asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Change font size pdf text box control software platform web page windows wpf web browser IPR%20(final)0-part631

1
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
M
ost CARIFORUM countries are members of the World
Trade Organization (WTO) and are therefore parties to the
WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual
Property (TRIPS).  This means that countries are required to
ensure that national legislation complies with these
international standards.  The development of intellectual
property legislation is a relatively new area for countries in
this region.  Several countries have made steps towards
modification of their laws.  However, much work remains to
be done in order to arrive at full compliance with TRIPS.
In order to assess the readiness of countries to meet full
TRIPS requirements by 1 January 2000, the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) commissioned a study to assess
the intellectual property (IP) regimes of five Caribbean
countries – Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica and
Trinidad and Tobago.  The consultants conducted extensive
research on national legislation and proposed
recommendations for improvement and overall TRIPS
compliance.  Administration and enforcement systems were
also examined.
The consultants found that legislation was uneven across
the countries and suggested that laws should be harmonised
– and resources accessed, maintained and implemented –
on a regional basis.  Though the deadline for TRIPS
compliance has passed, the original report still stands as a
useful document for outlining key concepts in intellectual
property law and major issues in legislating and enforcing
the law.
In this issue of TRADEWINS, we present highlights of the
original 1998 report with an emphasis on copyright,
trademarks and patents.    We hope that members of the
private sector will gain some insight into the need for
comprehensive and accessible legislation as a means of
protecting ideas and knowledge as essential elements of
trade.  Since legislation is currently being updated in several
countries in the region, we would suggest that readers contact
their national intellectual property agencies for information on
the status of local laws.
·
Copyright
·
Trademarks
·
Patents
·
Enforcement
·
Education
TRADEWINS
is designed with
Caribbean business in mind. The
Series is intended to bring issues of
trade policy to the private sector and
other interested parties
In
Thi
I
ss
u
e
Intellectual Property Rights in the
Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica and
Trinidad & Tobago
Change font size pdf text box - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
adjust pdf page size; pdf edit text size
Change font size pdf text box - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
change file size of pdf document; change page size pdf
2
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
BACKGROUND
Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind and is
divided into two categories.  Industrial property includes
inventions (protected by patents), trademarks, industrial
designs and geographic indications.  Copyright includes
literary and artistic works.   Intellectual property is crucial to
creative development and to the development of research and
trade.   Failure to protect intellectual property rights (IPRs) can
limit potential in both of these areas.  It can also result in loss
of revenue for small and large producers – and can create
tension among trading partners.
At the Uruguay Round of WTO talks (1986-1994), members
developed the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of
Intellectual Property (TRIPS).  The agreement came into effect
in April 1994  and was intended to provide a set of common
international rules on intellectual property.  The agreement
covers five main areas: basic principles; protection;
enforcement; dispute settlement; and special transitional
arrangements.
TRIPS aims to promote technological innovation and the
transfer and dissemination of technology in ways which are
beneficial to both producers and users.  Under TRIPS,
countries are expected to grant national treatment and Most-
Favoured Nation treatment to other WTO members.  They are
also expected to abide by the agreements of the World
Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), which were in force
prior to the establishment of TRIPS.
The agreement allowed developing countries a transitional
period of five years before full compliance.  Full compliance is
an indication of a country’s commitment to the international
agreement.  It also suggests that countries are prepared to
protect the intellectual property rights of its citizens – facilitating
research and creative development and setting clear
parameters for the conduct of trade in intellectual property.
Several CARIFORUM countries have moved towards
compliance.  However, more sustained and comprehensive
efforts must be undertaken.  An examination of issues facing
the Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad and
Tobago can bring key elements of intellectual property into
focus.
WHAT ARE THE ISSUES?
Intellectual property rights are relatively new as an area of law
and enforcement in the CARIFORUM region.  Consumers
(and often producers) are generally unaware of the value of
intellectual work and the scope of protection available to the
creators of such work.  There is often tension between notions
of individual and communal rights and not much appreciation
for the entitlement to be compensated for work of this nature.
Protection and support for intellectual property rights are key
to enforcement.  Protection under the law can take several
forms - including copyright, trademarks and patents.  Support
includes education, training and financial assistance.  As
knowledge-based industries become increasingly important
in the world of trade, it will become essential for developing
nations to identify and protect their intellectual resources.
A. Protection Under the Law
Copyright, trademarks and patents are the cornerstones of
much intellectual property legislation.  Although they are not
the only means by which material is protected, they do offer
some general principles for the preservation of intellectual
property rights. (For brief descriptions of selected other forms
of protection, see Annex I.)
i.
Copyright
The issue of copyright is particularly important in the area of
Caribbean culture and cultural identity and this is most evident
in the music industry.  Key problems include piracy and the
collection of royalties.  Musicians are often inadequately
compensated for use of their material and for performances
of their work.  In some instances, there is a highly developed
but unofficial “piracy industry”.
Creators in the countries investigated expressed the desire
for improvement in several areas, including the following:
protection, recourse to remedies and enforcement of rights
under copyright legislation; the return of royalties to creators;
adequate resources and power among police forces for
enforcing criminal remedies; and education of artists and
consumers on intellectual property rights and their value to
creators and to national economies.  Of particular interest to
many artists is the possibility of unauthorised copying via the
Internet.  Internet service providers (ISPs) are also concerned
about the possibility of inadvertently carrying infringing
What is Copyright?
Copyright is essentially the sole right to produce or
reproduce certain works, or any substantial part of
such works, in any material form.  A work qualifies
for copyright protection if it is an original literary,
dramatic, musical or artistic work.  (Computer
programmes are protected as literary works.)
Copyright arises once a work is created.  The author
of the work is generally the first owner of the work
but authors can assign, sell or license part or all of
their copyright to others.   The term of copyright
protection is generally the life of the author plus fifty
years after the author’s death.  Performers of works,
producers of sound recordings and broadcasters
have additional rights, e.g. performers have the sole
right to prevent broadcasting or communication of
their live performances to the public.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
change font size in pdf; pdf optimized format
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Support to add text, text box, text field and crop marks to PDF document. Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color.
best pdf compressor online; change font size pdf
3
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
material.
Several additional issues arise in the administration and
enforcement of copyright - exceptions, moral rights and
registration.
Exceptions
TRIPS allow members to provide exceptions or limitations to
copyright protection and these exceptions have traditionally
been determined locally, with a view to balancing the interests
of users and right holders.  These “special cases” must not
conflict with the normal exploitation or use of the work and
must not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of
the copyright holder.  The consultants found that there is some
concern among creators that the balance is currently in favour
of users.
Moral Rights
Moral rights of an author include the right to be associated
with the work, the right to remain anonymous and the right to
the integrity of the work.  These ensure that the true origin of
the work is known and that efforts are made to prevent any
modifications of a work, which might prejudice the honour, or
reputation of the author.
Registration
Registration of copyright cannot be a prerequisite for acquiring
copyright protection - this would be contrary to TRIPS and to
the WIPO Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and
Artistic Works.  However, voluntary registration may be a helpful
tool in enforcing rights and may encourage use and awareness
of copyright by local creators.  It may also remove the defence
of innocent infringement.  None of the countries studied
currently has a system of registration.  Countries will need to
determine whether a deposit of the work being registered will
also be required.  Though such deposits may serve to develop
an archive of cultural work, this may place additional burdens
on IP administration offices.
What the Report Recommended
§
A model law should be developed.  Trinidad and Tobago’s
legislation, with a few modifications, could serve as the
basis for developing the model.  (A model law will not
prevent countries from putting in culture-specific rights
such as Trinidad and Tobago’s unique right for “works of
mas’”.)
§
Moral rights of authors should continue to be protected.
(Such protection is already part of the Trinidad and Tobago
legislation suggested as a model.)
§
Exceptions to protection should be of the same nature
and extent in national laws.  Consensus should be
reached on acceptable norms and these should be
followed by all countries in the region.
§
A voluntary system of copyright registration - without
deposit of works - should be implemented.
§
Copyright collectives should aim to administer their rights
on a regional basis.  Licensing disputes between
collectives and users should for the moment be handled
by the courts.  Court procedures should be simplified
and expedited as far as possible.
§
Consideration could be given to a regional tribunal to
deal with disputes between collectives and users.
§
Education of the public should be actively pursued on a
regional basis.  (Such education will increase use of IPRs
and help curb piracy.)
§
The 1996 WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty
(WPPT) and WIPO Copyright Treaty (WCT) should be
implemented.
i.
Trademarks
Trademark applications have increased substantially over the
past decade with numbers increasing from 693 in 1990 to
2,270 in 1997 in Jamaica alone.  Three key instruments are
available to assist in the administration of trademarks: the
Trademark Law Treaty; the Nice Agreement Concerning the
International Classification of Goods and Services; and the
Madrid Protocol These agreements deal with questions of
registration, classification and centralisation of filing
respectively.
Of the countries surveyed in the original report, only Trinidad
and Tobago had signed the Trademark Law Treaty.  Both
Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados had acceded to the Nice
Agreement and Jamaica’s pending Trademarks Bill allowed
Copyright and National Legislation
Jamaica repealed and replaced its Copyright Act in
1993 with minor amendments in 1998.  Trinidad and
Tobago repealed and replaced its Copyright Act in 1996
in light of TRIPS and with the assistance of WIPO.  In
1998, the Bahamas passed its re-drafted Copyright Act
but the Act had not yet entered into force.  Guyana’s
Copyright Act was, in effect, the 1956 UK Copyright Act.
Barbados had re-drafted its Copyright Law, based
largely on Jamaica’s Copyright Act and this legislation
had been passed but had not yet entered into force.
The consultants found that legislation in Barbados,
Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago appeared to be
TRIPS-compliant with one notable difference being
accessibility of the language of the Trinidad and Tobago
legislation.  The Trinidad and Tobago legislation was
also thought to be capable of accommodating future
advances in technology.  The Bahamian legislation in
force in 1998 was out-of-date although the proposed
new legislation appeared to be TRIPS-compliant.  (The
consultants expressed some concern over compulsory
licensing and phono records.) The proposed system of
voluntary copyright registration (requiring a deposit of
works) is unique to the Bahamian approach.  Guyana’s
legislation was found to be out-of-date.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
300 dpi pdf file size; pdf markup text size
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change font size in pdf form field; change font size pdf text box
4
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
for future implementation of the Madrid Protocol.
The efficient administration of trademarks is crucial to
producers and consumers alike.  Trademarks suggest that
goods or services originate from a particular source and that
certain qualities or standards may be expected.  False use of
a trademark or the use of a mark resembling the original on
similar products may lead to significant confusion and could
be the cause of lengthy litigation.  Below are some of the
issues which need to be addressed in the administration of
trademarks.
Registered User System
A distinction is sometimes made between the right holder of
a trademark and the registered user of that mark.  Maintaining
a registered user system for trademarks is an administrative
burden and may deter right holders from registering their
marks.  A registered user system may also - depending on
the scope of the system - risk non-compliance with TRIPS.
The Bahamas, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago still
maintain systems which record trademark licence holders
as “registered users”.   Although registration of licences (in a
manner not inconsistent with TRIPS) may create a useful data
bank for those wishing to determine legitimate use of marks,
the administrative costs may exceed the value of such a data
bank.
Classification of Trademarks
Classification systems facilitate searches of the register and
help to avoid confusion over rights and usage of trademarks.
They may also promote administrative efficiency and
increased use of the system – particularly when automated.
The Trade Law Treaty requires countries to move towards the
classification system of the Nice Agreement.
Exhaustion
Exhaustion of intellectual property rights refers to the
relinquishing of control, by a right holder, over the distribution
of goods to which those rights are attached.  According to the
exhaustion concept, once an intellectual property right holder
has sold a product to which its intellectual property rights
are attached, that right holder cannot then prohibit the
subsequent resale of that product as his/her intellectual
property rights in that product are said to have been
“exhausted” by the first sale.
1
Exhaustion has economic implications for regional and
international trade.  It is somewhat controversial since it can
conflict with the concept of national jurisdiction.  However, it
is sometimes regarded as creating certainty for businesses.
At common law, the scope of exhaustion rights is generally
uncertain and varies with the particular IPR involved.
Jamaica’s draft Trade Marks Bill applies the principle of
exhaustion of rights in trademark on a CARICOM basis.  This
means that once legitimate goods are put on a CARICOM
market by the trademark owner, those goods may be freely
imported into Jamaica without any infringement of Jamaican
trademarks.   The principle of exhaustion also applies within
the European Union (EU).
What the Report Recommended
§
A model law should be developed.  Jamaica’s draft
legislation, with a few modifications, could be used as
the basis for the model.
§
Registration of licences should not be required in order
to obtain or maintain rights.
§
The need and scope for exhaustion of trademark rights
should be evaluated for implementation on a
harmonised regional basis.
§
The fees charged by trademark offices should be
increased to more closely reflect the true cost of
administration.  Self-funding agencies should also be
considered.
What is a Trademark?
A trademark is a symbol (a word, design, colour,
logo, device or any combination of these) used in
relation to goods or services and distinguishing one
trader’s goods or services from those of another.
Trademarks may be registered or unregistered.  An
owner’s rights in a registered trademark include the
exclusive right to prevent others from using the mark
for goods and services for which the mark is
registered (e.g. similar goods and services) where
confusion is likely to occur.  Under TRIPS, there is
a minimum seven year period of protection for a
registered trademark and this must be renewable
indefinitely.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
Trademarks and National Legislation
In 1998, the Trade Marks Act in effect in Jamaica
had been introduced in 1958 and based on the UK
Trade Marks Act of 1938.  Jamaica’s draft legislation
appeared essentially TRIPS-compliant and
contained elaborated definitions relating to
trademarks and signs.  Some concern was
expressed by consultants over the concept of
“registrable transactions” in the draft legislation. The
Trinidad and Tobago legislation was passed in 1957
and was also based on the UK Trade Marks Act of
1938.  A series of amendments (the latest in 1997)
retained the inaccessible language of the original
Act.  The system of registration was not compliant
with TRIPS and was administratively burdensome.
Barbados’ legislation was passed in 1981 and came
into force in 1985.  It appeared to be largely TRIPS-
compliant with the exception of issues related to
the protection of well-known trademarks and
customs measures to remedy the counterfeiting of
trademarks.  Laws in Guyana and the Bahamas
were not TRIPS-compliant and required significant
changes.  Protection for service marks and well-
known marks were noticeably absent.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Support to change font size in PDF form. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; List<BaseFormField
change paper size pdf; pdf file size
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Save text font, color, size and location changes to Other robust text processing features, like delete and remove PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
pdf file size limit; pdf font size change
5
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
§
Countries should adopt the principles of the Trademark
Law Treaty as a guide to harmonisation of administrative
practice.
§
The Nice Agreement on trademark classification should
be adopted by all countries.
§
Trademark office automation should be undertaken or
expedited if already underway.  Technical assistance and
funding should be secured to assist in the changeover.
§
Regionalised administration should be implemented.
§
Consideration should be given to future development of
a CARICOM-wide trademark right.
i.
Patents
Disclosure is a key element in the registration of patents.
Disclosure allows the government to make information on
the invention available to the public while at the same time
protecting the rights of the patent holder.   Knowledge of the
invention becomes available to the public and future
developments (in the way of research and investment) can be
made in the field.
Generally, there is very little patenting activity in the countries
studied.  There is a lack of appreciation for the patentability of
certain inventions as well as a suspicion that patenting will
benefit only foreign nationals. Much education is therefore
needed to ensure that local inventors – as well as consumers
and businesses – are aware of the benefits of patenting.  As
is the case with copyright and trademarks, systems of
patenting in the countries would benefit from automation and
from a revision of fee structures to more adequately reflect the
cost of examination and processing.  Since patent searching
is carried out on an international scale, regional automation
should be considered.
The administration and scope of patenting in the region will
also need to keep pace with international developments.
Below are some of the key areas of concern.
International Agreements
At the time of the original report, only Barbados and Trinidad
and Tobago had joined the Patent Cooperation Treaty.  The
treaty allows members to file an international application
specifying the countries in which it might later wish to apply at
a national level.   Such an arrangement is of value to inventors
who might wish to protect their inventions on a global scale
(and in a cost-effective manner).  It also provides useful
information (through searches of records) which might help
with applications at the local level.  Since the time of the original
report, WIPO’s Patent Law Treaty (2000) has come into effect.
Utility Certificates
Utility certificates are certificates offered in lieu of patents.
These certificates are often low-cost and may be offered
without the extensive search which is required in the patenting
process.  Under the Patents Act of Trinidad and Tobago, utility
certificates provide their holders with rights for ten years (as
opposed to twenty years offered by patents) if the invention is
novel and involves an innovative step.  Application for a utility
certificate may, under certain conditions, be upgraded to an
application for a patent.
Several countries (e.g. many in the European Union) provide
utility certificates as a low-cost alternative to patents although
the US and Canada offer no such protection.  Utility certificates
are not prohibited under TRIPS.  However, they may dissuade
inventors from pursuing the option of fuller protection offered
by patents.
Examination of Patent Applications
Thorough examination of patent applications determines the
eligibility of applications and helps to avoid the granting of
exclusive rights where such rights are not warranted. In this
way, examinations are crucial in avoiding legal challenges
later on.  However, examination requirements vary from country
to country.   In the Bahamas, there are no examination
procedures and applications are merely checked for
compliance with administrative formalities.  Guyana and
Barbados grant a patent on the basis of a granted UK patent.
Jamaica and Guyana require examination though the process
is lengthy and insufficient.  Trinidad and Tobago decisions of
patentability are guided by information provided by the Patent
Cooperation Treaty and other Patent Offices.  (TRIPS does
not require local examination of a patent.  Singapore’s Patent
Act allows for examination of local patent applications by
Examiners of the Austrian or Australian Patent Offices.)
Inadequate scientific resources contribute to the lack of
examination – or lengthy examination procedures – in the
countries.  In addition, it is not currently feasible to pay
examiners (low fees for obtaining patents may be a
contributing factor).
Biotechnology and Biodiversity
In the area of biotechnology, genetic research on human and
animal life forms is especially topical.  Related issues of
biodiversity and traditional knowledge bring into focus basic
questions surrounding the patentability of knowledge as well
as economic and other relations between the developed and
developing nations.  (For a further note on traditional
knowledge and biodiversity, see Annex II.)
What is a Patent?
A patent is an exclusive right to exclude others from
the manufacture, sale and use of an invention during
a defined period of time.  The government grants this
right in return for disclosure of that invention in a patent
specification.  An invention must meet certain criteria
in order to be considered patentable: it must be new;
it must comprise an inventive step; and it must be
capable of industrial application.  Under TRIPS, the
rights associated with a patent must last for a
minimum of twenty years from the date of filing of the
patent application.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf change font size in textbox
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc. Other PDF edit functionalities, like add PDF text, add PDF text box and field.
change font size pdf comment box; reduce pdf file size
6
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
What the Report Recommended
§
Model legislation should be developed and implemented
throughout the region.  Trinidad and Tobago’s legislation,
with some modifications, could be used as the basis for
the model.
§
Patent applications should be examined for novelty and
patentable subject matter by a regional office and/or by
offices outside of the region where necessary.
§
Fees for obtaining and maintaining patents should be
revised to defray examination and processing costs while
taking into account the needs of small businesses.
§
Countries should join the Patent Cooperation Treaty.
§
Additional protection of inventions by way of utility
certificates may be provided but need not be adopted in
model legislation.
§
Countries should implement standards of patentability
for biological subject matter - including the patenting of
higher life forms. These standards should allow countries
to maintain competitiveness internationally in the context
of agreed ethical considerations.
§
National bodies operating under regionally harmonised
principles should document and maintain an inventory of
genetic resources.  These bodies should also be
responsible for the administration and negotiation of the
exploitation of a genetic resource by a third party.
§
Legislation which implements policies linking natural
resource exploitation - including genetic resources - to
local or regional technology transfer and which ensures
adequate and effective compensation in return for
exploitation should be introduced.
§
Steps should be taken to automate patenting systems
regionally.  Countries must first ensure that national filing
procedures are compatible.  Regional steps should be
harmonised.
§
Pending patent applications should be made available
for public inspection shortly after filing.
§
Consideration should be given to future development of
a CARICOM-wide patent right.
A. Building a Supportive Environment
The key to effective protection of intellectual property rights is
an environment which supports the administration and
enforcement of such rights.  Producers and consumers must
be made aware of the value of intellectual property and
bureaucracies must be streamlined to facilitate efficient
management.  Below are some of the key areas highlighted
in the report.
i.
Harmonisation
International trends are moving towards the harmonisation of
intellectual property laws.  Efforts to make national legislation
TRIPS-compliant will be greatly facilitated by the adoption of
model legislation in the region.  Harmonisation of polices
and legislation may also assist in negotiations at the proposed
Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA).  Canada, the USA
and Mexico currently implement the same intellectual property
principles under the North American Free Trade Agreement
(NAFTA).
What the Report Recommended
§
Laws and administration of IPRs should be harmonised
on a regional basis and should include the adoption of
model laws.
§
Discussions should be undertaken at the appropriate
levels to allow the various national IP regimes to be
administered regionally.  Each country should include in
its legislation provisions which contemplate and allow
for future regional administration.
i.
Enforcement
There is generally an inadequate level of enforcement by
customs and police services with regard to intellectual property
Patents and National Legislation
Legislation in most of the countries is out of date
and requires much work to become TRIPS-
compliant.  The Bahamian patent legislation is
found in the Industrial Property Act of 1965.  The
Barbados legislation is the Patents Act of 1981
while Guyana’s Patents and Designs Act was last
consolidated in 1973. Jamaica’s Patent Act is
based on the 1793 UK Patent Act and was most
recently amended in 1973.  Trinidad and Tobago’s
Patent Act of 1996 is largely TRIPS-compliant
though some modifications will be necessary to
ensure full compliance.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
\
Emerging Areas in Intellectual Property Rights
Several new areas have emerged in the field of
intellectual property rights.  The internet poses a
number of challenges in terms of law, jurisdiction
and enforcement.  Marks owned by internet service
providers will now be protected by trademark under
TRIPS and by sui generis law..  Computer
programmes and integrated circuit topographies
will be protected by copyright.  Digital issues in
general raise new concerns. Finally, culture and
the culture industries have for some time been
receiving increased attention in intellectual property
legislation.    As new areas continue to emerge,
national and regional legislation will be required to
keep pace.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
7
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
rights and more training and resources are required –
particularly in the efforts to curb piracy.  The high cost of litigation
can also prevent right holders from seeking full redress.
What the Report Recommended
§
Training and resources should be made available to
police forces and customs officials.
§
Consideration should be given to appointing specified
judges to hear IP disputes on a national basis - and later
on a regional basis in keeping with other moves towards
the formation of regional courts.
§
Lower-cost litigation and alternatives to litigation should
be made available.
i.
Education
The general public in the countries is largely unaware of the
scope and value of intellectual property rights.  A
comprehensive education programme may encourage
creators and inventors to register their rights.  It may also
heighten awareness among law professionals.  Education
programmes will need to target several constituencies if they
are to succeed.
What the Report Recommended
§
Resources should be accessed, maintained and
directed to the training of the public and of law students,
legal practitioners, judiciary and customs and police
services in order to enhance awareness of IPRs.
§
Consideration should be given to developing an IP law
sub-faculty or institute at the University of the West Indies
which would serve as an expert resource in the field of
intellectual property and biodiversity and related issues.
§
The Faculty of Law of the University of the West Indies - in
conjunction with local IP Administration Offices - could be
charged with the outreach tasks of training the judiciary
and professionals on IPRs and conducting public
education programmes throughout the region.
i.
Technical Assistance
There has been significant interest in the CARICOM region
and its transition to TRIPS compliance among international
agencies.  WIPO has been the major source of technical
assistance in the areas of training, equipment, documents
and technical advice.  Significant assistance is still needed –
particularly with regard to automation, harmonisation and
regionalisation.   This assistance should be offered on a
continued basis and expanded to include other donor
agencies and fields such as enforcement and education.
Although several studies have been commissioned on the
modernisation process, there is some concern that these
efforts are not well coordinated and that much duplication
results.
What the Report Recommended
§
Funding for education and training programmes must
be coordinated - at national and regional levels - to make
the best use of funds and to avoid duplication of efforts.
§
A regional office should be established - or an existing
one may be so designated - to serve as a planning and
coordinating body for current and future studies and
projects.  Such an institution should serve as a resource
base for information in the area.
i.
Protection of Undisclosed Information
TRIPS requires that countries ensure effective protection
against unfair competition.  The agreement also requires that
they protect trade secrets - undisclosed information of
commercial value – and grant data exclusivity - undisclosed
data on agrochemical and pharmaceutical products using
new chemical materials.
Common law in individual countries in the region currently
covers many of the issues involved in unfair competition and
Protocol VIII amending the Treaty of Chaguaramas outlines
a regional competition policy for use in the proposed CARICOM
Single Market and Economy (CSME).   Trade secrets are also
covered under common law.  Where legislation is proposed
Intellectual Property Rights and the
CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME)
The Protocols Amending the Treaty of
Chaguaramas promote further integration of
CARICOM Member States and will facilitate the
establishment of the CARICOM Single Market and
Economy (CSME).  A special article of Protocol III
(Industrial Policy) focusses on the following issues
in intellectual property:
·
Strengthening intellectual property laws in
individual Member States
·
Simplifying registration procedures in individual
Member States
·
Establishing regional administration for patents,
trademarks and copyright
·
Ensuring the use of protected works and
industrial property for the benefit of Member
States; the protection of indigenous Caribbean
culture; and the protection of expressions of
folklore and other aspects of traditional
knowledge and national heritage (particularly
those of indigenous populations)
·
Increasing the dissemination and use of patent
documentation as a source of technological
information
·
Preventing abuse or misuse of property rights
by rights-holders which might unreasonably
affect the transfer of technology
·
Encouraging Member States to become a part
of international agreements and conventions
on intellectual property
For additional information on the Protocols see
Caribbean Export’s TradeWins feature on  “Protocols
Amending the Treaty of Chaguaramas” from which
this excerpt is edited.
F
act
-
o
-Fil
e
8
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
or in place to grant data exclusivity, countries have not followed
international trends to establish time limits.
What the Report Recommended
§
Countries should take steps to implement legislation
granting data exclusivity for a stated period of time which
is uniform throughout the region and consistent with
minimum international standards.
i.
Control of Anti-Competitive Practices in Contractual
Licences
TRIPS recognises that exercising exclusionary rights granted
in intellectual property legislation may become anti-
competitive.   This may be particularly relevant in the case of
patents and integrated circuits.  The agreement therefore
allows for the granting of licences to be issued once a specific
practice has been determined to be anti-competitive.  Licences
will allow use of the material in question by persons or
enterprises other than the original right holders.
What the Report Recommended
§
The compulsory licensing provisions permitted by TRIPS
in relation to anti-competitive practices relating to patents
and integrated circuits should be implemented as one of
the means for remedying anti-competitive practices.
§
Countries may wish to implement legislation based on
Jamaica’s Fair Competition Act as interim measure until
CARICOM’s harmonised Rules of Competition outlined
in Protocol VIII are implemented.
HOW MIGHT WE ADDRESS THESE ISSUES?
The authors of the original report suggested an action plan
for the implementation of their recommendations.  The action
plan was devised with the TRIPS January 1, 2000 deadline in
mind. Although that deadline has now passed, key elements
of the plan are worth reproducing here.  The consultants
envisaged a two-step process which would see countries
preparing to adopt model legislation and secure funding and
educational initiatives in Phase I and moving to establish
regional machinery in Phase II.
Highlights of Phase I
§
Mobilisation of local IP administration offices and
legislative drafting offices (with due consideration for the
need to increase human and financial resources)
§
Preparation for the development of IP outreach
educational programmes by the Law Faculty of the
University of the West Indies (UWI)
§
Preparation for a fully operational IP law sub-faculty or
institute of UWI (by a date to be determined) and for
introduction of a basic IP course for law students by the
academic year 2000
§
Establishment of a regional framework and mechanisms
for implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity
and for documenting and maintaining genetic resources,
traditional knowledge, folklore and cultural heritage on a
national and regional basis
Highlights of Phase II
§
Complete harmonisation of IP laws and adherence to
international treaties
§
Modernisation and automation of regional administration
offices and satellite offices
§
Training for personnel at those offices
§
Establishment of permanent mechanisms for continued
operations in areas such as education, technical
assistance, funding and modernisation
CONCLUSIONS
CARIFORUM countries have committed to participation in the
World Trade Organization and are bound by its agreements.
Special transitional arrangements for compliance with these
agreements allow only for a period of adjustment during which
countries must come to terms with the legislative, social/
cultural and economic implications of compliance.
Harmonisation and regionalisation will greatly enhance the
countries’ ability to make these adjustments and to negotiate
successfully for equitable terms in international trading
arrangements.
CARIFORUM countries will need to consolidate their efforts to
establish viable intellectual property regimes and to ensure
that the necessary support systems are in place to guarantee
public acceptance of the required changes in traditional
concepts of knowledge, value, compensation and entitlement.
Members of the private sector – and all those affected by the
regulation of intellectual property and trade – will need to
familiarise themselves with national legislation and work to
ensure that changes in the legislation reflect international
trends and local realities.
9
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
Several additional areas related to intellectual property rights
were included in the original report.  A brief definition of these
issues or forms of protection is given below – along with the
report’s recommendations.
Geographical Indications
A geographical indication is an indication which identifies a
good as originating in a particular place where a given quality
is attributed to its geographical origin (e.g. wines or spirits).
Stand-alone legislation on geographical indications is in force
in Trinidad and Tobago and proposed in Barbados.  Both
appear to be TRIPS compliant.
What the Report Recommended
§
Model legislation should be developed for geographical
indications.  Trinidad and Tobago’s legislation could be
used as a basis for the model.
§
Registration of geographical indications eventually should
be administered through one regional office.
Industrial Designs
Industrial designs are designs applied to a finished article
which are judged solely by the eye.  Trinidad and Tobago and
Barbados are the only two countries studied which have
stand-alone legislation in place.  Both appear to be TRIPS
compliant.
What the Report Recommended
§
Model legislation should be developed for industrial
designs.  Trinidad and Tobago’s legislation could be
used as the basis for the model.
§
One filing, examination and registry facility for industrial
designs should be established for the region.
§
Consideration should be given to future development of
a CARICOM-wide industrial design right.
Layout Designs of Integrated Circuits
Layout designs are topographies of integrated circuits.
Specific protection of these designs is in force in Trinidad and
Tobago and envisaged in proposed legislation in Barbados
and Jamaica.  All legislation appears to be TRIPS compliant.
Some aspects of integrated circuits such as sets of stored
instructions or the structure of electronic circuits may also be
protected by copyright and patents respectively.
What the Report Recommended
Annex I
Geographical Indications, Industrial Designs, Layout Designs and Plant Variety Protection
§
Model legislation should be developed.  Jamaica’s draft
legislation should be used as the basis for the model.
Plant Variety Protection
Plant variety protection is a form of protection which is granted
to developers of plant varieties based on criteria of novelty,
distinctiveness, uniformity and stability.  This is particularly
important in CARIFORUM countries where plant resources
are abundant and are receiving some attention from research
institutions such as the University of the West Indies (UWI).
Trinidad and Tobago is the only country studied which offers
protection for plant varieties. Its legislation complies with the
1978 Act of the UPOV Convention (Convention of the
International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of
Plants).  It is therefore TRIPS compliant.
What the Report Recommended
§
Model legislation should be developed for plant variety
protection.  Trinidad and Tobago’s legislation, which is
based upon the 1978 UPOV Convention, can be used as
a basis for the model.
§
Consideration should be given to moving to the 1991
UPOV. The implementing legislation should incorporate
an appropriate balance between plant variety rights and
the rights of farmers and other exemptions as determined
on a regional basis.
10
TRADEWINS is a publication of the Caribbean Export Development Agency( Caribbean Export) 2004.TRADEWINS is made possible through support of thr EUropean Union.
Traditional knowledge refers to knowledge, innovation and
practices of indigenous or local communities.  Biological
diversity – or biodiversity – refers to the variety of life on earth
and the natural patterns formed by that life.  This includes
plants, animals, microorganisms (and their genetic
differences) and ecosystems. Considerable work on the
preservation of traditional knowledge has taken place through
the Convention on Biological Diversity.  (See their webpage at
www.biodiv.org
 Some of the definitions come from this site.)
The question of intellectual property and local and indigenous
peoples is far-ranging and includes such issues as the
medicinal properties of plants and national heritage and
folklore.  Some of these issues are covered by traditional
legislation on copyright and patents.  A key issue is the
exploitation of traditional knowledge and compensation for
the use of that knowledge.
CARICOM’s Protocol III (Industrial Policy) and Protocol V
(Agricultural Policy) amending the Treaty of Chaguaramas
recognise the value of traditional knowledge and indigenous
knowledge as well as the commercial value of promoting and
protecting biodiversity.  (It is useful here to retain the distinction
between traditional and indigenous.  Traditional knowledge
includes that of local non-indigenous populations as well as
that of local indigenous populations.  Both forms of knowledge
are of immense value to the region.)  The region will need to
work to ensure that these resources are adequately preserved
for their value to local communities.
Useful References
Grell, Emma A. C., Clark, Jane E., Sechley, Konrad & Blanchard,
Adrienne M. (1998).  Intellectual Property Rights in the
Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad &
Tobago Study commissioned by the Inter-American
Development Bank.
For information on the World Trade Organization (WTO)
Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property
(TRIPS), visit that section of the World Trade Organization
(WTO) website at: www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/trips_e/
trips_e.htm
.
For information on the World Intellectual Property Organization
(WIPO) and its agreements, visit their website at:
www.wipo.org
.
Annex II
Traditional Knowledge and Biodiversity
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested