Attributes defined elsewhere 
id, class (document-wide identifiers [p.65] ) 
title (element title [p.57] ) 
style (inline style information [p.174] ) 
alt (alternate text [p.169] ) 
align, hspace, vspace (visual presentation of objects, images, and applets [p.168] )
This element, supported by all Java-enabled browsers, allows designers to embed a Java applet in an
HTML document. It has been deprecated [p.34] in favor of the OBJECT element. 
The content of the APPLET acts as alternate information for user agents that don't support this element or
are currently configured not to support applets. User agents must ignore the content otherwise. 
DEPRECATED EXAMPLE:
In the following example, the APPLET element includes a Java applet in the document. Since no 
codebase is supplied, the applet is assumed to be in the same directory as the current document. 
<APPLET code="Bubbles.class" width="500" height="500">
Java applet that draws animated bubbles.
</APPLET>
This example may be rewritten as follows with OBJECT as follows: 
<P><OBJECT codetype="application/java"
classid="java:Bubbles.class"
width="500" height="500">
Java applet that draws animated bubbles.
</OBJECT>
Initial values may be supplied to the applet via the PARAM element. 
DEPRECATED EXAMPLE:
The following sample Java applet: 
<APPLET code="AudioItem" width="15" height="15">
<PARAM name="snd" value="Hello.au|Welcome.au">
Java applet that plays a welcoming sound.
</APPLET>
may be rewritten as follows with OBJECT: 
<OBJECT codetype="application/java"
classid="AudioItem" 
width="15" height="15">
<PARAM name="snd" value="Hello.au|Welcome.au">
Java applet that plays a welcoming sound.
</OBJECT>
161
13.4 Including an applet: the APPLET element
Pdf thumbnail - application software utility:C# PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
Pdf thumbnail - application software utility:VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
www.rasteredge.com
13.5 Notes on embedded documents
Sometimes, rather than linking [p.135] to a document, an author may want to embed it directly into a
primary HTML document. Authors may use either the IFRAME element or the OBJECT element for this
purpose, but the elements differ in some ways. Not only do the two elements have different content
models, the IFRAME element may be a target frame (see the section on specifying target frame 
information [p.200] for details) and may be "selected" by a user agent as the focus for printing, viewing
HTML source, etc. User agents may render selected frames elements in ways that distinguish them from
unselected frames (e.g., by drawing a border around the selected frame). 
An embedded document is entirely independent of the document in which it is embedded. For instance,
relative URIs within the embedded document resolve [p.147] according to the base URI of the embedded
document, not that of the main document. An embedded document is only rendered within another
document (e.g., in a subwindow); it remains otherwise independent. 
For instance, the following line embeds the contents of embed_me.html at the location where the 
OBJECT definition occurs. 
...text before...
<OBJECT data="embed_me.html">
Warning: embed_me.html could not be embedded.
</OBJECT>
...text after...
Recall that the contents of OBJECT must only be rendered if the file specified by the data attribute
cannot be loaded. 
The behavior of a user agent in cases where a file includes itself is not defined. 
13.6 Image maps
Image maps allow authors to specify regions of an image or object and assign a specific action to each
region (e.g., retrieve a document, run a program, etc.) When the region is activated by the user, the action
is executed. 
An image map is created by associating an object with a specification of sensitive geometric areas on the
object. 
There are two types of image maps: 
Client-side. When a user activates a region of a client-side image map with a mouse, the pixel
coordinates are interpreted by the user agent. The user agent selects a link that was specified for the
activated region and follows it. 
Server-side. When a user activates a region of a server-side image map with a mouse, the pixel
coordinates of the click are sent to the server-side agent specified by the href attribute of the A
element. The server-side agent interprets the coordinates and performs some action. 
162
13.5 Notes on embedded documents
application software utility:How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Word
As you see, you are allowed to define and control the size of thumbnail. DOCXDocument pdf = new DOCXDocument(@"C:\1.docx"); BasePage page = pdf.GetPage(0
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET.
www.rasteredge.com
Client-side image maps are preferred over server-side image maps for at least two reasons: they are
accessible to people browsing with non-graphical user agents and they offer immediate feedback as to
whether or not the pointer is over an active region.
13.6.1 Client-side image maps: the MAP and AREA elements
<!ELEMENT MAP - - ((%block;)+ | AREA+) -- client-side image map -->
<!ATTLIST MAP
%attrs;                              -- %coreattrs, %i18n, %events --
name        CDATA          #REQUIRED -- for reference by usemap --
>
Start tag: required, End tag: required
<!ELEMENT AREA - O EMPTY               -- client-side image map area -->
<!ATTLIST AREA
%attrs;                              -- %coreattrs, %i18n, %events --
shape       %Shape;        rect      -- controls interpretation of coords --
coords      %Coords;       #IMPLIED  -- comma separated list of lengths --
href        %URI;          #IMPLIED  -- URI for linked resource --
nohref      (nohref)       #IMPLIED  -- this region has no action --
alt         %Text;         #REQUIRED -- short description --
tabindex    NUMBER         #IMPLIED  -- position in tabbing order --
accesskey   %Character;    #IMPLIED  -- accessibility key character --
onfocus     %Script;       #IMPLIED  -- the element got the focus --
onblur      %Script;       #IMPLIED  -- the element lost the focus --
>
Start tag: required, End tag: forbidden
MAP attribute definitions
name = cdata [p.44] [CI] [p.43] 
This attribute assigns a name to the image map defined by a MAP element.
AREA attribute definitions
shape = default|rect|circle|poly [CI] [p.43] 
This attribute specifies the shape of a region. Possible values: 
default: Specifies the entire region. 
rect: Define a rectangular region. 
circle: Define a circular region. 
poly: Define a polygonal region.
coords = coordinates [CN] [p.43] 
This attribute specifies the position a shape on the screen. The number and order of values depends
on the shape being defined. Possible combinations: 
rect: left-x, top-y, right-x, bottom-y. 
circle: center-x, center-y, radius. Note. When the radius value is a percentage value, user
agents should calculate the final radius value based on the associated object's width and height.
The radius should be the smaller value of the two. 
163
13.6.1 Client-side image maps: the MAP and AREA elements
application software utility:How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for PowerPoint
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:VB.NET Image: Program for Creating Thumbnail from Documents and
language. It empowers VB developers to create thumbnail from multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, TIFF, GIF, BMP, etc. It
www.rasteredge.com
poly: x1, y1, x2, y2, ..., xN, yN. 
Coordinates are relative to the top, left corner of the object. All values are lengths [p.46] . All values
are separated by commas. 
nohref [CI] [p.43] 
When set, this boolean attribute specifies that a region has no associated link. 
Attribute to associate an image map with an element
usemap = uri [p.44] [CT] [p.43] 
This attribute associates an image map with an element. The image map is defined by a MAP element.
The value of usemap must match the value of the name attribute of the associated MAP element.
Attributes defined elsewhere 
id, class (document-wide identifiers [p.65] ) 
lang (language information [p.71] ), dir (text direction [p.73] ) 
title (element title [p.57] ) 
style (inline style information [p.174] ) 
name (submitting objects with forms [p.231] ) 
alt (alternate text [p.169] ) 
href (anchor reference [p.138] ) target (frame target information [p.200] ) 
tabindex (tabbing navigation [p.228] ) 
accesskey (access keys [p.229] ) 
shape (image maps [p.162] ) 
onclick, ondblclick, onmousedown, onmouseup, onmouseover, onmousemove, 
onmouseout, onkeypress, onkeydown, onkeyup, onfocus, onblur (intrinsic events 
[p.240] )
The MAP element specifies a client-side image map that may be associated with one or more elements 
(IMG, OBJECT, or INPUT). An image map is associated with an element via the element's usemap
attribute. 
The presence of the usemap attribute for an OBJECT implies that the object being included is an image. 
Furthermore, when the OBJECT element has an associated client-side image map, user agents may
implement user interaction with the OBJECT solely in terms of the client-side image map. This allows
user agents (such as an audio browser or robot) to interact with the OBJECT without having to process it;
the user agent may even elect not to retrieve (or process) the object. When an OBJECT has an associated
image map, authors should not expect that the object will be retrieved or processed by every user agent. 
Each MAP element may contain either one of the following: 
1.  One or more AREA elements. These elements have no content but specify the geometric regions of
the image map and the link associated with each region. Note that when this method is used, the MAP
has no rendered content. Therefore, authors must provide alternate text for each AREA with the alt
attribute (see below for information on how to specify alternate text [p.169] ). 
2.  Block-level content. This content should include A elements that specify the geometric regions of the
164
13.6.1 Client-side image maps: the MAP and AREA elements
application software utility:How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB How to C#: Generate Thumbnail for Raster.
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
or Images; Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading
www.rasteredge.com
image map and the link associated with each region. Note that when this method is used, the MAP
element content may be rendered by the user agent. Authors should use this method to create more
accessible documents. 
If two or more defined regions overlap, the region-defining element that appears earliest in the document
takes precedence (i.e., responds to user input). 
User agents and authors should offer textual alternates to graphical image maps for cases when graphics
are not available or the user cannot access them. For example, user agents may use alt text to create
textual links in place of a graphical image map. Such links may be activated in a variety of ways
(keyboard, voice activation, etc.). 
Note. 
MAP
is not backwards compatible with HTML 2.0 user agents. 
Client-side image map examples 
In the following example, we create a client-side image map for the OBJECT element. We do not want to
render the image map's contents when the OBJECT is rendered, so we "hide" the MAP element within the 
OBJECT element's content. Consequently, the MAP element's contents will only be rendered if the 
OBJECT cannot be rendered. 
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>The cool site!</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<P><OBJECT data="navbar1.gif" type="image/gif" usemap="#map1">
<MAP name="map1">
<P>Navigate the site:
<A href="guide.html" shape="rect" coords="0,0,118,28">Access Guide</a> |
<A href="shortcut.html" shape="rect" coords="118,0,184,28">Go</A> |
<A href="search.html" shape="circle" coords="184,200,60">Search</A> |
<A href="top10.html" shape="poly" coords="276,0,373,28,50,50,100,120">Top Ten</A><
</MAP>
</OBJECT>
</BODY>
</HTML>
We may want to render the image map's contents even when a user agent can render the OBJECT. For
instance, we may want to associate an image map with an OBJECT element and include a text navigation
bar at the bottom of the page. To do so, we define the MAP element outside the OBJECT: 
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>The cool site!</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<P><OBJECT data="navbar1.gif" type="image/gif" usemap="#map1">
</OBJECT>
...the rest of the page here...
<MAP name="map1">
165
13.6.1 Client-side image maps: the MAP and AREA elements
application software utility:Create Thumbnail Winforms | Online Tutorials
Create Thumbnail; Generate Barcodes on Your Documents; Read Barcodes from Your Documents. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode
www.rasteredge.com
application software utility:How to C#: Overview of Using XImage.Raster
Empower to navigate image(s) content quickly via thumbnail. Able to support text extract with OCR. You may edit the tiff document easily. Create Thumbnail.
www.rasteredge.com
<P>Navigate the site:
<A href="guide.html" shape="rect" coords="0,0,118,28">Access Guide</a> |
<A href="shortcut.html" shape="rect" coords="118,0,184,28">Go</A> |
<A href="search.html" shape="circle" coords="184,200,60">Search</A> |
<A href="top10.html" shape="poly" coords="276,0,373,28,50,50,100,120">Top Ten</A>
</MAP>
</BODY>
</HTML>
In the following example, we create a similar image map, this time using the AREA element. Note the use
of alt text: 
<P><OBJECT data="navbar1.gif" type="image/gif" usemap="#map1">
<P>This is a navigation bar.
</OBJECT>
<MAP name="map1">
<AREA href="guide.html" 
alt="Access Guide" 
shape="rect" 
coords="0,0,118,28">
<AREA href="search.html" 
alt="Search" 
shape="rect" 
coords="184,0,276,28">
<AREA href="shortcut.html" 
alt="Go" 
shape="circle"
coords="184,200,60">
<AREA href="top10.html" 
alt="Top Ten" 
shape="poly" 
coords="276,0,373,28,50,50,100,120">
</MAP>
Here is a similar version using the IMG element instead of OBJECT (with the same MAP declaration): 
<P><IMG src="navbar1.gif" usemap="#map1" alt="navigation bar">
The following example illustrates how image maps may be shared. 
Nested OBJECT elements are useful for providing fallbacks in case a user agent doesn't support certain
formats. For example:
<P>
<OBJECT data="navbar.png" type="image/png">
<OBJECT data="navbar.gif" type="image/gif">
text describing the image...
</OBJECT>
</OBJECT>
If the user agent doesn't support the PNG format, it tries to render the GIF image. If it doesn't support GIF
(e.g., it's a speech-based user agent), it defaults to the text description provided as the content of the inner 
OBJECT element. When OBJECT elements are nested this way, authors may share image maps among
them: 
166
13.6.1 Client-side image maps: the MAP and AREA elements
<P>
<OBJECT data="navbar.png" type="image/png" usemap="#map1">
<OBJECT data="navbar.gif" type="image/gif" usemap="#map1">
<MAP name="map1">
<P>Navigate the site:
<A href="guide.html" shape="rect" coords="0,0,118,28">Access Guide</a> |
<A href="shortcut.html" shape="rect" coords="118,0,184,28">Go</A> |
<A href="search.html" shape="circle" coords="184,200,60">Search</A> |
<A href="top10.html" shape="poly" coords="276,0,373,28,50,50,100,120">Top Ten</A>
</MAP>
</OBJECT>
</OBJECT>
The following example illustrates how anchors may be specified to create inactive zones within an image
map. The first anchor specifies a small circular region with no associated link. The second anchor
specifies a larger circular region with the same center coordinates. Combined, the two form a ring whose
center is inactive and whose rim is active. The order of the anchor definitions is important, since the
smaller circle must override the larger circle. 
<MAP name="map1">
<P>
<A shape="circle" coords="100,200,50">I'm inactive.</A>
<A href="outer-ring-link.html" shape="circle" coords="100,200,250">I'm active.</A>
</MAP>
Similarly, the nohref attribute for the AREA element declares that geometric region has no associated
link. 
13.6.2 Server-side image maps
Server-side image maps may be interesting in cases where the image map is too complicated for a
client-side image map. 
It is only possible to define a server-side image map for the IMG and INPUT elements. In the case of IMG,
the IMG must be inside an A element and the boolean attribute ismap ([CI] [p.43] ) must be set. In the
case of INPUT, the INPUT must be of type "image". 
When the user activates the link by clicking on the image, the screen coordinates are sent directly to the
server where the document resides. Screen coordinates are expressed as screen pixel values relative to the
image. For normative information about the definition of a pixel and how to scale it, please consult 
[CSS1] [p.327] . 
In the following example, the active region defines a server-side link. Thus, a click anywhere on the image
will cause the click's coordinates to be sent to the server. 
<P><A href="http://www.acme.com/cgi-bin/competition">
<IMG src="game.gif" ismap alt="target"></A>
The location clicked is passed to the server as follows. The user agent derives a new URI from the URI
specified by the href attribute of the A element, by appending `?' followed by the x and y coordinates,
separated by a comma. The link is then followed using the new URI. For instance, in the given example, if
167
13.6.2 Server-side image maps
the user clicks at the location x=10, y=27 then the derived URI is
"http://www.acme.com/cgi-bin/competition?10,27". 
User agents that do not offer the user a means to select specific coordinates (e.g., non-graphical user
agents that rely on keyboard input, speech-based user agents, etc.) should send the coordinates "0,0" to the
server when the link is activated. 
13.7 Visual presentation of images, objects, and applets
All 
IMG
and 
OBJECT
attributes that concern visual alignment and presentation have been deprecated 
[p.34] in favor of style sheets. 
13.7.1 Width and height
Attribute definitions
width = length [p.46] [CN] [p.43] 
Image and object width override. 
height = length  [p.46] [CN] [p.43] 
Image and object override.
When specified, the width and height attributes tell user agents to override the natural image or object
size in favor of these values. 
When the object is an image, it is scaled. User agents should do their best to scale an object or image to
match the width and height specified by the author. Note that lengths expressed as percentages are based
on the horizontal or vertical space currently available, not on the natural size of the image, object, or
applet. 
The height and width attributes give user agents an idea of the size of an image or object so that they
may reserve space for it and continue rendering the document while waiting for the image data. 
13.7.2 White space around images and objects
The vspace and hspace attributes specify the amount of white space to be inserted to the left and right
(hspace) and above and below (vspace) an IMG, APPLET, OBJECT. The default value for these attributes
is not specified, but is generally a small, non-zero length. Both attributes take values of type length [p.46] 
13.7.3 Borders
An image or object may be surrounded by a border (e.g., when a border is specified by the user or when
the image is the content of an A element). 
Attribute definitions
168
13.7 Visual presentation of images, objects, and applets
border = pixels [p.46] 
Deprecated. [p.34] The border attribute specifies the width of this border in pixels. The default
value for this attribute depends on the user agent.
13.7.4 Alignment
The align attribute specifies the position of an IMG, OBJECT, or APPLET with respect to its context. 
The following values for align concern the object's position with respect to surrounding text: 
bottom: means that the bottom of the object should be vertically aligned with the current baseline.
This is the default value. 
middle: means that the center of the object should be vertically aligned with the current baseline. 
top: means that the top of the object should be vertically aligned with the top of the current text 
line.
Two other values, left and right, cause the image to float to the current left or right margin. They are
discussed in the section on floating objects [p.185] . 
Differing interpretations of align. User agents vary in their interpretation of the 
align
attribute. Some
only take into account what has occurred on the text line prior to the element, some take into account the
text on both sides of the element. 
13.8 How to specify alternate text
Attribute definitions
alt = text [p.44] [CS] [p.43] 
For user agents that cannot display images, forms, or applets, this attribute specifies alternate text.
The language of the alternate text is specified by the lang attribute.
Several non-textual elements (IMG, AREA, APPLET, and INPUT) let authors specify alternate text to
serve as content when the element cannot be rendered normally. Specifying alternate text assists users
without graphic display terminals, users whose browsers don't support forms, visually impaired users,
those who use speech synthesizers, those who have configured their graphical user agents not to display
images, etc. 
The alt attribute must be specified for the IMG and AREA elements. It is optional for the INPUT and 
APPLET elements. 
While alternate text may be very helpful, it must be handled with care. Authors should observe the
following guidelines: 
Do not specify irrelevant alternate text when including images intended to format a page, for
instance, alt="red ball" would be inappropriate for an image that adds a red ball for decorating
a heading or paragraph. In such cases, the alternate text should be the empty string (""). Authors are
in any case advised to avoid using images to format pages; style sheets should be used instead. 
169
13.8 How to specify alternate text
Do not specify meaningless alternate text (e.g., "dummy text"). Not only will this frustrate users, it
will slow down user agents that must convert text to speech or braille output.
Implementors should consult the section on generating alternate text [p.325] for information about how to
handle cases of omitted alternate text. 
Note. For more information about designing accessible HTML documents, please consult [WAIGUIDE] 
[p.331] . 
170
13.8 How to specify alternate text
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested