Of course, there is no limit to how authors may categorize information in a table. In the travel expense
table, for example, we could add the additional categories "subtotals" and "totals". 
This specification does not require user agents to handle information provided by the axis attribute, nor
does it make any recommendations about how user agents may present axis information to users or how
users may query the user agent about this information. 
However, user agents, particularly speech synthesizers, may want to factor out information common to
several cells that are the result of a query. For instance, if the user asks "What did I spend for meals in San
Jose?", the user agent would first determine the cells in question (25-Aug-1997: 37.74,
26-Aug-1997:27.28), then render this information. A user agent speaking this information might read it: 
Location: San Jose. Date: 25-Aug-1997. Expenses, Meals: 37.74
Location: San Jose. Date: 26-Aug-1997. Expenses, Meals: 27.28
or, more compactly: 
San Jose, 25-Aug-1997, Meals: 37.74
San Jose, 26-Aug-1997, Meals: 27.28
An even more economical rendering would factor the common information and reorder it: 
San Jose, Meals, 25-Aug-1997: 37.74
26-Aug-1997: 27.28
User agents that support this type of rendering should allow user agents a means to customize rendering
(e.g., through style sheets). 
11.4.3 Algorithm to find heading information
In the absence of header information from either the scope or headers attribute, user agents may
construct header information according to the following algorithm. The goal of the algorithm is to find an
ordered list of headers. (In the following description of the algorithm the table directionality [p.105] is
assumed to be left-to-right.)
First, search left from the cell's position to find row header cells. Then search upwards to find
column header cells. The search in a given direction stops when the edge of the table is reached or
when a data cell is found after a header cell. 
Row headers are inserted into the list in the order they appear in the table. For left-to-right tables,
headers are inserted from left to right. 
Column headers are inserted after row headers, in the order they appear in the table, from top to
bottom. 
If a header cell has the headers attribute set, then the headers referenced by this attribute are
inserted into the list and the search stops for the current direction. 
TD cells that set the axis attribute are also treated as header cells. 
131
11.4.3 Algorithm to find heading information
Pdf first page thumbnail - SDK application API:C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf first page thumbnail - SDK application API:VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
11.5 Sample table
This sample illustrates grouped rows and columns. The example is adapted from "Developing
International Software", by Nadine Kano.
In "ascii art", the following table:
<TABLE border="2" frame="hsides" rules="groups"
summary="Code page support in different versions
of MS Windows.">
<CAPTION>CODE-PAGE SUPPORT IN MICROSOFT WINDOWS</CAPTION>
<COLGROUP align="center">
<COLGROUP align="left">
<COLGROUP align="center" span="2">
<COLGROUP align="center" span="3">
<THEAD valign="top">
<TR>
<TH>Code-Page<BR>ID
<TH>Name
<TH>ACP
<TH>OEMCP
<TH>Windows<BR>NT 3.1
<TH>Windows<BR>NT 3.51
<TH>Windows<BR>95
<TBODY>
<TR><TD>1200<TD>Unicode (BMP of ISO/IEC-10646)<TD><TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>*
<TR><TD>1250<TD>Windows 3.1 Eastern European<TD>X<TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>X
<TR><TD>1251<TD>Windows 3.1 Cyrillic<TD>X<TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>X
<TR><TD>1252<TD>Windows 3.1 US (ANSI)<TD>X<TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>X
<TR><TD>1253<TD>Windows 3.1 Greek<TD>X<TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>X
<TR><TD>1254<TD>Windows 3.1 Turkish<TD>X<TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>X
<TR><TD>1255<TD>Hebrew<TD>X<TD><TD><TD><TD>X
<TR><TD>1256<TD>Arabic<TD>X<TD><TD><TD><TD>X
<TR><TD>1257<TD>Baltic<TD>X<TD><TD><TD><TD>X
<TR><TD>1361<TD>Korean (Johab)<TD>X<TD><TD><TD>**<TD>X
<TBODY>
<TR><TD>437<TD>MS-DOS United States<TD><TD>X<TD>X<TD>X<TD>X
<TR><TD>708<TD>Arabic (ASMO 708)<TD><TD>X<TD><TD><TD>X
<TR><TD>709<TD>Arabic (ASMO 449+, BCON V4)<TD><TD>X<TD><TD><TD>X
<TR><TD>710<TD>Arabic (Transparent Arabic)<TD><TD>X<TD><TD><TD>X
<TR><TD>720<TD>Arabic (Transparent ASMO)<TD><TD>X<TD><TD><TD>X
</TABLE>
would be rendered something like this:
CODE-PAGE SUPPORT IN MICROSOFT WINDOWS
===============================================================================
Code-Page | Name                         | ACP  OEMCP | Windows Windows Windows
ID    |                              |            |  NT 3.1 NT 3.51    95
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1200   | Unicode (BMP of ISO 10646)   |            |    X       X       *
1250   | Windows 3.1 Eastern European |  X         |    X       X       X
1251   | Windows 3.1 Cyrillic         |  X         |    X       X       X
1252   | Windows 3.1 US (ANSI)        |  X         |    X       X       X
1253   | Windows 3.1 Greek            |  X         |    X       X       X
132
11.5 Sample table
SDK application API:VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
are supposed to read VB.NET Imaging: Get Started first! document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF server space, which results in slower web page loading
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Project. RasterEdge XDoc.PowerPoint provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file.
www.rasteredge.com
1254   | Windows 3.1 Turkish          |  X         |    X       X       X
1255   | Hebrew                       |  X         |                    X
1256   | Arabic                       |  X         |                    X
1257   | Baltic                       |  X         |                    X
1361   | Korean (Johab)               |  X         |            **      X
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
437   | MS-DOS United States         |        X   |    X       X       X
708   | Arabic (ASMO 708)            |        X   |                    X
709   | Arabic (ASMO 449+, BCON V4)  |        X   |                    X
710   | Arabic (Transparent Arabic)  |        X   |                    X
720   | Arabic (Transparent ASMO)    |        X   |                    X
===============================================================================
A graphical user agent might render this as:
This example illustrates how COLGROUP can be used to group columns and set the default column
alignment. Similarly, TBODY is used to group rows. The frame and rules attributes tell the user agent
which borders and rules to render.
133
11.5 Sample table
SDK application API:How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
Programming Project. RasterEdge XDoc.Word provide you with APIs to get a thumbnail bitmap of the first page in the word document file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:C# Word - Render Word to Other Images
String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.docx"; DOCXDocument doc = new DOCXDocument(inputFilePath); // Get the first page of Word file.
www.rasteredge.com
134
11.5 Sample table
SDK application API:C# powerpoint - Render PowerPoint to Other Images
String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pptx"; PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(inputFilePath); // Get the first page of PowerPoint file.
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
page inserting library control toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document page (before the first page or after the
www.rasteredge.com
12 Links
Contents 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
135
1.  Introduction to links and anchors 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
135
1.  Visiting a linked resource 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
137
2.  Other link relationships 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
137
3.  Specifying anchors and links 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
138
4.  Link titles 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
138
5.  Internationalization and links
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
138
2.  The A element 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
141
1.  Syntax of anchor names 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
142
2.  Nested links are illegal 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
142
3.  Anchors with the id attribute 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
143
4.  Unavailable and unidentifiable resources
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
143
3.  Document relationships: the LINK element 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
144
1.  Forward and reverse links 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
144
2.  Links and external style sheets 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
145
3.  Links and search engines
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
146
4.  Path information: the BASE element 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
147
1.  Resolving relative URIs
12.1 Introduction to links and anchors
HTML offers many of the conventional publishing idioms for rich text and structured documents, but
what separates it from most other markup languages is its features for hypertext and interactive
documents. This section introduces the link (or hyperlink, or Web link), the basic hypertext construct. A
link is a connection from one Web resource to another. Although a simple concept, the link has been one
of the primary forces driving the success of the Web. 
link has two ends -- called anchors -- and a direction. The link starts at the "source" anchor and points
to the "destination" anchor, which may be any Web resource (e.g., an image, a video clip, a sound bite, a
program, an HTML document, an element within an HTML document, etc.). 
12.1.1 Visiting a linked resource
The default behavior associated with a link is the retrieval of another Web resource. This behavior is
commonly and implicitly obtained by selecting the link (e.g., by clicking, through keyboard input, etc.). 
The following HTML excerpt contains two links, one whose destination anchor is an HTML document
named "chapter2.html" and the other whose destination anchor is a GIF image in the file "forest.gif": 
135
12 Links
SDK application API:C# Raster - Image Save Options in C#.NET
Tiff Edit. Image Thumbnail. Image Save. Advanced Save Options. Save Image. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word to icon file, false: just save the first page to
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
page inserting library control toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document page (before the first page or after
www.rasteredge.com
<BODY>
...some text...
<P>You'll find a lot more in  <A href="chapter2.html">chapter two</A>. 
See also this <A href="../images/forest.gif">map of the enchanted forest.</A>
</BODY>
By activating these links (by clicking with the mouse, through keyboard input, voice commands, etc.),
users may visit these resources. Note that the href attribute in each source anchor specifies the address of
the destination anchor with a URI. 
The destination anchor of a link may be an element within an HTML document. The destination anchor
must be given an anchor name and any URI addressing this anchor must include the name as its fragment 
identifier [p.18] . 
Destination anchors in HTML documents may be specified either by the A element (naming it with the 
name attribute), or by any other element (naming with the id attribute). 
Thus, for example, an author might create a table of contents whose entries link to header elements H2, 
H3, etc., in the same document. Using the A element to create destination anchors, we would write:
<H1>Table of Contents</H1>
<P><A href="#section1">Introduction</A><BR>
<A href="#section2">Some background</A><BR>
<A href="#section2.1">On a more personal note</A><BR>
...the rest of the table of contents...
...the document body...
<H2><A name="section1">Introduction</A></H2>
...section 1...
<H2><A name="section2">Some background</A></H2>
...section 2...
<H3><A name="section2.1">On a more personal note</A></H3>
...section 2.1...
We may achieve the same effect by making the header elements themselves the anchors:
<H1>Table of Contents</H1>
<P><A href="#section1">Introduction</A><BR>
<A href="#section2">Some background</A><BR>
<A href="#section2.1">On a more personal note</A><BR>
...the rest of the table of contents...
...the document body...
<H2 id="section1">Introduction</H2>
...section 1...
<H2 id="section2">Some background</H2>
...section 2...
<H3 id="section2.1">On a more personal note</H3>
...section 2.1...
136
12.1.1 Visiting a linked resource
SDK application API:C# Image: Quick to Navigate Document in .NET Web Viewer
Navigation Throw Thumbnial Image. The first method recommended can be called from any document page object for formed documents, like Word and PDF, will contain
www.rasteredge.com
SDK application API:C# Word - Table Cell Processing in C#.NET
Create a Table for document ITable table = doc.CreateTable(3, 3); //Get all rows in table List<ITableRow> rows = table.GetRows(); //Get first row ITableRow row
www.rasteredge.com
12.1.2 Other link relationships
By far the most common use of a link is to retrieve another Web resource, as illustrated in the previous
examples. However, authors may insert links in their documents that express other relationships between
resources than simply "activate this link to visit that related resource". Links that express other types of
relationships have one or more link types [p.48] specified in their source anchor. 
The roles of a link defined by A or LINK are specified via the rel and rev attributes. 
For instance, links defined by the LINK element may describe the position of a document within a series
of documents. In the following excerpt, links within the document entitled "Chapter 5" point to the
previous and next chapters: 
<HEAD>
...other head information...
<TITLE>Chapter 5</TITLE>
<LINK rel="prev" href="chapter4.html">
<LINK rel="next" href="chapter6.html">
</HEAD>
The link type of the first link is "prev" and that of the second is "next" (two of several recognized link 
types [p.48] ). Links specified by LINK are not rendered with the document's contents, although user
agents may render them in other ways (e.g., as navigation tools). 
Even if they are not used for navigation, these links may be interpreted in interesting ways. For example, a
user agent that prints a series of HTML documents as a single document may use this link information as
the basis of forming a coherent linear document. Further information is given below of using links for the
benefit of search engines [p.145] 
12.1.3 Specifying anchors and links
Although several HTML elements and attributes create links to other resources (e.g., the IMG element, the 
FORM element, etc.), this chapter discusses links and anchors created by the LINK and A elements. The 
LINK element may only appear in the head of a document. The A element may only appear in the body. 
When the A element's href attribute is set, the element defines a source anchor for a link that may be
activated by the user to retrieve a Web resource. The source anchor is the location of the A instance and
the destination anchor is the Web resource. 
The retrieved resource may be handled by the user agent in several ways: by opening a new HTML
document in the same user agent window, opening a new HTML document in a different window, starting
a new program to handle the resource, etc. Since the A element has content (text, images, etc.), user agents
may render this content in such a way as to indicate the presence of a link (e.g., by underlining the
content). 
When the name or id attributes of the A element are set, the element defines an anchor that may be the
destination of other links. 
137
12.1.2 Other link relationships
Authors may set the name and href attributes simultaneously in the same A instance. 
The LINK element defines a relationship between the current document and another resource. Although 
LINK has no content, the relationships it defines may be rendered by some user agents.
12.1.4 Link titles
The title attribute may be set for both A and LINK to add information about the nature of a link. This
information may be spoken by a user agent, rendered as a tool tip, cause a change in cursor image, etc. 
Thus, we may augment a previous example [p.135] by supplying a title for each link: 
<BODY>
...some text...
<P>You'll find a lot more in <A href="chapter2.html"
title="Go to chapter two">chapter two</A>.
<A href="./chapter2.html"
title="Get chapter two.">chapter two</A>. 
See also this <A href="../images/forest.gif"
title="GIF image of enchanted forest">map of
the enchanted forest.</A>
</BODY>
12.1.5 Internationalization and links
Since links may point to documents encoded with different character encodings [p.37] , the A and LINK
elements support the charset attribute. This attribute allows authors to advise user agents about the
encoding of data at the other end of the link. 
The hreflang attribute provides user agents with information about the language of a resource at the
end of a link, just as the lang attribute provides information about the language of an element's content
or attribute values. 
Armed with this additional knowledge, user agents should be able to avoid presenting "garbage" to the
user. Instead, they may either locate resources necessary for the correct presentation of the document or, if
they cannot locate the resources, they should at least warn the user that the document will be unreadable
and explain the cause.
12.2 The A element
<!ELEMENT A - - (%inline;)* -(A)       -- anchor -->
<!ATTLIST A
%attrs;                              -- %coreattrs, %i18n, %events --
charset     %Charset;      #IMPLIED  -- char encoding of linked resource --
type        %ContentType;  #IMPLIED  -- advisory content type --
name        CDATA          #IMPLIED  -- named link end --
href        %URI;          #IMPLIED  -- URI for linked resource --
hreflang    %LanguageCode; #IMPLIED  -- language code --
rel         %LinkTypes;    #IMPLIED  -- forward link types --
rev         %LinkTypes;    #IMPLIED  -- reverse link types --
accesskey   %Character;    #IMPLIED  -- accessibility key character --
138
12.2 The A element
shape       %Shape;        rect      -- for use with client-side image maps --
coords      %Coords;       #IMPLIED  -- for use with client-side image maps --
tabindex    NUMBER         #IMPLIED  -- position in tabbing order --
onfocus     %Script;       #IMPLIED  -- the element got the focus --
onblur      %Script;       #IMPLIED  -- the element lost the focus --
>
Start tag: required, End tag: required
Attribute definitions
name = cdata [p.44] [CS] [p.43] 
This attribute names the current anchor so that it may be the destination of another link. The value of
this attribute must be a unique anchor name. The scope of this name is the current document. Note
that this attribute shares the same name space as the id attribute. 
href = uri [p.44] [CT] [p.43] 
This attribute specifies the location of a Web resource, thus defining a link between the current
element (the source anchor) and the destination anchor defined by this attribute. 
hreflang = langcode [p.47] [CI] [p.43] 
This attribute specifies the base language of the resource designated by href and may only be used
when href is specified. 
type = content-type [p.46] [CI] [p.43] 
When present, this attribute specifies the content type of a piece of content, for example, the result of
dereferencing a URI. Content types are defined in [MIMETYPES] [p.327] . 
rel = link-types [p.48] [CI] [p.43] 
This attribute describes the relationship from the current document to the anchor specified by the 
href attribute. The value of this attribute is a space-separated list of link types. 
rev = link-types [p.48] [CI] [p.43] 
This attribute is used to describe a reverse link [p.144] from the anchor specified by the href
attribute to the current document. The value of this attribute is a space-separated list of link types. 
charset = charset [p.47] [CI] [p.43] 
This attribute specifies the character encoding of the resource designated by the link. Please consult
the section on character encodings [p.37] for more details.
Attributes defined elsewhere
id, class (document-wide identifiers [p.65] ) 
lang (language information [p.71] ), dir (text direction [p.73] ) 
title (element title [p.57] ) 
style (inline style information [p.174] ) 
shape and coords (image maps [p.162] ) 
onfocus, onblur, onclick, ondblclick, onmousedown, onmouseup, onmouseover, 
onmousemove, onmouseout, onkeypress, onkeydown, onkeyup (intrinsic events [p.240] ) 
target (target frame information [p.200] ) 
tabindex (tabbing navigation [p.228] ) 
accesskey (access keys [p.229] )
139
12.2 The A element
Each A element defines an anchor 
1.  The A element's content defines the position of the anchor. 
2.  The name attribute names the anchor so that it may be the destination of zero or more links (see also 
anchors with id [p.142] ). 
3.  The href attribute makes this anchor the source anchor of exactly one link.
Authors may also create an A element that specifies no anchors, i.e., that doesn't specify href, name, or 
id. Values for these attributes may be set at a later time through scripts. [p.237] 
In the example that follows, the A element defines a link. The source anchor is the text "W3C Web site"
and the destination anchor is "http://www.w3.org/": 
For more information about W3C, please consult the 
<A href="http://www.w3.org/">W3C Web site</A>.
This link designates the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium. When a user activates this link
in a user agent, the user agent will retrieve the resource, in this case, an HTML document.
User agents generally render links in such a way as to make them obvious to users (underlining, reverse
video, etc.). The exact rendering depends on the user agent. Rendering may vary according to whether the
user has already visited the link or not. A possible visual rendering of the previous link might be:
For more information about W3C, please consult the W3C Web site.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
To tell user agents explicitly what the character encoding of the destination page is, set the charset 
attribute:
For more information about W3C, please consult the 
<A href="http://www.w3.org/" charset="ISO-8859-1">W3C Web site</A>
Suppose we define an anchor named "anchor-one" in the file "one.html".
...text before the anchor...
<A name="anchor-one">This is the location of anchor one.</A>
...text after the anchor...
This creates an anchor around the text "This is the location of anchor one.". Usually, the contents of A are
not rendered in any special way when A defines an anchor only.
Having defined the anchor, we may link to it from the same or another document. URIs that designate
anchors contain a "#" character followed by the anchor name (the fragment identifier [p.18] ). Here are
some examples of such URIs:
An absolute URI: http://www.mycompany.com/one.html#anchor-one 
A relative URI: ./one.html#anchor-one or one.html#anchor-one 
When the link is defined in the same document: #anchor-one
140
12.2 The A element
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested