Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
78
differences in the literature whether trade liberalization can affect export performance 
significantly or not and over the mechanisms which link them. It was based on this premise that 
the study seeks to provide empirical evidence on the impact of these reforms as well as the 
channels through which they can affect export performance in SSA. 
The panel evidence supports the view that the real effective exchange rate is an important factor 
affecting export performance in SSA. Trade liberalization can be said to affect export 
performance indirectly through the increased access to imported raw materials. This is because 
there was no significant relationship between reductions in tariff and increases in export in SSA. 
Rather empirical evidence revealed that increased access to imported inputs is an important 
factor that contributes positively to export performance in SSA. The productive capacity as 
captured by the manufacturing GDP may also be a contributory factor to export performance in 
SSA albeit marginally. Although not significantly, overvaluation of the exchange rate can also 
act as a disincentive to positive export performance. The impact of these trade and exchange rate 
policy reforms however differ across regions. For, example, while reductions in protections do 
not have any significant effect on the exports of the West and Eastern Africa sub-region, it 
marginally affects the Central African sub-regions exports. In addition, import of raw materials 
real effective exchange rate, and exchange rate overvaluation was found to be a positive 
contributory factor to export analysis of SSA countries. 
Trade liberalization on its own cannot stimulate export directly. Rather it works through the 
increased access to imported inputs. In addition, trade liberalization must be complemented with 
effective exchange rate management. This is evident on the significant effect that real effective 
exchange rate and overvaluation of the exchange rate can have on exports. Disaggregated 
estimates of export supply functions for individual countries and commodities are needed in 
order to untangle the relative role of external and internal influences on the export volume 
performance that we have empirically observed. Such estimates are also required in order to 
identify the specific internal economic factors that have been at play in industrial countries. It is 
also common knowledge that there are large margins of errors in SSA trade statistics and there 
may also have been other biases that have distorted the results. Nevertheless, it should be noted 
that the main general trends and findings that have discovered are so pronounced that potential 
data biases have to be large indeed to reverse them. 
Endnotes 
*
Musibau Adetunji Babatunde, Department of Economics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. 
E-mail: 
tunjiyusuf19@yahoo.com
ma.babatunde@mail.ui.edu.ng
. The author is very grateful to Professor 
Ademola Oyejide of the Department of Economics, University of Ibadan, for taking time to read 
the draft of this paper. The author also gratefully acknowledges the financial support from the 
African Economic Research Consortium (AERC), Nairobi under the thesis grant award in the 
Collaborative Ph.D. Programme.  
1. The adoption of a dummy variable as a way of capturing trade liberalization may likely yield 
estimates that are upwardly biased. 
Pdf form change font size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
advanced pdf compressor; change font size in pdf form field
Pdf form change font size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
best pdf compressor online; batch pdf compression
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
79
2. Other reasons identified by Oyejide, Ndulu and Gunning (1999) as stimuli for the 
liberalization of trade regimes include the conditions imposed for gaining access to external 
finance, positive external shock, specific country own initiative, and membership in a sub-
regional economic integration scheme. 
3. According to Oyejide (2004) trade liberalization implies the transformation of the trade regime 
from an inward –oriented stance that discriminates in favour of (and thus protects) import-
competing activities into a neutral regime whose incentive structure does not distinguish between 
exportables and importables or into an outward-oriented trade policy regime that discriminates in 
favour of and thus actively promotes exports. The adoption of trade liberalization measures 
should therefore produce either a neutral or an outward oriented trade regime and allows certain 
productivity enhancing and growth promoting features on the liberalized economy.  
4. A detailed country specific review of trade liberalization and concurrent events in selected 
SSA is presented in appendix 2. 
5. Ackah and Morrissey (2005) noted that the figures that they reported across countries in each 
group for average unweighted scheduled tariffs reported for a year within the relevant period. 
6. We calculate the value of manufacturing output from the data provided in the WDI (2005) as 
manufacturing as a percentage of gross domestic output. 
References 
Ackah, C. and O. Morrissey. 2005. “Trade Policy and Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Since the 1980s,” CREDIT Research Paper No. 05/13. 
Ahmed, N. U. 2000. “Export Responses to Trade Liberalization in Bangladesh: A Cointegration 
Analysis,” Applied Economics, 321077-1084. 
Agosín, M. R. 1991. “Trade Policy Reform and Economic Performance: A Review of the Issues 
and some Preliminary Evidence,” UNCTAD Discussion Papers No.41UNCTAD, Geneva. 
Bayes, A., M. I. Hossain and M. Rahman. 1995. “Trends in the External Sector: Trade and 
Aid,” Experiences with Economic Reform: a Review of Bangladesh’s Development 1995. Eds. 
R.Sobhan, Centre for Policy Dialogue and University Press Limited, Dhaka, 243-297. 
Bond, M. E. 1985. “Export Demand and Supply for Groups of Non-Oil Developing Countries,” 
IMF Staff Papers, March, 56-77. 
Clarke, R. and C. Kirkpatrick. 1991. “Trade Policy Reform and Economic Performance in 
Developing Countries: Assessing the Empirical Evidence,” in C. Kirkpatrick, R. Adhikri, and J. 
Weiss (eds) Industry, Trade and Policy Reforms in Developing Countries, pp 56-73. Manchester: 
Manchester University Press. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change font size in pdf form; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
adjust pdf size preview; pdf change font size
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
80
Dijkstra, A. G. 1997. “Trade Liberalization and Industrial Competitiveness: The Case of 
Manufactured Exports from Latin America,” Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands. 
Greenaway, D. and D. Sapsford. 1994, “What does Liberalization do for Exports and Growth,” 
Weltwirtschaftliches Archive, 130(1), 152-174. 
Hossain, M. I., M. A. Rahman, and M. Rahman. 1997. “Current External Sector Performance 
and Emerging Issues: Growth or Stagnation?” A Review of Bangladesh’s Development 1996. 
Eds. R.Sobhan, Centre for Policy Dialogue and University Press Limited, Dhaka, Pp 161-220. 
Jenkins, R. O. 1996. “Trade Liberalization and Export Performance in Bolivia,” Development 
and Change, 27(4), 693-716. 
Joshi, V. and I. M. D Little. 1996. India’s Economic Reforms 1991 -2001, Oxford University 
Press, Oxford. 
Morrissey, O.  and A. Mold. 2006. “Explaining Africa’s Export Performance-Taking a New 
Look,” Paper Presented at the Ninth annual Conference of GTAP, Adiss Abbaba, Ethiopia, June 
3-8. 
Michaely, M., D. Papageorgiou,  and A. Choksi. 1991. “Liberalizing Foreign Trade,” Vol.7: 
Lessons of Experience in the Developing World. Eds. Oxford: Blackwell. 
Milner, C and E. Zgovu. 2004. “Export Response to Trade Liberalization in the Presence of 
High Trade Costs: Evidence for a Landlocked African Country,” CREDIT Research Paper. 
03/04. 
Moon, B. E. 1997. “Exports, Outward-oriented Development, and Economic Growth,”  
Department of International Relations, Leigh University, Bethlehem, PA. 
Muscatelli, V. A., A. A. Stevenson, and C. Montagna. 1995. “Modelling Aggregate 
Manufactured Exports for some Asian Newly Industrialized Economies,” The Review of 
Economics and Statistics, 77, 47–55.  
Niemi, J. 2001. “The Effects of Trade Liberalization on ASEAN Agricultural Commodity 
Exports to the EU,” 77
th
EAAE Seminar. No. 325 August 17-18. 
Oyejide T. A., B. Ndulu, and J. W. Gunning. (eds.) .1999. “Introduction and Overview,” 
Regional Integration and TradeLliberalization in Sub-Saharan Africa. Vol.2. Country Case-
Studies. St. Martin’s press. Inc. New York. 
Oyejide, T. A. 2004. “Trade Liberalization, Regional Integration, and African Development in 
the Context of Structural Adjustment,” Accessed Jan. 10, 2005 http://www.idrc.ca/en/ev-56333-
201-1-DO_TOPIC.html
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
pdf file size; change file size of pdf document
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
change font size on pdf text box; acrobat compress pdf
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
81
Santos-Paulino, A and A. P. Thirlwall. 2004. “The Impact of Trade Liberalisation on Exports, 
Imports and the balance of Payments of Developing Countries," Economic Journal, Royal 
Economic Society, 114(493), F50-F72, 02. 
Santos-Paulino, A. U. 2000. “Trade Liberalization and Export Performance in Selected 
Developing Countries” Department of Economics, Studies in Economics, No. 0012 
University of 
Kent, Canterbury. 
Shafaeddin, S. M. 1994. “The impact of trade Liberalization on Export and GDP in Least 
Developed Countries,” UNCTAD Discussion Papers No.85, UNCTAD, Geneva. 
Thomas, V., J. Nash and Associates. 1991. Best Practices in Trade Policy Reform. Oxford: 
Oxford University Press.  
Utkulu, U., D. Seymen and A. Arı. 2004. “Export Supply and Trade Reform: The Turkish 
Evidence,” Paper presented at the International Conference on Policy Modelling, Paris June 30-
July 2, 2004. 
Weiss, J. 1992. “Export Response to Trade Reforms: Recent Mexican Experience”. 
Development Policy Review, 10(1), 43-60. 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
pdf page size; reduce pdf file size
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files; Compress & Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition & Processing
pdf change page size; change page size of pdf document
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
82
Table 1. The Pattern of Tariff Changes in Sub-Sahara Africa
.
5
Average Scheduled Tariffs 
% Change 
Regions  
1980-85 (1) 
1990-95 (2) 
2000-02 (3) 
1990-2002 (4) 
West Africa 
38.5 
23.4 
14.4 
-38.5 
Central Africa 
33.1 
20.4 
16.4 
-19.6 
East Africa 
32.5 
26.1 
16.0 
-38.7 
Southern Africa 
19.5 
17.7 
12.9 
-27.1 
All 
Sub-Sahara 
Africa 
30.9 
21.9 
14.9 
-31.9 
Source: Ackah and Morrissey (2005) 
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
for example, a VB.NET Windows Form application. Please note that you can change some of the provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change font size pdf form reader; advanced pdf compressor online
Generate Image in .NET Winforms Imaging Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & JPEG 2000 Files; Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition
pdf text box font size; pdf compression settings
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
83
Table 2. Average Tariffs by Country 
Country 
1980-85 
1990-95 
2000-02 
Benin 
48.3 
41.0 
12.0 
Burkina Faso 
N/A 
21.0 
12.0 
Burundi 
37.9 
7.4 
N/A 
Cameroon 
28.3 
18.6 
18.0 
CAR 
N/A 
18.6 
18.0 
Congo, Rep 
N/A 
20.6 
18.0 
Cote d’Ivoire 
27.7 
22.9 
12.0 
Ethiopia 
29.0 
22.6 
18.8 
Gabon 
N/A 
18.6 
17.9 
Ghana 
33.3 
16.7 
14.6 
Guinea 
76.4 
11.9 
16.9 
Kenya 
41.0 
33.3 
17.1 
Malawi 
19.4 
19.1 
13.4 
Mauritania 
24.6 
28.2 
10.9 
Mauritius 
36.2 
29.0 
19.0 
Nigeria 
33.8 
33.7 
30.0 
Rwanda 
N/A 
38.4 
9.9 
Senegal 
N/A 
13.3 
12.0 
Sierra Leone 
25.8 
30.3 
16.7 
South Africa 
29.0 
9.6 
5.8 
Tanzania 
23.9 
28.4 
16.3 
Togo 
N/A 
15.0 
12.0 
Uganda 
N/A 
17.1 
9.0 
Zambia 
N/A 
25.5 
14.0 
Zimbabwe 
10.0 
16.7 
18.3 
Note: N/A= Not Available 
Source: World Bank (2004) 
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
84
Table 3. Average Tariff Rates by Sector in SSA Countries. 
Product 
Category 
Primary 
Products 
Ores and 
Metals 
Manufactured 
products 
Chemical 
products 
Machinery and 
Transport equipment 
Other Manufactured 
products 
Botswana 
2001 
15.8 
2.7 
16.3 
5.1 
6.3 
24.7 
Cote d’Ivoire 
1996 
18.6 
12.8 
18.8 
12.4 
12.0 
23.8 
2001 
11.8 
7.5 
12.0 
6.3 
8.5 
15.4 
2002 
11.7 
7.5 
11.9 
6.3 
8.5 
15.3 
2003 
11.7 
7.3 
11.9 
6.3 
8.6 
15.3 
Ethiopia 
1995 
27.4 
13.6 
27.9 
16.4 
14.6 
37.1 
2001 
18.6 
10.0 
18.9 
10.8 
12.4 
24.5 
2002 
18.6 
10.0 
18.9 
10.8 
12.4 
24.5 
Ghana 
1993 
14.0 
10.9 
14.1 
11.1 
10.1 
16.7 
2000 
13.8 
11.7 
13.9 
11.7 
5.3 
17.9 
2004 
12.5 
11.5 
12.5 
10.9 
5.7 
15.8 
Kenya 
1994 
34.4 
28.3 
34.6 
30.0 
25.5 
39.8 
2000 
17.7 
12.7 
17.9 
11.7 
13.4 
23.1 
2001 
18.9 
12.0 
19.2 
10.9 
11.8 
25.2 
2004 
16.0 
12.2 
16.2 
9.2 
9.6 
21.3 
Mauritius 
1995 
31.7 
15.9 
32.2 
22.0 
31.5 
36.1 
1997 
30.6 
16.1 
31.1 
22.0 
30.7 
34.5 
1998 
30.6 
22.6 
31.1 
24.9 
30.0 
33.7 
2002 
18.6 
0.9 
19.2 
6.1 
14.2 
26.0 
Mali 
2001 
11.8 
7.5 
12.0 
6.3 
8.5 
15.4 
2002 
11.7 
7.5 
11.9 
6.3 
8.5 
15.3 
2003 
11.7 
7.3 
11.9 
6.3 
8.6 
15.3 
2004 
11.7 
7.4 
11.9 
6.3 
8.6 
15.3 
Malawi 
1996 
27.4 
14.8 
28.0 
20.1 
23.2 
32.7 
1997 
25.7 
13.9 
26.2 
19.8 
22.1 
30.1 
1998 
20.3 
10.4 
20.6 
11.1 
17.2 
25.3 
2001 
12.9 
8.0 
13.1 
6.1 
9.4 
17.0 
Nigeria 
1999 
25.3 
18.8 
25.6 
17.6 
16.3 
32.2 
2000 
25.3 
18.8 
25.6 
17.6 
16.3 
32.2 
2001 
25.3 
18.8 
25.6 
17.6 
16.3 
32.2 
2002 
26.7 
17.4 
27.1 
16.1 
15.4 
35.7 
Uganda 
2001 
8.4 
8.0 
8.4 
7.1 
3.6 
10.7 
2002 
8.3 
8.0 
8.3 
7.0 
3.5 
10.6 
2003 
7.9 
7.7 
7.9 
5.9 
3.2 
10.5 
2004 
7.0 
7.5 
7.0 
1.9 
3.2 
10.4 
Zambia 
1993 
25.6 
20.6 
25.8 
20.5 
22.9 
28.8 
1997 
13.4 
9.6 
13.6 
7.0 
10.8 
17.1 
2002 
11.4 
6.8 
11.5 
6.2 
6.5 
15.3 
Zimbabwe 
1999 
18.6 
9.6 
19.0 
9.3 
14.1 
25.2 
2001 
19.1 
8.6 
19.5 
7.9 
13.3 
26.1 
2002 
15.3 
8.5 
15.6 
7.9 
11.9 
20.4 
Cameroon 
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
85
1994 
17.9 
15.4 
18.1 
11.3 
14.1 
22.1 
1995 
17.5 
12.1 
17.7 
10.6 
14.0 
21.7 
2001 
17.3 
11.7 
17.5 
10.6 
14.0 
21.4 
2002 
17.3 
11.7 
17.5 
10.6 
14.0 
21.4 
Senegal 
2001 
11.8 
7.5 
12.0 
6.3 
8.5 
15.4 
2002 
11.7 
7.5 
11.9 
6.3 
8.5 
15.3 
2003 
11.7 
7.3 
11.9 
6.3 
8.6 
15.3 
2004 
11.7 
7.4 
11.9 
6.3 
8.6 
15.3 
South Africa 
2001 
7.9 
1.4 
8.2 
2.5 
3.2 
12.4 
Tanzania 
1997 
22.6 
28.9 
22.4 
17.6 
17.6 
22.7 
1998 
22.9 
29.3 
22.7 
17.9 
17.9 
23.0 
2000 
15.9 
12.0 
16.2 
7.9 
13.1 
20.5 
2003 
12.9 
7.0 
13.3 
3.7 
8.9 
18.5 
Source: UNCTAD, 2004. 
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
86
Table 4. Average Tariff Rate for Regions (Number of Countries) 
Period 
All Goods 
Agriculture Manufactured Products 
All developing countries 
(96) 
1993-99 
13.1 
17.1 
12.4 
East Asia (15) 
1994-99 
9.9 
13.9 
9.4 
South Asia (5) 
1996-99 
27.7 
26.3 
28.0 
Sub-Saharan Africa (26) 
1993-99 
16.5 
19.2 
16.0 
Middle East & N. Africa 
(11) 
1995-99 
14.4 
20.8 
13.2 
Transition Europe (15) 
1996-99 
9.6 
15.7 
7.8 
Latin America (15) 
1995-99 
10..1 
13.8 
9.5 
Source: Ackah and Morrissey (2005) 
Babatunde, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 2(1), June 2009, 68-92 
87
Table 5. Descriptive Statistics of the Variables 
LMCH LTRF LPC 
LIMPTR LEXROV LEER 
Mean 
8.994
1.33 
8.664
8.57
2.011 2.1018 
Median 
8.997 1.314 
8.575
8.473
2.025 2.0431 
Maximum 
10.56 1.684 
10.47
10.35
2.731 3.3486 
Minimum 
7.38 0.756 
7.589
7.522
1.254 1.7408 
Std. Dev. 
0.611 0.186 
0.581
0.649
0.245 0.1862 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested