asp.net pdf viewer c# : Create pdf thumbnails SDK application service wpf html azure dnn R7970c1-part1153

Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
11
the  fact  that  many  studies  of  various  kinds  have  been  conducted  in  the  past  and  the 
general impression is that  the  fishing  and fish  trading community do not benefit from 
such  studies.  Yet  another  limitation  was  with  regard  to  interviewing  peeling  shed 
workers. It was difficult to get meetings organised without the knowledge of the peeling 
shed owner and it is very likely that responses given (especially with regard to working 
conditions etc) in the presence of peeling shed owners are not entirely true. 
6. An Overview of the Fisheries Sector in Kerala 
6.1 Introduction
The state of Kerala situated on the southwest coast of India is richly endowed in fishing 
resources. Kerala has a coast line of 590 kms (7.26% of the India coastline), 44 rivers 
with  a  total  length  of  3,200  kms  and  a  water  spread  of  85,000  ha,  30  extensive 
interconnected backwaters and estuaries with a water spread of 243,000 ha, 30 reservoirs 
with an area of 30,000 ha and a large number of ponds and tanks totalling to about an 
area of 4,000 ha. 
An assessment of fisheries resources made by Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute 
(CMFRI) reveals that there is a potential for capture fisheries to the extent of 7.50 lakh 
tonnes in the marine sector. This includes 5.70 lakh tonnes from the inshore areas and 
1.80 lakh tonnes through offshore and deep-sea fishing. The fish catch from the inshore 
has crossed the 6-lakh tonne mark in 2000/01. The inland fish production is around 0.75 
lakh tonnes. (College of Fisheries report, 2002)  
Fishery resources contribute around 3% to the state’s economy and provide a means of 
livelihood  to  about  1,000,000  (10  lakh)  people  directly  (i.e.  fishermen  and  their 
dependants) and 200,000 (2 lakh) people indirectly (i.e. people who work in allied areas 
like fish trade, fish peeling, fish processing, transportation and ice manufacturing). The 
state accounts for 22% of the marine products exported from India in value terms. Fish 
and fish products account for about 25% of the total export earnings of the state. (College 
of Fisheries report, 2002) 
6.2 A Note on Fishing Methods 
The Kerala coast is characterised by a wide diversity in fishing craft and gear. The fishing 
fleet can be broadly categorised into the mechanised and artisanal sectors based on the 
size  of  the  boats  and  the  extent  of mechanisation.  The artisanal sector  can  be  further 
divided into the motorised and non-motorised sectors. The use of certain types of craft 
and  gear  are  limited  to  certain  areas  of  the  Kerala  coast.  Traditionally,  fishermen  in 
various  parts  of  the  coast  have  developed  craft  and  gear  that  is  best  suited  for  the 
conditions in which they operate. There are various factors, which influence the choice of 
craft  and gear.  The  main factors that  influence the choice of gear are  the predominant 
species that is available in the fishing grounds where the fisherman normally operates and 
the  predominant  species  that  is  available  at  a  particular  time  of  the  year.  The  main 
factors, which influence the choice of craft, are the general characteristics of the sea in 
Create pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail preview
Create pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
enable pdf thumbnail preview; show pdf thumbnail in
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
12
the area of operation and the average catch sizes that are obtained in a particular region. 
These factors are elaborated in the section that follows.   
Factors influencing choice of gear 
1.  Predominant  species  that  is  available:  The  predominant  species  of  fish  that  is 
available  in  the  area  of  operation  determines  the  choice  of  gear.  The  main 
categories of gear that is used on the Kerala coast are  the gillnets, the trammel 
nets, the shore seine, the boat  seine, the ring seine, the mini trawl  nets and  the 
hook  and  line.  In  areas  such  as  Alappuzha,  where  species  like  mackerel  and 
sardines are available in large quantities the gear of choice is the ring seine. In the 
fishing villages of Thiruvananthapuram district, the gear of choice is the hook and 
line as this type of gear suits many of the major species like seer fish and pomfret 
that are found in this area. 
2.  Seasonality:  The  choice  of  gear  can  also  vary  from  one  season  to  the  other 
depending on the predominant species that is available at a point of time. 
Factors influencing choice of craft
1.  Nature of the sea: The choice of craft depends to a large extent on the how the 
sea behaves for most parts of the year. Fishermen operating in areas where the 
seas is generally rough for most parts of the year, prefer smaller crafts such as the 
catamaran which are easier  to manage in case  they capsize. In areas  where the 
seas  are  calmer  and  hence  the  chances  of  the  craft  capsizing  are  smaller, 
fishermen prefer  larger crafts.  The main categories of craft  that is used on  the 
Kerala coast are the dugout canoes (large, medium, small and very small), plank 
canoes (very large, large, medium, small and transom), kattumarams (3 log and 4 
log varieties) and the plywood boats (very large, large, medium and small). The 
kattumarams  is  the  smallest  type  of  craft  on  the  Kerala  coast  and  is  found 
exclusively in the Thiruvananthapuram and Kollam districts where the seas are 
rougher  than  in  other  places.  The  plywood  boat,  which  is  a  relatively  new 
introduction  on  the  Kerala  coast,  has  caught  on  mainly  in  the 
Thiruvananthapuram  and  Kollam  districts  as  a  substitute  to  the  traditional 
kattumarams.  A  fairly  large  number  of  plywood  boats  are  also  found  in  the 
northern Kerala districts of Kannur, Kozhikode and Malapuram. The motorised 
plank canoes are mainly found in Alappuzha, Ernakulam and Thrissur districts. 
The non-motorised  plank  canoes are found in  Thiruvananthapuram,  Alappuzha 
and Ernakulam districts. The dugout canoes are mainly found in northern Kerala 
districts of Kasargod, Kannur, Kozhikode, Malapuram, Thrissur and Ernakulam.        
2.  Average catch sizes: In areas where the catch sizes tend to large, fishermen prefer 
larger crafts. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf thumbnail fix; pdf thumbnails
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
create pdf thumbnails; print pdf thumbnails
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
13
The mechanised sector
The mechanised sector comprises of three main category of crafts; i.e. the trawlers, the 
purse seiners and the gill-netters.    
Whereas  purse  seiners  and gill  netters  are mainly  involved in  the capture  of domestic 
species such as mackerel and sardine, mechanised trawler boats are primarily involved in 
‘shrimping’ i.e. fishing which revolves almost entirely around shrimp capture. The main 
method  of  fishing  is  bottom  trawling.  Trawlers  are  expensive  to  operate  and  hence 
necessarily have to target the higher value export species such as shrimp and cuttlefish. It 
appears that the operating cost of an average sized trawler is in the range of Rs 10,000 per 
day. The typical argument given by many trawler crews is that given the high operational 
cost, shrimp is the only species that make trawling viable. 
There  are  3800 mechanised trawler  vessels  in  the  State, which  employ around  30,400 
crew  (Expert  Committee  for  Fisheries  Management  Studies,  Kerala,  2000).  Trawlers 
come in a variety of sizes. Whereas until about 5 years back most of the trawlers were 
about 32 – 40 feet long, most of the trawlers launched in the last five years measure 45 – 
50 feet and the really big trawlers measure as much as 60 feet. In fact the trend towards 
larger and consequently more expensive trawlers  has been forced upon the industry  by 
the  lack  of  availability  of  shrimp  in  traditional  fishing  grounds,  which  are  relatively 
closer to shore. This has forced trawlers to go deeper into the sea and stay longer (which 
necessitates larger  boats). Trawlers are designed to stay at sea for anywhere between 7 
and  20  days  at  a  stretch  depending  on  the  storage  and  fuel  capacities.  Many  of  the 
trawlers  carry  modern  equipment  like  echo  sounders  and  GPS,  which  increase  their 
efficiency in locating fish. Almost all trawlers irrespective of size take a crew of 6- 7 per 
trip. The main landing centres for trawling boats are the Neendakara harbour in Kollam 
district and the Kochi harbour in Ernakulam. 
This  sector accounted  for 78.6 % of the total penaeid prawn landings in Kerala during 
1997/98. (Expert Committee for Fisheries Management Studies, Kerala, 2000). Informed 
sources suggest that this sector accounted for 92% of the cephalopod landings in Kerala 
in the year 2000 - 2001. (Source - Interview with Dr Kurup, Professor at the School of 
Industrial Fisheries at the Cochin University of Science and Technology). 
The artisanal sector
The  artisanal  sector  forms  the  core  of  the  fishing  population  of  Kerala.  John  Kurien 
(2000) estimated that the total employment generation potential of the non -mechanised 
artisanal  sector remained  constant around 146,000 jobs in 1998, comprising 25% non-
motorised and 75% motorised.  
The artisanal motorised sector in Kerala encompasses a large variety of craft and gear. 
No single type of craft or gear is representative of the whole Kerala coast. Fishing units 
in the artisanal sector are small in their scale of operations and normally fish for species 
that are sold in the domestic market. In most locations on the Kerala coast, landings of 
export species  such as  shrimp and  cuttlefish by these units are seasonal. However,  the 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Embedded page thumbnails. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options Dim
can't see pdf thumbnails; how to view pdf thumbnails in
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
enable thumbnail preview for pdf files; show pdf thumbnails
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
14
artisanal sector accounted for a significant 21.5% of the total penaeid prawn landings in 
Kerala  during  1997/98  (Expert  Committee  for  Fisheries  Management  Studies,  Kerala, 
2000). 
Most of the shrimp is landed by these units during the months of June, July and August 
when there is a trawling ban in effect in Kerala waters. However during the other months, 
export species are merely incidental catch. The general impression is that export species 
while always welcome (as they help generate some surplus) are not treated as the main 
breadwinner by the average artisanal fisherman. 
However,  there  are  isolated  villages  on  the  coast  (such  as  Marianadu  in 
Thiruvananthapuram  district)  in  which  operators  of  artisanal  motorised  units  depend 
heavily on export varieties like cuttlefish.  
As is clear from the above, the demand for export species such as shrimp, cuttlefish and 
squid is mainly  satisfied  by  the mechanised trawling industry. The  motorised  artisanal 
sector makes a relatively modest contribution. However, this was not always the case. In 
1969, the mechanised sector (purse seiners, gill netters and trawlers) accounted for just 
10% of the total marine catch landings (including both domestic and export species). By 
1996  this  figure  had  risen  to  46%.  The  mechanised  sector,  in  particular  the  trawling 
industry has grown at the expense of the artisanal sector. This is more so in the case of 
export species. 
Table 1: Distribution of fishing craft and main fishing gears in Kerala 
Fishing craft 
Areas where mainly used 
Main fishing gears used 
Plank canoes 
From north of Neendakara (Kollam 
district) up to Malapuram district 
Ring seine, Gill net, Hook 
and line, shore seine 
Dugout canoes 
From Kasargod to Ernakulam 
Ring seine, Gill net, Hook 
and line, mini trawl nets 
Kattumarams 
Thiruvananthapuram and Kollam 
districts  
Hook and line 
Plywood boats (decked)  All districts except Ernakulam 
Mainly hook and line. Gill 
net and ring seine are also 
used  
Plywood boats (open) 
All districts except Ernakulam 
Mainly large mesh gillnets. 
Adapted from ‘A census of the artisanal marine fishing fleet of Kerala 1998’, SIFFS 
6.3 Fish Production in Kerala 
Kerala is one of the premier fish producing states in India. During the period 1988/89 to 
1999/00, fish production in Kerala registered a 65.8% increase from 4.03 lakh tonnes to 
6.68 lakh tonnes (see Figure 1). During the same period inland fish production increased 
by 164% from 0.28 lakh tonnes to 0.74 lakh tonnes. Also, during the same period marine 
fish production increased by 58.4% from 3.75 lakh tonnes to 5.94 lakh tonnes. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded page thumbnails. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options
pdf files thumbnails; create thumbnail from pdf c#
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
pdf thumbnail; pdf files thumbnail preview
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
15
Figure 1: Marine and inland fish production in Kerala
Marine & Inland fish production in Kerala
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1988-
89
1989-
90
1990-
91
1991-
92
1992-
93
1993-
94
1994-
95
1995-
96
1996-
97
1997-
98
1998-
99
1999-
00
Year
lakh tonnes
Marine
Inland
Total
Source: College of Fisheries report, 2002 
6.4 Marine Fish Production 
Kerala  occupies  second  position  in  the  total  marine  fish  production  of  India  and 
contributes 20.5% of the volume of the all India landings for 1999 - 2000. The species 
wise contribution to the Kerala marine catch is given in Figure 2. 
Figure 2: Volume wise species composition of marine fish landings in Kerala
Species composition of marine fish landings in Kerala (1999 - 2000)
Mackeral
11%
Carangids
12%
Perches
8%
Cephalopods
6%
Elasmobranchs
1%
Flat fishes
3%
Prawns
13%
Anchovies
7%
Rest
25%
Oil sardines
14%
Source: College of Fisheries report, 2002
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
can't view pdf thumbnails; create thumbnail jpg from pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace
how to create a thumbnail of a pdf document; view pdf thumbnails in
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
16
As can be seen from Figure 2, prawns constitute a significant portion of the total landings 
in the state. Cephalopods such as cuttlefish, squid and octopus also constitute 6% of the 
total landings. 
6.5 Aquaculture in Kerala
Shrimp  aquaculture  has  come to  play an  important  role in the Kerala fisheries  sector. 
Traditional aquaculture has been practiced in the wetlands of central Kerala (mainly in 
Ernakulam, Thrissur and Alappuzha) for a long time in the form of pokkali cultivation in 
which paddy is cultivated from June to October and shrimp is cultured from November to 
March.  Pokkali was done on a small scale by paddy farmers in these regions. 
It is with the advent of modern aquaculture technology and practice in the last decade or 
so  that  the  shrimp  aquaculture  industry  has  expanded  in  a  big  way.  Many  of  the 
traditional paddy  farmers  who could  afford to  invest in  modern  methods  shifted  from 
pokkali  aquaculture  to  round  the  year  modern  aquaculture.  They  adopted  modern 
methods  like  the  use  of  hatchery-developed  seedlings  (as  opposed  to  the  traditional 
filtration  process),  scientifically  developed  feeds  and  feeding regimens (as  opposed  to 
little  or  no  feeding in the traditional  system) and  the use  of  antibiotics to prevent  the 
outbreak of disease. The returns were high and so were the investments. The high level of 
investment that is required in the preparation of the land, purchase of seedlings, feeds and 
medicines meant that modern aquaculture was not an option for the poor. Farmers with 
some economic surplus to invest were the ones who adopted the new methods. 
Of late the industry has been hit by disease affecting the shrimps mainly the white spots 
disease and environmental concerns, which have retarded its growth. This can be clearly 
seen from Figure 3. Shrimp production from aquaculture has been steadily declining from 
its  peak  in  1994/95.  During  the  decade  1990/91  to  2000/01,  aquaculture  shrimp 
production in Kerala registered an 18% decline from 8,925 tonnes to 7,327 tonnes. 
Figure 3: Estimated aquaculture production in Kerala
Estimated aquaculture production in Kerala
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01
Year
Production (in tonnes)
Source: College of Fisheries report, 2002 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
17
The main species that are cultured in Kerala are the kara chemmen (trade name – tiger 
shrimp,  scientific  name  –  Peneaus  Monodon)  and  the  naran  chemmen  (trade  name  – 
White prawn, scientific name – Peneaus Indicus). 
7 An Overview of Seafood Exports from Kerala 
7.1 Introduction
Kerala  is  one  of  the  main  seafood  exporting  states  in  India.  Kochi  is  the  main  port 
through which seafood from Kerala leaves for export markets. Trivandrum is also an exit 
point for seafood albeit a very minor one. While some quantity is shipped through the 
Tuticorin port  in neighbouring  Tamil  Nadu,  this  is considered negligible.  The general 
impression  gained  from  informed  sources  is  that  almost  no  seafood  that  is  processed 
outside the state is exported from the Kochi or Trivandrum ports. Hence the figures of 
seafood  exported  from  the  Kochi  port  can  be  taken  as  fairly  accurate  figures  for  the 
amount of  seafood  that is  processed for  export by  peeling sheds and  processing plants 
within the state.  
7.2 Seafood Export from the Kochi Port
As can be seen from Figure 4, there has been an increase in the quantity and the value of 
the seafood exported from the Kochi port from 1995/96 to 2000/01. In that time period 
the quantity exported has increased by 12.3% from 78,682 tonnes to 88,355 tonnes. This 
increase however is significantly lower than the 49% increase, which All India seafood 
exports  registered  during  the  period.  Also  during  the  same  period,  the  value  of  the 
seafood exported from Kochi port has increased by 21.1% from Rs 854 crores to Rs 1034 
crores. This again is significantly lower than the 84% rise in the value of all India seafood 
export during the time period. 
Thus, while there is a definite growth in the quantity and value of seafood exported from 
Kerala, it is much lower than the growth of the all India seafood exports both in terms of 
volume and value. In 2000/01 Kerala accounted for 16% by value (20% by volume) of 
the total seafood exported from India. 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
18
Figure 4: Trends in seafood export from Kochi port
Trends in seafood export from Kochi port
0
20000
40000
60000
80000
100000
95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00 00-01
Year
Quantity (in tonnes)
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
Value (in Rs crores)
Q (in tonnes)
V (in Rs crores)
Source: MPEDA internal document, 2000 - 2001 
The declining importance of the Kochi port in terms of all India seafood export can be 
seen from the fact that while there has been an increase in actual volume terms of 12.3% 
for the period under  consideration, the share of the total exports handled by the Kochi 
port vis-à-vis the all India exports, has actually come down from 26.56% to 20% (Figure 
5).  
Figure 5: Trends in seafood export from Kochi port
Quantity and value share of Kochi port in All India exports
26.69%
20.06%
26.56%
24.22%
22.19%
23.10%
16.04%
22.22%
17.46%
19.97%
25.39%
22.46%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
95-96
96-97
97-98
98-99
99-00
00-01
Year
Quantity share
Value share
Source: MPEDA Internal document, 2000 - 2001 
The same trend can be seen  in terms  of the value of seafood exported from the Kochi 
port. While there has been an increase in actual value terms of 21% for the period under 
consideration, the value of the total exports handled by the Kochi port vis-à-vis the value 
of all India exports, has actually come down from 25.3% to 16% (Figure 5). 
One of the major reasons for the decline in Kerala’s share has been its inability to keep 
up with Andhra Pradesh in the production of cultured shrimp. During the period 1995/6 – 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
19
2000/01,  Kerala’s  share  in  the  All  India  cultured  shrimp  production  dropped  from 
12.75% to 6.74%. During the same period AP’s share increased from 38.46% to 59.49%. 
Aquaculture has been assuming significant importance in All India exports of shrimp. In 
2000  –  01,  shrimp  from  cultured  sources  accounted  for  59%  by  volume  of  the  total 
shrimp exported from India.  
7.3 Species Composition of Exports from Kerala
The main species exported from Kerala are illustrated in Figures 6&7. The major export 
item is shrimp which accounts for 32% by volume and 59% by value. In value terms this 
is followed by frozen cuttlefish (15% by value and 16.4% by volume) and frozen squid 
(13% by value and 17% by volume). Finfish, which accounts for 28% by volume, is a 
relatively low value item accounting for just 9% of the total export value. 
Figure 6: Species wise contribution to Kerala exports in volume terms (2000 – 01)
Species wise contribution to Kerala exports in volume terms
(2000 -01)
Shrimp
32.02%
Frozen cuttle fish
16.38%
Frozen squid
16.88%
Frozen fin fish
28.16%
Chilled/live
0.09%
Octopus
2.55%
Lobster
0.18%
Dried
0.07%
Others
3.67%
Source: SEAI annual report 2000-01 
Kerala Seafood Export Supply Chain 
S
OUTH 
I
NDIAN 
F
EDERATION OF 
F
ISHERMEN 
S
OCIETIES
20
Figure 7: Species wise contribution to Kerala exports in value terms (2000 – 01)
Species wise contribution to Kerala exports in value terms
(2000 -01)
Shrimp
59%
Frozen cuttle fish
15%
Frozen squid
13%
Frozen fin fish
9%
Others
3%
Dried
0%
Lobster
0%
Octopus
1%
Chilled/live
0%
Source: SEAI annual report 2000-01 
7.4 Country Wise Exports from Kerala 
As can be seen from Figures 8 & 9, Kerala primarily caters to the South East Asian and 
the EU markets in terms of the volume exported. While the South East Asian markets 
account for 34% by volume of the seafood exported from Kerala it accounts for only 16% 
by value, indicating that the main species that are exported are the lower value fin fishes. 
However Japan (11% by volume and 18% by value) and the USA (15% by volume and 
22% by value) seem to be the main markets for the high value species such as shrimp. 
The  EU  however is  the  main market for  seafood from  Kerala  accounting  for  33%  by 
volume  and  36%  by value.  While  the  relative  importance  of  the  EU as  a  market  has 
declined in the last five years (in 1995/96, the EU accounted for 56% by volume and 49% 
by  value  of  seafood  export  from  Kerala)  it  still  remains  the  mainstay  of  the  Kerala 
seafood industry. 
Kerala was one of the pioneers in the area of exporting seafood from India and countries 
in  the  EU  have  been  the  major  destination.  One  of  reasons  is  that  the  EU  markets 
purchase and assortment of seafood (shrimp of all sizes and cephalopods), whereas Japan 
and  the US  generally  prefer  the  larger sized  shrimp,  which  is not  widely available  in 
Kerala. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested