asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Change file size of pdf Library SDK component .net asp.net azure mvc itcdtab49_en0-part654

UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT 
POLICY ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND COMMODITIES 
STUDY SERIES No. 48 
EXPORT STRUCTURE AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE IN 
DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: 
EVIDENCE FROM NONPARAMETRIC METHODOLOGY 
by 
Sudip Ranjan Basu 
UNCTAD, Geneva 
and 
Monica Das 
Skidmore College, New York
UNITED NATIONS 
New York and Geneva, 2011 
Change file size of pdf - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size fillable pdf; pdf edit text size
Change file size of pdf - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
advanced pdf compressor; batch pdf compression
ii 
Note
The purpose of this series of studies is to analyse policy issues and to stimulate discussions 
in the area of international trade and development. The series includes studies by UNCTAD staff 
and by distinguished researchers from academia. This paper represents the personal views of the 
authors only, and not the views of the UNCTAD secretariat or its member States. 
The designations employed and the presentation of the material do not imply the 
expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the United Nations Secretariat concerning the 
legal status of any country, territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the 
delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. 
Material in this publication may be freely quoted or reprinted, but acknowledgement is 
requested, together with a reference to the document number. It would be appreciated if a copy of 
the publication containing the quotation or reprint could be sent to the UNCTAD secretariat at the 
following address: 
Chief 
Trade Analysis Branch 
Division on International Trade in Goods and Services, and Commodities 
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development 
Palais des Nations 
CH-1211 Geneva 
Series Editor: 
Victor Ognivtsev 
Officer-in-Charge, Trade Analysis Branch 
UNCTAD/ITCD/TAB/49 
UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION 
ISSN 1607-8291 
© Copyright United Nations 2011 
All rights reserved 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines. Split PDF file by output file size.
change page size pdf; pdf compression
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split Split PDF File by Output File Size Demo Code in VB.NET. This
adjust size of pdf in preview; best way to compress pdf files
iii 
Abstract 
The objective of the paper is to use nonparametric methodology to examine the 
relationship between skill and technology intensive manufacture exports and gross domestic 
product (GDP) per capita, controlling for institutional quality and human capital in developing 
countries. The paper uses the Li-Racine (2004) generalized kernel estimation methodology to 
examine the role of skill and technology content of the exports in understanding differential level 
of economic performance across countries and country groups. In the extended model, we also 
control for other factors that influence economic performance such as availability of financial 
capital and effective foreign market access of exports of developing countries. The paper uses the 
database from the United Nations COMTRADE Harmonized System (HS) four-digit level of 
disaggregation to provide new system of classification of traded goods by assigning each one of 
them according to their skill and technology content as proposed in Basu (forthcoming). The 
analysis is carried out for a set of 88 developing countries over 1995 to 2007. Similar to parametric 
results, the nonparametric analysis lends further support to the view that as the skill and technology 
content of the exports increase, the impact on GDP per capita increases positivity and significantly 
as well, after controlling for other policy variables.  
Keywords:  Nonparametric analysis, Export structure, Institutions, Developing countries  
JEL Classification:  C1, F1, O43, R11 
 
 
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
2) Dim FormSizeY As Integer = (Me.Size.Height / 2 Height * zoomFactor))) End Sub ' Save The File Private Sub sfd.FileName) End If End Sub ' Change Zoom Level
adjust pdf size; pdf page size limit
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online in ASP.NET. Ability to change text size in PDF text box.
change file size of pdf document; change paper size in pdf document
iv 
Acknowledgements 
We would like to thank Wojciech Stawowy for providing research support and  
Sandwip Das, Khalil Rahman, Victor Ognivtsev, Aki Kuwahara and Mia Mikic for their 
encouraging comments during the preparation of the paper. Thanks are also due to the 
participants’ comments at the Research Workshop on Trade Diversification in the 
Context of Global Challenge, UNESCAP-UNCTAD-WTO, Vientiane, Lao PDR, 27-28 
October 2010 and XV
th
Spring Meeting of Young Economists, Luxembourg,  
15-17 April 2010, where some concepts and results of this paper were presented. We 
gratefully acknowledge the Faculty Development grant from Skidmore College, New 
York, as well as the Economics department for funding the services of research assistant 
Brian Stickles. 
The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect 
the views of the United Nations Secretariat or its members. Any mistakes and errors in 
this paper are the authors’ own. 
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change page size of pdf document; change font size in fillable pdf form
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Ability to change text font, color, size and location and page, we will demonstrate how to use C#.NET class code to add and insert text to PDF file page.
pdf text box font size; reader pdf reduce file size
Contents 
 
Introduction..........................................................................................................................1 
Empirical Methodology.......................................................................................................2 
2.1 Nonparametric Density Estimates................................................................................2 
2.2 A Generalized Kernel Estimation................................................................................3 
2.3 Computing the IQI.......................................................................................................5 
Data and Empirical Model..................................................................................................6 
3.1 Data..............................................................................................................................6 
3.2 Dependent and Independent Variables.........................................................................7 
3.3 The Empirical Model.................................................................................................13 
Results.................................................................................................................................13 
4.1 Core Model Results....................................................................................................14 
4.2 Extended Model Results: Robustness Checks...........................................................17 
Conclusions.........................................................................................................................19 
References ....................................................................................................................................20 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff
no change for image size. Able to adjust and customize image resolution to meet various C# PDF conversion requirements. Conversion from other files to PDF file
batch reduce pdf file size; best pdf compressor
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Jpeg
C# class code to convert Dicom image to Tiff image file. are suggested to keep the actual size for conversion will tell C# programmers how to change and convert
best pdf compression tool; adjust size of pdf
vi 
List of figures
Figure 1:  Nonparametric Estimation Analysis Framework............................................................4 
Figure 2:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for InGDPPCpenn...........................................................9 
Figure 3:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Incnsexp.....................................................................9 
Figure 4:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Indnsexp...................................................................10 
Figure 5:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Inensexp ..................................................................10 
Figure 6:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Iniqi..........................................................................11 
Figure 7:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Incger.......................................................................11 
Figure 8:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Inpcrdbofgdp............................................................12 
Figure 9:  Nonparametric pdf Estimates for Inwavg......................................................................12 
List of tables
Table 1:  Nonparametric First, Second and Third Quartile Estimates .........................................23 
Table 2:  Nonparametric Median Estimates by Country .............................................................24 
Table 3:  Nonparametric Median Estimates by Year ...................................................................30 
Table 4:  Nonparametric Median Estimates by Region ...............................................................33 
Table 5:  Nonparametric Median Estimates by Emerging Country Group .................................34 
Table 6:  Nonparametric Median Estimates by Income Group....................................................35 
Table 7:  Extended Model: Nonparametric First, Second and Third Quartile Estimates.............36 
Table 8:  Extended Model: Impact of Covariates on GDP Per Capita by Country......................37 
Table 9: Extended Model: Nonparametric Median Estimates by Year.......................................39 
Table 10:  Extended Model: Nonparametric Median Estimates by Region...................................42 
Table 11:  Extended Model: Nonparametric Median Estimates by Emerging Country Group......43 
Table 12:  Extended Model: Nonparametric Median Estimates by Income Group........................44 
Annex tables
Table A1.  List of countries in sample............................................................................................45 
Table A2.  Description and sources of variables.............................................................................47 
 
1. Introduction 
Does transformation in export structure cause differential levels of economic performance 
across countries? Should the trade policymaking agenda of developing countries be directed 
towards building capacities and capabilities for producing skill and technologically intensive 
manufacturing goods with similar to those of developed countries?
1
What effects do low, medium 
and high-skill and technological intensive exports at the national level have on Gross Domestic 
Product per capita (GDPPC) in developing countries? Answers to these questions are relevant for 
trade policymakers and planners in developing and least developed countries (LDCs) as well as to 
the United Nations and other multilateral organizations. 
During the recent global economic and financial crisis, many developing countries faced a 
steady decline of their exports revenue due to the over-dependence on international trade leading to 
over-exposure of those economies to the rest of the world that eventually led to many unwarranted 
impacts on economic growth and employment opportunities at the domestic markets
(UNCTAD, 
2009) Some developing countries such as China, India, Brazil and others could undertake trade-
related policies to speed up the recovery process –diversification of their exports basket has been 
one of the key trade policy components – to stabilize the exports sector growth and subsequently 
GDP growth.  
In recent years, the trade literature provides a number of empirical evidence to support the 
importance of export diversification and what a country produces matter, by examining the 
national share of exports (NSEXP) in manufacturing goods (Lall, 2000; Hausman, Hwang and 
Rodrik, 2006; UNDESA, 2006; UNECA, 2007; World Bank, 2009; and Shirotori, Tumurchudur 
and Cadot, 2010). However, to support the increasing role of exports and their transformation, 
countries’ domestic industrial policies require emphasizing the promotion of efficient domestic 
institutions, spending on human capital accumulation and well-balanced financial and trade-
supporting economic policies to raise the level of the GDP per capita – a measure of improvement 
in economic performance – at the national level (UNCTAD, 2002; Imbs and Wacziarg, 2003; 
Dollar and Kraay, 2003; Hausmann and Klinger, 2006; Rodrik, 2007; Klinger, 2009; UNDESA, 
2010). 
Apart from key role of diversification of exports as well as changing nature of skill and 
technological content of products in developing countries to boost economic performance, there are 
growing number of research papers in literature to document the critical role of efficient domestic 
institutional conditions as well as human capital accumulation and geography (Acemoglu et al., 
2001; Sachs, 2003; Easterly and Levine, 2003; Rodrik et al., 2004; and Basu, 2008).  
The purpose of our paper is to further investigate the quality of exports hypothesis by 
classifying the exported products in relation to level of skill and technological contents. We 
compute shares of low (C), medium (D ) and high (E ) level skill and technology contents of 
exported products for each of the countries in the sample and then use the measure of institutional 
quality index (IQI) by applying the latent variable technique developed by Nagar and Basu (2002) 
and combined gross enrolment ratio (CGER) to explore their impact on income. Utilizing the Li–
Racine nonparametric estimation technique for mixed data, developed by Li and Racine (2004) and 
Racine and Li (2004), our paper explores the relationship between GDP per capita (GDPPC) and 
level of skill and technology contents of exports. The technique of choice allows us to examine the 
GDPPC-(C/D/E) NSEXP, the relationship in a data-driven specification-free manner.  
1
For details, refer to the United Nations Statistics Division. Table A1 gives a complete list and classification 
of the countries used in the paper. 
The contribution of our paper is in the application of the Li and Racine (2007) 
nonparametric methodology to investigate the relationship between three types of manufactures 
exports based on their skill and technology intensity and GDP per capita variable, in a panel with 
both time and country effects. In the estimation of any model with GDP per capita and export 
structure and other institutional, human capital and policy variables, mainly two types of biases can 
be at work: (a) misspecification bias and (b) endogeneity/omitted variable bias. The parametric 
estimates potentially suffer from both (Basu, forthcoming). The nonparametric estimates in the 
paper effectively deal with (a). Bias due to (b) is left for future works. 
Our nonparametric estimates find strong support for positive significant impact of higher 
level of skill and technology intensive manufactures on GDP per capita, one of the first attempts in 
this field of study. For the majority of the countries examined, the impact of higher level of skill 
and technology related exports on the GDP per capita are quite favorable. Since the Li–Racine 
methodology provides weighted estimates (weights determined by all observations) of the 
regression function and its slope at every data point, we can also examine the nonparametric 
estimates for various subgroups by continents and country characteristics. The impact of skill and 
technology contents of exports on GDP per capita is far from uniform across countries or time 
periods. However, the favourable relationship between these two or minimal support for a negative 
relation between the two variables, is robust to most sub groups and country characteristics. 
We now sketch a course for the rest of the paper. Section 2 presents the nonparametric 
density estimates and the Li–Racine estimation technique for mixed data, utilized in the paper to 
the estimation of (C/D/E) NSEXP-GDPPC relationship, and then latent variable technique for 
calculating the IQI. Section 3 discusses the data set and the empirical model. Main results of the 
paper are presented in section 4 and section 5 concludes the paper.
2. Empirical Methodology 
This section provides description of nonparametric density estimation to all the variables 
considered in the analysis and then provide theoretical framework of the Li–Racine (2004) 
generalized kernel estimation methodology. We also construct the IQI, which is a composite index 
based on the methodology developed by Nagar and Basu (2002).    
2.1 Nonparametric Density Estimates 
In this section we obtain some graphs of the probability density functions of the variables 
considered in the core as well as extended models. Figures 1 through 8 are the graphs of the density 
functions for all economic variables used in the empirical models. The estimator of the probability 
function of random variable 
X∈ℜ
at the point 
x∈ℜ
is given by 
( )
(
)
=
=
n
i
i
K x x x x h
n
f x
1
, ,
1
ˆ
(1) 
In the above equation, is a continuous random variable, K(.) is the Gaussian kernel density 
function and h is a smoothing parameter obtained from the method of cross validation.  
We estimate the density functions, unconditional or conditional moments of distributions, 
without making any prior assumptions about functional forms. The data are allowed to speak for 
themselves in determining the shape of the unknown functions (Silverman, 1986). Suppose X is a 
continuous random variable, f(x) is the probability density function and F(x) is the cumulative 
density function, when X = x. With h as the smoothing parameter, the nonparametric naive 
estimate of f(x) is 
( )
(
)
(
)
[
]
F x x h/2 2 /h
lt F F x x h/2
f x
ˆ
h 0
+
=
(2) 
According to equation (2), the nonparametric density estimate 
( )
)
f x
ˆ
is 1/h the probability 
that  belongs to the interval 
[
]
x h/2,x h/2
+
. In other words, 
( )
)
f x
ˆ
is 1/h the probability that 
(
)
x /h
X
belongs to the interval 
[
]
1/2, 1/2
. Following the methodology outlined in 
Silverman (1986), we define an identity function.  
()
(
)
otherwise
x h
X
if
I
i
0
0.5
0.5
. 0
=
=
(3) 
We rewrite the nonparametric density function as 
( )
=
=
n
i 1
i
h
x
X
I
nh
1
f x
ˆ
(4) 
The graph of the estimated density function from equation (3) is not a smooth curve. Thus 
the weight function I(.) is replaced by the following kernel density function K(.)
(
)
(
)
=
2
i
i
2
1
exp
2
1
K
ψ
π
ψ
(5) 
(
)
x /h
X
i
i
=
ψ
( )
1
d
K
=
+∞
−∞
ψ
ψ
The nonparametric density function is 
( )
(
)
=
=
n
i 1
i
K
nh
1
f x
ˆ
ψ
(6) 
It is well known in the literature that the choice of kernels does not influence significantly 
the efficiency of estimates. The choice of window width is, however, crucial, since small values of 
h cause over-smoothing and high values lead to under-smoothing of the estimates. To estimate the 
density function is (5), we choose the optimum h such that is minimizes some function of the mean 
squared error of 
( )
f x
ˆ
2.2   A Generalized Kernel Estimation 
The basic principle behind the nonparametric estimation technique is to fit a window h 
(also known as smoothing parameter) around every observation of the data set and estimate the 
relationship of interest between variables in each window. A kernel density function K(.) is used to 
give high weights to data points close to the window and low weights to data points far from the 
window. Thus the regression relationship is estimated, piece by piece or window by window as 
shown in figure 1. One of the advantages of nonparametric estimation is that it estimates the 
regression function m(.) as well as the slope coefficients β(.) at every data point.  
Figure 1: Nonparametric Estimation Analysis Framework 
If y
i
is the target variable (GDP per capita) and x
i
the policy variable (level of skill and 
technology content of the manufactures goods, institutional quality or enrolment ratio), (E(y
i
|x
i
) < 
∞) the relation among them may be expressed in terms of the conditional moment E(y
i
|x
i
) =m(x
i
). 
When the actual functional form is unknown, parametric specifications including complex ones 
like the translog functions are deemed inadequate. Compared with the parametric procedures, the 
nonparametric methodology is more proficient in capturing non linearities in the underlying system 
thus dealing with the problem of model misspecification.  
The paper uses the Li–Racine Generalized Kernel Estimation Methodology (by Li and 
Racine, 2004; and Racine and Li, 2004) to examine the relationship between exports structure by 
classifying the product space through level of skills and technology content manufactures and GDP 
per capita. Equation (7) represents the basic regression model. 
( )
)
i
i
i
mx
y
ε
+
=
(7) 
In equation (7), y
i
represents the i
th
observation on the dependent variable (GDP per capita) 
and indexes country-time observations of N countries and T time intervals. Also, m(.)  is an 
unknown smooth regression function with argument x
i
=[
u
i
c
i
,x
], where 
c
i
x
is a NT×k vector of 
continuous variables (low, medium and high skill and technology intensive manufactures as well as 
institutional quality and gross combined enrolment ratio), 
u
i
x
is a NT×1 vector of unordered 
discrete variables (country effects) and 
ε
i
is a NT×1 vector of errors. Following the Li-Racine 
methodology, we take a first order Taylor expansion of (7) around x
j
to obtain equation (8). 
(
)
(
)
(
)
i
j
c
j
c
i
j
i
x
x
x
mx
y
ε
β
+
+
(8) 
Here, 
β
(x
j
) is the partial derivative of m(x
j
) with respect to x
c
. The estimate of 
δ
(x
j
) ≡ [m(x
j
β
(x
j
)]’ is represented by equation (9).  
( )
(
)
( )
=
j
j
j
x
mx
x
β
δ
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested