BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
181
institution, thus severely limiting the number of potential bidders. Moreover, the FDIC
could not use section 13 of the FDI Act, which allowed the FDIC to market institutions
on an interstate basis before interstate branching was allowed, because section 13 is
applicable only to banks with more than $500 million in assets. Section 13, however,
can be used in the case of a bridge bank. In addition, FNB was created by a merger of
three banks in July 1992, but the operations of the banks had not been merged when
FNB failed, making resolution activities such as data gathering and due diligence diffi-
cult. A bridge bank structure gave the FDIC the time necessary to prepare the institu-
tion for sale. It also gave the FDIC an opportunity to offer the bank to both in-state and
out-of-state bidders. On June 4, 1993, New FNB was sold to Merchants Bank, Burling-
ton, Vermont.
Another small institution, The Meriden Trust & Safe Deposit Company (Meriden),
Meriden, Connecticut, was an FDIC insured institution based on its charter as a deposi-
tory institution and on its past deposit activities, although it no longer made loans or
accepted deposits from the public. Meriden, with assets of $6.6 million, primarily oper-
ated a trust department. Meriden became critically undercapitalized and failed when it
was assessed on October 16, 1992, for cross guarantee liability by the FDIC in connection
with Meriden’s failed affiliate, Central Bank (Central), Meriden, Connecticut. Both Meri-
den and Central were owned by Cenvest, Inc., Meriden, Connecticut. In court, Cenvest,
Inc., challenged the FDIC’s assessment of Meriden with Central’s losses, partly on the
basis that Meriden was not an insured depository institution. Because of the protracted
litigation between the FDIC and Meriden, it was uncertain when the FDIC would be
able to appoint itself receiver. On June 30, 1994, the U.S. District Court in Connecticut
ruled in favor of the FDIC, and for the first time, the FDIC closed an institution and
appointed itself receiver of Meriden on July 7, 1994 (in contrast to being appointed
receiver by the chartering authority). The FDIC was not able to plan and schedule a reso-
lution to occur simultaneously with the self-appointment, so the FDIC used a bridge
bank to provide staff with the necessary time to market the institution to maximize the
FDIC’s recovery on the cross guarantee claim. On October 18, 1994, New Meriden was
acquired by Peoples Savings Bank of New Britain, New Britain, Connecticut.
The FNB and Meriden cases illustrate the versatility of the FDIC’s bridge bank
authority. A bridge bank is not just a valuable tool for the resolution of large failing
banks, but it is also useful for resolving smaller failing institutions with complex issues
that are not easily solved within the 90-day prompt corrective action (PCA) period.10
10. Prompt corrective action is a provision of FDICIA that affects the timing of bank failures. Prompt corrective
action requires that an institution must be closed by its primary regulator if it is “critically undercapitalized” for a
prolonged period. A bank that is critically undercapitalized is defined as having tangible capital that is equal to or
less than 2 percent of total assets. Under previous law, an institution typically was closed only after its capital had
been exhausted.
Can a pdf be compressed - Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
C# Code & .NET API to Compress & Decompress PDF Document
advanced pdf compressor; .pdf printing in thumbnail size
Can a pdf be compressed - VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Document Compression and Decompression Control SDK
optimize scanned pdf; pdf page size limit
182
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
R
e
s
olution Co
s
t of Brid
g
e
Bank
s
The FDIC applies the least cost test twice in cases in which it uses bridge banks: first,
before a failed bank (or failed banks) goes into the bridge bank and, second, at final
resolution of the bridge bank. The FDIC compares the estimated cost of a bridge bank
and its subsequent resolution to the estimated cost of the two alternatives: an immedi-
ate sale without the bridge bank structure or a payoff of deposits. The FDIC deter-
mines the estimated cost using several factors such as the cost of operating a bridge
bank, the market value and relative attractiveness of the bridge bank’s assets, and the
premium expected from the eventual sale of the franchise. The FDIC also factors in the
significant negative effect a substantial shrinkage of the deposit base could have on the
amount of premium ultimately received and on the viability of the bridge bank as a
cost-effective resolution mechanism for the failed bank.
The FDIC also must consider another factor: treatment of the uninsured deposits.
In the earlier bridge banks, the FDIC transferred both insured and uninsured deposits to
the bridge bank. In later bridge banks, the FDIC made a determination on the basis of
treatment of the uninsured deposits in keeping with the least cost resolution require-
ment. If the FDIC’s initial cost analysis, made when a bank is placed in a bridge struc-
ture, indicates a loss is going to occur in the bridge bank, the FDIC will transfer only
insured deposits to the bridge bank. It leaves uninsured deposits with the receivership
created when the bridge bank is established. Uninsured deposits and unsecured creditors
that are left with the receivership become claimants of the receivership and share in any
losses.
At the sale of each bridge bank, all deposits in the bank, including uninsured
deposits accepted during the bridge period, will pass to the acquirer. The FDIC deter-
mined that the cost savings of leaving the new uninsured depositors behind in a receiver-
ship would be outweighed by the impairment of the usefulness of bridge banks as a
resolution method in the future. The bridge bank, however, does not attempt to increase
deposits and, in fact, attempts to limit any new uninsured deposits.
Before forming a bridge bank, the FDIC completes a timetable and strategy for res-
olution, which varies, depending on whether the bridge bank will be held short term or
long term. Of the 32 bridge banks resolved, all but 2 were short term, lasting seven
months, or less. The two long-term bridge banks, First RepublicBanks and MCorp,
were resolved within seven months but, as a part of the transaction, the FDIC main-
tained a stock ownership position in each of the new entities. The FDIC expects that
future bridge banks will continue to be short term because the ultimate purpose is to
resolve failing banks as quickly, efficiently, and cost-effectively as possible. Table I.6-2
shows the FDIC’s resolution costs for each situation in which the FDIC used its bridge
bank authority.
It is difficult to make resolution cost comparisons among failed banks because each
failing bank is unique. The problems that led one bank into failure may not be the same
ones that lead another bank into failure. Also, banks vary in their asset mix and a bank
VB.NET TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to PDF in a VB.NET Doc Imaging
A TIFF file can be compressed with several methods, but this If you want to restore the file with a smallest possible size, you should choose TIFF over PDF.
pdf compression settings; pdf markup text size
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET program, do you TIFF stands for Tagged Image File Format which can be compressed and uncompressed by
reader compress pdf; change font size in pdf form field
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
183
with certain assets may be more marketable than others; the assets may benefit the sale
of the failing bank franchise and the sale of assets remaining in the receivership after the
bank is sold. In addition, a bank’s regional location may affect the ease with which the
bank franchise and the assets are sold. If the bank’s region is in a severe downturn,
marketing the bank might be more difficult. Indeed, it was the unique characteristics
that a failing bank (particularly a large failing bank) can have that led to the creation of
the bridge bank as a resolution tool.
Table 
I
.6-2
Bridge
Bank
Resolu
t
ions
1987–1994
($
in
Thousands)
Bridge
Bank
Si
t
ua
t
ions
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
(as
of
failure)
FDIC
Resolu
t
ion
Cos
t
(as
of
December
31,
1996)*
Cos
t
s
as
a
Percen
t
age
of
Asse
t
s
Time
Elapsed
Un
t
il
Resolu
t
ion
(days)
Capital Bank 
&
Trust Co.
$386,302
$55,594
14.4
206
First RepublicBanks
33,417,629
3,856,826
11.5
†273
MCorp
15,748,537
2,839,514
18.0
†308
Texas American Bancshares
4,733,686
1,076,760
22.7
147
First American Bank 
&
Trust
1,669,743
388,573
23.3
129
Bank of New England Banks
22,010,866
889,379
4.0
189
First City Banks
8,850,054
0
0.0
121
Missouri Bridge Bank, N.A.
2,829,368
355,765
12.6
161
The First National Bank of 
V
ermont
224,689
33,638
15.0
126
Meriden Trust 
&
Safe Deposit Co.
6,565
0
0.0
123
Totals/Average
$89,877,439
$9,486,049
10.6
NA
* For bridge banks with open receiverships, the cost of resolution is the estimated total cost of resolution as of December 
31, 1995.
† Acquirers for the bridge banks were chosen within seven months of their inception
;
the time elapsed represents the time 
needed to finalize the transaction. As part of the resolution, the FD
I
C took an equity position in the bridge banks. The 
First RepublicBanks’ bridge bank was terminated after 376 days and the MCorp bridge bank was terminated after 944 
days, when the acquirers purchased the FD
I
C’s stock in each.
NA
:
Not applicable.
Source
:
FD
I
C Division of Research and Statistics.
C# Word: How to Compress, Decompress Word in C#.NET Projects
can save both the original and compressed files to project in your VS program, you can simply copy powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change font size pdf form reader; reader pdf reduce file size
VB.NET Image: RasterEdge JBIG2 Codec Image Control for VB.NET
compressed bitonal images into PDF files and decompress images from PDF files quickly with the smallest quality loss. The encoded images in PDF file can also
advanced pdf compressor online; pdf file size
184
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
Bridge
Bank
Issues
Several issues regarding the future use of a bridge bank and the effect on uninsured
depositors’ and shareholders’ interests include future effects from passage of FDICIA,
nationalization, depositor discipline, and loss to stockholders.
Futur
e
Eff
e
c
t
s
from th
e
Pa
s
s
a
g
e
of FDICIA
Two key provisions of FDICIA could make the use of bridge banks more likely in the
future.
1.The prompt corrective action provision limits regulatory discretion and requires
that institutions be closed by their chartering authority within 90 days of their
becoming critically undercapitalized (capital is less than or equal to 2 percent).
Before FDICIA, an institution typically was not closed until it was book insol-
vent. In the case of publicly traded institutions, PCA directives become public
information and could lead to deposit withdrawals and liquidity crises for the
failing bank.
2.FDICIA also restricts the authority of a Federal Reserve Bank (Federal Reserve)
to make advances to institutions that are undercapitalized or critically undercapi-
talized. By limiting a failing institution’s ability to borrow from the Federal
Reserve banks, FDICIA makes it more likely that failing banks could face
liquidity shortages in the future.
Whether increased liquidity pressures could result in the potential for more bridge
bank transactions will depend on the size, complexity, and other characteristics of the
specific failing institution. Since passage of FDICIA in 1991, numerous banks have
failed because of liquidity crises; however, most have been relatively small, and none
have required the use of a bridge bank.
Nationalization
When the FDIC creates a bridge bank from a failing bank and maintains control of the
bank until it is sold or resolved, the bridge bank is in effect a nationalized bank. Critics
have expressed concern that the government is running a bank and competing against
other nongovernment owned banks. That concern can be mitigated by the short-term
nature of the bridge bank as they are meant to be sold as quickly as possible.
D
e
po
s
itor Di
s
c
iplin
e
Until 1992, the FDIC protected all depositors, insured and uninsured, in bridge banks.
Beginning with the First City transaction, the FDIC, as required by statute, focused on
VB.NET Image: JPEG 2000 Codec for Image Encoding and Decoding in
For example, you can use our VB.NET image to display, view and process images compressed or decompressed Integrate PDF, Tiff, Word compression add-on with JPEG
pdf compression; change font size in pdf file
C# Image: How to Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images Using C#.NET JP2
image file format for JPEG 2000 compressed data) adopts image codec SDK has provided can also help powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf custom paper size; adjust size of pdf file
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
185
obtaining the least costly resolution. The FDIC now leaves uninsured deposits with the
receivership when a bridge bank is created and a loss is associated with the failed bank.
The new policy moves responsibility for uninsured deposits from the FDIC to the
depositors themselves and imposes market discipline on the public.
Lo
s
s
to Sto
c
khold
e
r
s
Before the passage of CEBA, which first enabled the FDIC to establish bridge banks, the
FDIC resolved most large failing banks through open bank assistance. OBAs allowed
holding company shareholders and creditors to retain an interest in the bank, though
their interest was significantly diluted from their previous position. In a bridge bank, the
FDIC transfers liabilities and some assets of the failing bank to the new bridge bank,
while the shareholders’ and creditors’ interests remain with the receivership. The 1988
First RepublicBanks (Texas) transaction was the first large failing bank resolution that
eliminated holding company interests in the new bank. That treatment of the holding
company interests raised concern within the financial sector that it would be more diffi-
cult for holding companies to raise capital and would force them to pay a higher rate of
return to lure investors. If anything, such treatment likely has instilled greater market dis-
cipline into the system by placing more of the burden on shareholders and creditors of
the holding company to scrutinize large banks and carefully consider their investments.
FDIC
Al
t
erna
t
ive
t
o
Use
of
Bridge
Banks
When the FDIC is dealing with insured financial institutions that are not banks (savings
banks and thrifts), it does not have the authority to use a bridge bank; in these situations,
the FDIC can create a conservatorship. The FDIC has used its conservatorship authority
only once, in January 1992, with CrossLand Savings Bank, FSB (CrossLand), Brooklyn,
New 
Y
ork.
11
Although the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) was CrossLand’s primary
regulator, the bank was insured by the BIF. The FDIC did not use a bridge bank for
CrossLand because it had a thrift charter. When CrossLand was closed by the OTS, the
FDIC was appointed receiver. The FDIC created a new federal mutual savings bank,
which was chartered by the OTS and for which the FDIC was appointed conservator.
The new savings association, CrossLand Federal Savings Bank (New CrossLand),
acquired substantially all the assets and assumed all deposits and certain other liabilities of
the original CrossLand.
In many ways the CrossLand resolution was unique. It was the first time the FDIC
exercised its conservatorship authority. Also, the FDIC determined that the least cost
resolution would be for the FDIC to operate New CrossLand as an ongoing bank with
11. See Part II, Case Studies of Significant Bank Resolutions, Chapter 11, CrossLand Savings Bank, FSB.
VB.NET Image: Free VB.NET Guide to Convert Image to Byte Array
Byte array can be compressed and preserved in other data If necessary, you can also use this VB.NET Image Conversion Control to convert Word or PDF document to
best online pdf compressor; adjust pdf page size
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
JPEG to PDF Converter can be used on Windows 95 Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after
can a pdf file be compressed; pdf optimized format
186
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
the goal of improving its franchise value, rather than liquidating it. The FDIC carried
out its objective by shrinking New CrossLand to its core franchise, cleaning up its bal-
ance sheet (working out bad assets as appropriate), and reducing noninterest expenses.
By the time New CrossLand was ready to be returned to the private sector almost 19
months later, it had reduced total assets by more than $2 billion, closed or sold 45 non-
core branches, sold 2 major operating subsidiaries, and reduced the number of employ-
ees by 1,200.
Using a method unlike the resolution practice it typically used, the FDIC converted
New CrossLand to stock ownership and sold it through a private placement of stock and
debt to a group of 40 institutional investors for $332 million. The FDIC also received
warrants providing the FDIC the right to purchase one million shares, or 7 percent, of
the common stock of New CrossLand. Finally, to effect the sale, the FDIC entered into
a loss sharing assistance agreement with New CrossLand providing loss coverage on the
commercial and real estate assets.
As of December 31, 1995, the cost to the FDIC for resolving CrossLand was
$739.9 million, a relatively favorable 10.2 percent of CrossLand’s assets at time of fail-
ure. That cost is considerably less than the estimated $1.2 billion cost of liquidation,
which was the least costly alternative available in January 1992. Previous marketing
attempts by the FDIC had resulted in no acceptable offers for CrossLand that were less
than the cost of liquidation. In February 1996, New CrossLand was acquired by
Republic New 
Y
ork Corporation (Republic), New 
Y
ork, New 
Y
ork, and the FDIC was
able to exchange its warrants for a price equal to the difference between the exercise
price and Republic’s offer price, resulting in additional cost savings of $10 million to
the FDIC.
Conclusion
The bridge bank vehicle has proved to be a valuable tool for the FDIC and has been
used to resolve some of the largest and most complex failures in recent history. Bridge
banks were created 32 times in 10 failing bank situations between 1987 and 1994.
When banks face a poor regional economy and a sudden or severe liquidity crisis, the
bridge bank structure allows time to evaluate the bank’s condition and to address out-
standing problems before the marketing and sale of the bank. Bridge banks have been
used effectively in the past and likely will continue to be useful in the future.
VB.NET PowerPoint: How to Convert PowerPoint Document to TIFF in
can be compressed to reduce the file size by using LZW compression and can be converted to many other image and document formats, such as JPEG, GIF and PDF, by
change font size pdf fillable form; pdf compressor
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
That is to say, you add a compressed image to Our .NET TIFF Processing Toolkit can be incorporated powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf page size; reader shrink pdf
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
187
Table 
I
.6-3
Individual
Failed
Banks
t
ha
t
Were
Placed
in
t
o
Bridge
Banks
($
in
Thousands)
Bridge
Da
t
e
Failed
Ins
t
i
t
u
t
ion
Loca
t
ion
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
Oct. 87
Capital Bank 
&
Trust Co.
Baton Rouge, 
L
A
$386,302
July 88
First RepublicBank-Austin, N.A.
Austin, T
X
1,734,407
July 88
First RepublicBank-A
&
M
College Station, T
X
92,090
July 88
First RepublicBank-Abilene, N.A.
Abilene, T
X
214,305
July 88
First RepublicBank-Brownwood, N.A.
Brownwood, T
X
124,218
July 88
First RepublicBank-Cleburne, N.A.
Cleburne, T
X
114,816
July 88
First RepublicBank-Clifton
Clifton, T
X
77,693
July 88
First RepublicBank-Conroe, N.A.
Conroe, T
X
206,393
July 88
First RepublicBank-Corsicana, N.A.
Corsicana, T
X
198,593
July 88
First RepublicBank-Dallas, N.A.
Dallas, T
X
18,162,609
July 88
First RepublicBank-Denison, N.A.
Denison, T
X
141,514
July 88
First RepublicBank-El Paso, N.A.
El Paso, T
X
212,114
July 88
First RepublicBank-Ennis, N.A.
Ennis, T
X
96,137
July 88
First RepublicBank-Forney
Forney, T
X
50,994
July 88
First RepublicBank-Fort Worth, N.A.
Ft Worth, T
X
1,905,148
July 88
First RepublicBank-Galveston, N.A.
Galveston, T
X
261,089
July 88
First RepublicBank-Greenville, N.A.
Greenville, T
X
82,781
July 88
First RepublicBank-Harlingen, N.A.
Harlingen, T
X
208,383
July 88
First RepublicBank-Henderson, N.A.
Henderson, T
X
120,083
July 88
First RepublicBank-Hillsboro
Hillsboro, T
X
63,530
July 88
First RepublicBank-Houston, N.A.
Houston, T
X
2,886,126
July 88
First RepublicBank-Jefferson Co.
Beaumont, T
X
221,573
July 88
First RepublicBank-
L
ubbock, N.A.
L
ubbock, T
X
496,207
July 88
First RepublicBank-
L
ufkin
L
ufkin, T
X
218,720
July 88
First RepublicBank-Malakoff
Malakoff, T
X
47,978
July 88
First RepublicBank-Midland, N.A.
Midland, T
X
616,165
July 88
First RepublicBank-Mineral Wells, N.A.
Mineral Wells, T
X
167,841
July 88
First RepublicBank-Mt. Pleasant, N.A.
Mt. Pleasant, T
X
142,692
188
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
Table 
I
.6-3
Individual
Failed
Banks
t
ha
t
Were
Placed
in
t
o
Bridge
Banks
Con
t
inued
Bridge
Da
t
e
Failed
Ins
t
i
t
u
t
ion
Loca
t
ion
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
July 88
First RepublicBank-Odessa, N.A.
Odessa, T
X
167,958
July 88
First RepublicBank -Paris
Paris, T
X
77,906
July 88
First RepublicBank-Plano, N.A.
Plano, T
X
183,784
July 88
First RepublicBank-Richmond, N.A.
Richmond, T
X
94,945
July 88
First RepublicBank-San Antonio, N.A.
San Antonio, T
X
743,428
July 88
First RepublicBank-Stephenville, N.A.
Stephenville, T
X
119,699
July 88
First RepublicBank-Temple, N.A.
Temple, T
X
163,400
July 88
First RepublicBank-Tyler, N.A.
Tyler, T
X
600,406
July 88
First RepublicBank-
V
ictoria
V
ictoria, T
X
173,057
July 88
First RepublicBank-Waco, N.A.
Waco, T
X
703,104
July 88
First RepublicBank-Wichita Falls, N.A.
Wichita Falls, T
X
287,558
July 88
First RepublicBank-Williamson
Austin, T
X
41,681
July 88
National Bank of Ft. Sam Houston
San Antonio, T
X
614,155
Aug. 88
First RepublicBank-Delaware
Newark, DE
582,350
Mar. 89
MBank Abilene, N.A.
Abilene, T
X
189,363
Mar. 89
MBank Alamo, N.A.
San Antonio, T
X
687,646
Mar. 89
MBank Austin, N.A. 
Austin, T
X
591,009
Mar. 89
MBank Brenham, N.A.
Brenham, T
X
143,838
Mar. 89
MBank Corsicana, N.A.
Corsicana, T
X
190,909
Mar. 89
MBank Dallas, N.A.
Dallas, T
X
6,973,816
Mar. 89
MBank Denton County, N.A.
L
ewisville, T
X
230,149
Mar. 89
MBank Fort Worth, N.A.
Fort Worth, T
X
766,273
Mar. 89
MBank Greenville, N.A
Greenville, T
X
166,244
Mar. 89
MBank Houston, N.A.
Houston, T
X
3,098,989
Mar. 89
MBank Jefferson County, N.A.
Port Arthur, T
X
325,646
Mar. 89
MBank 
L
ongview, N.A.
L
ongview, T
X
261,253
Mar. 89
MBank Marshall, N.A.
Marshall, T
X
217,748
BR
I
DGE BAN
K
S
189
Table 
I
.6-3
Individual
Failed
Banks
t
ha
t
Were
Placed
in
t
o
Bridge
Banks
Con
t
inued
Bridge
Da
t
e
Failed
Ins
t
i
t
u
t
ion
Loca
t
ion
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
Mar. 89
MBank Midcities, N.A.
Arlington, T
X
$369,280
Mar. 89
MBank Odessa, N.A.
Odessa, T
X
322,582
Mar. 89
MBank Orange, N.A.
Orange, T
X
158,888
Mar. 89
MBank Round Rock, N.A.
Round Rock, T
X
159,912
Mar. 89
MBank Sherman, N.A.
Sherman, T
X
274,782
Mar. 89
MBank The Woodlands, N.A.
The Woodlands, T
X
165,063
Mar. 89
MBank Wichita Falls, N.A.
Wichita Falls, T
X
455,147
July 89
Texas American Bank-Amarillo, N.A.
Amarillo, T
X
222,179
July 89
Texas American Bank-Austin, N.A.
Austin, T
X
144,372
July 89
Texas American Bank-Breckenridge, N.A.
Breckenridge, T
X
85,676
July 89
Texas American Bank-Dallas, N.A.
Dallas, T
X
227,312
July 89
Texas American Bank-Denison, N.A.
Denison, T
X
139,323
July 89
Texas American Bank-Duncanville, N.A.
Duncanville, T
X
218,539
July 89
Texas American Bank-Farmers Branch, N.A.
Farmers Branch, T
X
49,381
July 89
Texas American Bank-Fort Worth, N.A.
Fort Worth, T
X
1,974,591
July 89
Texas American Bank-Forum, N.A.
Arlington, T
X
66,618
July 89
Texas American Bank-Frederickson, N.A.
Fredericksburg, T
X
145,123
July 89
Texas American Bank-Galleria, N.A.
Houston, T
X
300,022
July 89
Texas American Bank-Greater Southwest
Grand Prairie, T
X
40,997
July 89
Texas American Bank-
L
BJ, N.A.
Dallas, T
X
67,192
July 89
Texas American Bank-
L
evelland
L
evelland, T
X
198,523
July 89
Texas American Bank-
L
ongview, N.A.
L
ongview, T
X
92,880
July 89
Texas American Bank-Mc
K
inney, N.A.
Mc
K
inney, T
X
168,389
July 89
Texas American Bank-Midland, N.A.
Midland, T
X
145,952
July 89
Texas American Bank-Plano, N.A.
Plano, T
X
35,503
July 89
Texas American Bank-Prestonwood, N.A.
Dallas, T
X
227,312
July 89
Texas American Bank-Richardson, N.A.
Richardson, T
X
43,059
190
MANAG
I
NG THE CR
I
S
I
S
Table 
I
.6-3
Individual
Failed
Banks
t
ha
t
Were
Placed
in
t
o
Bridge
Banks
Con
t
inued
Bridge
Da
t
e
Failed
Ins
t
i
t
u
t
ion
Loca
t
ion
To
t
al
Asse
t
s
July 89
Texas American Bank-Southwest, N.A.
Stafford, T
X
$36,015
July 89
Texas American Bank-Temple, N.A. 
Temple, T
X
68,011
July 89
Texas American Bank-Tyler, N.A.
Tyler, T
X
148,321
July 89
Texas American Bank-Wichita Falls, N.A.
Wichita Falls, T
X
66,699
Dec. 89
First American Bank and Trust
North Palm Beach, F
L
1,669,743
Jan. 91
Bank of New England, N.A.
Boston, MA
14,036,401
Jan. 91
Maine National Bank
Portland, ME
998,323
Jan. 91
Connecticut Bank 
&
Trust Co., N.A.
Hartford, CT
6,976,142
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Alice
Alice, T
X
127,990
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Aransas Pass
Aransas Pass, T
X
54,406
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Austin, N.A.
Austin, T
X
346,981
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Beaumont, N.A.
Beaumont, T
X
531,489
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Bryan
Bryan, T
X
340,398
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Corpus Christi
Corpus Christi, T
X
474,108
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Dallas
Dallas, T
X
1,324,843
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-El Paso, N.A.
El Paso, T
X
397,859
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Graham, N.A.
Graham, T
X
94,446
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Houston, N.A.
Houston, T
X
3,575,886
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-
K
ountze
K
ountze, T
X
50,706
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-
L
ake Jackson
L
ake Jackson, T
X
102,875
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-
L
ufkin, N.A.
L
ufkin, T
X
156,766
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Madisonville, N.A.
Madisonville, T
X
119,821
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Midland, N.A.
Midland, T
X
312,987
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-Orange, N.A.
Orange, T
X
128,799
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-San Angelo, N.A.
San Angelo, T
X
138,948
Oct. 92
First City, Texas-San Antonio, N.A.
San Antonio, T
X
262,538
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested