UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT 
POLICY ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND COMMODITIES  
STUDY SERIES No. 32 
ROADBLOCK TO REFORM: 
THE PERSISTENCE OF AGRICULTURAL 
EXPORT SUBSIDIES 
by 
Ralf Peters 
Division on International Trade in Goods and Services, 
and Commodities 
UNCTAD 
UNITED NATIONS 
New York and Geneva, 2006
Pdf markup text size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size in fillable pdf form; batch pdf compression
Pdf markup text size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best way to compress pdf files; pdf paper size
ii
NOTE
The purpose of this series of studies is to analyse policy issues and to stimulate discussions 
in the area of international trade and development. This series includes studies by UNCTAD 
staff, as well as by distinguished researchers from academia. In keeping with the objective of the 
series, authors are encouraged to express their own views, which do not necessarily reflect the 
views of the United Nations. 
The designations employed and the presentation of the material do not imply the expression 
of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the United Nations Secretariat concerning the legal 
status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of 
its frontiers or boundaries. 
Material in this publication may be freely quoted or reprinted, but acknowledgement is 
requested, together with a reference to the document number. It would be appreciated if a copy 
of the publication containing the quotation or reprint were sent to the UNCTAD secretariat: 
Chief 
Trade Analysis Branch 
Division on International Trade in Goods and Services, and Commodities 
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development 
Palais des Nations 
CH-1211 Geneva 
Series Editor: 
Khalilur Rahman 
Chief, Trade Analysis Branch 
DITC/UNCTAD 
UNCTAD/ITCD/TAB/33 
UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION 
Sales No. E.05.II.D.18 
ISBN 92-1-112678-9 
ISSN 1607-8291 
© Copyright United Nations 2006 
All rights reserved 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
change font size in pdf fillable form; best pdf compression
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
adjust size of pdf file; reader pdf reduce file size
iii
ABSTRACT 
Agricultural export subsidies are one of the most distorting of the numerous distortions 
affecting agricultural trade, and the reluctance of users to make clear commitments for their 
elimination was a key factor contributing to the deadlock of the WTO negotiations on 
agriculture. In August 2004 the WTO General Council decided to eliminate export subsidies by a 
specific yet undetermined date. Export subsidies amount to around $6 billion each year, 
depending on world price movements. Some countries pay export subsidies in order to dispose of 
their surplus agricultural production on world markets. These payments impose substantial costs 
on taxpayers in the subsidizing countries and reduce the world prices of several temperate and 
competing products to the detriment of producers in developing and least developed countries. 
However, they also benefit consumers in food-importing countries, many of which are 
developing.  
Quantitative analysis using the UNCTAD/FAO ATPSM model suggests that the removal 
of export subsidies would raise world prices. The major beneficiaries would be EU taxpayers and 
developing country producers. Since consumers in developing countries probably face higher 
prices the welfare effects are ambiguous, but most likely only during an initial period until 
domestic supply capacities can catch up in many of these developing countries. This is because 
many of them are net importers of wheat, dairy products and beef, and the cheap subsidies 
imports hinder the production of these products and of substitutes. Although the benefits to some 
of preferential access to the EU sugar market would also likely be reduced if export subsidy 
reform led to the reduction of EU domestic sugar prices, increasing world market prices are 
likely to more than offset the losses. The analysis also points to diverse results regarding specific 
products for producers and consumers in most countries. This suggests that while longer-term 
reforms of export subsidies are desirable, the immediate removal of export subsidies is likely to 
cause some hardships for some developing country consumers, which will need to be addressed 
with appropriate support mechanisms. 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Split PDF file by output file size.
best online pdf compressor; reader compress pdf
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split Split PDF File by Output File Size Demo Code in VB.NET. This
change page size of pdf document; adjust size of pdf file
iv
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
The author thanks David Vanzetti for his invaluable advice throughout the 
preparation of this paper and Miho Shirotori for very helpful comments.   
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Using this C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion library component toolkit, C# developers can easily and quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to a
apple compress pdf; pdf change font size
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
change font size in pdf fillable form; change paper size in pdf
v
CONTENTS 
1. 
Introduction..............................................................................................................1 
2. 
Regulations and Use of Export Subsidies..............................................................4 
Export subsidies and WTO provisions.............................................................4 
Export subsidy budgetary outlays.....................................................................4 
Export subsidy volumes....................................................................................6 
Commitments and negotiations........................................................................7 
Export credits....................................................................................................8 
Data issues......................................................................................................10 
3. 
Economic Effects of Export Subsidies.................................................................11 
Theoretical model...........................................................................................11 
Effects on world prices and welfare considerations.......................................11 
Political-economy considerations...................................................................12 
Effects of export credits..................................................................................13 
4. 
Agriculture Trade Policy Proposals.....................................................................14 
5. 
Simulating Export Subsidy Reductions...............................................................17 
Export subsidy rates........................................................................................17 
Export credits..................................................................................................19 
How ATPSM works: EU’s beef export subsidies..........................................20 
Modelling limitations.....................................................................................21 
Scenarios.........................................................................................................22 
6.  
Results.....................................................................................................................24 
Impact on world prices...................................................................................24 
Consumers and producers in different country groups...................................25 
Welfare changes.............................................................................................26 
Sectoral analysis.............................................................................................27 
Bovine meat....................................................................................................28 
Sugar...............................................................................................................29 
Dairy products................................................................................................30 
Wheat..............................................................................................................30 
Vegetable oil, oilseeds and tobacco................................................................31 
7.  
Conclusions.............................................................................................................32 
References ........................................................................................................................34 
Appendix ........................................................................................................................36 
Product concordance................................................................................................36 
The ATPSM modelling framework.........................................................................37 
Equation system in the standard version..................................................................38 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
best way to compress pdf file; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
C# Convert: PDF to Word: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Microsoft
Support fast Word and PDF conversion with original document page size remained. Microsoft Office Word 2003 (.doc) and 2007 (.docx) versions are available.
best compression pdf; pdf file size
vi
Figures 
1. 
Export subsidy expenditures by commodity groups..................................................5 
2. 
Bound and actual export subsidy expenditure, all countries......................................6 
3. 
Subsidy element amount of export credits.................................................................9 
4. 
Export subsidy outlays and export credit subsidy element......................................10 
5. 
Tariffs and export subsidies as measures to raise domestic prices..........................11 
6. 
Price effects of export subsidies...............................................................................12 
7. 
Harbinson proposal on export subsidies..................................................................15 
8. 
Additional welfare gains, by commodity.................................................................28 
Tables 
1. 
Use of export subsidies: Averages from 1995 to 2000 by country............................5 
2. 
Export subsidy utilization in selected countries........................................................7 
3. 
The impact of export subsidy elimination on the EU beef market..........................21 
4. 
Alternative liberalization scenarios.........................................................................22 
5. 
Consumer surplus impacts resulting from export subsidies reductions...................25 
6. 
Producer surplus impacts resulting from export subsidies reductions.....................25 
7. 
Export revenue change impacts...............................................................................26 
8. 
Welfare impacts.......................................................................................................27 
9. 
Additional welfare gains from eliminating export subsidies on bovine meat.........29 
10. Additional welfare gains from eliminating export subsidies on sugar....................30 
11. Additional welfare gains from eliminating export subsidies on dairy products......30 
12. Additional welfare gains from eliminating export subsidies on wheat...................31 
13. Additional welfare gains from eliminating export subsidies on vegetable oil, 
oilseeds and tobacco................................................................................................31 
Boxes 
1. 
Export subsidies.........................................................................................................4 
2. 
Canadian export subsidies in dispute.........................................................................8 
3. 
Prices in ATPSM.....................................................................................................18 
1
The commitment to eliminate
agricultural export subsidies by a specific date,
although subject to negotiations, is considered
to be the major achievement of the WTO
General Council Decision in August 2004. The
framework agreement provides for a parallel
elimination of all elements and practices of
export subsidization, including scheduled
export subsidies and distorting elements in
export credits, State trading enterprises and
food aid. Such subsidies are often regarded as
an unfair means of support that distorts
international markets (particularly since they
are prohibited for non-agricultural products)
and imposes an unreasonable burden on third
country producers, many of whom are in
developing or least developed countries. As
such, they represented for a long time a
roadblock to a successful outcome in the
current WTO trade negotiations.
A new round of negotiations was
launched in 2001 as part of the “built-in
agenda” decided at the end of the Uruguay
Round.  While considerable progress has been
made in clarifying issues, several deadlines have
been missed and export subsidies were one of
the key elements behind the failure of the
WTO Ministerial Conference in Cancún in late
2003 already.  The current WTO work
programme, decided at Doha in 2001, covers
agriculture, non-agriculture market access,
services, dispute settlement and other fields.
Most of the negotiations were supposed to be
finished as a single undertaking in January
2005. Negotiations on agriculture are among
the most difficult, centring on three main
pillars — market access, domestic support and
export subsidies — although there are other
related issues, including TBT/SPS measures.
In this paper an analysis of costs and benefits
for developed and developing countries
resulting from an elimination of agricultural
export subsidies is provided. Elimination of
subsidies was agreed in the General Council
Decision in 2004 (WTO, 2004), albeit without
a specific deadline. The computable partial
equilibrium model ATPSM
1
is used to
determine the likely economic effects of
eliminating export subsidies and export credit
subsidy elements by country and commodity.
Some countries pay export subsidies in
order to dispose of their surplus agricultural
production on world markets. This surplus
production is often stimulated by domestic
supports and high import tariffs. The average
annual amount of notified export subsidies
between 1995 and 2000 was $6.2 billion. The
European Union is by far the largest provider
of these export subsidies. Export credits,
whose use has been expanding in recent years,
may also distort export competition where the
credit conditions go beyond what private
arrangements could achieve. In this
connection, the United States is the largest
provider.
Export subsidies are often considered
to be the most distorting of the three pillars.
The subsidizing of exports increases
production and therefore decreases world
1.   INTRODUCTION
The Agricultural Trade Policy Simulation Model ATPSM was developed by UNCTAD in collaboration with FAO.
UNCTAD acknowledges financial support from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development
for the development of the model and software system for its exploitation.
2
market prices. This has drawbacks for
producers in non-subsidizing countries.
2
Developing countries generally cannot afford
to pay export subsidies, and thus lose some
of their export competitiveness relative to
developed countries. Consumers, however,
gain in general from the policy of subsidizing
exports so long as they are not taxpayers in
subsidizing countries.
In the Uruguay Round member States
agreed to cap and reduce export subsidies for
agriculture. However, the permitted amount
is still considerable and most developing
countries and agricultural exporters want them
to be eliminated. So far there is no WTO
agreement that disciplines the use of export
credits or limits the subsidy elements in these
loans. At the Doha Ministerial Conference in
2001 ministers agreed to a “reduction of, with
a view to phasing out, all forms of export
subsidies”. In subsequent negotiations many
developing countries have demanded a total
elimination of export subsidies. Members of
the G20, a heterogeneous group of developing
countries formed shortly before the Cancún
Ministerial Conference, have taken a strong
position on this issue. In addition, most least
developed and even net food-importing
countries (apparently taking the view that their
own, currently limited, agricultural production
would benefit) also want export subsidies
eliminated.
On the other hand, it was only in 2004
that the European Commission indicated that
the European Union would be ready to
eliminate all export subsidies if other countries
did the same. This offer is conditional on other
members’ removing State trading enterprises
and export credits with subsidy components
(“parallelism”), on an acceptable outcome
emerging with regard to market access and
domestic support, and on the EU’s non-trade
concerns being taken into account. The offer
contributed to achieving agreement on a
framework for modalities, which provides for
the elimination of export subsidies by a certain
date.
Despite the importance attached to the
elimination of export subsidies by most
developing countries and the Cairns Group,
several studies have shown that the impact of
reducing export subsidies is smaller than that
of a reduction of import tariffs. The
Economic Research Service of the US
Department of Agriculture (USDA) (2001)
estimates that export subsidies account for 13
per cent of market distortions in agriculture,
compared with 52 per cent accounted for by
tariffs and 31 per cent by domestic support.
The OECD (2000) finds that the results of
export subsidy elimination are fairly modest.
World dairy prices would increase, but effects
on world crop prices would be limited. This,
however, depends on the assumptions made
concerning movements in world food prices.
Increasing world prices reduces the necessary
expenditure on subsidies. Hoekman et al.
(2003) concluded from their analysis that a 50
per cent reduction in border protection for
subsidized products would have a greater
positive impact on developing countries’
exports and imports than a comparable
reduction in agricultural subsidies.
Our analysis roughly confirms these
findings on the relative importance of tariffs
and subsidies. One reason is that while export
subsidies are about $6 billion, global tariff
revenue from agricultural products is in the
order of $36 billion. However, since it is likely
that WTO members will agree on more
ambitious reductions concerning export
subsidies than concerning import tariffs the
aggregate impact of export subsidy reductions
may be considerable. Global annual welfare
There are many examples that demonstrate this linkage. Oxfam (2002), for example, reports that “In Jamaica,
trade liberalisation in the early 1990s resulted in the substitution of locally produced fresh milk by subsidised
European milk powder as the major input for the Jamaican dairy industry. … these exports dominated the small
Jamaican dairy market, with devastating consequences for local producers” (p. 116).
3
gains resulting from a total elimination are
estimated at $4.3 billion, which compares with
gains of about $9.5 billion from reducing
import tariffs applying the Uruguay Round
formula. The Australian Bureau of
Agricultural and Resource Economics
(ABARE, 2001) puts gains from an elimination
of export subsidies at $3.6 billion, in the same
order of magnitude.
Major winners are producers in
agricultural exporting countries such as
competitive Cairns Group members,
producers in other developing countries and
consumers and taxpayers in developed
countries. Another advantage of eliminating
export subsidies not captured by the static
models that have been used is a likely
stabilization effect. It can be expected that the
price fluctuations would be reduced, as more
adjustment would occur in the subsidizing
countries and less would be pushed on to the
residual world market. However, consumers in
developing countries and even in Cairns Group
exporters would have to pay higher food prices
unless they also have an option of making
corresponding tariff reductions to offset the
expected increase in world prices.
Since in developing countries a large
proportion of the population depends on the
agricultural sector and the share of income that
is spent on food is relatively higher in
developing and least developed countries,
quantitative analysis of this sector is extremely
important for these countries. Our results
indicate that in many net food-importing
developing countries the supply capacity would
have to be increased in order to adequately
respond to the expected increase in
international prices – however modest – as
export subsidies are reduced. Laird et al. (2003)
show similar results.
The recent proposals to eliminate first
export subsidies for products of specific
interest to developing countries call for a look
at single commodities. Impacts differ greatly
for different commodities. Extreme examples
are sugar and wheat. Whereas developing
countries as a group greatly benefit from the
elimination of sugar subsidies, the elimination
of wheat subsidies is expected to cause some
hardships for consumers, at least during an
adjustment period.
However, apart from these direct
economic effects, the total elimination of
export subsidies may have another positive
effect since many developing countries
maintain high import tariffs in order to protect
their farmers against cheap subsidized imports
from developed countries. As shown by
Anderson (2004) and others, developing
countries would benefit from liberalizing their
own markets and the elimination of export
subsidies would make this more feasible
without costly adjustments. Furthermore, a
reinforcement of the rural population, which
depends heavily on agricultural production and
is in general disproportionately poor, may
contribute to poverty alleviation. Export
subsidies can distort local markets in
developing countries, causing harmful effects
for small agricultural producers and food
security. This, however, depends on specific
country conditions, which are not further
examined here.
In this paper, section 2 provides an
overview of the current use and ceiling levels
of export subsidies. Section 3 describes the
theoretical economic effects of export
subsidies. Section 4 describes how the
Agricultural Trade Policy Simulation Model
simulates export subsidies. In section 5 the
recent proposals concerning export subsidies
are discussed. In section 6 the results of a
reduction of export subsidies are outlined.
Section 7 concludes with implications and
limitations and a discussion on how export
subsidy policies are linked to the “development
benchmarks” which were developed by
UNCTAD.
4
Export subsidies and WTO provisions
In the years leading up to the Uruguay
Round export subsidies proliferated. The
Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture
(URAA) imposed disciplines on agricultural
export subsidies for the first time. Countries
that used agricultural export subsidies agreed
to evaluate, declare and reduce them, according
to negotiated modalities. Of the current 148
WTO members, 25 countries have export
subsidy commitments for various groups of
products.
3
The commitments involve both
volume and budgetary outlay constraints.
Developed countries committed themselves to
reducing subsidized exports by 21 per cent in
volume and 36 per cent in value by the year
2001. For developing countries the
corresponding numbers are 14 per cent and
24 per cent, respectively, and reductions had
to be completed by 2004. New subsidies
cannot be introduced.
However, the URAA allowed special
and differential treatment export subsidies in
developing countries (e.g. marketing costs,
internal transport and freight charges), export
credits with a subsidy component and export
subsidies related to international food aid.
Least developed countries are exempt from any
commitments.
Export subsidy budgetary outlays
The budgetary outlay constraint for all
25 subsidizing countries was almost $11 billion
in 2000. The level of export subsidies actually
provided depends on production, exchange
rates and world food prices, and therefore
fluctuates. Subsidies are counter-cyclical,
expanding when world prices fall and vice
versa. During the period from 1995 to 2000
on average $6.2 billion was spent annually on
export subsidies by WTO members. The
European Union is by far the largest user of
export subsidies, accounting for almost 90 per
cent of expenditures (see table 1). On average
the EU spent $5.5 billion each year between
1995 and 2000. However, the latest available
data for the EU show a distinct decline in its
use of export subsidies. In the marketing years
2000/01 and 2001/02 budgetary outlays
declined to $2.5 and $2.3 billion, respectively.
Since most of the export subsidies are
provided by developed countries from the
northern hemisphere, the bulk of subsidies are
for temperate products. Almost 35 per cent is
for dairy products and 23 per cent is for meat
(see figure 1). Producers of cereals,
incorporated products and sugar also receive
a considerable amount. Beef, which is of
export interest to some developing countries,
makes up almost 60 per cent of all meat
subsidies.
2.   REGULATIONS AND USE OF EXPORT SUBSIDIES
Box 1. Export subsidies
Any payments contingent on ex-
ports, producer-financed export subsidies,
export marketing subsidies, export-specific
transportation subsidies, and subsidies on
goods incorporated into exports (Agreement
on Agriculture Article 9).
These are the countries which had export subsidies during the Uruguay Round base period.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested