CHAPTER
6
Bridge
Banks
In
t
roduc
t
ion
On August 10, 1987, Congress signed into law the Competitive Equality Banking Act
(CEBA) of 1987, which authorized the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)
to establish bridge banks. A bridge bank is a temporary national bank chartered by the
Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and organized by the FDIC to take
over and maintain banking services for the customers of a failed bank. It is designed to
“bridge” the gap between the failure of a bank and the time when the FDIC can imple-
ment a satisfactory acquisition by a third party. An important part of the FDIC’s bank
resolution process for large or complex failing bank situations, a bridge bank provides
the time the FDIC needs to take control of a failed bank’s business, stabilize the situa-
tion, effectively market the bank’s franchise, and determine an appropriate resolution.
See chart I.6-1, which shows the FDIC’s use of bridge banks.
Background
Between 1987 and 1994, the FDIC used its bridge bank powers only 10 times; however,
most of those instances involved multiple related bank failures. The 10 situations in
which the FDIC used its bridge bank authority resulted in the creation of 32 bridge
banks into which the FDIC placed 114 individual banks.1 Those banks had total assets
1.  Throughout this chapter, a distinction is made among (1) individual banks, (2) bridge banks, and (3) bridge
bank situations. Number (1) refers to the number of individual failed banks that were put into bridge banks; (2)
refers to the number of bridge banks that were created to handle the individual banks; and (3) groups all individual
banks within a holding company into one “situation” that was handled by the FDIC with its bridge bank authority.
For example, First RepublicBanks’ 41 individual banks were placed into two bridge banks. Table I.6-1 shows the
results of those distinctions.
Pdf form change font size - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
change font size pdf comment box; change font size in pdf
Pdf form change font size - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
pdf optimized format; change font size pdf document
172
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
n
Bridge Bank Assets
n
All Failed Bank Assets
Total Number of Bridge Banks
Total Number of Failed Banks
Source
:
FD
I
C Division of Research and Statistics.
Chart 
I
.6-1
Number
and
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
of
FDIC's
Bridge
Banks
by
Year
1987–1994
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
0
10
50
100
150
200
250
300
$
i
n
B
i
l
l
i
o
n
s
N
u
m
b
e
r
o
f
B
a
n
k
s
of about $90 billion. Between 1987 and 1994, bridge banks made up only a small por-
tion (10 percent) of the total bank failures, but they represented a substantial portion
(45 percent) of the total assets of failed banks. See table I.6-1 for details of the 10 bridge
bank situations.
Bridge banks are designed to aid in the resolution of complicated, large failing
banks. Seven of the 10 instances in which the FDIC used its bridge bank authority
involved assets of more than $1 billion. (See chart I.6-2.) The largest bridge bank situa-
tion was for First RepublicBanks (Texas), with $33.4 billion in assets at resolution.
The location of the bridge banks reflects the economic problems of the late 1980s
and early 1990s. All but 3 of the 32 bridge banks were located in the Southwest or
Northeast. In the Southwest, 23 bridge banks were in Texas and 1 was in Louisiana. In
the Northeast, two bridge banks were in Connecticut and one each was in Massachu-
setts, Maine, and Vermont. The remaining three bridge banks were in Delaware, Flor-
ida, and Missouri.
When the FDIC establishes bridge banks, it intends that the banks will be interim,
rather than permanent, solutions for failing banks. Each bridge bank that the FDIC
created has lasted less than seven months, with the exception of two early bridge banks,
the First RepublicBanks (Texas) and the MCorp banks. In those two instances, acquirers
were selected early in the bridge bank process, but because the FDIC took an equity
position as part of the banks’ resolutions, the bridge bank periods were extended. First
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
advanced pdf compressor; reader compress pdf
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C#.NET class. Support to change font size in PDF form. Able to delete form fields from adobe PDF file.
pdf edit text size; reader shrink pdf
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
173
Table 
I
.6-1
The
FDIC’s
Use
of
Bridge
Bank
Au
t
hori
t
y
1987–1994
($
in
Thousands)
Bridge
Bank
Si
t
ua
t
ions
Failure
Da
t
e
Bridge
Banks
Num-
ber
of
Failed
Banks
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
To
t
al
Deposi
t
s
1
10/31/87  1 - Capital Bank 
&
Trust Co.
1
$386,302
$303,986
2
07/29/88  2 - First RepublicBanks (Texas)
40
32,835,279
19,528,204
08/02/88  3 - First RepublicBank (Delaware)
1
*582,350
*164,867
3
03/28/89  4 - MCorp
20
15,748,537
10,578,138
4
07/20/89  5 - Texas American Bancshares
24
*4,733,686
*4,150,130
5
12/15/89  6 - First American Bank 
&
Trust
1
1,669,743
1,718,569
6
01/06/91  7 - Bank of New England, N.A.
1
*14,036,401
*7,737,298
01/06/91  8 - Connecticut Bank 
&
Trust Co., N.A.
1
*6,976,142
*6,047,915
01/06/91  9 - Maine National Bank
1
*998,323
*779,566
7
10/30/92 10 - First City, Texas-Alice
1
127,990
119,187
10/30/92 11 - First City, Texas-Aransas Pass
1
54,406
47,806
10/30/92 12 - First City, Texas-Austin, N.A.
1
346,981
318,608
10/30/92 13 - First City, Texas-Beaumont, N.A.
1
531,489
489,891
10/30/92 14 - First City, Texas-Bryan, N.A.
1
340,398
315,788
10/30/92 15 - First City, Texas-Corpus Christi
1
474,108
405,792
10/30/92 16 - First City, Texas-Dallas
1
1,324,843
1,224,135
10/30/92 17 - First City, Texas-El Paso, N.A.
1
397,859
367,305
10/30/92 18 - First City, Texas-Graham, N.A.
1
94,446
85,667
10/30/92 19 - First City, Texas-Houston, N.A.
1
3,575,886
2,240,292
10/30/92 20 - First City, Texas-
K
ountze
1
50,706
46,481
10/30/92 21 - First City, Texas-
L
ake Jackson
1
102,875
95,416
10/30/92 22 - First City, Texas-
L
ufkin, N.A.
1
156,766
146,314
10/30/92 23 - First City, Texas-Madisonville, N.A.
1
119,821
111,783
10/30/92 24 - First City, Texas-Midland, N.A.
1
312,987
289,021
10/30/92 25 - First City, Texas-Orange, N.A.
1
128,799
119,544
10/30/92 26 - First City, Texas-San Angelo, N.A.
1
138,948
127,802
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
change paper size pdf; batch reduce pdf file size
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
best pdf compression; pdf page size limit
174
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
Chart 
I
.6-2
Bridge
Bank
Si
t
ua
t
ions
in
which
Assets Were Greater than $1 Billion
1987–1994
($
in
Billions)
First 
Bank of
MCorp
First
Texas
Missouri
First
Republic-
New England
Banks
City
American
Bridge
American
Banks
Banks
Banks
Bankshares
Bank, N.A.
Bank  & Trust
33.4
22.0
15.7
8.9
4.7
2.8
1.7
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
D
o
l
l
a
r
s
Source
:
FD
I
C Division of Research and Statistics.
Con
t
inued
Bridge
Bank
Si
t
ua
t
ions
Failure
Da
t
e
Bridge
Banks
Num-
ber
of
Failed
Banks
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
To
t
al
Deposi
t
s
10/30/92 27 - First City, Texas-San Antonio, N.A.
1
$262,538
$244,960
10/30/92 28 - First City, Texas-Sour 
L
ake
1
54,145
49,701
10/30/92 29 - First City, Texas-Tyler, N.A.
1
254,063
225,916
8
11/13/92 30 - Missouri Bridge Bank, N.A.
2
2,829,368
2,715,939
9
01/29/93 31 - The First National Bank of 
V
ermont
1
224,689
247,662
10
07/07/94 32 - Meriden Trust 
&
Safe Deposit Co.
1
6,565
0
10
Totals
32
114
$89,877,439 $61,043,683
Data for Total Assets and Total Deposits are as of resolution. 
Data marked with an asterisk (*) are from the quarter before resolution.
Source
:
FD
I
C Division of Research and Statistics.
Table 
I
.6-1
The
FDIC’s
Use
of
Bridge
Bank
Au
t
hori
t
y
1987–1994
($
in
Thousands)
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
best pdf compression tool; change paper size in pdf
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files; Compress & Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition & Processing
adjust size of pdf; pdf page size dimensions
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
175
RepublicBanks (Texas) lasted for a little more than a year, from July 29, 1988, to August
9, 1989, and MCorp operated from March 28, 1989, until October 28, 1991, for a total
of 31 months. Although the bridge banks were in existence for a long period of time,
they were under the control of the acquiring banks, which had contributed part of the
banks’ capital.
Reasons
for
a
Bridge
Bank
When a large bank with a complex structure, such as a multi-bank holding company, is in
danger of failing, creating a bridge bank allows the FDIC to take control of the bank and
stabilize it. It also enables the FDIC to gain sufficient flexibility for marketing the bank.
After the bank is under the FDIC’s control, the additional time allows for a thorough
assessment of the bank’s condition and a complete evaluation of alternate forms of resolu-
tion. Additional time also allows for due diligence by all interested parties. All of those
functions can be performed without inhibiting the day-to-day operations of the bridge
bank for its depositors.
Public disclosure of serious financial problems at a large bank can cause sudden
liquidity problems that could result in the closing of the banks if they are not stabilized
quickly. After a bridge bank is established, the FDIC can lend directly to the bridge
bank and provide assurance to insured depositors that their money is safe. The alterna-
tive to creating a bridge bank may be to use a straight deposit payoff or, at best, an
insured deposit transfer. Usually, in situations such as liquidity failures, far less advance
preparation has taken place (compared to a situation in which asset quality problems
have built up over time), so creating a bridge bank gives the FDIC and potential bidders
an opportunity to review the bank in a more stable environment. In the case of multiple
bank failures within a holding company, such as First RepublicBanks (Texas), bridge
banks can facilitate the handling of multiple failures in a short time.
Bridge
Bank
Opera
t
ions
The FDIC’s bridge bank authority permits the creation of a national bank, and the
FDIC has broad powers to operate, manage, and resolve that bank. Initially, the FDIC
establishes bridge banks for two years maximum, with the possibility of up to three one-
year extensions. A bridge bank operates in a conservative manner, while serving the
banking needs of the community. It accepts deposits and makes low-risk loans to regu-
lar customers. Its management goal is to preserve the franchise value and lessen any dis-
ruption to the local community. For the early bridge banks, such as First RepublicBanks
(Texas) and MCorp, the FDIC had an acquirer before the bridge bank was organized or
shortly thereafter. The FDIC entered into a management agreement with the acquirer,
who made almost all decisions concerning bank operations. The acquiring bank
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
for example, a VB.NET Windows Form application. Please note that you can change some of the provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adjust size of pdf file; pdf file size limit
Generate Image in .NET Winforms Imaging Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & JPEG 2000 Files; Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition
change font size pdf comment box; batch pdf compression
176
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
managed the bridge bank under that contract until the acquisition was finalized. For the
later bridge banks, the FDIC would select a chief executive officer (CEO) from the pri-
vate sector or FDIC senior staff to conduct day-to-day operations. It would then
appoint a board of directors, composed of senior FDIC personnel and the CEO, for the
bridge bank. The bridge bank board, along with the CEO and management, is respon-
sible for developing a strategic plan to meet the goals recommended and for addressing
any operational issues confronting the bank. The bridge bank board is also responsible
for reviewing and approving the bank’s business plan and for assuming other manage-
ment and oversight duties. The FDIC board retains authority to effect a final resolution
of the bank and approve the sale of bank assets.
L
e
ndin
g
In the early bridge bank transactions, little lending took place until the acquiring bank
took control. In the later transactions, in which the FDIC would be in control for a
longer time, however, the bridge bank would attempt to maintain a presence in the local
community to prevent a significant outflow of commercial and retail loan customers.
Specifically, the bridge bank would be expected to make limited loans to the local com-
munity and to honor the previous institution’s commitments that would not create
additional losses, including funding the completion of unfinished projects.
A
s
s
e
t
s
The bridge bank staff completes an inventory to identify, evaluate, and work out trou-
bled assets. It develops realistic market values for assets and assigns appropriate loss
reserves. The bridge bank may sell assets if such an action is suitable. For a period of up
to 90 days after the bridge bank begins operations, assets that could benefit from the
powers of the receivership or assets that would be difficult to sell to a franchise acquirer
can be transferred by the bridge bank management to the receivership. The assets trans-
ferred from the bridge bank to the receivership would be those with the most problems
and the least potential for improvement, including nonperforming loans, owned real
estate, subsidiaries, assets in litigation, and fraud-related assets.
The bridge bank management attempts to maintain the quality of the assets that
remain in the bank and, to the extent possible, work out or reduce nonperforming
assets. Under the latter scenario, the bank focuses on a workout program that offers a
greater chance for recovery than alternatives such as foreclosure and litigation. Another
cost-effective option is a compromise settlement. The CEO, in consultation with the
bridge bank’s board of directors, makes the final decision on the most appropriate type
of asset workout.
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
177
Liabiliti
e
s
Before the failing bank is closed, the FDIC must decide whether to pass all deposits or
only insured deposits to the bridge bank. Before the passage of the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation Improvement Act (FDICIA) of 1991, all the deposits were
passed to a bridge bank. Since FDICIA, the FDIC has passed only insured deposits to a
bridge bank when there is an expected loss to the receivership; uninsured depositors
share in any loss with the FDIC. Those depositors are entitled to their proportionate
share in the liquidation of the receivership. Usually, most unsecured nondeposit credi-
tors are also left with the receivership. Secured creditors are passed to the bridge bank,
along with their collateral.
Like any other bank that has assumed deposits from the FDIC, the bridge bank
must notify depositors that their accounts have been transferred to the bridge bank. In
turn, depositors must contact the bank within 18 months to claim their deposits.
Unclaimed deposits are subject to state escheat laws and are turned over to the respective
state if they are not claimed. Bridge bank management also decides whether to maintain
or change the interest rates paid on deposits by the failing bank. The FDIC requires that
rates remain the same for the first 14 days and that the bank provide depositors 7 days’
notice of a rate change. Customers can withdraw their funds without penalty until they
enter into new contracts with the bridge bank.
Liquidity
The FDIC reviews the failing bank’s liquidity during the bridge bank preparation phase.
It monitors liquidity levels to determine if the bridge bank can meet its own funding
needs or if it needs access to the FDIC’s revolving credit facility. The bridge bank also
attempts to reestablish lines of credit and correspondent banking relationships that were
maintained by the failing institution.
The
FDIC’s
Experience
wi
t
h
Bridge
Banks
Passage of CEBA in 1987 authorized the FDIC to create bridge banks to resolve failing
institutions. According to CEBA, the FDIC may establish a bridge bank if the board of
directors determines that such an action is cost-effective; that is, that the action is in
accordance with the cost test (before December 1991) or the least cost test (after
December 1991).
The FDIC used its bridge bank authority for the first time on October 30, 1987,
when the Louisiana banking commissioner closed Capital Bank & Trust Company,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and placed the failed bank into a bridge bank. On May 23,
1988, Grenada Sunburst System Corporation, Grenada, Mississippi, acquired the bridge
bank. The FDIC determined that using the new bridge bank authority was the most
178
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
cost-effective way to preserve existing banking services and give sufficient time to
arrange a permanent transaction.
2
Some of the early bridge banks—First RepublicBanks (Texas), MCorp, and Texas
American Bancshares—involved many banks within a holding company.3 First Repub-
licBanks (Texas) combined 40 failed banks into one bridge bank; MCorp combined 20
failed banks into one bridge bank; and Texas American Bancshares combined 24 failed
banks into one bridge bank. 
First RepublicBanks (Texas), MCorp, and Texas American Bancshares were large
multi-bank holding companies whose banks failed during 1988 and 1989. During that
period, the FDIC’s policy was to sell large institutions in total rather than by part or by
branch, so the holding company’s failed banks were combined into one bridge bank.
4
In each case, all deposits, including uninsured deposits, were transferred to the bridge
bank. At the time those banks were bridged, the test for establishing a bridge bank was
whether the cost of organizing and operating the bridge bank was less than the cost for
liquidating the failed bank. Acquirers were either selected before going into the bridge
bank, as with First RepublicBanks (Texas) and Texas American Bancshares, or shortly
thereafter, as with MCorp. The FDIC sold each bridge bank to one acquirer. In those
cases, the acquiring institution operated the bridge bank under a management
agreement, while negotiating the final terms of the transaction.
Bank of N
e
w En
g
land (1991) and th
e
U
s
e
of Cro
s
s
Guarant
e
e
Authority
On August 9, 1989, Congress signed into law the Financial Institutions Reform,
Recovery, and Enforcement Act (FIRREA). The law focused primarily on the thrift
crisis, but also included significant provisions for bank failures. The cross guarantee pro-
vision of FIRREA allowed the FDIC to recover part of its costs of liquidating or aiding a
troubled insured institution by assessing those costs against the solvent insured
institutions in the same holding company.
The first time the FDIC used the cross guarantee in connection with a bridge bank
was with the Bank of New England (BNE), Boston, Massachusetts, failure on January 6,
1991. BNE, Connecticut Bank & Trust Company, N.A. (CBT), Hartford, Connecti-
cut, and Maine National Bank (MNB), Portland, Maine, were all subsidiaries of the
Bank of New England Corporation. BNE was considered the flagship bank and was
significantly larger than the other two banks. BNE’s failure was attributed to rapid
growth, particularly in commercial real estate lending, which was adversely affected by
deterioration of the local economy. Following an announcement of major increases in
2.  FDIC, 1987 Annual R
e
port.
3.  See Part II, Case Studies of Significant Bank Resolutions, Chapter 6, First RepublicBank Corporation, and
Chapter 7, MCorp.
4.  First RepublicBanks Corporation also had a credit card subsidiary located in another state (Delaware), which
was placed in its own bridge bank and was sold in a separate transaction.
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
179
loan loss reserves and an erosion of deposit funding, BNE experienced severe liquidity
problems and subsequent failure. Because BNE experienced heavy deposit withdrawals,
the FDIC used the essentiality provision of Section 13(c) of the Federal Deposit Insur-
ance (FDI) Act to help stabilize the situation and explicitly guaranteed all deposits,
including uninsured deposits, in all three banks.
5
CBT failed at the same time as BNE
because of losses on federal funds sold to BNE. Using the cross guarantee provision,
MNB was assessed with the FDIC losses for BNE and CBT, causing MNB’s failure.
The FDIC placed each of the three institutions into a separate bridge bank, transfer-
ring all deposits and most assets. The FDIC marketed the bridge banks individually and
as a total package. On April 22, 1991, the FDIC Board of Directors awarded the three
bridge banks to Fleet/Norstar Financial Group (Fleet). Fleet managed the banks on an
interim basis until the sale closed on July 14, 1991.6
Fir
s
t City Ban
c
orporation of T
e
xa
s
, In
c
. (1992) and L
e
a
s
t Co
s
t R
e
s
olution
On December 19, 1991, Congress signed FDICIA into law, an act that had far-reaching
effects on the FDIC. The law’s provision for least cost resolutions had a major effect on
bridge banks. Before FDICIA, the FDIC could select any resolution method as long as
it was less costly than a payoff of insured deposits and a liquidation of the assets.
FDICIA, however, requires the FDIC to choose the least cost alternative in resolving
failing institutions. The least cost provision can be waived only in a systemic risk situa-
tion in which the least cost resolution of a failed institution would have a serious effect
on economic conditions or financial stability.
7
Before establishing a bridge bank, the
FDIC prepares a cost analysis comparing the estimated operation and resolution costs of
the bridge bank to the cost of liquidation. The FDIC can establish a bridge bank only if
it is the least costly resolution method.
Following the open bank assistance (OBA) transaction between the FDIC and the
First City Bancorporation of Texas, Inc. (First City), in 1988, First City continued to be
affected by the poor quality of its loan portfolio and experienced additional losses on
real estate.8 In October 1992, the two largest First City banks in Houston and Dallas
were found insolvent and closed. The remaining 18 First City banks were closed after
5.  A bank was deemed essential when, in the opinion of the FDIC Board of Directors, the continued operation
of the bank was essential to providing adequate banking service in the community. Ultimately, the provision would
come under scrutiny by Congress because large banks were being treated differently than small banks.
6.  FDIC, 1991 Annual R
e
port.
7.  The provision was the result of a reaction to the perceived FDIC policy of “too big to fail,” and as a result, in
all future bridge banks only insured deposits will be placed in the bridge bank, except in cases of systemic risk or
cross guarantee in which there is no loss in the bank. Any case of systemic risk must be approved by the secretary
of the Treasury in consultation with the president of the United States.
8.  See Chapter 5, Open Bank Assistance, for a discussion of the 1988 open bank assistance transaction for First
City and Part II, Case Studies of Significant Bank Resolutions, Chapter 5, First City Bancorporation of Texas, Inc.
180
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
the FDIC exercised its cross guarantee authority to assess the other subsidiaries for
anticipated losses from the Houston and Dallas banks.
Each of the 20 banks was placed in an individual bridge bank. By separating the
banks, an individual sale of each bank was possible. Unlike previous multi-bank bridge
banks, such as First RepublicBanks (Texas), in which the bridge bank was made up of 40
individual banks and was purchased by one acquirer, the First City bridge banks could
have had one acquirer or different acquirers. By selling each bank separately, the FDIC
opened the door for smaller institutions to join the resolution process and generally
increased interest from banks of all sizes. Previously, the FDIC had sold only one large
institution, American Savings Bank, New 
Y
ork, New 
Y
ork, by breaking the branch net-
work into parts or clusters and selling them to several acquirers.
To comply with the least cost requirement, the FDIC analyzed each of First City’s
banks to determine if a loss was anticipated. In the four banks in which the FDIC
projected a loss—those in Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Austin—uninsured
deposits were not passed to the bridge banks but stayed with the receiverships. The
remaining 16 better-capitalized banks passed all deposits to the bridge banks. In Febru-
ary 1993, the FDIC sold the First City bridge banks to 13 acquirers in transactions that
were projected to result in no loss to the Bank Insurance Fund (BIF). It sold 3 of the 20
bridge banks with loss share arrangements, which were five-year assistance agreements
that provided protection on certain assets sold in the resolution. Loss share arrange-
ments, which after 1991 became standard resolution tools for larger banks with more
than $500 million in assets, followed the FDIC’s preference for keeping bank assets in
the private sector.
9
Initially, at the time of failure in October 1992, the uninsured depositors of the
Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, and Austin banks received an advance dividend of 80
percent of their claims on the receivership. In January 1993, when it became apparent
that losses at Dallas, San Antonio, and Austin were likely to be less than projected, the
FDIC made an additional 10 percent advance dividend to the uninsured depositors of
those three banks (thus increasing their cumulative advance dividend to 90 percent).
The receivership eventually was able to pay uninsured depositors, other creditors, and
bondholders 100 percent of their claims. It was even able to return some funds to the
failed bank’s stockholders.
Small
e
r Brid
g
e
Bank
s
(1993 to 1994)
In January 1993, the FDIC placed The First National Bank of Vermont (FNB), Brad-
food, Vermont, in a bridge bank. Although FNB was smaller than most bridge banks,
with $225 million in assets, the FDIC placed it in a bridge bank because Vermont
statutes did not include emergency provisions for an interstate acquisition of a failing
9.  See Chapter 7, Loss Sharing, for more detail.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested