asp.net open pdf in new window code behind : Batch pdf compression software Library dll windows asp.net web page web forms harris_UKTIFinalReport7-part70

©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
63
A3.3 Equation (A3.3) shows that a comparison between exporting and non-exporting 
plants (in terms of what is observable – cf. equation A3.2) equals the effect of 
what is known as ‘treatment on the exporting’ (the first term in equation A3.3) 
plus a bias term (the second major term). As pointed out by Angrist, et. al. 
(1999), this bias would be zero if exporting plants were randomly assigned (or 
at least assigned to ensure independence between D
i
and
0
i
).
42
So, for example, 
if entrants select into international markets in a manner independent of (say) the 
plant’s potential productivity gain if it did not go international, then the bias 
term would be zero. But this seems unrealistic because selection into export 
markets is likely to be made taking account of the potential productivity gains 
from operating in distinct markets, and it might be expected that those most 
likely to benefit will have a higher probability of deciding to penetrate export 
markets (and possibly have a greater probability of survival and success). Put 
another way, and referring to the second term in equation (A3.3), bias occurs 
because the characteristics of export-market entrants are such that they achieve 
better performance than non-entrants even when they do not participate, and this 
‘better performance’ is correlated with the decision to internationalise.  
A3.4 There are several approaches that attempt to eliminate the bias that arises from 
self-selection (cf. Blundell and Costa Dias, 2000). The first is matching. 
Essentially, this involves matching every exporting plant with another plant that 
has (very) similar characteristics but does not export (plants not participating in 
international markets that have non-similar characteristics to those who do 
42
Note if D
i
is also independent of 
1
i
Y
(as would be expected in a ‘laboratory-type’ experiment where 
plants were randomly assigned) then 
]
[
1]
[
0
1
0
1
i
i
i
i
i
Y
EY
Y D
EY
= =
and the ‘treatment on the 
exporting effect equals the unconditional average treatment effect (that is, the impact on a participant 
drawn randomly from the population of plants). 
Batch pdf compression - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
batch pdf compression; pdf change page size
Batch pdf compression - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
optimize scanned pdf; acrobat compress pdf
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
64
participate are of course not included in such an analysis of the impact of 
exporting). Different approaches can be used to match from using simple 
propensity score matching algorithms such as the probit/logit regression 
approach, to covariate matching estimators. It assumes therefore that the 
exporting and non-exporting groups are effectively the same in all relevant 
respects so that the outcome that would result in the absence of exporting is the 
same in both cases.
43
There are a number of issues with this matching process, 
including the need for a rich dataset that includes all relevant variables (X
i
) that 
impact on outcomes and all variables that impact on participation in export 
markets (Z
i
). Matching is done on the set of variables W = (X, Z), so that any 
selection on unobservables is assumed to be trivial and does not affect outcomes 
in the absence of the exporting. As Heckman and Navarro-Lozano (2004) point 
out, this requirement can lead to problems since “…if the analyst has too much 
information about the decision of who takes treatment, so that P(W) =1 or 0, the 
method breaks down because people cannot be compared at a common 
W…(thus) methods for choosing W based on the fit of the model to data on D 
are potentially problematic”.
44, 45
Further discussion of matching – especially 
the practical issues faced in empirical design of matching plants – is available in 
Bryson et. al. (2002), Imbens (2004) and Zhao (2004). 
A3.5 A second approach to dealing with self-selection bias is instrumental variable 
(IV) estimation. If a variable(s) can be found (belonging to Z
i
) that affects 
43
In terms of equation (A3.3), it is assumed: 
0]
[
1]
[
0
0
=
= =
i
i
i
i
EY D
EY D
. Thus matching 
assumes that 
1
i
Y
and 
0
i
Y
are independent of D
i
 
44
Typically ‘unsupported’ eeeexporting plants in the non-exporting population are dropped, which can 
reduce significantly the size of the eexporting sub-group included in any analysis. So where there is 
little common support between the exporting and non-exporting comparators, matching breaks down. 
45
Another issue is that by definition, matching assumes that the effect for the average plant 
participating in foreign markets is the same as the effect for the marginal plant (the ‘treatment on the 
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection.
change font size in pdf text box; change paper size pdf
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class. Description: Convert to PDF with specified compression method and save it on
can pdf files be compressed; adjust pdf page size
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
65
participation in export markets but does not affect outcomes (Y
i
) directly (i.e. Z
i
is not completely determined by X
i
) then such a variable(s) can be used to 
instrument for D
i
and overcome the problem of self-selection.
46
Put another 
way, such a variable(s) affects outcomes indirectly since it determines 
participation in export markets (which is correlated with outcomes), but it does 
not need to enter the outcome equation directly (i.e. does not belong to X
i
) and 
is consequently a source of exogenous influence that can be used to identify the 
causal impact of D
i
in the model.
47
The main issue with the approach is finding 
an appropriate instrument(s) that affects the export participation decision but 
does not directly affect outcomes (other than through its effect on whether the 
plant exports). As Angrist and Krueger (2001) point out: “…good instruments 
often come from detailed knowledge of the economic mechanism and 
institutions determining the regressor of interest” (p. 73).  
A3.6 The standard Heckman two-stage approach is a third approach to dealing with 
self-selection bias, and one that is closely linked to the IV approach. This 
approach begins with a first-stage use of a probit/logit estimator to generate 
first-stage predicted values when there is a dummy endogenous regressor 
(export versus non-export), with the second stage estimation of outcomes 
including the sample selectivity correction from the first-stage model. Several 
authors (Puhani, 2000; Smith, 2004; Angrist and Kruger, 2001) point out some 
of the problems associated with the Heckman approach. First, the model tends 
to instability if X ∈ W, i.e. there is a need for exclusion restrictions otherwise 
treated effect equals the unconditional average treatment effect). Heckman and Navarro-Lozano (op. 
cit.) argue that this is an unattractive implication. 
46
Note, the fact that D
i
is dichotomous is not a problem according to Angrist (2001). 
47
For example, a valid instrument is one that ‘forces’ a plant into entering export markets but is not 
correlated with the factors that determine (say) total factor productivity, even though exporting is 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Powerful components for batch converting PDF documents in C# of the original PDF page size. DocumentType targetType, ImageCompress compression, String filePath).
pdf edit text size; change file size of pdf document
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Professional .NET PDF converter control for batch conversion. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and save it on the disk.
change font size pdf fillable form; adjust size of pdf file
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
66
the model may be identified (through the nonlinearity of the selectivity 
parameter included in the second stage equation) but it can often lead to what 
Puhani (op. cit.) refers to as “…rather unrobust results due to collinearity 
problems” (p. 57). Moreover, using a nonlinear first stage to generate fitted 
values for the second stage does not result in consistent estimates unless the first 
stage model is exactly correct (Angrist and Kruger, 2001, p.80). 
A3.7 The last approach considered here for eliminating the bias that arises from self-
selection is the difference-in-difference estimator. If information is available for 
a pre- and post-entry period (denoted t′ and t, respectively), then measuring the 
impact of export-market participation can be achieved using an amended 
version of equation (A3.2): 
{
}
{
}
( 3.4)
0]
0] [
[
1]
1] [
[
0
0
0
1
A
EY D
EY D
EY D
EY D
i
ti
i
it
i
it
i
it
=
=
=
= −
where the first term represents the experience of plants with international 
exposure between ( tt ) and the second term is the experience between 
tt ′− ) of those without such exposure. To justify this difference-in-difference 
estimator, it is assumed that (in terms of the counterfactual) what entrants into 
export markets would have experienced post entry, had they not entered, is the 
same as the experience of non-entrants, i.e. 
{
}
{
}
( 3.5)
0]
0] [
[
1]
1] [
[
0
0
0
0
A
EY D
EY D
EY D
EY D
i
it
i
it
i
it
i
it
=
= −
=
=
= −
The missing counterfactual is now known since rearranging (A3.5) gives: 
{
}
( 3.6)
0]
0] [
[
1)
(
1)
(
0
0
0
0
A
EY D
EY D
EY D
EY D
i
it
i
it
i
it
i
it
=
=
= +
= =
correlated with TFP. To the best of our knowledge, no appropriate instruments have been identified in 
the literature to test the productivity effect of exporting. 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Professional .NET PDF converter control for batch conversion. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and save it on the disk.
change font size in pdf form field; reduce pdf file size
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Professional .NET control for batch conversion in C#.NET class. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and save it on the disk.
adjusting page size in pdf; compress pdf
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
67
that is, the outcome that export-market entrants would have experienced post 
entry, had they not entered, equals their outcome effect before entry takes 
place adjusted for what happens over the period to all those not participating 
in  international markets (the last major term in equation A3.6). As Smith 
(2004) shows, a relatively simple difference-in-difference model is to estimate 
(omitting the X variables for simplicity): 
( 3.7)
0
A
TD
D
T
Y
i
i i
DD
i
D
T i
i
ε
β
β
β
β
+
+
+
+
=
where T
i
= 1 in period “t” and T
i
= 0 otherwise;
T
β
measures the impact of 
common influences impacting on all i plants;
D
β
is the time invariant 
difference between the export-market entrants and non-entrants; and 
DD
β
estimates the average impact of export-market entry on the entrants.
48
A3.8 A major issue with this approach is the assumption underlying equation (A3.5), 
which is needed to justify the difference-in-differences estimator. Essentially it 
is assumed that the outcome effect for export-market participants would have 
been the same as that experienced by non-participants in the absence of 
participation in overseas markets; but this seems unlikely if participants are a 
self-selected sub-group exhibiting characteristics that make it more likely they 
will do better if they expand into international markets. 
A3.9 In summary, all the above techniques to deal with selectivity have something to 
offer, but which is most useful depends on an investigator’s knowledge of the 
selection process. For example, if no appropriate instruments are available, then 
the IV approach is likely to provide unreliable results. If a comprehensive 
48
If panel data are used, equation (A3.7) becomes: 
( 3.7')
0
A
D
Y
i
t
i
it
D
i
ε
μ
μ
β
β
+
+
+
+
=
where
D
β
is the panel data impact estimator, D
it
is the time-varying indicator for exporting and μ terms 
are the usual panel data terms to pick up plant- and time-specific effects. 
JPEG2000 to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG2000 to PDF, Convert PDF
Alongside image conversion and compression capabilities, this JPEG2000 to PDF Converter also to manipulate converted files, even in batch conversion mode.
pdf custom paper size; best way to compress pdf
C# Create PDF from CSV to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
NET library for batch converting CSV formats to adobe PDF files in Visual C#. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and save
change pdf page size; pdf text box font size
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
68
dataset is not available to capture what determines selection and outcomes, then 
the matching approach is also likely to be biased.     
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
A professional .NET PDF control able to batch convert multiple OpenOffice documents Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF with specified compression method and
reader compress pdf; change font size in fillable pdf form
JPEG2000 to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG2000 to JBIG2, Convert
image compression capabilities (lossy compression & lossless compression) are also to, from JBIG2 image with single-page conversion or batch conversion method;
change page size pdf; pdf file size limit
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
69
4.  The Role of Government in Business Internationalisation  
Introduction 
4.1 In this chapter we consider the case for government invention with regard to 
business internationalisation. The traditional ‘market failure’ arguments are 
examined first, together with an overview of the type of market inventions 
typically undertaken by government. Note, in line with the rest of this literature 
review, we largely ignore the role of both inward FDI, and the role of importing. 
This is not because these are not important, but rather because this review has 
focused on firm-level internationalization and adjustment to globalisation.  
4.2 Following the discussion of ‘market failures’, we consider some of the extant 
literature that argues for a wider response to business internationalisation by 
government. This includes both the needs of ‘born-global’ companies, and the 
need to ensure that all firms face the ‘right’ incentives when undertaking 
necessary adjustments to changes in the business environment due to trade and 
investment liberalisation and other aspects of globalisation.  
4.3 Where necessary, we also pick up on any issues that relate to government 
policies as they have featured in the literature reviewed in earlier chapters. 
Market Failure   
4.4 
The standard neoclassical Arrow-Debreu model of the perfectly competitive, 
general equilibrium economy states that the market, consisting of individuals 
motivated by self-interest (i.e. seeking to maximise profitability and utility) who 
engage in the production, exchange and consumption of goods or services, 
provides an allocation of the economy’s resources which is socially beneficial. 
Such an efficient allocation of resources combines the utility maximizing 
choices of consumers with the profit maximising choices of producers. Market 
forces determine the optimal quantity of a good or a service (such as exports) 
that will be supplied and consumed by individuals or firms in order to maximise 
social welfare. At this point no individual can be better off without at the same 
time making another individual worse off. This is the First Theorem of Welfare 
Economics: in such a system the allocation of resources is Pareto-efficient. 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
70
However, in reality, markets may not be perfectly competitive and may fail to 
produce an efficient allocation of resources. In this standard approach, such 
deviations from optimality are called market failures and arise due to the 
characteristics of goods or services, such as the presence of externalities or 
public goods, and the characteristics of markets, such as monopoly, oligopoly 
and inadequate information. 
4.5 Table 1 contains a list of market failures as identified in the literature. We shall 
take each in turn, and relate them specifically to how they hinder 
internationalisation. A common rationale for government intervention is on the 
grounds that there has been a market failure due to inaccurate or incomplete 
information, and to the costs of acquiring information. Imperfect information in 
product markets impedes internationalisation since potential buyers and sellers 
need access to the identity and location of potential suppliers and customers, 
and about the prices and quality of the goods and services that they may be 
traded. Connections between buyers and sellers of differentiated products have 
to be made through a process of search, resulting mostly in small-valued, short-
lived transactions because of the uncertainty about the reliability of buyers and 
sellers. As Besedes and Prusa (2004) argue: “…by starting small the buyer can 
efficiently ascertain the supplier’s type. A good match will result in a deepening 
of the relationship. A poor match will lead to the termination of the relationship. 
In effect, even though they are modest in value, small orders play a large role in 
creating trade flows” (p. 1). A major reason for this pattern of trade (for which 
they present robust US evidence) is that entry into foreign markets involve large 
sunk costs (see Chapter 2 and below), and therefore before undertaking costly 
(irreversible) investment to overcome entry barriers trade takes place with a 
small order over the short run, in order to reveal if the buyer-seller relationship 
is mutually beneficial and sustainable.  
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
71
Table 4.1: Taxonomy of market failures impeding internationalisation 
Type 
Description 
Market failure due to imperfect markets
(1) Imperfect information  
firms using inaccurate or incomplete 
information to assess costs and benefits of 
international production  
(2) Asymmetric information  
costs of acquiring information make it 
more available to some more than others 
leading to adverse selection and/or moral 
hazard 
(3) Financial barriers  
firms without sufficient collateral or track 
record have less access to finance 
(4) Missing markets   
there is no market for externalities; public 
good elements; extreme cases of 
asymmetric and imperfect information 
(5) Appropriability failure  
problems with the enforceability of 
property rights, especially over knowledge 
and technology. 
Barriers to entry and exit
Sunk costs   
irreversible fixed costs of 
internationalisation result in entry and exit 
being costly undertakings. 
Institutional failure: government
public good argument   
In situations where the government has a 
comparative advantage in supplying a 
good or service (usually information) 
Institutional failure: networks
Group formation   
networks may not possess the right 
portfolio of skills, information and 
knowledge and membership rules may 
exclude some firms 
Systemic failure
Bounded rationality and path dependency  
lead firms to make sub-optimal choices of 
technology to which they may become 
locked in. 
Source: based on Harris and Robertson (2001, Table 1) 
4.6 Besedes and Prusa (op. cit.) test their search model using US data and find 
strong support for its predictions: “many trade relationships start small but those 
that start large have longer duration. The more reliable the supplier, the greater 
the fraction of trade that start large. Relationships involving more reliable 
©Richard Harris and Q Cher Li 
72
suppliers have longer duration. The data indicate the chance of a trade 
relationship ending is highest during the first few years (i.e. the learning phase) 
and a small fraction of relationships end even after the supplier has proven to be 
successful” (pp. 25-26).  
4.7 Note, Booth di Giovanni (1998, par. 9) comments on this search process from 
the government viewpoint, arguing that search models cannot inform policy 
regarding the existence or otherwise of market failures since:  
(a) The fact that businesses may lack relevant information, and the existence of 
uncertainty, does not, by itself, imply that market processes are inefficient 
but rather that information is costly. This does not mean that there is no 
rationale for government intervention, assuming that it sees a direct 
increase in economic benefits from more firms gaining information and 
thus acting on that information (e.g., by internationalising.). Casson (1999) 
argues that in this situation the government has a comparative advantage in 
information, and it is on this basis (not market failure) that it can justify 
intervention.
49
(b) A certain proportion of poorly informed decisions leading to business 
venture failures are likely to be consistent with optimal search behaviour. 
That is, it can be argued that information costs leading to asymmetric 
outcomes are one of the features of the market, and they are in part 
necessary as a selection device (for promoting the fittest firms) and in 
providing incentives for learning and discovery, which is crucial to the 
process of variety creation upon which an evolutionary view of markets is 
based.
50
(c) Search model analysis suggests that in general businesses should invest 
more resources in (prior) information gathering when risk is higher, as it is 
likely to be in international markets. 
4.8 Thus searching for information is costly, and when firms do not engage (fully) 
for this reason they only have a partial knowledge about the market, and thus 
may underestimate the potential benefits of internationalisation (both private 
49
Although he argues that in such a situation there is little in the way of a case for government to pass 
on that information through subsidising the activity from the public fund. Rather he argues that 
government can and should pass on the information available but be prepared to charge for this 
activity.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested