asp.net pdf viewer c# : Create pdf thumbnails application control utility azure web page html visual studio R7970c0-part1152

Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
1
GLOBALISATION AND INTERNATIONAL SEAFOOD LEGISLATION: 
THE IMPACT ON POVERTY IN INDIA 
DFID PROJECT  
A REVIEW OF EXPORT SUPPLY CHAINS IN KERALA 
By  
SOUTH INDIA FEDERATION OF FISHERMEN SOCIETIES (SIFFS), 
Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 
July 2002
Create pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnail fix; generate pdf thumbnail c#
Create pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
show pdf thumbnails in; pdf preview thumbnail
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
GLOSSARY OF TERMS.................................................................................................4 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...............................................................................................5 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...............................................................................................5 
MAIN REPORT................................................................................................................9 
1. B
ACKGROUND
..............................................................................................................9 
2. O
BJECTIVE AND 
S
TRUCTURE OF THE 
S
TUDY
................................................................9 
3. M
ETHODOLOGY
...........................................................................................................9 
4. S
ELECTION OF SITES
...................................................................................................10 
5. L
IMITATIONS
..............................................................................................................10 
6. A
O
VERVIEW OF THE 
F
ISHERIES 
S
ECTOR IN 
K
ERALA
...............................................11 
6.1 Introduction.........................................................................................................11 
6.2 A Note on Fishing Methods.................................................................................11 
6.3 Fish Production in Kerala...................................................................................14 
6.4 Marine Fish Production......................................................................................15 
6.5 Aquaculture in Kerala.........................................................................................16 
7 A
O
VERVIEW OF 
S
EAFOOD 
E
XPORTS FROM 
K
ERALA
................................................17 
7.1 Introduction.........................................................................................................17 
7.2 Seafood Export from the Kochi Port...................................................................17 
7.3 Species Composition of Exports from Kerala.....................................................19 
7.4 Country Wise Exports from Kerala.....................................................................20 
8. K
ERALA
S
HARE IN 
I
NDIAN 
S
EAFOOD 
E
XPORTS TO THE 
M
AIN 
E
XPORT 
M
ARKETS
...22 
8.1 Japan...................................................................................................................22 
8.2 European Union..................................................................................................23 
8.3 USA......................................................................................................................23 
8.4 South East Asia....................................................................................................24 
8.5 Middle East .........................................................................................................25 
9. E
XPORT 
C
HAINS FOR 
I
MPORTANT 
S
EAFOOD 
V
ARIETIES 
P
ROCESSED IN 
K
ERALA
.......25 
9.1 Introduction.........................................................................................................25 
9.2 Captured Shrimp.................................................................................................26 
9.3 Cultured Shrimp..................................................................................................28 
9.4 Cuttlefish .............................................................................................................28 
9.5 Squid....................................................................................................................30 
9.6 Fin fishes .............................................................................................................30 
10. A N
OTE ON THE 
P
EELING 
S
HED 
I
NDUSTRY
...............................................................31 
11. S
EAFOOD 
E
XPORTS AND THE 
P
OOR IN 
K
ERALA
........................................................37 
REFERENCES................................................................................................................39 
APPENDIX......................................................................................................................40 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf thumbnail viewer; show pdf thumbnail in html
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
disable pdf thumbnails; how to make a thumbnail from pdf
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
3
TABLE OF FIGURES 
Figure 1: Marine and inland fish production in Kerala.....................................................15 
Figure 2: Volume wise species composition of marine fish landings in Kerala...............15 
Figure 3: Estimated aquaculture production in Kerala .....................................................16 
Figure 4: Trends in seafood export from Kochi port ........................................................18 
Figure 5: Trends in seafood export from Kochi port ........................................................18 
Figure 6: Species wise contribution to Kerala exports in volume terms (2000 – 01).......19 
Figure 7: Species wise contribution to Kerala exports in value terms (2000 – 01) ..........20 
Figure 8: Destination wise break-up of exports from Kerala in volume terms.................21 
Figure 9: Destination wise break-up of exports from Kerala in value terms (2000 – 01) 21 
Figure 10: Trends in destination wise composition of Kerala exports (value terms) .......21 
Figure 11: Kerala’s share of Indian seafood exports to Japan ..........................................22 
Figure 12: Kerala’s share of Indian seafood exports to the EU ........................................23 
Figure 13: Kerala’s share of Indian seafood exports to the US ........................................24 
Figure 14: Kerala’s share of Indian seafood exports to the South East Asia....................24 
Figure 15: Kerala’s share of Indian seafood exports to the Middle East..........................25 
LIST OF TABLES 
Table 1: Distribution of fishing craft and main fishing gears in Kerala ...........................14 
Table 2: Processing activities for fin fishes ......................................................................31 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded page thumbnails. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options Dim
pdf thumbnail generator; create thumbnail from pdf c#
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
pdf thumbnails in; create thumbnail jpeg from pdf
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
4
GLOSSARY OF TERMS 
AP 
Andhra Pradesh 
BF 
Block frozen 
CMFRI 
Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute  
Crore 
10,000,000 
DFID 
Department for International Development 
EU 
European Union 
IQF 
Individually quick frozen  
Lakh 
100,000 
MPEDA 
Marine Products Export Development Authority, India  
NRI 
Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich 
PD 
Peeled and deveined 
PUD 
Peeled and undeviened 
Rs 
Indian rupees 
SEAI 
Seafood Exporters Association of India 
SIFFS 
South Indian Federation of Fishermen Societies 
USA (or US)  United States of America 
WG 
Whole gut 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded page thumbnails. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
can't see pdf thumbnails; enable pdf thumbnails in
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
view pdf thumbnails in; pdf files thumbnail preview
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
5
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
1.  Kerala is one of the major maritime states in India accounting for 20.5% of the 
total marine fish landings in India in 1999 - 2000. The major species landed are 
oil sardine (14% by volume) and shrimp (13% by volume).  
2.  During 2000  – 01,  Kerala accounted  for  20.6% in volume terms and  16.0%  in 
value terms of seafood exports from India. The sector accounts for approximately 
25%  of  Kerala’s export  earnings and  directly  employs  approximately 1  million 
people. 
3.  The  major  export  species  from  Kerala  are  shrimp  (59%  by  value,  32%  by 
volume), frozen cuttlefish (15% by value, 16% by value) and frozen squid (13% 
by value, 17% by volume). Finfishes, which account for 28% by  volume,  are a 
relatively low value item accounting for just 9% of the total export value.  
4.  Seafood  export  from  Kerala  is  mainly  channelled  through  the  Kochi (formerly 
Cochin)  and  Trivandrum  ports  with  Kochi  handling  the  vast  majority  of  the 
exports. During  the period 1996 – 2000, the Kochi port handled 99.30% of the 
volume (98.97% by value)  of all  exports channelled  through  Kerala ports.  It is 
generally  felt  by  industry  sources  such  as  officials  of  the  Seafood  Exporters 
Association  of India and MPEDA officials that seafood export figures from the 
Kochi  port  give  a  fair  picture  of  the  seafood  exported  from  Kerala.  For  the 
purposes of this study this is assumed to be correct and Kochi seafood export data 
are taken to represent those of Kerala as a whole. 
5.  In terms of seafood exports, the  Kochi port, in comparison to the eastern coast 
ports of Chennai and Vishakapatanam, is a high volume-low value-port. During 
the last five years the value share of the seafood export from Kochi port vis-à-vis 
all  India  figures  has  been  lower  than  the  volume  share  (see  Figure  5  in  main 
report). Whereas, the Kochi port accounted for 20.6% in volume terms and 16.0% 
in value terms of seafood exports from India during 2000 – 01, the Chennai port 
accounted for 8.12% of the volume and 26.05% by value of All India exports. The 
corresponding  figures  for  the  Vishakapatanam  port  are  5.66%  by  volume  and 
15.32%  by  value.  Analysis of MPEDA  data of the  composition of the  exports 
from the Kochi port will show that it has not been able to keep up with Chennai 
and Vishakapatanam in terms of growth of exports of high value items such as 
shrimp. For instance Kochi has registered a growth rate of 37% in value terms for 
shrimp exports for the period 1996 – 2000, the corresponding figures for Chennai 
and  Vishakapatanam  are  123%  and  72%  respectively.  On  the  other  hand,  the 
export from Kochi of low value items such as frozen ribbon fish (which mainly 
goes to the South East Asian market) has increased during the same period. The 
opposite trend is seen in Chennai.  
6.  Though seafood exports from the Kochi port have increased in absolute volume 
(12.3%) and value (21%) during the period 1995/96 to 2001/02, Kerala’s share of 
All  India exports has declined by 6.5 percentage points in volume terms and in 
value terms  by  9.3  percentage points  during this  period.  In other  words, while 
exports from Kerala have been increasing, they have not been keeping pace with 
the  growth  in  All  India  exports.  One  of  the  major  reasons  for  the  decline  in 
Kerala’s  share  has  been  its  inability  to  keep  up  with  Andhra  Pradesh  in  the 
production  of  cultured  shrimp.  During  the  period  1995/6  –  2000/01,  Kerala’s 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
thumbnail view in for pdf files; pdf thumbnail html
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
show pdf thumbnail in; pdf thumbnail viewer
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
6
share in the All India cultured shrimp production dropped from 12.75% to 6.74%. 
During the same period AP’s share increased from 38.46% to 59.49%. Cultured 
shrimp accounts for 45% by value of the total seafood exports from Chennai and 
Vishakapatanam  ports.  It can be  safely  assumed  that  a large  percentage of the 
cultured shrimp that is exported from the Chennai and Vishakapatanam ports is 
produced in Andhra Pradesh. 
7.  The EU is the main destination for seafood exported from Kerala with 33% of the 
volume (and 36% of value) during the year 2000 - 01 going to this market. Japan 
(11% by volume and 18% by value) and the USA (15% by volume and 22% by 
value)  are  the  other  major  markets.  South  East  Asia  (mainly  China),  which 
accounts for 34% by volume accounts for only 16% by value, indicating that this 
market  mainly  buys  lower  value  species such as frozen  ribbon fish  and frozen 
mackerel from Kerala. 
8.  Kerala’s share in Indian seafood exports to major markets like Japan, the EU, the 
USA and the Middle East has declined in both volume and value terms during the 
period 1995/6 – 2000/01. The main reason for this has been the state’s inability to 
keep up with Andhra Pradesh in shrimp culture. In value terms, frozen shrimp is 
the main seafood export item from India accounting for 70.91% of the total value 
of All India exports. According to MPEDA statistics, of the Rs 4535 crores worth 
of shrimp that was exported from India during the year 2000 – 01, a whopping 
86% came from shrimp culture. As mentioned earlier Kerala has not been doing 
well  in  the  field  of  shrimp  aquaculture  during  the  above-mentioned  period.  In 
other words AP has been encroaching into Kerala’s share in overseas markets by 
increasing its shrimp culture production.  
9.  Kerala’s share in Indian seafood exports to Japan has declined during the period 
1995/96 – 2000/01 by about 5 percentage points in volume terms and by about 3 
percentage points in value terms. The main reason for this has been that shrimp is 
the  major  item  of  export  to  Japan  accounting  for  89.6%  of  the  total  value  of 
exports  from  India  to  that  country.  Kerala  with  its  falling  shrimp  aquaculture 
production has not been able to cater to the demand as well as states such as AP 
and Orissa have. 
10. Kerala’s share in Indian seafood exports to the EU has declined during the period 
1995/96 – 2000/01 by about 7 percentage points in volume terms and by about 9 
percentage points in value terms. Once again, shrimp is the main item of export to 
the EU in terms of value accounting for 62.46% of the total exports from India. 
Kerala seems to have lost out in this market on account of its increasing inability 
to cater to this demand for shrimp. 
11. Kerala’s  share  in  Indian  seafood  exports  to  the  USA  has  declined  during  the 
period 1995/96 – 2000/01 by 20 percentage points in volume terms and by about 
30 percentage points in value terms. As in the case of Japan and the EU, shrimp is 
the main item of export to the USA accounting for 85.01% of the total value of 
exports to that country.  Kerala seems to have been at a disadvantage in servicing 
this demand for shrimp given its falling aquaculture production. 
12. Kerala’s  share  in  Indian  seafood  exports  to  South  East  Asian  countries  has 
increased during the period 1995/96 – 2000/01 by 5 percentage points in volume 
terms and by about 0.4 percentage points in value terms. The major reason for the 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
7
increase in Kerala’s share has been the rising exports of low value frozen fishes 
such  as ribbonfish  and  mackerels  to  China  and  Hong  Kong.  This explains the 
marginal increase in the value share.  
13. Kerala’s share in Indian seafood exports to the Middle East has declined during 
the period 1995/96 – 2000/01 by about 6 percentage points in volume terms and 
by  about  1.4  percentage  points  in  value  terms.  The  reasons  for  the  drop  in 
Kerala’s share are not clear. 
14. The mechanised trawl sector accounts for 79% of the shrimp landings and about 
92%  of the  cephalopod  landings  in the  state.  The  rest  is  accounted  for  by the 
artisanal sector. 
15. Fishing for export species such as shrimp, cuttlefish and squid is mostly done by 
large mechanised  trawlers. Trawlers rarely, if  at all target domestic species.  On 
the other hand, artisanal fishermen who use smaller artisanal crafts generally fish 
mainly for domestic species. However these artisanal fishermen do fish for export 
species  during  the  months  of June, July and  August when a  trawling ban is  in 
effect in the state. There are isolated pockets in Kerala where artisanal fishermen 
fish  year  round  for  export  species  such  as  cuttlefish.  However  this  is  the 
exception. 
16. The traditional form of pokkali aquaculture in which paddy and shrimp farming 
are alternated, has been practised in certain parts of Kerala for a long time. During 
the  1990’s,  many  of  the  traditional  pokkali  farmers  started  adopting  modern 
methods  of  aquaculture  such  as  use  of  hatchery  developed  seedlings,  use  of 
scientifically developed feeds and use of medicines to control diseases. Most of 
the aquaculture that is practised in Kerala is of the traditional to semi intensive 
kind on a  small scale. The farm sizes are relatively small  in Kerala. This  is  in 
contrast to aquaculture farming in AP where it is done on an intensive basis on a 
large scale.    
17. Aquaculture,  which  emerged  as  a  major  source  of  cultured  shrimp  during  the 
1990’s, has been hit by disease and environmental concerns and the total output 
from  this  sector  has  declined  18%  during  the  decade  1990/91  –  2000/01.  The 
contribution  of this  sector to the total prawn production (captured and cultured 
sources) in the state fell from a high of 19% in 1993 to just under 11.5% in 1997. 
Shrimp  from  captured  sources  continues  to  be  the  mainstay  of  the  industry in 
Kerala. 
18. The marketing  chain for export species comprises of four categories of players, 
namely  the  fisherman,  commission  agents  of  peeling  sheds  and  processing 
companies,  the  peeling  sheds  and  the  processing/exporting  companies.  A 
significant  quantity  of  material  that  is  exported  is  handled by the peeling  shed 
industry, which is still very much in the informal sector. 
19. Fishermen  are  a diverse  group comprising of  trawler crew,  crew of small-scale 
artisanal  fishing  units and owners of  small  scale  motorised  and  non-motorised 
artisanal fishing units. The main constituents of the peeling shed industry are the 
owners of peeling sheds and the peeling shed workers; mainly women from the 
economically weaker sections of the fishing community. 
20. The seafood export industry in Kerala is currently facing several problems. Chief 
among them is raw material scarcity. The dwindling catch quantities coupled with 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
8
the  overcapacity  in  the  fishing  fleet  is  placing  enormous  pressure  on  the 
profitability of  individual fishing units. This  problem is further compounded by 
the steady  increase  in  operating  costs as  fuel prices  increase. The raw  material 
scarcity is also affecting the peeling shed industry and the processing industry in 
the state. The excess processing capacity that has been built up at a high cost is 
proving  to  be  the  bane  of  many  processors  in  Kerala.  While  the  demand  for 
processed seafood continues to exist in export markets, it is the lack of availability 
of  sufficient  quantities  of  raw  material  at  a  reasonable  price  that  keeps  many 
processing facilities idle. 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
9
MAIN REPORT 
1. Background 
This  study  has  been  undertaken  as  part  of  a  DFID  funded  research  project  on 
“Globalisation  and  Seafood  Trade  Legislation:  The  effect  of  poverty  in  India”.  At  a 
workshop organised in Vishakapatanam, Andhra Pradesh in June 2001 by NRI  and its 
Indian collaborators; Integrated Coastal Management, Catalyst Management Systems and 
South  Indian  Federation  of  Fishermen  Societies,  it  was  agreed  that  a  mapping  of  the 
export  chains of the  main  seafood  export species  would  be  vital  in  understanding  the 
impact of international seafood legislation on the various players involved in the seafood 
export industry. 
2. Objective and Structure of the Study 
The study aims to provide a background to fisheries in Kerala with a particular focus on 
seafood export from the state using commodity, quantity, value and country wise data. 
The study also aims to map the flow of key export species from landing site to the port of 
dispatch in order to list the main factors that determine the seafood export chains in the 
state and identify the key stakeholders involved. 
The  report  has  been  organised  as  follows.  An  overview  of  the  fisheries  sector  places 
fisheries  in  the context  of  the Kerala state in terms of the number of people who are 
dependent on fishing as a livelihood, a broad classification of the craft and gear that is 
used on the Kerala coast and an overview of the main sub sectors i.e. the mechanised and 
the  non  mechanised  sectors.  This  is  followed  by  a  brief  look  at  the  trends  in  fish 
production  in  Kerala  over  the  last  decade,  the  main  species  caught  and  the  trends  in 
aquaculture  production  in  Kerala  state.  An  overview  of  the  Kerala  seafood  export 
scenario  follows.  This  section  provides  information  on trends  in volume  and value  of 
exports from the Kochi port over the last six years, species composition of exports and 
destination wise split of exports from Kerala. This is followed by a presentation of export 
trends  to  the  major  export  markets  for  seafood  and  Kerala’s  share  in  each  of  these 
markets. The next section describes the export chains for the major seafood varieties that 
are processed in Kerala i.e. shrimp, cuttle fish, squid and finfishes. A note on the peeling 
shed industry in Kerala gives an overview of industry. The report ends with a brief note 
on  the  degree  of  dependence  of  the  poor  within  the  fishing  community  on  seafood 
industry. 
3. Methodology 
The report has been compiled using information from the following sources. 
1.  Interviews  with important stakeholders  at the  major  landing centres  of  Kollam 
and  Kochi.  These  include  owners  of  mechanised  and  artisanal  fishing  craft, 
crewmembers, owners of aquaculture farms and peeling sheds, peelers, wholesale 
agents,  traders,  exporters,  processing  plant  owners,  Marine  Products  Export 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
10
Development Authority (MPEDA) officials, officials of the Cochin University of 
Science  and  Technology  and  Seafood  Exporters’  Association  of  India  (SEAI) 
office bearers. 
2.  Secondary sources such as published MPEDA and College of Fisheries statistics 
and reports, unpublished documents obtained from various sources and journals 
such as the Seafood Export Journal. 
3.  Field observations from visits to landing sites, aquaculture farms, peeling sheds 
and processing plants 
4. Selection of sites 
Sites for fieldwork were selected on the  basis of information gathered from interviews 
with key informants who are knowledgeable about the fishing industry in Kerala. It was 
decided that Kochi and Neendakara would be the main sites for fieldwork as most of the 
seafood export  related  activity  is  in  these areas. More time was spent at Kochi  as  the 
majority of peeling  sheds, processing plants  and  two of the major fishing  harbours  in 
Kerala are located there. The Neendakara region also has a major fishing harbour and a 
few processing plants and peeling sheds. Apart from these two sites, fieldwork was also 
done  in  Tykcal  village  in  Allepey  district  in  order  to  understand  the  relevance  of the 
export industry to the livelihoods of fishermen in that area. Fieldwork was also done in 
Vizhinjam and Marianadu, which are major fishing village in the Thiruvananthapuram 
district of Kerala. A more detailed note on this presented in the final report in the section 
dealing with research methodology. 
5. Limitations 
Given the diversity of fishing activity in the state it is not possible for a single study of 
this nature to encapsulate the various marketing chains for export species. In other words, 
no single export chain mentioned in this report is truly representative for the whole state. 
Therefore, the choice of locations for this study will have a bearing on the findings. 
There is a lack of information about the amount of seafood exported from Kerala. While 
informed sources suggest that almost all of the seafood exported from Kerala leaves the 
country  through  the  Kochi  and  Trivandrum  ports,  there  is  an  opinion  that  some  goes 
through the Tuticorin port in neighbouring Tamil Nadu. The lack of reliable information 
in this regard is a handicap in making authoritative claims about the quantity, value and 
composition of seafood export from Kerala. 
There are no reliable records about the prices, cost and margin structures at the various 
levels of the export chain. This problem is accentuated by the large variations in prices 
that are observed in this sector. 
Suspicion on the part of the respondents especially at the Kochi fishing harbour was a 
major problem that was faced during the fieldwork. The respondents at the harbour were 
generally  guarded  in  their  answers  and  were  quite  suspicious  of  any  note  taking. 
Cynicism on the part of respondents was also a problem. This can perhaps be attributed to 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested