asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Change font size in fillable pdf control SDK system azure winforms wpf console itcdtab33_en2-part652

15
The Cairns Group has always been a
“hardliner” concerning export competition. It
proposed (Cairns Group, 2000) as follows:
14
“WTO Members agree to the elimination
and prohibition of all forms of export
subsidies for all agricultural products.”
Figure 7. Harbinson proposal on export
subsidies
The two lines in both figures are intended to reflect 50 per
cent of the budgetary outlays, respectively.
The former Chair of the WTO
Committee on Agriculture, Special Session,
Mr. Harbinson, proposed that export subsidies
be eliminated. He proposed a formula by
which the budgetary outlay and quantity
reduction commitments would be determined.
Figure 7 shows the phasing-out of allowed
budgetary outlays for developed and
developing countries. A set of products
representing at least 50 per cent of bound
levels of budgetary outlays would have to be
reduced and eliminated earlier. Selecting the
set of products is a matter for each country.
In the draft Cancún text, the WTO
General Council adopted the EC-US approach
(EC and US, 2003), namely to eliminate export
subsidies for as yet unspecified products that
are of particular interest to developing
countries, and to reduce export subsidies for
the remaining products, but with a view to
eventually phasing out all export subsidies and
trade-distorting elements of export credits.
15
Most developing countries, including the
Group of 20,
16
were seeking the elimination
of all forms of export subsidies as an outcome
in the current negotiations. The G-20 proposal
was to eliminate export subsidies for products
of specific interest to developing countries
first and in a second step to eliminate them
for all other products.
The products of specific interest to
developing countries have not been specified.
The early EU proposal mentions wheat,
oilseeds, olive oil and tobacco. Since
developing countries are not a homogeneous
group it is difficult to identify products of
specific interest to developing countries as a
whole. Furthermore, at least two approaches
are possible in identifying these products. One
is to look at the demand side and the second
is to look at export competition. On the
demand side, wheat is a candidate since all least
developed countries and the vast majority of
developing countries are net importers of
wheat. On the export competition side, bovine
meat and sugar are possible product groups.
Developed countries
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Year
Allowed export 
subsidies
Developing countries
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Year
Allowed export 
subsidies
14
Several other proposals containing positions on export subsidies and competition were submitted during
negotiations. For a list see WTO (2002).
15
Agreed disciplines on export credits would address appropriate provisions for differential treatment in favour of
least developed and net food-importing developing countries.
16
The Group of 20 is a group of developing countries led by Brazil, China and India, which was formed prior to the
Cancún Conference in 2003.
Change font size in fillable pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
pdf custom paper size; change paper size pdf
Change font size in fillable pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf markup text size; pdf optimized format
16
Many developing countries could move into
the production of beef and many can produce
cane sugar, a substitute for beet sugar. Since
most of the budgetary outlay is on dairy
products, this might also be of specific interest
to developing countries.
The General Council agreed to
eliminate by an end date to be agreed:
• Scheduled export subsidies;
• Export credits not in accordance with
certain disciplines (partly) to be agreed;
• Trade-distorting practices with respect
to State trading enterprises;
• Food aid not in conformity with
disciplines to be agreed.
Developing countries will benefit from
longer implementation periods and will
continue to benefit from special and
differential treatment that allows them the
provision of certain export subsidies within a
reasonable period. Furthermore, State trading
enterprises in developing countries that
preserve consumer and ensure food security
will receive special consideration for
maintaining monopoly status. Disciplines on
export credits will make appropriate provisions
for least developed and net food-importing
developing countries.
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in to add text field to specified PDF file position Support to change font size in PDF form.
change font size pdf form reader; advanced pdf compressor online
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF RasterEdge. Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
can pdf files be compressed; pdf change page size
17
UNCTAD’s Agricultural Trade Policy
Simulation Model (ATPSM) is used to estimate
the potential impact of reducing or eliminating
export subsidies on the agricultural sector.
17
The static, partial-equilibrium, global,
agricultural-trade model is able to estimate the
economic effects of changes in within-quota,
applied and out-quota tariffs, import quotas,
export subsidies and domestic support on
production, consumption, prices, trade flows,
trade revenues, quota rents, producer and
consumer surplus, and welfare. A more
detailed description of ATPSM and the data,
including a discussion of the specific
difficulties resulting from modelling
agricultural policy changes with regard to
quota rents, domestic support, two-way trade
and preferential access, can be found in Peters
and Vanzetti (2004).
18
The present version of the model
covers 175 countries, of which the current 15
European Union members form a single
region. Countries designated here as
“developed” are defined by the World Bank
as high-income countries with per capita GNP
in excess of $9,266 (World Bank, 2001).
Another group is the 50 least developed
countries as defined by the United Nations.
There are 36 commodities in the ATPSM data
set, covering most of the agricultural sector.
This includes many tropical commodities of
interest to developing countries, although
many of these have relatively little trade by
comparison with some of the temperate-zone
products.
The data in the model come from
different sources, including AMAD, FAO,
OECD, UN Comtrade, WTO and UNCTAD.
The year 2000 represents the base year for the
model.
Export subsidy rates
One of the main characteristics of
ATPSM is that domestic prices are all
functions of the world market price, border
protection and subsidies. All protection and
support measures are expressed in tariff rate
equivalents. Specific and mixed tariffs,
domestic support, export subsidies and export
credit subsidy elements are converted into ad
valorem equivalents.
Simplified, a producer receiving export
subsidies gets P
w
(1+s), where P
is the world
price and s is the export subsidy rate, for a
commodity sold abroad. The supply reaction
to a change of the export subsidy equals the
supply elasticity, å , multiplied by the change
of the producer price, P
w
(1+s). Additionally,
cross-price effects are taken into account.
However, the other policy measures, domestic
support and import tariffs, which also
influence the production decision and the two-
way trade of one and the same product have
to be taken into account. Two-way trade occurs
because products are aggregates and therefore
countries simultaneously import and export
different components of the same aggregate.
To accommodate two-way trade, a composite
5. SIMULATING EXPORT SUBSIDY REDUCTIONS
17
An operational version of the model, associated database and documentation are available free of charge from
UNCTAD (http://www.unctad.org/tab).
18
In this paper the “standard” ATPSM version has been used. In this version it is not the Armington assumption
that determines imports but the condition that percentage changes in exports equals the percentage change of the
production. Import changes are the residual of changes in production, consumption and exports.
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF
change font size in pdf file; change font size pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size. 0.1f
reader compress pdf; pdf page size dimensions
18
domestic price is required. The composite
price depends on import tariffs, export
subsidies and domestic support measures. As
a result, import tariffs and export subsidies do
not have to be equal as in the simplified
theoretical model, but rather single measures
can be changed separately. The technique
chosen in the model is described in box 3. The
effect is that, ceteris paribus, a higher export
subsidy leads to higher production and exports
of the corresponding good. The impact of
export subsidies on domestic prices depends
on the proportion of domestic production
exported. Because there is a greater incentive
to produce for export markets, consumption
prices are positively correlated with export
subsidies provided in the same country.
Furthermore, export subsidies depress world
market prices, and this results in lower
producer and consumer prices in the other
countries.
Two export subsidy rates are calculated.
One reflects the export subsidies actually
received or applied and the second one reflects
maximum allowable subsidies. The latter is a
bound rate for export subsidy rates.
The ad valorem export subsidy rates are
calculated from the WTO members’
notifications, which comprise their annual
commitment and use in terms of budgetary
outlays and volumes. The bound subsidy rate
that determines the maximum possible subsidy
that can be provided is the year 2000
commitment level divided by the ATPSM
export volume and the world market price.
Thus, the bound rate expresses how much the
observed export could maximally be
subsidized without violating the WTO rules.
Since in some cases current exports are low,
bound export subsidy rates are very high in
these cases.
The applied subsidy rates are calculated
for each year between 1995 and 2000 on the
basis of the formula
WTO
WTO W
ES
exportsubsidyrate
X
P
=
,
where ES
WTO
is the notified use of budgetary
outlay, X
WTO
is the notified subsidized quantity
and P
W
is the world price. Because budgetary
outlays and subsidized quantities vary from
year to year the applied subsidy rate used in
Box 3.  Prices in ATPSM
All domestic prices are functions of the world market price and the border protection or special
domestic support measures. Transaction costs are not taken into account.
First, a domestic market price wedge t
d
is computed as the weighted average of two tariffs, the
export subsidy t
x
and import tariff t
m
, where the weights are exports X and imports M: t
= (X t
x
+ M t
m
)/
(M + X).
Second, a consumption tariff t
c
is computed as the weighted average of the import tariff t
m
and
the domestic market tariff t
d
, where the weights are imports M and domestic supply S
d
: t
c
= (M t
m
+ S
d
t
d
)
/ D.
Third, a supply tariff t
s
is computed as the weighted average of the export tariff t
m
and the
domestic market tariff t
d
, where the weights are exports X and domestic supply (S
d
) plus the domestic
support tariff t
p
: t
s
= (X t
x
+ S
d
t
d
) / S + tp.
The domestic consumer price is P
c
=P
w
(1+t
c
) and the domestic producer price is P
s
=P
w
(1+t
s
).
The calculations of consumer and producer prices are applied both to the initial and to the final tariffs.
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page
change font size pdf form; change font size in pdf comment box
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET RasterEdge.Imaging. Font.dll. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf compress; acrobat compress pdf
19
ATPSM is the average of the six annual subsidy
rates.
19
The obtained applied export subsidy
rates have to be adjusted to the ATPSM export
data, because there is not a one-to-one
correspondence between the product
definition in ATPSM and the product
categories used in the notifications. For the
establishment of export subsidy reduction
commitments during the Uruguay Round 24
groups of products were specified by the
WTO. The correspondence of these groups
with the ATPSM classification is shown in
table A1 in the Appendix. The structure of
schedules, however, varies between countries.
Each member uses different product
categories. Switzerland, for example, reports
in five broad product groups, whereas
Venezuela reports in 72 detailed groups. The
different groups of products were assigned to
the 36 ATPSM commodities as best as
possible.
Export subsidies may be applied to
some rather than all exports within a product
category. If a subsidized volume that is notified
to the WTO is smaller than the export volume
in the ATPSM database, the calculated subsidy
rate is adjusted downwards so that the
expenditure for the specific product is not
higher than the notified budgetary outlay. On
the other hand, if exports in ATPSM are
smaller than the notified subsidized export
volume, the subsidy rate is not adjusted
upwards in order to avoid a higher rate than
the actual rate. Furthermore, where an applied
subsidy rate is higher than the corresponding
bound subsidy rate, the bound rate is used as
the applied export subsidy rate in ATPSM.
Since the initial applied rate is an average over
the six years when binding commitments were
reduced annually, the bound rate that depends
only on the final commitment is smaller than
the average for a commodity for which
subsidies were always close to the
commitment.
These downward adjustments and the
exclusion from the model of products such as
cut flowers, juice and wine for which export
subsidies are provided  imply that the sum of
export subsidy expenditures in ATPSM at $4.4
billion is significantly smaller than the
observed average of $6.2 billion. The results
shown below are thus biased downwards for
this reason.
A specific difficulty is the calculation
of subsidy rates for Canadian dairy products.
Canada notified to the WTO very little or nil
use of export subsidies.  However, as described
in box 2, the WTO Appellate Body found that
Canada’s commercial export milk practices
constitute export subsidies. Since it is not
possible to calculate the exact subsidy
component of this policy, we assumed that
Canada provides the maximum legitimate
export subsidies to its dairy products of $54.5
and calculated the corresponding subsidy rate.
Export credits
Since official data on export credits and
associated conditions were not available, the
data in the ATPSM database on the subsidy
element of export credits are taken from the
OECD (2000).
20
Unfortunately, the estimated
amount of the export subsidy element is given
only by countries or by product groups but
not by country and product. Thus, an estimate
of how much a specific country subsidizes a
19
Data for 2001 and following years are available only for some countries. For those few countries that have not yet
notified for 1999 and 2000 the average for 1995 to 1998 was taken. However, data for the whole period were
available for those countries that provided more than 99 per cent of the export subsidies between 1995 and 1998.
20
There are several deficiencies with these data. They cover only those countries that joined the Export Credit
Arrangement, and the basis for the interest rate is solely 1998, a year in which the financial crises may bias the
results obtained by the OECD. Furthermore, only officially supported export credits were taken into account and
exchange rate guarantees were not included. To calculate the hypothetical market conditions, a credit ranking for the
importer is necessary but not always available, in which cases standard Moody rankings were used.
20
specific product through export credits is not
available. Estimates are constructed using the
available information from the OECD and
ATPSM export revenue data. For each country
the total amount of the subsidy element is
distributed among the ATPSM products in
proportion to the weighting of subsidy amount
estimates across commodity groups and the
export revenue. Thus, the export credit subsidy
element rate is
j
i
ij
j
ij W
j
j
EC
exportcreditsubsidyelementrate
s
XP s
=
,
where EC
i
is the amount of the subsidy
element in country i, X
ij
is the export of
country i of commodity jP
wj
is the world price
of commodity j and s
j
is the reported share of
subsidies of the product group j in the total
subsidy.
The consequence of this approach is
that there are export credit subsidy elements
on each product in the EU, the United States,
Canada, the Czech Republic and the Republic
of Korea. For Australia, additional information
was available. Since Australia provides export
credits only for wheat, the whole estimated
subsidy element was attributed to this
commodity.
After the subtraction of export credits
for which the products are unknown or which
are on products not covered by ATPSM, such
as wool, the total export credit subsidy in the
initial model database amounts to $228 million.
This is in addition to the total export subsidy
expenditure of $4.4 billion. Thus, the total
export subsidy amount in ATPSM is $4.6
billion. This compares with global export
revenue for the 36 commodities in the model
of $200 billion.
The calculated export credit subsidy
element rate was added to both the bound and
the actual export subsidy rate. Thus, the export
credit subsidy element is treated as an
additional export subsidy. This rate is
comparably small. The simple average is 0.07
per cent in the EU, 0.33 per cent in the United
States, 0.13 per cent in Australia (only wheat),
0.07 per cent in Canada, 0.02 per cent in the
Czech Republic and 0.0005 per cent in the
Republic of Korea. This compares with much
higher export subsidy rates. For example, the
EU rate for beef is 54 per cent, for butter 79
per cent, for wheat 13 per cent and for sugar
31 per cent. The US rate for concentrated milk
is 30 per cent and for butter 33 per cent.
Norway’s rate for beef is 145 per cent and for
sheepmeat 121 per cent. Switzerland
subsidized its dairy products with a rate of 95
per cent. There are also many small rates, such
as 1.2 per cent on barley in South Africa.
How ATPSM works:  The EU’s beef
export subsidies
Export subsidies are complex. To
illustrate how they are modelled within
ATPSM we provide an example of EU bovine
meat, a heavily subsidized sector. According
to WTO notifications, the EU provided on
average $1.1 billion annually of export
subsidies for beef meat. The subsidized
volume was on average 851,000 metric tonnes
annually. After adjusting to the ATPSM
commodity classification $800 million remain.
Since EU’s exports of beef in the ATPSM
database are 0.645 million tonnes and the initial
world price for beef is $2,300 per tonnes, the
export subsidy rate is about 54 per cent. The
export credit subsidy element rate is 0.03 per
cent.
From the subsidy, domestic support
and import tariff rates and the volumes the
composite tariffs t
c
and t
s
are calculated (see
box 3). These give the domestic consumer and
producer prices, and changes in the distorting
measures determine the price changes, which
then verify the volume changes.
21
Table 3 gives
an example of the changes resulting from an
elimination of export subsidies for EU beef
exports.
21
Since ATPSM is an equilibrium model a mechanism ensures that domestic and global markets are always clear.
21
The elimination of the export subsidy
reduces the composite consumption and
supply tariff, which leads to lower consumer
and producer prices in the EU, although the
world price increases slightly. As a
consequence, the EU’s consumption and
imports increase and production and exports
decrease. Tariff revenues are increased owing
to the rise in imports.
Modelling limitations
There are various limitations in
modelling trade policy changes and
interpreting the results. These include
modelling preferential access, the lack of
knowledge of the distribution of quota rents,
the static nature of the model, the absence of
adjustment costs, intersectoral and
macroeconomic effects, and, of course, data
quality. These are discussed in greater detail
in Vanzetti and Peters (2003).
Specific limitations concerning export
subsidies and credits include data availability,
which is discussed above, the difficulty with
both volume and value constraints, and the
limitations in view of the fact that export
subsidy rates are used. In ATPSM effectively
only value constraints and budgetary outlays
are used. Quantity commitment levels and the
quantity of subsidized exports are available
and have been used to calculate the export
subsidy rates. However, these subsidy rates
were then adjusted to the ATPSM export
volumes. Thus, instead of, for example,
subsidizing a small quantity by a high subsidy
rate, all exports are subsidized by an
accordingly lower rate. This may bias the
results. De Gorter (2004) discusses the
interplay according to volume and value
constraints. Furthermore, the change of
export subsidy rates impacts on world prices
and export volumes. As a consequence, subsidy
expenditures need not be reduced by exactly
Table 3. The impact of export subsidy elimination on the EU beef market
Initial values
Final values
Export subsidy rate
%
53.9
0
Export credit rate
%
0.03
0
Import tariff
%
138
138
Domestic support rate
%
0
0
Consumption tariff t
c
%
89.4
58.2
Supply tariff t
s
%
83.7
48.8
World price
$/t
2 300
2 342
Producer price
$/t
4 224
3 484
Consumer price
$/t
4 357
3 706
Consumption
kt
7 158
7 577
Production
kt
7 396
7 130
Exports
kt
645
622
Imports
kt
407
1 069
Tariff revenue
$m
793
2 948
22
the same percentage as the subsidy rate, since
expenditures are a product of volumes, world
prices and subsidy rates.
Another limitation is that some
countries that provide export subsidies have
production quotas for products they subsidize,
for example beef and dairy products in the
case of the EU. If the quota is binding, a
reduction of export subsidies may not
(immediately) lead to reduced exports. Since
production quotas are not taken into account
in ATPSM any change to export subsidies leads
to changes of the production and export
incentives. Thus, the production- and export-
limiting effect of a reduction of export
subsidies may be overestimated.
Furthermore, many countries, such as
the United States in the case of wheat, provide
export support on a bilateral basis, that is for
specific countries. An elimination of such
subsidies would have no impact on world
prices if the importing countries would face
liquidity constraints on purchasing food where
they otherwise could not. However, the OECD
(2000) has shown in the case of export credits
that only a small share of subsidized exports
are imported by, for example, least developed
countries. Thus, it is likely that without any
subsidies a large proportion of the demand
would be on world markets.
Finally, the economic impact of export
credit subsidy elements is different from that
of export subsidies. Export subsidies permit
exporters to sell products at world prices even
if production costs are higher. Thus, producers
receive the budgetary outlay. This need not be
the case with export credits, where importers
receive at least parts of the subsidy element.
However, since data about the bilateral flows
benefiting from export credits with a subsidy
element were not available, export credits were
treated as  export subsidies.
Scenarios
Several simulations are undertaken to
analyse the effects of reductions of export
subsidies (see table 4). In an ambitious
scenario, all export subsidies and export credit
subsidy elements are eliminated. This reflects
the WTO General Council decision of August
2004 and the early positions of the Cairns
Group, the Group of 20 and other developing
countries. A 50 per cent reduction scenario is
very close to the initial EU position whereby
export credits are to be reduced by 45 per cent.
Because of the interaction with other
border measures, import tariffs and domestic
support measures are also reduced. However,
since we want to compare the scenarios with
different reductions in export subsidies, the
Label
Description
Basic
A reduction in bound out-quota tariffs of 36 per cent in developed countries
and 24 per cent in developing countries; a 60 per cent and 20 per cent
reduction of domestic support in developed and developing countries, re-
spectively. No reduction in export subsidies or export credit subsidy ele-
ments. No reductions in least developed countries.
50 per cent
As in the Basic scenario, plus a 50 per cent reduction of bound export subsi-
reduction
dies and export credit subsidy elements.
Elimination
As in the Basic scenario, plus the total elimination of export subsidies and
export credit subsidy elements.
Table 4.  Alternative liberalization scenarios
23
reduction of the tariffs and domestic support
remains the same across all scenarios. A third
scenario, in which export subsidies are not
changed, provides a benchmark.
Since the export credit subsidy element
rate is added to the bound and the applied
subsidy rate it is implicitly assumed that an
agreement would restrict the use of export
credits with a subsidy element. Furthermore,
bound rather than applied export subsidy rates
are reduced.
In the following an equal percentage
reduction in bound export subsidies and in
export credit subsidy elements is summarized
as a reduction of export subsidies.
Furthermore, we will look at the additional
economic effects resulting from a reduction
of export subsidies. Because of the interaction
of various border measures, we are comparing
a situation in which only tariffs and domestic
support are reduced with one in which in
addition export subsidies are reduced. Thus,
we compare the Elimination and 50 per cent
reduction scenarios with the Basic scenario.
The concentration on the two extremes – the
Basic scenario and the Elimination scenario –
may overemphasize the economic effects.
However, the qualitative results are the same
if we compare a 55 per cent with a 45 per cent
reduction of export subsidies.
24
The tariff reduction scheme, as
specified in the Basic scenario, is the same in
all three scenarios. The Uruguay Round
continuation leads to an import tariff
reduction in developed countries and, because
applied tariffs are smaller than bound tariff
rates in most developing countries, to a small
reduction of tariffs in developing countries.
As a consequence, world market prices
increase. Peters and Vanzetti (2004) provide
more details of this scenario. Prices for
temperate products increase more than prices
for tropical products. Globally, the total
welfare effect is positive, but some countries
lose while others gain. In highly protecting
developed countries consumers and taxpayers
gain, producers lose and the overall welfare
effect is positive. In most developing countries
producers gain, whereas consumers lose as the
result of higher domestic prices. The overall
welfare effect varies from country to country,
depending on the production and trade
structure. Most least developed countries are
net food-importing developing countries and
suffer from increasing food prices. These
results can also be seen in the first columns
of tables 5 to 8.
Impact on world prices
Eliminating export subsidies leads to a
further increase in world market prices. Since
in the Basic scenario the average trade
weighted price increase is 1.3 per cent and in
the Elimination scenario 2.9 per cent, the
additional price increase as a consequence of
the export subsidy elimination is 1.6
percentage points. Thus, compared with the
price effects resulting from a Uruguay Round
continuation concerning import tariffs, an
elimination of all export subsidies has a
considerable impact on world market price
movements.
22
In the 50 per cent reduction scenario the
average trade-weighted price increase is 2.1 per
cent. The average reduction in actual export
subsidy rates is only 14 per cent (simple
average) and 10 per cent (trade-weighted) if
bound export subsidies are reduced by 50 per
cent. This reflects the difference between
bound and applied subsidies. In many cases
the export subsidy constraints are not binding.
However, total export subsidy expenditures,
including export credit subsidy element
amounts, are reduced by 48 per cent. The
reason is that it is not only the export subsidy
rate that has been reduced but also exports.
Hence, in general, subsidy expenditures are
reduced by a higher percentage than subsidy
rates. Furthermore, export subsidies for
commodities that represent the bulk of
subsidy expenditures are often up against their
constraints. For example, the EU’s actual
export subsidy rate on concentrated milk
equals the bound rate.
The increase in the world market price
and the reduction in exports from export-
subsidy-providing countries as a result of
6.  RESULTS
22
However, the trade-weighted price increase in a scenario where all tariffs but not the export subsidies are eliminated
is at 6.9 per cent higher than the price increase that stems from an elimination of export subsidies (1.6 per cent).
Thus, the price increase resulting from eliminating tariffs is about four times higher than the one resulting from
eliminating export subsidies. This corresponds to the finding of the Economic Research Service at the US Department
of Agriculture (2001) that market distortions resulting from tariffs are four times as high as the one resulting from
export subsidies.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested