asp.net pdf viewer c# : Show pdf thumbnail in control Library utility azure .net asp.net visual studio R429651-part1143

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
rights concerning nondiscriminatory treatment, cross-border sales and entry, investment, and 
access to information. However, there were certain exclusions and reservations by each country. 
These included maritime shipping (United States), film and publishing (Canada), and oil and gas 
drilling (Mexico).
25
Although NAFTA liberalized certain service sectors in Mexico, particularly 
financial services, which profoundly altered its banking sector, other sectors were barely 
affected.
26
In telecommunications services, NAFTA partners agreed to exclude provision of, but 
not the use of, basic telecommunications services. NAFTA granted a “bill of rights” for the 
providers and users of telecommunications services, including access to public 
telecommunications services; connection to private lines that reflect economic costs and available 
on a flat-rate pricing basis; and the right to choose, purchase, or lease terminal equipment best 
suited to their needs.
27
However, NAFTA did not require parties to authorize a person of another 
NAFTA country to provide or operate telecommunications transport networks or services. 
NAFTA did not bar a party from maintaining a monopoly provider of public networks or services, 
such as Telmex, Mexico’s dominant telecommunications company.
28
Other Provisions 
In addition to market opening measures through the elimination of tariff and non-tariff barriers, 
NAFTA incorporated numerous other provisions, including foreign investment, intellectual 
property rights (IPR), dispute resolution, and government procurement.  
•  Foreign Investment. NAFTA removed significant investment barriers, ensured 
basic protections for NAFTA investors, and provided a mechanism for the 
settlement of disputes between investors and a NAFTA country. NAFTA 
provided for “non-discriminatory treatment” for foreign investment by NAFTA 
parties in certain sectors of other NAFTA countries. The agreement included 
explicit country-specific liberalization commitments and exceptions to national 
treatment. Exemptions from NAFTA investment provisions include the energy 
sector in Mexico in which the Mexican government reserved the right to prohibit 
foreign investment. It also included exceptions related to national security and to 
Canada’s cultural industries.
29
•  IPR. NAFTA built upon the then-ongoing Uruguay Round negotiations that 
would create the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) 
agreement in the World Trade Organization and on various existing international 
intellectual property treaties. The agreement set out specific enforceable 
commitments by NAFTA parties regarding the protection of copyrights, patents, 
trademarks, and trade secrets, among other provisions.  
•  Dispute Settlement Procedures. NAFTA’s provisions for preventing and settling 
disputes were built upon provisions in the U.S.-Canada FTA. NAFTA created a 
system of arbitration for resolving disputes that included initial consultations, 
25 United States General Accounting Office (GAO), “North American Free Trade Agreement: Assessment of Major 
Issues, Volume 2,” Report to the Congress, September 1993, pp. 35-36.  
26 Hufbauer and Schott, NAFTA Revisited, pp. 25-29. 
27
GAO, Report to Congress, September 1993, pp. 38-39. 
28 Description of the Proposed North American Free Trade Agreement, August 12, 1992, p. 29. 
29 Ibid., pp. 30-32.  
Show pdf thumbnail in - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail generator; create thumbnails from pdf files
Show pdf thumbnail in - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
no pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
taking the issue to the NAFTA Trade Commission, or going through arbitral 
panel proceedings.
30
NAFTA included separate dispute settlement provisions for 
addressing disputes over antidumping and countervailing duty determinations.  
•  Government Procurement. NAFTA opened up a significant portion of federal 
government procurement in each country on a nondiscriminatory basis to 
suppliers from other NAFTA countries for goods and services. It contains some 
limitations for procurement by state-owned enterprises.
31
NAFTA Side Agreements on Labor and the Environment 
The NAFTA text did not include labor or environmental provisions, which was a major concern 
to many in Congress at the time of the agreement’s consideration. Some policymakers called for 
additional provisions to address numerous concerns about labor and environmental issues, 
specifically in Mexico. Other policymakers argued that the economic growth generated by the 
FTA would increase Mexico’s resources available for environmental and worker rights protection. 
However, congressional concerns from policymakers, as well as concerns from labor and 
environmental groups, remained strong. 
Shortly after he began his presidency, President Clinton addressed labor and environmental 
concerns by joining his counterparts in Canada and Mexico in negotiating formal side 
agreements. The NAFTA implementing legislation included provisions related to the side 
agreements, authorizing U.S. participation in NAFTA labor and environmental commissions and 
appropriations for these activities. The North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation 
(NAALC) and the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) entered 
into force on January 1, 1994, the same day as NAFTA.
32
NAFTA implementing legislation also 
included two adjustment assistance programs, designed to ease trade-related labor problems: the 
NAFTA Transitional Adjustment Assistance (NAFTA-TAA) Program and the U.S. Community 
Adjustment and Investment Program (USCAIP).  
The labor and environmental side agreements included language to promote cooperation on labor 
and environmental matters as well as provisions to address a party’s failure to enforce its own 
labor and environmental laws. Perhaps most notable were the side agreements’ dispute settlement 
processes that, as a last resort, may impose monetary assessments and sanctions to address a 
party’s failure to enforce its laws.
33
NAFTA marked the first time that labor and environmental 
provisions were associated with an FTA. For many, it represented an opportunity for cooperating 
on environmental and labor matters across borders and for establishing a new type of relationship 
among NAFTA partners.
34
30 If the parties are unable to resolve the issue through consultations, they may take the dispute to the NAFTA Trade 
Commission, which is comprised of Ministers or cabinet-level officers designated by each country. A party may also 
request the establishment of an arbitral panel, which may make recommendations for the resolution of the dispute. 
31 GAO, Report to Congress, September 1993, pp. 69-71. 
32 The USCAIP, administered by the North American Development Bank, provides financial assistance to communities 
with significant job losses due to changes in trade patterns with Mexico or Canada as a result of NAFTA. 
33 For more information, see CRS Report RS22823, Overview of Labor Enforcement Issues in Free Trade Agreements, 
by Mary Jane Bolle, and CRS Report 97-291, NAFTA: Related Environmental Issues and Initiatives, by Mary 
Tiemann. 
34 Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, NAFTA at 10: Progress, Potential, and Precedents, pp. 20-30.  
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB Thumbnail item. Make the ToolBox view show.
create pdf thumbnail image; generate thumbnail from pdf
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Create Footer & Header. The following C# sample code will show you how to create a header and footer in section.
create thumbnail from pdf c#; html display pdf thumbnail
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
In addition to the two trilateral side agreements, the United States and Mexico entered into a 
bilateral side agreement to NAFTA on border environmental cooperation.
35
In this agreement, the 
two governments committed to cooperate on developing environmental infrastructure projects 
along the U.S.-Mexico border to address concerns about the degradation of the environment 
along the U.S.-Mexico border due to increased economic activity. The agreement established two 
organizations to address these concerns: the Border Environment Cooperation Commission 
(BECC), located in Juárez, Mexico, and the North American Development Bank (NADBank), 
located in San Antonio, Texas. The sister organizations work closely together and with other 
partners at the federal, state and local level in the United States and Mexico to develop, certify, 
and facilitate financing for water and wastewater treatment, municipal solid waste disposal, and 
related projects on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border region. Both organizations also have 
ongoing efforts to measure the results of the projects on the border region. From 1995 to 2011, 
BECC certified 189 projects (86 in the United States and 103 in Mexico), representing nearly 
$4.3 billion in environmental infrastructure investment, directly benefiting 14 million border 
residents. NADBank has financed 152 of these projects with approximately $1.33 billion in loans 
and grants.
36
These projects have provided border residents with more access to drinking water, 
sewer and wastewater treatment. They also include water conservation, air quality, and renewable 
energy projects.
37
Trade Trends and Economic Effects 
Many economists contend that trade liberalization promotes overall economic growth and 
efficiency among trading partners, although there are short-term adjustment costs. NAFTA was 
unusual in global terms because it was the first time that an FTA linked two wealthy, developed 
countries with a low-income developing country. For this reason, the agreement received 
considerable attention by U.S. policymakers, manufacturers, service providers, agriculture 
producers, labor unions, non-government organizations, and academics. Proponents argued that 
the agreement would help generate thousands of jobs and reduce income disparity between 
Mexico and its northern neighbors. Opponents warned that the agreement would create huge job 
losses in the United States as companies moved production to Mexico to lower costs.
38
Estimating the economic impact of trade agreements is a daunting task due to a lack of data and 
important theoretical and practical matters associated with generating results from economic 
models. In addition, such estimates provide an incomplete accounting of the total economic 
effects of trade agreements.
39
Numerous studies suggest that NAFTA achieved many of the 
intended trade and economic benefits.
40
Other studies suggest that NAFTA has come at a cost to 
35
The Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the United Mexican 
States Concerning the Establishment of a Border Environment Cooperation Commission and a North American 
Development Bank, November 1993.  
36 Border Environment Cooperation Commission, 2011 Annual Report, p. 7. 
37
Ibid. 
38 See Ross Perot with Pat Choate, Save Your Job, Save Our Country: Why NAFTA Must be Stopped-Now!, New York, 
1993. 
39 For more information, see CRS Report R41660, U.S.-South Korea Free Trade Agreement and Potential Employment 
Effects: Analysis of Studies, by Mary Jane Bolle and James K. Jackson. 
40
See for example, Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Jeffrey J. Schott, NAFTA Revisited: Achievements and Challenges, 
Institute for International Economics, October 2005; Center for Strategic and International Studies, NAFTA’s Impact on 
North America: The First Decade, Edited by Sidney Weintraub, 2004; and U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Opening 
(continued...) 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
How to Process Image Using VB.NET. In this section, we will show you all VB.NET Image Cropping Assembly to Crop Image, VB.NET Image Thumbnail Creator Control SDK
enable pdf thumbnails in; how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document
How to C#: File Format Support
PowerPoint Pages. Annotate PowerPoint. Text Search. Insert Image. Thumbnail Create. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Microsoft Office 2003 PowerPoint Show
show pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
10 
U.S. workers.
41
This has been in keeping with what most economists maintain, that trade 
liberalization promotes overall economic growth among trading partners, but that there are both 
winners and losers from adjustments.  
Not all changes in trade and investment patterns within North America since 1994 can be 
attributed to NAFTA because trade has also been affected by a number of factors. The sharp 
devaluation of the peso at the end of the 1990s and the associated recession in Mexico had 
considerable effects on trade, as did the rapid growth of the U.S. economy during most of the 
1990s and, more recently, the economic slowdown caused by the 2008 financial crisis. Trade-
related job gains and losses since NAFTA may have accelerated trends that were ongoing prior to 
NAFTA and may not be totally attributable to the trade agreement. 
U.S. Trade Trends with NAFTA Partners 
Overall Trade 
U.S. trade with its NAFTA partners has more than tripled since the agreement took effect. It has 
increased more rapidly than trade with the rest of the world. In 2011, trilateral trade among 
NAFTA partners reached the $1 trillion threshold. Since 1993, total U.S. trade with Mexico 
increased more rapidly than total trade with Canada and trade with non-NAFTA countries. In 
2014, Canada was the leading market for U.S. exports, while Mexico ranked second. The two 
countries accounted for 34% of total U.S. exports in 2014. In imports, Canada and Mexico ranked 
second and third, respectively, as suppliers of U.S. imports in 2014. The two countries accounted 
for 27% of U.S. imports.
42
Most of the trade-related effects of NAFTA may be attributed to changes in trade and investment 
patterns with Mexico because economic integration between Canada and the United States had 
already been taking place. As mentioned previously, while NAFTA may have accelerated U.S.-
Mexico trade since 1993, other factors, such as economic growth patterns, also affected trade. As 
trade tends to increase during cycles of economic growth, it tends to decrease as growth declines. 
The economic downturns in 2001 and 2009, for example, likely played a role in the decline in 
both U.S. exports to and imports from Canada and Mexico, as shown in Figure 1. 
(...continued) 
Markets, Creating Jobs: Estimated U.S. Employment Effects of Trade with FTA Partners, 2010. 
41 See for example, Robert E. Scott, Heading South: U.S.-Mexico Trade and Job Displacement under NAFTA, 
Economic Policy Institute, May 3, 2011; and The Frederick S. Pardee Center, The Future of North American Trade 
Policy: Lessons from NAFTA, Boston University, November 2009.  
42 Trade statistics in this paragraph are derived from data from the U.S. International Trade Commission’s Interactive 
Tariff and Trade Data Web, at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
By clicking a thumbnail, you are redirect to a to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office Word In addition, you may customize to show or hide
enable pdf thumbnail preview; program to create thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET DLL for Image Basic Transforming in .NET
VB.NET demo code below will show you how to crop a local image by We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
pdf no thumbnail; show pdf thumbnail in
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
11 
Figure 1. U.S. Merchandise Trade with NAFTA Partners: 1993-2014 
(billions of nominal U.S. dollars) 
Source: Compiled by CRS using trade data from the U.S. International Trade Commission’s Interactive Tariff 
and Trade Data Web, at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Energy Trade Implications 
Trade in petroleum products is a central component of U.S. trade with both Canada and Mexico. 
Approximately 16% of total trade with NAFTA partners is in petroleum products. Canada and 
Mexico accounted for 46% ($110.9 billion) of total U.S. crude oil imports ($241.8 billion) in 
2014. Canada is the leading supplier of crude petroleum oil to the United States, followed by 
Saudi Arabia and Mexico. If petroleum products are excluded from trade statistics, the United 
States had a trade surplus with NAFTA partners in merchandise trade between 2011 and 2013, 
before going to zero in 2014, as shown in Figure 2. In 2013, the trade surplus in non-petroleum 
products was an estimated $9.2 billion. 
VB.NET Image: Sharpen Images with DocImage SDK for .NET
This guiding page will show you how to sharpen an image in a Visual Basic .NET image processing application. Besides, we would like
pdf thumbnail html; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
Add Watermark to Image. In the code tab below we will show you the We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
enable pdf thumbnails in; view pdf thumbnails in
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
12 
Figure 2. Non-Petroleum Trade with NAFTA Partners: 1993-2014 
(billions of nominal U.S. dollars) 
Source: Compiled by CRS using trade data from the U.S. International Trade Commission’s (USITC’s) 
Interactive Tariff and Trade Data Web, at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Notes: The United States uses different classifications of trade for trade statistics. Trade data in this chart 
excludes energy trade in three categories: Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) code 2709, petroleum oils and oils 
from bituminous minerals, crude; HTS code 2710, petroleum oils and oils from bituminous minerals (other than 
crude) and products therefrom, NESOI, containing 70% (by weight) or more of these oils; and HTS code 2711, 
petroleum gases and other gaseous hydrocarbons. See http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Trade by Product 
In 2014, U.S. imports in crude petroleum oil ranked first among the five leading import items 
from NAFTA partners, as shown in Figure 3.
43
The next leading import items were motor 
vehicles, motor vehicle parts, motor vehicles for the transport of goods, and non-crude petroleum 
products. The value of crude oil imports from both Canada and Mexico in 2014 totaled $110.9 
billion. In 2009, the value of crude oil imports dropped considerably, from $100.1 billion in 2008 
to $59.1 billion in 2009, reflecting a drop in oil prices that year. In 2014, the top five U.S. export 
items to NAFTA partners were motor vehicle parts, non-crude petroleum oil products, motor 
vehicles, crude petroleum oil, and machinery parts, as shown in Figure 3. 
43 This statistic is derived from the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), using HTS number 2709 
for petroleum oils and oils from bituminous minerals, crude. The HTS comprises a hierarchical structure for describing 
all goods in trade for duty, quota, and statistical purposes. This structure is based upon the international Harmonized 
Commodity Description and Coding System (HS), administered by the World Customs Organization in Brussels. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Windows TIFF Viewer | Online
400; option.DocViewerHeight = 400; // Show the thumbnail ThumbDock.Left; // Set the thumbnail height option & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; pdf reader thumbnails
C# Word: How to Create C# Word Windows Viewer with .NET DLLs
400; option.DocViewerHeight = 400; // Show the thumbnail ThumbDock.Left; // Set the thumbnail height option & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
create thumbnail jpeg from pdf; thumbnail view in for pdf files
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
13 
Figure 3. Top Five U.S. Import and Export Items to and from NAFTA Partners 
(billions of nominal U.S. dollars) 
Source: Compiled by CRS using trade data from the USITC at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Notes: Statistics in this figure are derived from the Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) of the United States at 
the 4-digit level. The HTS comprises a hierarchical structure for describing all goods in trade for duty, quota, and 
statistical purposes. This structure is based upon the international Harmonized Commodity Description and 
Coding System (HS), administered by the World Customs Organization in Brussels. See http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Trade with Canada 
U.S. trade with Canada more than doubled in the first decade of the FTA/NAFTA (1989-1999) 
from $166.5 billion to $362.2 billion. U.S. exports to Canada increased from $100.2 billion in 
1993 to $312.1 billion in 2014, an increase of 211%. U.S. imports from Canada increased from 
$110.9 billion in 1993 to $346.1 billion in 2014, an increase of 212% (see Table A-1). After 
falling off during the recession of 2001, total trade with Canada reached a new high of $596.5 
billion in 2008, only to fall victim to the financial crisis in 2009 when it fell to $429.6 billion. In 
2011, total trade had returned to 2008 levels at $596.6 billion. The United States has run a trade 
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
14 
deficit with Canada since the FTA/NAFTA era, increasing from $9.9 billion in 1989 to $74.6 
billion in 2008, before falling back during the 2009 recession. In 2014, the trade deficit with 
Canada was $33.9 billion. While the increase in the trade deficit with Canada has been attributed 
to the FTA/NAFTA, the increase has been uneven and may also be attributed to other economic 
factors, such as energy prices.
44
In services, the United States had a surplus of $32.8 billion in 2013 in trade with Canada. U.S. 
private services exports to Canada increased from $17.0 billion in 1993 to $63.3 billion in 2013. 
U.S. private services imports from Canada increased from $9.1 billion in 1993 to $30.5 billion in 
2013, as shown in Table A-2.
45
Trade with Mexico 
The United States is, by far, Mexico’s leading partner in merchandise trade. U.S. exports to 
Mexico increased rapidly since NAFTA, increasing from $41.6 billion in 1993 to $240.3 billion 
in 2014, an increase of 478% (see Table A-1 in Appendix A). U.S. imports from Mexico 
increased from $39.9 billion in 1993 to $294.2 billion in 2014, an increase of 637%. The trade 
balance with Mexico went from a surplus of $1.7 billion in 1993 to a deficit of $74.3 billion in 
2007. Since then, the trade deficit with Mexico has fallen to $53.8 billion in 2014.
46
In services, the United States had a surplus of $12.1 billion in 2013 in trade with Mexico. U.S. 
private services exports to Mexico increased from $10.4 billion in 1993 to $29.9 billion in 2013. 
U.S. private services imports from Mexico increased from $7.4 billion in 1993 to $17.8 billion in 
2013, as shown in Table A-2.
47
Effect on the U.S. Economy 
The overall net effect of NAFTA on the U.S. economy has been relatively small, primarily 
because total trade with both Mexico and Canada was equal to less than 5% of U.S. GDP at the 
time NAFTA went into effect. Because many, if not most, of the economic effects came as a result 
of U.S.-Mexico trade liberalization, it is also important to take into account that two-way trade 
with Mexico was equal to an even smaller percentage of GDP (1.4%) in 1994. Thus, any changes 
in trade patterns would not be expected to be significant in relation to the overall U.S. economy. A 
major challenge in assessing NAFTA is separating the effects that came as a result of the 
agreement from other factors. U.S. trade with Mexico and Canada was already growing prior to 
NAFTA and it likely would have continued to do so without an agreement. A 2003 report by the 
Congressional Budget Office observed that it was difficult to precisely measure the effects of 
NAFTA. It estimated that NAFTA likely increased annual U.S. GDP, but by a very small 
amount—“probably no more than a few billion dollars, or a few hundredths of a percent.”
48
In 
44 Trade statistics in this paragraph are derived from data from the U.S. International Trade Commission’s Interactive 
Tariff and Trade Data Web, at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
45 Services trade statistics in this paragraph are derived from the Bureau of Economic Analysis online database at 
http://www.bea.gov. 
46 Merchandise trade statistics in this paragraph are derived from data from the U.S. International Trade Commission’s 
Interactive Tariff and Trade Data Web, at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
47
Services trade statistics in this paragraph are derived from the Bureau of Economic Analysis online database at 
http://www.bea.gov. 
48 Congressional Budget Office of the United States, “The Effects of NAFTA on U.S.-Mexican Trade and GDP,” A 
(continued...) 
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
15 
some sectors, trade-related effects could have been more significant, especially in those industries 
that were more exposed to the removal of tariff and non-tariff trade barriers, such as the textile, 
apparel, automotive, and agriculture industries. 
Studies by the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) on the effects of NAFTA pointed 
out the difficulty in isolating the agreement’s effects from other factors. Although the effects of 
NAFTA are not easily measured, the USITC provided some estimates over the years. A 2003 
study estimated that U.S. GDP could experience an increase between 0.1% and 0.5% upon full 
implementation of the agreement.
49
Another USITC study that was congressionally mandated in 
1997 offered a comprehensive assessment of the operation and effects of NAFTA after three 
years.
50
The report estimated that NAFTA had a small, but positive, effect on the overall U.S. 
economy. Some of the findings include the following: data inadequacies at the industry level 
made it difficult to isolate the effects of NAFTA on absolute trade flows; U.S. trade with NAFTA 
partners increased more rapidly than U.S. trade with the rest of the world; the share of U.S. 
exports in the Mexican market increased by a higher percentage than the share of total imports 
from other countries; industries such as autos, chemicals, textiles, and electronics benefitted by 
achieving synergies across the North American market.
51
U.S. Industries and Supply Chains 
Many economists and other observers have credited NAFTA with helping U.S. manufacturing 
industries, especially the U.S. auto industry, become more globally competitive through the 
development of supply chains.
52
Much of the increase in U.S.-Mexico trade, for example, can be 
attributed to specialization as manufacturing and assembly plants have reoriented to take 
advantage of economies of scale. As a result, supply chains have been increasingly crossing 
national boundaries as manufacturing work is performed wherever it is most efficient.
53
reduction in tariffs in a given sector not only affects prices in that sector but also in industries that 
purchase intermediate inputs from that sector. The importance of these direct and indirect effects 
is often overlooked, according to one study. The study suggests that these linkages offer 
important trade and welfare gains from free trade agreements and that ignoring these input-output 
linkages could underestimate potential trade gains.
54
Much of the trade between the United States and its NAFTA partners occurs in the context of 
production sharing as manufacturers in each country work together to create goods. The 
expansion of trade has resulted in the creation of vertical supply relationships, especially along 
the U.S.-Mexico border. The flow of intermediate inputs produced in the United States and 
exported to Mexico and the return flow of finished products greatly increased the importance of 
(...continued) 
CBO Paper, May 2003, p. xiv.  
49 USITC, “The Impact of Trade Agreements: Effect of the Tokyo Round, U.S.-Israel FTA, U.S.-Canada FTA, 
NAFTA, and the Uruguay Round on the U.S. Economy,” Publication 3621, August 2003. 
50 USITC, “The Impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on the U.S. Economy and Industries: A Three-
Year Review,” Publication 3045, June 1997. 
51 Ibid. 
52 Hufbauer and Schott, NAFTA Revisited, pp. 20-21. 
53
Ibid., p. 21. 
54 Lorenzo Caliendo and Fernando Parro, Estimates of the Trade and Welfare Effects of NAFTA, National Bureau of 
Economic Research, November 2012, pp. 1-5. 
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
16 
the U.S.-Mexico border region as a production site.
55
U.S. manufacturing industries, including 
automotive, electronics, appliances, and machinery, all rely on the assistance of Mexican 
manufacturers. One report estimates that 40% of the content of U.S. imports from Mexico and 
25% of the content of U.S. imports from Canada are of U.S. origin. In comparison, U.S. imports 
from China are said to have only 4% U.S. content. Taken together, goods from Mexico and 
Canada represent about 75% of all the U.S. domestic content that returns to the United States as 
imports.
56
Auto Sector 
NAFTA was instrumental in the integration of the North American auto industry, which 
experienced some of the most significant changes in trade following the agreement. U.S. auto 
parts producers may use inputs and components produced by another NAFTA partner to assemble 
parts, which are then shipped to another NAFTA country where they are assembled into a vehicle 
that is sold in any of the three NAFTA countries.
57
NAFTA provisions consisted of a phased 
elimination of tariffs and the gradual removal of many non-tariff barriers to trade. It provided for 
uniform country of origin provisions, enhanced protection of intellectual property rights, adopted 
less restrictive government procurement practices, and eliminated performance requirements on 
investors from other NAFTA countries. NAFTA established the removal of Mexico’s restrictive 
trade and investment policies and the elimination of U.S. tariffs on autos and auto parts.  
After NAFTA’s entry into force, U.S. trade in vehicles and auto parts increased rapidly. Mexico 
became a more significant trading partner in the U.S. motor vehicle market as U.S. auto exports 
to Mexico increased 251% while imports increased 679% between 1993 and 2014 (see 
55 Gordon H. Hanson, North American Economic Integration and Industry Location, National Bureau of Economic 
Research, June 1998.  
56 Robert Koopman, William Powers, and Zhi Wang, et al., Give Credit Where Credit is Due: Tracing Value Added in 
Global Production Chains, National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper 16426, Cambridge, MA, 
September 2010, p. 8. 
57 Business Roundtable, NAFTA: A Decade of Growth, p. 8. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested