asp.net pdf viewer c# : Program to create thumbnail from pdf Library SDK class asp.net wpf winforms ajax html401-part1117

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
319
2.  Recommended Layout Algorithms 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
320
Fixed Layout Algorithm 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
320
Autolayout Algorithm
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
322
6.  Notes on forms 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
322
1.  Incremental display 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
322
2.  Future projects
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
323
7.  Notes on scripting 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
323
1.  Reserved syntax for future script macros 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
323
Current Practice for Script Macros
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
324
8.  Notes on frames 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
325
9.  Notes on accessibility 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
325
10.  Notes on security 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
325
1.  Security issues for forms
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
327
References 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
327
1.  Normative references 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
329
2.  Informative references
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
333
Index of Elements 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
337
Index of Attributes 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
353
Index
Copyright [p.16]  ©  1997 W3C (MIT, INRIA, Keio ), All Rights Reserved.
11
Table of Contents
Program to create thumbnail from pdf - Library SDK class:C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Program to create thumbnail from pdf - Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
12
Table of Contents
Library SDK class:VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. In addition, you can easily create, modify, and delete PDF annotations. PDF Thumbnail Edit.
www.rasteredge.com
1 About the HTML 4.0 Specification
Contents 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
13
1.  How the specification is organized 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
14
2.  Document conventions 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
14
1.  Elements and attributes 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
15
2.  Notes and examples
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
15
3.  Acknowledgments 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
16
4.  Copyright Notice
1.1 How the specification is organized
This specification is divided into the following sections: 
Sections 2 and 3: Introduction to HTML 4.0 
The introduction describes HTML's place in the scheme of the World Wide Web, provides a brief
history of the development of HTML, highlights what can be done with HTML 4.0, and provides
some HTML authoring tips. 
The brief SGML tutorial gives readers some understanding of HTML's relationship to SGML and
gives summary information on how to read the HTML Document Type Definition (DTD). 
Sections 4 - 24: HTML 4.0 reference manual 
The bulk of the reference manual consists of the HTML language reference, which defines all
elements and attributes of the language. 
This document has been organized by topic rather than by the grammar of HTML. Topics are
grouped into three categories: structure, presentation, and interactivity. Although it is not easy to
divide HTML constructs perfectly into these three categories, the model reflects the HTML Working
Group's experience that separating a document's structure from its presentation produces more
effective and maintainable documents. 
The language reference consists of the following information:
What characters [p.37] may appear in an HTML document.
Basic data types [p.43] of an HTML document.
Elements that govern the structure of an HTML document, including text [p.81] , lists [p.93] , 
tables [p.101] , links [p.135] , and included objects, images, and applets [p.149] .
Elements that govern the presentation of an HTML document, including style sheets [p.171] , 
fonts, colors, rules, and other visual presentation [p.183] , and frames for multi-windowed 
presentations [p.193] .
13
1 About the HTML 4.0 Specification
Library SDK class:C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program. Tell C# users how to: create a new PDF file and load PDF from C#.NET: Edit PDF Thumbnail.
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Elements that govern interactivity with an HTML document, including forms for user input 
[p.207] and scripts for active documents [p.237] .
The SGML formal definition of HTML: 
The SGML declaration of HTML [p.249] . 
Three DTDs: strict [p.251] , transitional [p.267] , and frameset [p.287] . 
The list of character references [p.289] .
Appendixes 
The first appendix contains information about changes from HTML 3.2 [p.301] to help authors and
implementors with the transition to HTML 4.0, and changes from the 18 December 1997 
specification [p.304] . The second appendix contains performance and implementation notes [p.309] ,
and is primarily intended to help implementors create user agents for HTML 4.0. 
References 
A list of normative and informative references. 
Indexes 
Three indexes give readers rapid access to the definition of key concepts [p.353] , elements [p.333] 
and attributes [p.337] .
1.2 Document conventions
This document has been written with two types of readers in mind: authors and implementors. We hope
the specification will provide authors with the tools they need to write efficient, attractive, and accessible
documents, without over-exposing them to HTML's implementation details. Implementors, however,
should find all they need to build conforming user agents. 
The specification may be approached in several ways: 
Read from beginning to end. The specification begins with a general presentation of HTML and
becomes more and more technical and specific towards the end. 
Quick access to information. In order to get information about syntax and semantics as quickly as
possible, the online version of the specification includes the following features: 
1.  Every reference to an element or attribute is linked to its definition in the specification. Each
element or attribute is defined in only one location. 
2.  Every page includes links to the indexes, so you never are more than two links away from
finding the definition of an element [p.333] or attribute [p.337] . 
3.  The front pages of the three sections of the language reference manual extend the initial table of
contents with more detail about each section.
1.2.1 Elements and attributes
Element names are written in uppercase letters (e.g., BODY). Attribute names are written in lowercase
letters (e.g., lang, onsubmit). Recall that in HTML, element and attribute names are case-insensitive; the
convention is meant to encourage readability. 
14
1.2 Document conventions
Library SDK class:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the Get document preview from PowerPoint file String inputFilePath1 = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
Create a VB.NET imaging application in your Visual can freely use the method below in your program. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
www.rasteredge.com
Element and attribute names in this document have been marked up and may be rendered specially by
some user agents. 
Each attribute definition specifies the type of its value. If the type allows a small set of possible values, the
definition lists the set of values, separated by a bar (|). 
After the type information, each attribute definition indicates the case-sensitivity of its values, between
square brackets ("[]"). See the section on case information [p.43] for details. 
1.2.2 Notes and examples
Informative notes are emphasized to stand out from surrounding text and may be rendered specially by
some user agents. 
All examples illustrating deprecated [p.34] usage are marked as "DEPRECATED EXAMPLE".
Deprecated examples also include recommended alternate solutions. All examples that illustrates illegal
usage are clearly marked "ILLEGAL EXAMPLE". 
Examples and notes have been marked up and may be rendered specially by some user agents. 
1.3 Acknowledgments
Thanks to everyone who has helped to author the working drafts that went into the HTML 4.0
specification, and to all those who have sent suggestions and corrections. 
Many thanks to the Web Accessibility Initiative task force (WAI HC group) for their work on improving
the accessibility of HTML and to T.V. Raman (Adobe) for his early work on developing accessible forms. 
The authors of this specification, the members of the W3C HTML Working Group, deserve much
applause for their diligent review of this document, their constructive comments, and their hard work:
John D. Burger (MITRE), Steve Byrne (JavaSoft), Martin J. Dürst (University of Zurich), Daniel Glazman
(Electricité de France), Scott Isaacs (Microsoft), Murray Maloney (GRIF), Steven Pemberton (CWI),
Robert Pernett (Lotus), Jared Sorensen (Novell), Powell Smith (IBM), Robert Stevahn (HP), Ed Tecot
(Microsoft), Jeffrey Veen (HotWired), Mike Wexler (Adobe), Misha Wolf (Reuters), and Lauren Wood
(SoftQuad). 
Thank you Dan Connolly (W3C) for rigorous and bountiful input as part-time editor and thoughtful
guidance as chairman of the HTML Working Group. Thank you Sally Khudairi (W3C) for your
indispensable work on press releases. 
Thanks to David M. Abrahamson and Roger Price for their careful reading of the specification and
constructive comments. 
Thanks to Jan Kärrman, author of html2ps for helping so much in creating the Postscript version of the
specification. 
15
1.3 Acknowledgments
Library SDK class:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the Get document preview from word file String inputFilePath1 = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1
www.rasteredge.com
Library SDK class:VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. You can generate thumbnail image(s) from PDF
www.rasteredge.com
Of particular help from the W3C at Sophia-Antipolis were Janet Bertot, Bert Bos, Stephane Boyera,
Daniel Dardailler, Yves Lafon, Håkon Lie, Chris Lilley, and Colas Nahaboo (Bull). 
Lastly, thanks to Tim Berners-Lee without whom none of this would have been possible. 
1.4 Copyright Notice
Copyright © 1997 World Wide Web Consortium, (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institut
National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, Keio University). All Rights Reserved. 
Documents on the W3C site are provided by the copyright holders under the following license. By
obtaining, using and/or copying this document, or the W3C document from which this statement is linked,
you agree that you have read, understood, and will comply with the following terms and conditions:
Permission to use, copy, and distribute the contents of this document, or the W3C document from which
this statement is linked, in any medium for any purpose and without fee or royalty is hereby granted,
provided that you include the following on ALL copies of the document, or portions thereof, that you use: 
1.  A link or URI to the original W3C document. 
2.  The pre-existing copyright notice of the original author, if it doesn't exist, a notice of the form:
"Copyright © World Wide Web Consortium, (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institut
National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, Keio University). All Rights Reserved." 
3.  If it exists, the STATUS of the W3C document.
When space permits, inclusion of the full text of this NOTICE should be provided. In addition, credit
shall be attributed to the copyright holders for any software, documents, or other items or products that
you create pursuant to the implementation of the contents of this document, or any portion thereof. 
No right to create modifications or derivatives is granted pursuant to this license.
THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED "AS IS," AND COPYRIGHT HOLDERS MAKE NO
REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT
LIMITED TO, WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OR TITLE; THAT THE CONTENTS OF THE
DOCUMENT ARE SUITABLE FOR ANY PURPOSE; NOR THAT THE IMPLEMENTATION
OF SUCH CONTENTS WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY THIRD PARTY PATENTS,
COPYRIGHTS, TRADEMARKS OR OTHER RIGHTS.
COPYRIGHT HOLDERS WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL
OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF ANY USE OF THE DOCUMENT OR
THE PERFORMANCE OR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CONTENTS THEREOF.
The name and trademarks of copyright holders may NOT be used in advertising or publicity pertaining to
this document or its contents without specific, written prior permission. Title to copyright in this
document will at all times remain with copyright holders. 
16
1.4 Copyright Notice
2 Introduction to HTML 4.0
Contents 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
17
1.  What is the World Wide Web? 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
17
1.  Introduction to URIs 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
18
2.  Fragment identifiers 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
18
3.  Relative URIs
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
19
2.  What is HTML? 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
19
1.  A brief history of HTML
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
20
3.  HTML 4.0 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
20
1.  Internationalization 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
20
2.  Accessibility 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
21
3.  Tables 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
21
4.  Compound documents 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
21
5.  Style sheets 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
22
6.  Scripting 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
22
7.  Printing
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
22
4.  Authoring documents with HTML 4.0 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
22
1.  Separate structure and presentation 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
22
2.  Consider universal accessibility to the Web 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
22
3.  Help user agents with incremental rendering
2.1 What is the World Wide Web?
The World Wide Web (Web) is a network of information resources. The Web relies on three mechanisms
to make these resources readily available to the widest possible audience: 
1.  A uniform naming scheme for locating resources on the Web (e.g., URIs). 
2.  Protocols, for access to named resources over the Web (e.g., HTTP). 
3.  Hypertext, for easy navigation among resources (e.g., HTML).
The ties between the three mechanisms are apparent throughout this specification. 
2.1.1 Introduction to URIs
Every resource available on the Web -- HTML document, image, video clip, program, etc. -- has an
address that may be encoded by a Universal Resource Identifier, or "URI". 
URIs typically consist of three pieces: 
1.  The naming scheme of the mechanism used to access the resource. 
2.  The name of the machine hosting the resource. 
3.  The name of the resource itself, given as a path.
17
2 Introduction to HTML 4.0
Consider the URI that designates the current HTML specification: 
http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/
This URI may be read as follows: There is a document available via the HTTP protocol (see [RFC2068] 
[p.328] ), residing on the machine www.w3.org, accessible via the path "/TR/REC-html4/". Other schemes
you may see in HTML documents include "mailto" for email and "ftp" for FTP. 
Here is another example of a URI. This one refers to a user's mailbox:
...this is text...
For all comments, please send email to 
<A href="mailto:joe@someplace.com">Joe Cool</A>.
Note. Most readers may be familiar with the term "URL" and not the term "URI". URLs form a subset of
the more general URI naming scheme. 
2.1.2 Fragment identifiers
Some URIs refer to a location within a resource. This kind of URI ends with "#" followed by an anchor
identifier (called the fragment identifier). For instance, here is a URI pointing to an anchor named 
section_2:
http://somesite.com/html/top.html#section_2
2.1.3 Relative URIs
relative URI doesn't contain any naming scheme information. Its path generally refers to a resource on
the same machine as the current document. Relative URIs may contain relative path components (e.g., ".."
means one level up in the hierarchy defined by the path), and may contain fragment identifiers [p.18] . 
Relative URIs are resolved to full URIs [p.147] using a base URI. As an example of relative URI
resolution, assume we have the base URI "http://www.acme.com/support/intro.html". The relative URI in
the following markup for a hypertext link:
<A href="suppliers.html">Suppliers</A>
would expand to the full URI "http://www.acme.com/support/suppliers.html", while the relative URI in
the following markup for an image
<IMG src="../icons/logo.gif" alt="logo">
would expand to the full URI "http://www.acme.com/icons/logo.gif". 
In HTML, URIs are used to: 
Link to another document or resource, (see the A and LINK elements). 
Link to an external style sheet or script (see the LINK and SCRIPT elements). 
Include an image, object, or applets in a page, (see the IMG, OBJECT, APPLET and INPUT
elements). 
18
2.1.2 Fragment identifiers
Create an image map (see the MAP and AREA elements). 
Submit a form (see FORM). 
Create a frame document (see the FRAME and IFRAME elements). 
Cite an external reference (see the Q, BLOCKQUOTE, INS and DEL elements). 
Refer to metadata conventions describing a document (see the HEAD element).
Please consult the section on the URI [p.44] type for more information about URIs. 
2.2 What is HTML?
To publish information for global distribution, one needs a universally understood language, a kind of
publishing mother tongue that all computers may potentially understand. The publishing language used by
the World Wide Web is HTML (from HyperText Markup Language). 
HTML gives authors the means to: 
Publish online documents with headings, text, tables, lists, photos, etc. 
Retrieve online information via hypertext links, at the click of a button. 
Design forms for conducting transactions with remote services, for use in searching for information,
making reservations, ordering products, etc. 
Include spread-sheets, video clips, sound clips, and other applications directly in their documents.
2.2.1 A brief history of HTML
HTML was originally developed by Tim Berners-Lee while at CERN, and popularized by the Mosaic
browser developed at NCSA. During the course of the 1990s it has blossomed with the explosive growth
of the Web. During this time, HTML has been extended in a number of ways. The Web depends on Web
page authors and vendors sharing the same conventions for HTML. This has motivated joint work on
specifications for HTML. 
HTML 2.0 (November 1995, see [RFC1866] [p.330] ) was developed under the aegis of the Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) to codify common practice in late 1994. HTML+ (1993) and HTML 3.0
(1995, see [HTML30] [p.329] ) proposed much richer versions of HTML. Despite never receiving
consensus in standards discussions, these drafts led to the adoption of a range of new features. The efforts
of the World Wide Web Consortium's HTML Working Group to codify common practice in 1996
resulted in HTML 3.2 (January 1997, see [HTML32] [p.329] ). Changes from HTML 3.2 are summarized
in Appendix A [p.301] 
Most people agree that HTML documents should work well across different browsers and platforms.
Achieving interoperability lowers costs to content providers since they must develop only one version of a
document. If the effort is not made, there is much greater risk that the Web will devolve into a proprietary
world of incompatible formats, ultimately reducing the Web's commercial potential for all participants. 
Each version of HTML has attempted to reflect greater consensus among industry players so that the
investment made by content providers will not be wasted and that their documents will not become
unreadable in a short period of time. 
19
2.2 What is HTML?
HTML has been developed with the vision that all manner of devices should be able to use information on
the Web: PCs with graphics displays of varying resolution and color depths, cellular telephones, hand held
devices, devices for speech for output and input, computers with high or low bandwidth, and so on.
2.3 HTML 4.0
HTML 4.0 extends HTML with mechanisms for style sheets, scripting, frames, embedding objects,
improved support for right to left and mixed direction text, richer tables, and enhancements to forms,
offering improved accessibility for people with disabilities. 
2.3.1 Internationalization
This version of HTML has been designed with the help of experts in the field of internationalization, so
that documents may be written in every language and be transported easily around the world. This has
been accomplished by incorporating [RFC2070] [p.330] , which deals with the internationalization of
HTML. 
One important step has been the adoption of the ISO/IEC:10646 standard (see [ISO10646] [p.327] ) as the
document character set for HTML. This is the world's most inclusive standard dealing with issues of the
representation of international characters, text direction, punctuation, and other world language issues. 
HTML now offers greater support for diverse human languages within a document. This allows for more
effective indexing of documents for search engines, higher-quality typography, better text-to-speech
conversion, better hyphenation, etc. 
2.3.2 Accessibility
As the Web community grows and its members diversify in their abilities and skills, it is crucial that the
underlying technologies be appropriate to their specific needs. HTML has been designed to make Web
pages more accessible to those with physical limitations. HTML 4.0 developments inspired by concerns
for accessibility include:
Better distinction between document structure and presentation, thus encouraging the use of style
sheets instead of HTML presentation elements and attributes. 
Better forms, including the addition of access keys, the ability to group form controls semantically,
the ability to group SELECT options semantically, and active labels. 
The ability to markup a text description of an included object (with the OBJECT element). 
A new client-side image map mechanism (the MAP element) that allows authors to integrate image
and text links. 
The requirement that alternate text accompany images included with the IMG element and image
maps included with the AREA element. 
Support for the title and lang attributes on all elements. 
Support for the ABBR and ACRONYM elements. 
A wider range of target media (tty, braille, etc.) for use with style sheets. 
Better tables, including captions, column groups, and mechanisms to facilitate non-visual rendering. 
Long descriptions of tables, images, frames, etc.
20
2.3 HTML 4.0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested