asp.net pdf viewer c# : Enable pdf thumbnails SDK Library project wpf asp.net web page UWP R429652-part1144

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
17 
Table 1). Mexico’s share in U.S. total trade in motor vehicles increased during this time period, 
while the share from Canada and other countries decreased. Mexico was the leading supplier of 
automotive goods for the United States in 2014, accounting for 30% ($86.5 billion) of total U.S. 
motor vehicle and auto parts imports. Canada ranked second, accounting for 21% ($58.8 billion) 
of total U.S. imports in motor vehicles and auto parts in 2014.
58
58 Merchandise trade statistics in this paragraph are derived from data from the U.S. International Trade Commission’s 
Interactive Tariff and Trade Data Web, at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. 
Enable pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnails in; thumbnail pdf preview
Enable pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
how to show pdf thumbnails in; how to view pdf thumbnails in
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
18 
Table 1. U.S. Trade in Motor Vehicles and Parts: 1993 and 2014 
(billions of U.S. dollars) 
1993 
2014 
% Change 
1993-2014 
Exports  Imports  Total  Exports  Imports  Total  Exports  Imports 
Mexico 
Vehicles 
0.2 
3.7 
3.9 
4.8 
46.4 
51.2 
2300% 
1154% 
Parts 
7.3 
7.4 
14.7 
21.5 
40.1 
61.6 
195% 
442% 
Total 
7.5 
11.1 
18.6 
26.3 
86.5 
112.8 
251% 
679% 
Canada 
Vehicles 
8.2 
26.7 
34.9 
26.9 
44.2 
71.1 
228% 
66% 
Parts 
18.2 
10.3 
28.5 
26 
14.6 
40.6 
43% 
42% 
Total 
26.4 
37.0 
63.4 
52.9 
58.8 
111.7 
100% 
59% 
World 
Vehicles 
18.9 
63.0 
81.9 
76.8 
182.1 
258.9 
306% 
189% 
Parts 
33.4 
38.3 
71.7 
62.1 
109.8 
171.9 
86% 
187% 
Total 
52.3 
101.3  153.6 
138.9 
291.9 
430.8 
166% 
188% 
Source: Compiled by CRS using trade data from the USITC at http://dataweb.usitc.gov. For 2013, “vehicles” consists 
of items under the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) number 3361 and “parts” consists of 
items under NAIC number 3363. 
Note: The NAICS is the standard used by Federal statistical agencies in classifying business establishments for the 
purpose of collecting, analyzing, and publishing statistical data related to the U.S. business economy. 
Effect on Mexico 
A number of studies have found that NAFTA has brought economic and social benefits to the 
Mexican economy as a whole, but that the benefits have not been evenly distributed throughout 
the country.
59
The agreement also had a positive impact on Mexican productivity. A 2011 World 
Bank study found that the increase in trade integration after NAFTA had a positive effect on 
stimulating the productivity of Mexican plants.
60
Most post-NAFTA studies on economic effects 
have found that the net overall effects on the Mexican economy tended to be positive but modest. 
While there have been periods of positive and negative economic growth in Mexico after the 
agreement was implemented, it is difficult to measure precisely how much of these economic 
changes was attributed to NAFTA. A World Bank study assessing some of the economic impacts 
from NAFTA on Mexico concluded that NAFTA helped Mexico get closer to the levels of 
development in the United States and Canada. The study states that NAFTA helped Mexican 
59 See for example, Robert A. Blecker and Gerardo Esquivel, NAFTA, Trade, and Development, Center for U.S.-
Mexican Studies (San Diego), El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and 
El Colegio de Mexico, WP 10-03, 2010; and Daniel Lederman, William F. Maloney, and Luis Servén, Lessons from 
NAFTA for Latin America and the Caribbean, The World Bank, 2005. 
60 Rafael E. de Hoyos and Leonardo Iacovone, Economic Performance under NAFTA, The World Bank Development 
Research Group, May 2011, pp. 25-27. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded page thumbnails. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing for Monochrome Image 'to enable dowmsampling for
disable pdf thumbnails; pdf files thumbnails
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded page thumbnails. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing Monochrome Image -- // to enable downsampling for
pdf thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnails
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
19 
manufacturers adapt to U.S. technological innovations more quickly; likely had positive impacts 
on the number and quality of jobs; reduced macroeconomic volatility, or wide variations in the 
GDP growth rate, in Mexico; increased the levels of synchronicity in business cycles in Mexico, 
the United States, and Canada; and reinforced the high sensitivity of Mexican economic sectors to 
economic developments in the United States.
61
Other studies suggest that NAFTA has been disappointing in that it failed to significantly improve 
the Mexican economy or lower income disparities between Mexico and its northern neighbors.
62
Some argue that the success of NAFTA in Mexico was probably limited by the fact that NAFTA 
was not supplemented by complementary policies that could have promoted a deeper regional 
integration effort. These policies could have included improvements in education, industrial 
policies, and/or investment in infrastructure.
63
One of the more controversial aspects of NAFTA is related to the agricultural sector in Mexico 
and the perception that NAFTA has caused a higher amount of worker displacement in this sector 
than in other economic sectors. Many critics of NAFTA say that the agreement led to severe job 
displacement in agriculture, especially in the corn sector. One study estimates these losses to have 
been over 1 million lost jobs in corn production between 1991 and 2000.
64
However, while some 
of the changes in the agricultural sector are a direct result of NAFTA as Mexico began to import 
more lower-priced products from the United States, many of the changes can be attributed to 
Mexico’s unilateral agricultural reform measures in the 1980s and early 1990s. Most domestic 
reform measures consisted of privatization efforts and resulted in increased competition. 
Measures included eliminating state enterprises related to agriculture and removing staple price 
supports and subsidies.
65
These reforms coincided with NAFTA negotiations and continued 
beyond the implementation of NAFTA in 1994. The unilateral reforms in the agricultural sector 
make it difficult to separate those effects from the effects of NAFTA. 
U.S.-Mexico Trade Market Shares 
Mexico relies heavily on the United States as an export market; this reliance has diminished very 
slightly over the years. The percentage of Mexico’s total exports going to the United States 
decreased from 83% in 1993 to 78% in 2013 (see Figure 4). In addition, its share of the U.S. 
market has lost ground since 2003 when China surpassed Mexico as the second-leading supplier 
of U.S. imports. The United States is losing market share of Mexico’s import market. Between 
61 Daniel Lederman, William F. Maloney, and Luis Servén, Lessons from NAFTA for Latin America and the 
Caribbean, The World Bank, 2005.  
62
Robert A. Blecker and Gerardo Esquivel, NAFTA, Trade, and Development, Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, the 
Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, and El Colegio de México, USMEX 
WP 10-03, 2010.  
63 Ibid., p. 22.  
64
Robert E. Scott, Carlos Salas, Bruce Campbell and Jeff Faux, Revisiting NAFTA: Still Not Working for North 
America’s Workers, Economic Policy Institute, Briefing Paper #173, p. 43.  
65 Mexico’s unilateral agricultural reform measures removed government subsidies and price controls in the agricultural 
sector that resulted in rising prices for tortillas. Tortillas are the basic staple for the Mexican diet and a necessity of the 
poor. For this reason, higher prices had a greater effect on the poor than on middle- and higher-income Mexicans. 
Mexico also reformed its Agrarian Law. Lands that had been distributed to ejidos or community rural groups following 
the 1910 revolution gained the right to privatize. This led to more efficient production processes, especially in Northern 
states. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
framework class. An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Support to
generate thumbnail from pdf; html display pdf thumbnail
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on IIS in .NET
and set the “Physical path” to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo. Pool Defaults…" in the right panel, and set the value "Enable 32-Bit
generate pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnail
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
20 
1993 and 2013, the U.S. share of Mexico’s imports decreased from 78% to 55%. China is 
Mexico’s second-leading source of imports. 
Figure 4. Market Share as Percentage of Total Trade: Mexico and the United States 
(1993-2013) 
Source: Economist Intelligence Unit, from IMF International Financial Statistics. 
Notes: Represents exports to and imports from other country as percentage of country’s total trade. Statistics 
prior to 1993 are not available. 
U.S. and Mexican Foreign Direct Investment 
Foreign direct investment (FDI) has been an integral part of the economic relationship between 
the United States and Mexico for many years, especially after NAFTA. Two-way investment 
increased rapidly after the agreement went into effect. The United States is the largest source of 
FDI in Mexico. The stock of U.S. FDI in Mexico increased from $15.2 billion in 1993 to $101.0 
billion in 2013, a 564% increase (see Table A-4 in Appendix A). The flows of FDI have been 
affected by other factors over the years, with higher growth during the period of economic 
expansion during the late 1990s, and slower growth in recent years, possibly due to the economic 
downturn caused by the 2008 global financial crisis and/or the increased violence in Mexico. 
Mexican FDI in the United States, while substantially lower than U.S. investment in Mexico, has 
also increased rapidly, from $1.2 billion in 1993 to $17.6 billion in 2013, an increase of over 
1000% (See Table A-4).
66
While Mexico’s unilateral trade and investment liberalization measures in the 1980s and early 
1990s contributed to the increase of U.S. FDI in Mexico, NAFTA provisions on foreign 
investment may have helped to lock in Mexico’s reforms and increase investor confidence. 
NAFTA helped give U.S. and Canadian investors nondiscriminatory treatment of their 
66 Foreign direct investment data in this section is derived from data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis online 
database at http://www.bea.gov. 
VB.NET PDF - VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Deployment on IIS
and set the “Physical path” to the place where you store XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo. Pool Defaults…" in the right panel, and set the value "Enable 32-Bit
how to make a thumbnail from pdf; pdf thumbnail generator online
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. Support to overwrite PDF and save rotation changes to original PDF file.
pdf first page thumbnail; create pdf thumbnail image
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
21 
investments as well as investor protection in Mexico. Nearly half of total FDI investment in 
Mexico is in the manufacturing industry. 
Income Disparity 
One of the main arguments in favor of NAFTA at the time it was being proposed by policymakers 
was that the agreement would improve economic conditions in Mexico and narrow the income 
disparity between Mexico and the United States and Canada. Studies that have addressed the 
issue of economic convergence
67
have noted that economic convergence in North America has 
failed to materialize. One study states that NAFTA failed to fulfill the promise of closing the 
Mexico-U.S. development gap and that this was partially due to the lack of deeper forms of 
regional integration or cooperation between Mexico and the United States.
68
The study contends 
that domestic policies in both countries, along with underlying geographic and demographic 
realities, contribute to the continuing disparities in income. The authors argue that neither Mexico 
nor the United States adopted complementary policies after NAFTA that could have promoted a 
more successful regional integration effort. These policies could include education, industrial 
policies, and more investment in border and transportation infrastructure. The authors also note 
that other developments, such as increased security along the U.S.-Mexico border after the 
September 11 terrorist attacks, have made it much more difficult for the movement of goods and 
services across the border and for improving regional integration. They argue that the two 
countries could cooperate on policies that foster convergence and economic development in 
Mexico instead of increasing security and “building walls.”
69
A World Bank study states that NAFTA brought economic and social benefits to the Mexican 
economy, but that it is not enough to help narrow the disparities in economic conditions between 
Mexico and the United States.
70
It contends that Mexico needs to invest more in education, 
innovation, and infrastructure, and in the quality of national institutions. The study also states that 
income convergence between a Latin American country and the United States is limited by the 
wide differences in the quality of domestic institutions, in the innovation dynamics of domestic 
firms, and in the skills of the labor force. While NAFTA had a positive effect on wages and 
employment in some Mexican states, the wage differential within the country increased as a result 
of trade liberalization.
71
Another study also notes that the ability of Mexico to improve economic 
conditions depends on its capacity to improve its national institutions, adding that Mexican 
institutions did not improve significantly more than those of other Latin American countries since 
NAFTA went into effect.
72
67
Economic convergence can be broadly defined as a narrowing of the disparities in the economic levels and the 
manufacturing performances of particular countries or their regions. The goal of the theory of economic convergence is 
to research and analyze the factors influencing the rates of economic growth and real per capita income in countries. 
68 Robert A. Blecker and Gerardo Esquivel, NAFTA, Trade, and Development, Working Paper 10-03, Center for U.S.-
Mexican Studies (San Diego), the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson Center (Washington DC), El Colegio de la 
Frontera Norte (Tijuana), and El Colegio de México (Mexico City), 2010, p. 2. 
69 Ibid., pp. 19-23. 
70 Lederman, Maloney, and Servén, Lessons from NAFTA for Latin America and the Caribbean, The World Bank, 
2005. 
71
Ibid. 
72 William Easterly, Norbert Fiess, and Daniel Lederman, “NAFTA and Convergence in North America: High 
Expectations, Big Events, Little Time,” Economía, Fall 2003. 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
with XDoc.PDF SDK. Enable C#.NET Users to Create PDF OpenOffice Document (Odt, Ods, Odp) from PDF with .NET PDF Library in C# Class.
create thumbnails from pdf files; print pdf thumbnails
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
VB.NET PDF - Read and Write PDF Metadata in VB.NET. Enable VB.NET Users to Read, Write, Edit, Delete and Update PDF Document Metadata in Visual Basic .NET.
.pdf printing in thumbnail size; create thumbnail from pdf
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
22 
Effect on Canada 
As noted earlier, the U.S.-Canada FTA came into effect on January 1, 1989. Thus, trade 
liberalization between the two countries was well underway—or already completed—by the time 
of the implementation of NAFTA. This section summarizes the effect of trade liberalization from 
both agreements on Canada. 
From the Canadian perspective, the important consequence of the FTA may have been what did 
not happen, that is, that many of the fears of opening up trade with the United States did not come 
to pass. Canada did not become an economic appendage or “51
st
state” as many had feared. It did 
not lose control over its water or energy resources; its manufacturing sector was not gutted. 
Rather, as one Canadian commentator remarked, “free trade helped Canada to grow up, to turn its 
face out to the world, to embrace its future as a trading nation, [and] to get over its chronic sense 
of inferiority.”
73
However, some hopes for the FTA, for example, that it would be a catalyst for 
greater productivity in Canadian industry, also have not come to pass. 
U.S.-Canada Trade Market Shares 
The United States is the number one purchaser of Canadian goods and supplier of imports to 
Canada. Canada’s share of its exports going to the United States steadily increased during the 
1980s, from 60.6% in 1980 to 70.7% in 1989, the first year of the FTA. Canada’s percentage of 
total exports to the United States continued to increase, reaching 87.7% in 2002. The relative 
importance of the value of U.S. and Canadian trade with each other, however, has been falling in 
recent years. Since 2002, this percentage has fallen back to 75.8% in 2013. The U.S. share of 
Canada’s total imports, which reached a peak of 70.0% in 1983, topped out at 68.7% during the 
free trade era and has been steadily dropping ever since to a low of 52.1% in 2013 (see Figure 5). 
Traditionally, Canada was the largest purchaser of U.S. exports and supplier of U.S. imports; 
however, shares of both peaked before the free trade era. Canada purchased 23.5% of U.S. 
exports in 1987 and equaled that figure in 2005, but it has since fallen off to 18.9% in 2012. 
Canada traditionally was the largest supplier of U.S. imports, peaking at 20.6% in 1984, reaching 
a NAFTA high of 20.1% in 1996, but has declined thereafter to 14.6% in 2013. China displaced 
Canada as the largest supplier of U.S. imports in 2007. 
73 John Ibbitson, “After 25 Years, Free-Trade Deal with U.S. Has Helped Canada Grow Up,” The Globe and Mail, 
September 29, 2012. 
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, and other formats such as TXT and SVG form. OCR text from scanned PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
can't view pdf thumbnails; pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Enable extracting PDF text to another PDF file, TXT and SVG formats. Support extracting OCR text from PDF by working with XImage.OCR SDK.
show pdf thumbnail in html; enable pdf thumbnail preview
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
23 
Figure 5. Market Share as Percentage of Total Trade: Canada and the United States 
(1993-2013) 
Source: Economic Intelligence Unit, from IMF International Financial Statistics. 
Note: Represents exports to and imports from other country as percentage of country’s total trade. 
The composition of trade has also changed. Canada initially entered a manufacturing recession 
after the conclusion of the FTA as branch plants of U.S. companies set up behind the Canadian 
tariff wall were abandoned. However, more internationally competitive manufacturing sectors 
thrived as long as the Canadian dollar (nicknamed the loonie for the soaring loon pictured on its 
reverse) was relatively cheap. From a low point of a Canadian dollar worth US$0.65 in 2002, the 
loonie reached parity in 2007, and has hovered around the parity point until 2013 before sliding to 
a recent US$0.92. The appreciation has been attributed to the boom in Canada’s natural 
resources—oil and gas displaced motor vehicles as Canada’s largest export to the United States in 
2005. The “great recession” and the woes of the integrated North American auto sector also took 
a toll on Canadian manufacturing. 
For some advocates in Canada, free trade was meant to alleviate the long-term labor productivity 
gap between the United States and Canada. Open competition was seen as forcing Canadian 
industry to be more productive. In much of the free trade era, this gap could be accounted for by 
the low value of the Canadian dollar. As adding capital equipment (often purchased from the 
United States) was relatively more expensive than hiring extra workers, the latter was often 
employed. The appreciation of the Canadian dollar has made additional capitalization more 
attractive, but labor productivity recently remained only at 72% of U.S. levels.
74
The relatively 
low productivity levels of Canadian industry, as well as its relatively low investments in research 
and development (R&D), and relatively lower expenditures on information technology, are seen 
as threatening to Canadian long-term competitiveness, and remain of concern to Canadian 
74 Kevin Lynch, “Canada’s Challenge—From Good to Great,” Inside Policy, October 2012. 
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
24 
policymakers, despite leading the organization of Economic Cooperation and Development’s 
ranking of the population with post-secondary education.
75
U.S. and Canadian Foreign Direct Investment 
Two-way investment has also increased markedly during the free trade era, both in terms of stock 
and flow of investment. The United States is the largest single investor in Canada with a stock of 
FDI into Canada reaching $368.3 billion in 2013, up from a stock of $69.9 billion in 1993 (see 
Table A-4). U.S. investment represents nearly 51.5% of the total stock of FDI in Canada from 
global investors. U.S. FDI flows into Canada averaged $3.28 billion in the five years prior to the 
FTA, and actually fell to an average of $1.7 billion in the first six years of the FTA, mainly 
attributed to divestments of U.S.-owned branch plants in Canada. However, U.S. flows into 
Canada increased markedly to an average of $14.9 billion during the years 1995 to 2012.
76
The 
stock of U.S. FDI is now equivalent to 18% of the value of Canadian GDP, in contrast to 1% at 
the beginning of the FTA. 
While Canada is not the largest investor in the United States, the United States was the largest 
destination for Canadian FDI in 2013 with a stock of $237.9 billion, an increase from $26.6 
billion in 1988.
77
Approximately 40.7% of Canadian FDI was invested in the United States in 
2012. Canadian FDI flows into the United States annually averaged $2.3 billion in five years 
prior to the FTA, and an annual average of $1.8 billion during the FTA years, but increased to an 
annual average of $9.9 billion from 1995 to 2012.
78
These trends highlight the changing view of 
FDI among Canadians, from one that could be considered fearful or hostile to FDI as vehicles of 
foreign control over the Canadian economy, to one that is more welcoming of new jobs and 
techniques that result from FDI. 
Issues for Congress 
Many economists and business representatives generally look at NAFTA as a success and credit it 
for fueling unprecedented North American trade and creating job growth in the United States. 
They look to build on NAFTA’s momentum to improve trade relations and economic integration 
within the region. However, labor groups and some consumer-advocacy groups argue that the 
agreement has had negative effects. They maintain that the agreement resulted in outsourcing and 
lower wages that have had a negative effect on the U.S. economy and that it has caused job 
dislocations in Mexico, especially in agriculture. 
Given the increasing number of regional trade agreements throughout the world and the ongoing 
Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade negotiations, one general question that policymakers 
may consider in forming future trade policy is whether or not NAFTA has lost its relevance. The 
numerous FTAs that the United States, Mexico, and Canada have put into effect have given other 
75 Glen Hodgson, “Canada U.S. Competitiveness, Addressing the Canadian Economic Contradiction,” Woodrow 
Wilson Center, Canada Institute, June 2007; Lynch, ibid. 
76 Investment statistics are from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, and Statistics 
Canada. 
77
Ibid. 
78 Douglas Porter, “Free Trade at 25: How the FTA Positioned Canada for the 21 st Century,” Inside Policy, October 
2012. 
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
25 
countries the same preferences to the U.S. market that Canada and Mexico benefit from under 
NAFTA. Similarly, these FTAs have lessened the preferences the United States has in other 
markets. 
Both proponents and critics of NAFTA agree that the three countries should look at what the 
agreement has failed to do as they look to the future of North American trade and economic 
relations. Policies could include strengthening institutions to protect the environment and worker 
rights; considering the establishment of a border infrastructure plan; increasing regulatory 
cooperation; promoting research and development to enhance the global competiveness of North 
American industries; investing in more border infrastructure to make border crossings more 
efficient; and/or creating more efforts to lessen income differentials within the region. 
Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) 
In December 2012, Canada and Mexico began participating in the ongoing negotiations for a 
proposed TPP free trade agreement (FTA) among 12 countries in the Asia-Pacific region.
79
The 
United States is an active participant in the negotiations and was among the first tranche of 
countries to join the original four members of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership 
(Brunei, Chile, New Zealand, and Singapore) to launch the TPP negotiations in the fall of 2008. 
With 26 negotiating groups and 29 chapters under discussion, the TPP partners envision the 
agreement to be “comprehensive and high-standard,” in that they seek to eliminate tariffs and 
non-tariff barriers to trade in goods, services, and agriculture, and to establish rules on a wide 
range of issues, including intellectual property rights, foreign direct investment, and other 
economic activities. They also strive to create a “21
st
century agreement” that addresses new and 
cross-cutting issues presented by an increasingly globalized economy. 
The United States has indicated that it is only negotiating bilateral market access in the TPP talks 
with countries with which it does not have FTAs—Brunei, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, and 
Vietnam. The addition of Japan to the negotiations in the summer of 2013 may afford all three 
NAFTA countries with the possibility of additional market opening opportunities. However, the 
United States has sought to go beyond current U.S. FTAs in its proposed rules chapters. This has 
become a point of contention in the talks and may become an issue for Canada and Mexico as 
well. The TPP may have implications for NAFTA in several areas, including intellectual property 
rights (IPR), investment, services, and government procurement, as well as labor and 
environmental provisions. The related provisions in more recent free trade agreements that the 
United States has negotiated, such as those with Colombia, Panama, Peru, and South Korea, 
include commitments that go beyond NAFTA. If agreement is reached on a TPP, Canada and 
Mexico may have to adhere to stronger and more enforceable labor and environmental provisions, 
stronger IPR provisions, and some issues that were not addressed in detail in the NAFTA, such as 
disciplines on state-owned enterprises. 
79 The 12 countries involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations include the United States, Australia, 
Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam. For more information 
on the TPP, see CRS Report R42694, The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Negotiations and Issues for Congress, 
coordinated by Ian F. Fergusson. 
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 
Congressional Research Service 
26 
Regulatory Cooperation 
Policymakers may consider issues on how the United States can improve cooperation with its 
North American neighbors in the areas of trade, transportation, competitiveness, economic 
growth, and security enhancement. The United States, Canada, and Mexico have made efforts 
since 2005 to increase cooperation on these issues through various endeavors, most notably by 
participating in trilateral summits known as the North American Leaders Summits. The most 
recent Summit took place on February 19, 2014, in Toluca, Mexico. President Barack Obama met 
with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to 
discuss the economic well-being of the region; education initiatives; energy and climate change; 
citizen security; and regional and global outreach.
80
Canada postponed the 2015 Summit that had 
been planned for January 2015, stating that it would take place sometime in the fall.  
After the first North American Leaders’ Summit on March 23, 2005, in Waco, TX, the three 
countries agreed on enhancing regulatory cooperation through the former initiative known as the 
Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP). The main goal was to increase and 
enhance prosperity in the United States, Canada, and Mexico through regulatory cooperation.
81
The Obama Administration has affirmed its commitment to continue past efforts on North 
American cooperation but under a different approach from the SPP initiative. While these efforts 
have served as mechanisms to increase communications on issues of mutual interest, their role 
has been limited because there are no binding agreements.  
The former SPP initiative evolved to other efforts pursued by the Obama Administration for 
regulatory cooperation, which have included separate bilateral endeavors. For example, in May 
2010, the United States and Mexico released the Declaration Concerning Twenty-first Century 
Border Management and, in December 2011, the United States and Canada announced the 
Beyond the Border Action Plan: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic 
Competiveness. In February 2012, the United States and Mexico announced the High-Level 
Regulatory Cooperation Council (HLRCC) to help align regulatory principles, an effort similar to 
the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. In March 2012, the Defense Ministers of the 
three countries met in Ottawa, Canada, for the first ever “Trilateral Meetings of North American 
Defense Ministers” to increase cooperation on national security issues. 
Some critics of North American trilateral cooperation contend that the efforts are an attempt to 
create a common market or economic union in North America. Others contend that past efforts 
under the SPP were contributing to the creation of a so-called “NAFTA Superhighway” that 
would link the United States, Canada, and Mexico with a “super-corridor.”
82
Proponents of North 
American competitiveness and security cooperation view the initiatives as constructive to 
addressing issues of mutual interest and benefit for all three countries. Business groups generally 
support increased North American cooperation and believe that it is necessary to enhance the 
competitiveness of U.S. businesses in the global market. 
80 The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, Fact Sheet: Key Deliverables for the 2014 North American Leaders 
Summit, February 19, 2014. 
81 The SPP was endorsed by all three countries, but it was not a signed agreement or treaty and contained no legally 
binding commitments or obligations. Although the SPP built upon the existing trade and economic relationship of the 
three countries, it was distinct and separate from NAFTA. 
82 See for example, Society for American Sovereignty, at http://www.americansov.org. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested