream 
activities and BPH MIGAS to regulate downstream activities. Both regulators 
reports to the MEMR. Figure 44 summarises the regulatory structure of 
Indonesia’s gas sector. 
Can a pdf file be compressed - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in pdf comment box; pdf change font size
Can a pdf file be compressed - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change font size fillable pdf; 300 dpi pdf file size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
73 
BP MIGAS is the executive agency that signs the PSCs with production 
companies, and is responsible for monitoring the operation of PSCs, 
evaluating and approving plans for development and work programmes and 
budgets. BP MIGAS also provides policy advice and recommendations to 
DGO&G. 
BPH MIGAS regulates the operations of downstream activities, including 
setting tariffs for gas transmission and distributions to households and small 
customers.  
Another player in the regulatory structure is the Ministry of State Owned 
Enterprises (MSOE), which is responsible for supervision and monitoring of 
the operations of state-owned enterprises in the gas sector, including 
Pertamina and PGN. 
Figure 44 Indonesia Gas Sector Regulatory Structure 
Source: adapted from International Energy Agency (IEA), Energy Policy Review of Indonesia, 
2008
8.7. Similarities to Israel 
There are similarities between Indonesia and Israel: 
 Indonesia and Israel have a similar primary energy consumption fuel 
mix with both being dependent on oil as the main energy source 
Ministry of Energy and 
Mineral Resources
Directorate General for 
Oil and Gas
• Sectoralplanning, policy 
and industry development 
for upstream & 
downstream
• Preparation, management 
and awarding of acreage 
bidding rounds
BP MIGAS
• Responsible for upstream 
oil & gas activities from the 
time of signing of PSC
• Recommend policies of 
offering acreage
• Signs PSCs
• Evaluate & approve plans 
for development
• Approve work program  & 
budget
• Monitor operation of PSCs
• Appoint sellers of domestic 
share of oil & gas
BPH MIGAS
Responsible for downstream 
oil & gas activities including:
• Supervision of 
transmission and 
wholesale of gas
• Supervision of distribution 
and supply
• Setting transmission tariffs 
via pipelines
• Setting retail tariffs for 
households and small 
customers
Ministry of State Owned 
Enterprises
TOTAL, 37%
ConocoPhillip
s, 18%
Pertamina, 
15%
ExxonMobil, 
9%
Vico, 6%
PetroChina, 
5%
BP, 3%
Chevron, 3%
Kodeco, 
2%
CNOOC, 2%
Upstream
PGN, 82%
Pertamina 
(Pertagas), 
18%
Transmission
PGN, 87%
Private 
retailers, 
13%
Distribution
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET program, do you Originally, TIFF stands for Tagged Image File Format which can be compressed and
can pdf files be compressed; apple compress pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to PDF in a VB.NET Doc Imaging
A TIFF file can be compressed with several methods, but this If you want to restore the file with a smallest possible size, you should choose TIFF over PDF.
adjusting page size in pdf; pdf custom paper size
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
74 
 Both Indonesia and Israel are looking to increase their gas 
consumption and reduce their dependency on oil. Indonesia aims to 
increase gas consumption to 30% of total energy consumption by 
2025, while Israel aims to increase gas consumption by threefold by 
2015 
 Both Indonesia and Israel will need to increase investments in 
domestic gas infrastructure. The Indonesian domestic market is under 
developed due to the lack of investments in infrastructure. Israel on the 
other hand, has only started gas development in 2003 and the current 
energy infrastructures are not fully geared towards gas consumption 
outside the power sector. 
 Indonesia has improved the investment climate somewhat, however 
further policy clarification and more importantly, aligning domestic 
prices with international prices are necessary to attract more 
investments in infrastructure. Similarly, Israel needs to improve the 
investment climate in the gas sector to meet increasing domestic 
demand 
8.8. Differences to Israel 
There are differences between Indonesia and Israel: 
 Indonesia has been a gas producing and exporting country for around 
30 years, and has never imported natural gas. Israel was and still is a 
gas importing country 
 Indonesia is an archipelago, which makes development of gas 
pipelines difficult and therefore relies mostly on LNG terminals to 
transport gas. Israel has land borders with other countries, which 
makes export or imports of gas possible by pipelines 
8.9. Lessons Leant 
The following are the main lessons: 
 Indonesian gas production is geared towards export in the form of 
LNG, with less than 50% of production supplied to the domestic 
market.  
 Increasing domestic usage due to high oil prices coupled with 
Government’s policies to increase domestic consumption (such as the 
Domestic Market Obligation or DMO) has caused problems in terms of 
meeting LNG export obligations, and has slowed down investments in 
further gas development, also because of low domestic prices.  
 As domestic prices are low compared to international or export prices, 
developers are reluctant to increase their gas production since around 
25% of production will have to be sold to domestic buyers under the 
DMO. Export contracts are needed to undertake new investments 
 The lesson to be learnt is that domestic gas market obligations should 
be accompanied with cost reflective domestic prices. Setting domestic 
C# Word: How to Compress, Decompress Word in C#.NET Projects
a C# project in your VS program, you can simply copy below to compress the Word document file to a powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf font size change; change font size in pdf fillable form
C# Image: How to Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images Using C#.NET JP2
JPEG 2000 image codec SDK has provided can also help and decompress JPEG 2000 image file from local powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjust file size of pdf; change font size in pdf file
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
75 
prices close to export prices will give incentives to gas producers to 
meet both export and domestic market demands. 
9. Libya 
9.1. Key Issues 
Libya has significant gas reserves, the fourth largest in Africa. The country’s 
potential gas reserves are however still largely unexploited and are less 
explored than its oil reserves. Proven gas reserves currently stand at 1,549 
bcm but Libyan experts believe it is considerably larger, possibly 1,982 -2,832 
bcm or more. Libya's National Oil Corporation (NOC) said they could be 
approximately 3,398 bcm. Compared with other countries with similar or less 
gas reserves quantity, Libya’s gas production and exports are quite low.  
Political restrictions arising from international sanctions on Libya limited the 
growth of the gas industry and the full capacity utilization of the Marsa El 
Brega LNG plant. The huge potential for hydrocarbons discoveries that was 
expected following the lifting of the previous round of international sanctions in 
2003-04 was not realised under the Qadhafi regime. Libya was also severely 
affected by the recent civil war, with gas production and exports grinding to a 
halt for several months. Although, oil and gas production is gradually 
recovering to the pre-conflict level, the Economist Intelligence Unit posits that 
expansion of production in the sector is still likely to be slow once output has 
recovered from the effects of the war. 
9.2. Basic Data 
9.2.1. Proven Reserves 
As at 31 December 2010 Libya had 1,549 bcm of proven gas reserves which 
compares with 1,208 bcm as at 31 December 1990. 
9.2.2. Exports 
Total exports in 2010 were 9.75 bcm of which 9.41 bcm were via pipeline and 
0.34 bcm were via LNG. The two largest export markets were Italy (9.41 bcm) 
and Spain (0.34 bcm). 
9.2.3. Production 
Gas production in 2010 was 15.8 bcm. It has increased steadily over the last 
six years but has reached a plateau since 2008. Details of the production are 
shown in Table 22 and Figure 45. 
Table 22 Libya Gas Production (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
6.2 
5.9 
5.5 
8.1 11.3 13.2 15.3 15.9 15.9 15.8 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
compressed bitonal images into PDF files and decompress images from PDF files quickly with the smallest quality loss. The encoded images in PDF file can also
pdf compression settings; change pdf page size
VB.NET Image: JPEG 2000 Codec for Image Encoding and Decoding in
For example, you can use our VB.NET image online Integrate PDF, Tiff, Word compression add-on with JPEG 2000 and lossless compression in the same file stream.
change font size pdf fillable form; change file size of pdf document
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
76 
Figure 45 Libya Gas Production 
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011
9.2.4. Consumption 
Gas consumption in 2010 was 22.0 bcm and consumption has been growing 
steadily as shown in Table 23 and Figure 46. 
Table 23 Libya Gas Consumption (bcm) 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
5.4 
5.6 
4.8 
5.9 
5.8 
4.7 
5.3 
5.5 
6.0 
6.8 
Source: EIA, International Energy Statistics
0.0
2.0
4.0
6.0
8.0
10.0
12.0
14.0
16.0
18.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
b
cm / Year
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
level model to demonstrate pages in all document file. Our .NET TIFF Processing Toolkit can be incorporated & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change font size in pdf; can a pdf be compressed
VB.NET Image: Free VB.NET Guide to Convert Image to Byte Array
If necessary, you can also use this VB.NET Image Conversion Control to convert Word or PDF document to image file in VB.NET application.
best pdf compressor; best pdf compression
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
77 
Figure 46 Libya Gas Consumption 
Source: EIA, International Energy Statistics
9.2.5. Reserves/Production 
The reserves/production ratio is 1549/15.8 = 98 years. 
9.2.6. Reserves/Consumption 
The reserves/consumption ratio is 1549/6.8 = 226 years. 
9.2.7. Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
Natural gas contributes to Libya’s GDP as shown in Table 24 and Figure 47. 
Table 24 Libya Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP) 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2.6 
3.6 
3.5 
5.9 
5.9 
5.1 
5.6 
3.7 
Source: World Bank 
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
bcm / Year
VB.NET PowerPoint: How to Convert PowerPoint Document to TIFF in
can be compressed to reduce the file size by using LZW compression and can be converted to many other image and document formats, such as JPEG, GIF and PDF, by
reader pdf reduce file size; pdf compress
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
JPEG to PDF Converter can be used on Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion;
optimize scanned pdf; change font size in pdf text box
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
78 
Figure 47 Libya Natural Gas Rents (% of GDP)
Source: World Bank 
9.3. Gas Production Facilities 
About 80% of Libya’s gas reserves are located in the Sitre basin while the 
remainder lies in the Ghadames basin and Pelagian shelf. Major producing 
gas fields include Attahaddi, Hatieba, Defa-Waha, Zelten, Assoumoud and 
Sahl. Libya commenced associated gas production in the 1960s and natural 
gas production was about 8 bcm in 2004.  
Production rose significantly with the coming on stream of the Western Libya 
Gas Project. Sirte Oil Company (SOC) produces about 10 bcm per year of 
gas from Assoumoud, Nasser, Hatieba and Sahl fields. Eni and Arabian Gulf 
Oil Company (Agoco) also produce gas from the Bu' Attifel, Nafoora, Sarir, 
Bahr Essalam and Wafa fields
74
. The location of the gas fields and domestic 
pipelines can be seen (in red) in Figure 48. 
74
http://www.menas.co.uk/localcontent/home.aspx?country=73&tab=industry 
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Year
Natural Gas Rent Contribution (% of GDP)
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
79 
Figure 48 Libya Oil and Gas Production Facilities 
Source: African Energy 2011 (www.africa-energy.com) 
9.4. Gas Export and Import Facilities 
96% of Libya's gas exports go to Europe through the Greenstream pipeline, 
which extends from Melitah to Sicily. The Greenstream pipeline is an 
underwater gas pipeline that crosses the Mediterranean. It is part of the 
WLGP. Natural gas is piped from the Wafa concession and the offshore Bahr 
es Salam fields to Melitah, where it is treated for export. From Sicily, the 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
80 
natural gas flows to the Italian mainland. The Greenstream pipeline came 
online in 2004 and is operated by Eni in partnership with NOC
75
The Greenstream pipeline is shown Figure 49. 
Figure 49 Libya Greenstream Pipeline 
Source: Eni 
Libya's LNG plant in Marsa El Brega was built in the late 1960s by Esso and 
has a nameplate capacity of about 3.54 bcm per year.  Libya was the second 
country in the world (after Algeria in 1964) to export LNG in 1971.  However, 
U.S. sanctions prevented Libya from obtaining necessary technology to 
separate out LPG from the natural gas, thereby limiting the plant's output by 
over half of capacity. In 2010 LNG exports decreased to 0.34 bcm, all of 
which was exported to Spain
76
In May 2005 Shell signed a long-term gas exploration and development deal 
with NOC for the upgrade of the existing LNG plant at Marsa El Brega. Long-
delayed plans to rejuvenate and upgrade the plant by Shell may be revived 
75
http://www.eia.gov/countries/cab.cfm?fips=LY 
76
http://www.eia.gov/countries/cab.cfm?fips=LY 
International Gas Export Countries Review 
12 March 2012       
81 
under the new regime. Shell had also agreed to build a new LNG plant if it 
found enough gas, but the company's exploration efforts were unsuccessful
77
9.5. Industry Organisation 
Libya's natural gas industry is mostly state-run, although a number of 
international firms participate in the sector. The NOC has overseen the oil and 
gas sector since 2006, when Colonel Qadhafi dissolved the Ministry of Oil. 
NOC operates through several subsidiaries, the most significant being
78
:  
 Arabian Gulf Oil Company (Agoco), formed by NOC in 1979 to take 
over the assets of the BP and Hunt joint venture, as well as Amoseas 
(the Chevron and Texaco JV). Agoco's production comes from the 
Sarir, Nafoora and Messla fields. 
 Waha Oil Company (WOC), the largest of NOC's subsidiaries and was 
created by NOC to take over the operations of the US Oasis 
consortium - of Conoco, Marathon, Amerada Hess - when it was forced 
to abandon Libya due to sanctions. WOC operates the Sidra terminal.  
 Sirte Oil Company (SOC), established in 1981 to takeover Exxon's 
Libyan holdings, but later also took Grace Petroleum's assets when it 
departed Libya in 1986. Its assets include the Marsa El Brega LNG 
plant and it operates the Nasser, Raguba, Attahaddi and Assoumoud 
fields.  
 Zueitina Oil Company (ZOC) , created after the departure of Occidental 
Petroleum in 1986 to operate the five Intisar fields in the Sirte Basin, 
plus other interests previous held by Occidental. ZOC also operates 
the Zueitina terminal. ZOC is now owned by NOC (87.5 %) and OMV 
(12.5 %).  
NOC controls the gas industry and is responsible for gas exploration and 
production, processing, transmission, distribution and exports of gas and 
liquids. Gas production is mostly undertaken by SOC on behalf of NOC's Gas 
Projects Department, but WOC and Agoco also control significant reserves. 
NOC also has participation agreements with international companies and 
such agreements have developed into exploration and production sharing 
agreements. International companies that participate in exploration, 
production, and transportation of natural gas in Libya include Eni, BP, Shell, 
ExxonMobil and others. 
77
http://www.eiu.com/index.asp?layout=ib3Article&article_id=1868551171&pubtypeid=114246
2499&country_id=1200000320&category_id=775133077&rf=0 
78
http://www.menas.co.uk/localcontent/home.aspx?country=73&tab=industry 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested