asp.net pdf viewer c# : Print pdf thumbnails SDK application API .net html asp.net sharepoint RD-412-part1161

13
to iterate until both the low flow method (or pressure flow) and the weir flow method have the 
same energy (within a specified tolerance) upstream of the bridge (section 3). The combination 
of low flow and weir flow can be computed with any of the low flow methods mentioned 
previously, except the momentum based method. 
HEC-2 
HEC-2 computes energy losses caused by structures such as bridges in two parts.  One part 
consists of the losses that occur in reaches immediately upstream and downstream from the 
bridge where contraction and expansion of the flow is taking place.  The second part consists of 
losses at the structure itself and is calculated with either the normal bridge method or the special 
bridge method.  Cross section locations are the same as described previously for HEC-RAS. 
Losses due to contraction and expansion of flow between cross sections are determined by 
standard-step profile calculations.  Manning's equation is used to calculate friction losses, and all 
other losses are described in terms of a coefficient multiplied by the absolute value of the change in 
velocity head between adjacent cross sections. 
Normal Bridge Method 
The normal bridge method handles a bridge cross section in the same manner as a natural river 
cross section, except that the area of the bridge below the water surface is subtracted from the 
total area, and the wetted perimeter is increased where the water is in contact with the bridge 
structure.  The user is required to enter the two cross sections inside the bridge.  The bridge deck 
is described either by entering the constant elevations of the top of roadway and low chord, or by 
specifying a table of roadway stations and elevations, and corresponding low chord elevations.  
Pier losses are accounted for by the loss of area and the increased wetted perimeter of the piers, 
as described in terms of cross section coordinates. 
Special Bridge Method 
The special bridge method computes losses through the structure for low flow, pressure flow, 
weir flow, or for a combination of these.  The profile through the bridge is calculated using 
hydraulic formulas to determine the change in energy and water surface elevation through the 
bridge. 
Low Flow.  
The procedure used for low flow calculations in the special bridge method depends 
on whether the bridge has piers.  
Without piers, 
the low flow solution is accomplished by 
standard-step calculations as in the normal bridge method.  The transfer to the normal bridge 
method is necessary because the equations used in the special bridge method for 
low flow 
are 
based on the obstruction width due to the piers.  Without piers, the special bridge solution would 
indicate that no losses would occur. 
For a bridge 
with piers, 
the program goes through a momentum balance for cross sections just 
outside and inside the bridge to determine the class of flow.  The momentum calculations are  
Print pdf thumbnails - Draw thumbnail images for PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
pdf thumbnails in; how to show pdf thumbnails in
Print pdf thumbnails - VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Thumbnail Generation with Various Options for Quick PDF Navigation
enable pdf thumbnails in; pdf thumbnail html
14
handled by employing the following momentum relations based on the equations proposed by 
Koch-Carstanjen [Eichert/Peters, 1970] [Koch-Carstanjen, 1962]. 
3
2
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
( )
gA
Q
m
m
gA
Q
m
A
C
A
g A
Q
m
m
p
p
D
p
+
=
+
=
+
(10) 
where:  A
1
,A
3
=  flow areas at upstream and downstream sections, respectively 
A
2
=  flow area (gross area - area of piers) at a section within constricted 
reach 
A
p1
,A
p3
=  obstructed areas at upstream and downstream sections, respectively 
=  vertical distance from water surface to center of gravity of 
A
1
,A
2
,A
3
, respectively 
m
1
,m
2
,m
3
2 2
1 1
,
Ay A A y
and 
3 3
A y
, respectively 
m
p1
,m
p3
1
1
p
p
A y
and 
3
3
p
p
A y
, respectively 
C
D
=  drag coefficient equal to 2.0 for square pier ends and 1.33 for piers 
with semicircular ends 
=  vertical distance from water surface to center of gravity of A
p1
and 
A
p3
, respectively 
=  discharge 
=  gravitational acceleration 
The three parts of the momentum equation represent the total momentum flux in the constriction 
expressed in terms of the channel properties and flow depths upstream, within and downstream 
of the constricted section.  If each part of this equation is plotted as a function of the water depth, 
three curves are obtained representing the total momentum flux in the constriction for various 
depths at each location.  The desired solutions (water depths) are then readily available for any 
class of flow.  The momentum equation is based on a trapezoidal section and therefore requires a 
trapezoidal approximation of the bridge opening. 
Class A low flow 
occurs when the water surface through the bridge is above critical depth, i.e., 
subcritical flow.  The special bridge method uses the Yarnell equation for this class of flow to 
determine the change in water surface elevation through the bridge.  As in the momentum 
calculations, a trapezoidal approximation of the bridge opening is used to determine the areas. 
g
V
K K
H
2
)
15
0.6)(
10
2 (
2
3
4
3
α
α
ω
+
+
=
(11) 
3
2
1
, ,
y y y y
3
1
,
p
p
y y
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. Create PDF from Word. Create PDF from Excel. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages
thumbnail pdf preview; pdf thumbnail creator
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
create pdf thumbnail; pdf thumbnail fix
15
where:  H
3
=  drop in water surface from upstream to downstream sides of the bridge 
K  =  pier shape coefficient 
ω  =  ratio of velocity head to depth downstream from the bridge obstructed 
area 
α  =  total unobstructed area 
V
3
=  velocity downstream from the bridge 
The computed upstream water surface elevation is simply the downstream water surface 
elevation plus H
3
.  With the upstream water surface elevation known, the program computes the 
corresponding velocity head and energy elevation for the upstream section. 
Class B low flow
can exist for either a subcritical or supercritical profile.  For either profile, 
class B low flow occurs when the profile passes through critical depth in the bridge constriction.  
For a
subcritical profile
, critical depth is determined in the bridge, a new downstream depth 
(below critical) and the upstream depth (above critical) are calculated by finding the depths 
whose corresponding momentum fluxes equal the momentum flux in the bridge for critical 
depth.  The program does not provide the location of the hydraulic jump.  A supercritical profile 
could be computed starting at the downstream section with a water surface elevation X.  For a
supercritical profile
, the bridge is acting as a control and is causing the upstream water surface 
elevation to be above critical depth.  Momentum equations are again used to recompute an 
upstream water surface elevation (above critical) and a downstream elevation below critical 
depth. 
Class C low flow
is computed for a supercritical profile where the water surface profile stays 
supercritical through the bridge constriction.  The downstream depth and the depth in the bridge 
are computed by the momentum equations based on the momentum flux in the constriction and 
the upstream depth. 
Pressure Flow.
The pressure flow computations use the orifice flow equation of U.S. Army 
Engineer Manual 1110-2-1602, "Hydraulic Design of Reservoir Outlet Structures," [USACE, 
1963]. 
K
gH
A
Q
2
=
(12) 
where:  H  =  difference between the energy gradient elevation upstream and tailwater 
elevation downstream 
K  =  total loss coefficient 
A  =  net area of the orifice 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Support for customizing image size.
pdf thumbnail generator online; pdf reader thumbnails
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. WPF: Export PDF. WPF: Print PDF. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
show pdf thumbnails in; pdf files thumbnails
16
g  =  gravitational acceleration 
Q  =  total orifice flow 
The total loss coefficient, K, for determining losses between the cross sections immediately 
upstream and downstream from the bridge, is equal to 1.0 plus the sum of loss coefficients for 
intake, intermediate piers, friction, and other minor losses.  The section on loss coefficients 
provides values for the total loss coefficient and shows the derivation of the equation and the 
definition of the loss coefficient. 
Weir Flow.
Flow over the bridge and the roadway approaching the bridge is calculated using 
the standard weir equation: 
32
CLH
Q
=
(13) 
where:  C  =  coefficient of discharge 
L  =  effective length of weir controlling flow 
H  =  difference between the energy grade line elevation and the roadway crest 
elevation 
Q  =  total flow over the weir 
The approach velocity is included by using the energy grade line elevation in lieu of the 
upstream water surface elevation for computing the head, H.  Where submergence by tailwater 
exists, the coefficient 'C' is reduced by the program [Bradley, 1978].  Submergence corrections 
are based on a trapezoidal weir shape or optionally an ogee spillway shape.  A total weir flow, Q, 
is computed by subdividing the weir crest into segments, computing L, H, a submergence 
correction and Q for each segment, and summing the incremental discharges. 
Combination Flow.  
Sometimes combinations of low flow or pressure flow occur with weir 
flow.  In these cases a trial and error procedure is used, with the equations just described, to 
determine the amount of each type of flow.  The procedure consists of assuming energy 
elevations and computing the total discharge until the computed discharge equals, within 1 
percent, the discharge desired. 
WSPRO 
WSPRO computes the water surface profile through a bridge by solving the energy equation.  
Cross sections are located as shown in Figure 8. 
Computations of the water surface profile require the user to enter a minimum of four cross 
sections.  These include sections 4, 3F, 3, and 1. Sections 4, 3F, and 1 are unconstricted full 
valley sections, while section 3 is the bridge opening section.  Cross section 2 represents an  
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails. Embedded print settings.
enable pdf thumbnails; thumbnail view in for pdf files
VB.NET PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in vb.net, ASP.NET
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
how to make a thumbnail of a pdf; create thumbnail from pdf c#
17
additional control point in the computations, but requires no data.  Section 2 will be assumed to 
be the same as section 3, unless the user enters a separate cross section for that location. 
The WSPRO program first computes a natural profile (no bridge structure) by performing a 
standard step calculation from section 4 (exit section) to section 3F (full valley section); then 
from section 3F to section 1 (approach section).  The program then computes the profile with the 
bridge in place.  In this case the energy balance is performed from section 4 to 3 (bridge 
opening); then from section 3 to 2 (upstream bridge opening); and finally from 2 to 1.  The total 
energy equation from the exit to the approach section can be written as follows: 
(1 4)
2
4
4
2
1
1
2
2
+
+
=
+
L
h
g
V
h
g
V
h
(14) 
where:  h
1
=  water surface elevation at section 1 
V
1
=  velocity at section 1 
h
4
=  water surface elevation at section 4 
V
4
=  velocity at section 4 
h
L
=  energy losses from section 1 to 4 
Energy losses from section 1 to 4 are equal to friction losses from 1 to 4 and an expansion loss 
from 3 to 4.  The incremental losses are calculated as follows: 
Figure 8.
Cross section locations for WSPRO bridge hydraulics 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded page thumbnails. Embedded print settings.
pdf thumbnail; program to create thumbnail from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Print PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in WPF. Export PDF in WPF. Print PDF in WPF. PDF Create. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page
generate pdf thumbnail c#; show pdf thumbnail in html
18
From Section 4 to 3 
Losses from section 4 to section 3 are based on friction losses and an expansion loss.  Friction 
losses are calculated using the geometric mean friction slope times the straight line distance 
between sections 3 and 4 (distance B from Figure 8).  The following equation is used for fiction 
losses from 3 to 4: 
4
3
2
(3 4)
K K
BQ
h
f
=
(15) 
Where K
3
and K
4
are the total conveyance at sections 3 and 4 respectively.   The expansion loss 
from section 3 to section 4 is computed by the following equation: 
+
=
2
3
4
3
3
4
3
4
4
2
4
2
2
2
2
A
A
A
A
gA
Q
h
e
α
β
α
β
(16) 
Where α and β are energy and momentum correction factors for non-uniform flow.  α
4
and β
4
are 
computed as follows: 
T
T
i
i
A
K
A
K
3
2
3
4
=
α
(17) 
T
T
i
i
A
K
A
K
2
2
4
=
β
(18) 
α
3
and β
3
are related to the bridge geometry and are defined as follows: 
2
3
1
C
=
α
(19) 
C
1
3
=
β
(20) 
Where C is an empirical discharge coefficient for the bridge, which was developed as part of the 
Contracted Opening method by Kindswater, Carter, and Tracy (USGS, 1953). 
19
From Section 2 to 3 
Energy losses from section 2 to 3 (through the bridge) are based on friction losses only.  The 
following equation is used for calculating the friction loss: 
2
3
(2 3)
(2 3)
=
K
Q
L
h
f
(21) 
Where L
(2-3)
is the distance between the bridge sections, and K
3
is the conveyance at section 3 
inside the bridge. 
From Section 1 to 2 
Energy losses from section 1 to 2 are based on friction losses only.  The equation for computing 
the friction loss is as follows: 
c
av
f
KK
L Q
h
1
2
(1 2)
=
(22) 
Where L
av
, is the effective flow length in the approach reach, and K
c
is the minimum of the 
conveyances inside the bridge.  The effective flow length is computed as the average length of 
20 equal conveyance stream tubes (FHWA, 1990). 
Pressure flow
and 
weir flow
are modeled in a similar manner as in the HEC-RAS software. 
Model Development 
Because this study is a comparison between models, it is very important that the geometric data 
and model parameters be developed in a consistent manner.  The key pieces of information are: 
cross-section geometry and location; Manning's n values; reach lengths (left overbank, main 
channel, and right overbank); contraction and expansion coefficients; bridge geometry; 
ineffective flow areas; and the location of the main channel bank stations.  Each of the models 
were developed using the same data where possible (i.e., the same cross sections and locations, 
the same n values, bridge geometry, etc.).  The only differences between the models were the 
required coefficients that are used in solving the hydraulic equations in the vicinity of the bridge.  
This will be discussed in further detail under the description of model calibration. 
Cross Section Data and Locations 
At all of the bridge sites, the corresponding hydrologic atlas provided cross section data that was 
surveyed at equal intervals along the stream, both sufficiently upstream and downstream from 
the bridge sites.  Each data set included no fewer than eight cross sections.  Additional cross 
sections were also surveyed just downstream of the bridge and inside the bridge.  In general, the 
surveyed cross sections were used at the locations provided.  In addition to the surveyed cross  
20
sections, it was necessary to locate cross sections in the vicinity of the bridge, as required by the 
various models.  These cross sections consisted of: an exit section (section 1 from Figure 1); a 
cross section upstream of the bridge (section 3 from Figure 1); and an approach section  
(section 4 from Figure 1).  The cross sections were formulated by making a copy of the closest 
surveyed section, and then making any minor adjustments to the station and elevation points if 
needed. 
There is some question about the sharpness of the contraction and re-expansion of effective flow 
in the immediate vicinity of a bridge, and indeed this concept is an integral part of the bridge 
modeling methodologies.  For this study, almost all of the models are based on the assumption 
that both the contraction and expansion reaches have a length equal to the width of the bridge 
waterway opening.  Because this assumption is a requirement in the WSPRO model, the 
approach and exit cross sections were placed at the same locations in HEC-RAS and HEC-2.  
This was done in order to have consistency between the models.  In addition, for these specific 
sites the assumption of one bridge opening width for the expansion and contraction reach lengths 
appears to give reasonable results.  However, for three of the events, it was found that improved 
results could be achieved by moving the exit section to a greater distance downstream from the 
bridge.  This was done for both HEC-RAS and HEC-2. 
Manning's n Values 
The USGS hydrologic atlases contain color coded land use maps for the area of the floodplain.  
Each color is assigned a range of values for the Manning roughness coefficient.  The maps also 
recommend using the high end of the range for depths below 0.6 meters, the low end of the range 
for flow depths above 1.0 meter, and linear interpolation between those two depths. 
The approach for selecting n values was to have only as many different n values in the model as 
there are roughness types on the maps.  The only exception to this is where the channel and the 
overbanks have been coded with the same roughness type, and the channel flow depth is much 
greater than the overbank depth.  We faithfully tried to represent the information in the atlases as 
much as possible in the models, with respect to where changes in the n values can be expected to 
occur. 
Channel Bank Stations and Reach Lengths 
In some of the study reaches, the atlases delineate the low-flow channel on the planimetric view 
of the atlas.  The models for these reaches have the section bank stations set to correspond with 
the atlas low-flow channel, even at sections where this alleged channel does not include the 
lowest point in the cross section.  For those sites that did not indicate a low-flow channel 
location, bank stations have been set at each section generally to include the sharpest and deepest 
incision in the channel, except where this incision appears to be a tributary channel.  In many of 
these cases, the bank station settings are inconsequential since a uniform n value has been used 
across the section. 
Channel reach lengths for the models were scaled from the atlases.  The main channel reach 
lengths were measured along the invert of the main channel.  The overbank reach lengths were 
measured along the perceived path of the center of mass of the overbank flow.  In general, the 
21
center of mass of the overbanks was estimated as being 1/3 the distance from the main channel 
bank station to the edge of the water surface boundary. 
Cross Section Effective Flow Area 
For the sections immediately adjacent to bridges and those which incorporate an apparent area of 
'dead water', the effective flow area at the cross section has been constrained within the 
floodplain.  In most cases this has been done in a manner which accomplished the constraint 
without adding wetted perimeter at the effective flow boundaries, using the assumption that a 
water-to-water boundary induces no significant friction loss.  Two methods can be used which 
have this effect: using extremely high n values in the ineffective areas (n = 100); or using the 
program's ineffective flow option. 
Bridge Crossing Geometry 
Detailed information about the bridge (road embankment, bridge deck, abutments, and piers) was 
well documented in each of the USGS hydrologic atlases.  Each atlas contained a surveyed cross 
section inside the bridge, as well as detailed drawings of the bridge opening.  This information 
was used consistently between all of the computer programs. 
Model Calibration 
At all of the study sites, reach geometry, discharge, and observed water surface data are given far 
enough downstream that a profile starting point can be selected which is outside of the influence 
of the bridge.  The main calibration parameter in all of the models was Manning's n values.  
Contraction and expansion coefficients were also estimated. 
Manning's n Values 
Calibration of Manning's n values was done using the entire observed extent of each reach.  
Exceptions to this are reaches where there was a significant inaccuracy in the downstream 
portions of the model, which could not be rectified by reasonable calibration.  It was suspected 
that some important changes in roughness existed which were not documented on the atlas.  In 
such cases, the starting point was moved upstream beyond the troublesome spot.  The calibration 
of n values was done by raising or lowering the n values of the entire reach.  There are some 
locations in the models where a change in the n value at a specific cross section would produce a 
much better fit to the observed data, but no indication is given in the atlas that the roughness has 
changed for that cross section.  In these cases, we did not change the n value.  In other words, we 
have avoided a section-by-section calibration of n values, since to calibrate n values in this way 
would produce a model where all other parameter effects are masked.  All changes in n values, 
within a particular model, were constrained to the n value ranges provided by the atlases.  Also, 
the same n values were used in each of the three models for the same data set. 
All the models involved in the study incorporate the set of n values which, following the basic 
rules mentioned above, provide the best fit to the observed data over the entire reach, with  
22
greater weight given to those portions of the reach not likely to be affected by the bridge (cross 
sections downstream of the exit section).  The final n values were set after we were confident 
that the reach geometry was modeled reasonably based on the atlases. 
Contraction and Expansion Coefficients 
In general, contraction and expansion coefficients were set to 0.1 and 0.3 respectively.  There is 
some uncertainty about the proper values for these coefficients in the vicinity of a bridge.  At 
most of the sites in our study, the velocity heads are low, even at the bridge.  Therefore the 
setting of these parameters had little effect on the solution.  We have considered this to be an 
allowable calibration variable at the bridge with two possible discreet settings: 
1.  Contraction Coefficient = 0.3 and Expansion Coefficient = 0.5, or 
2.  Contraction Coefficient = 0.5 and Expansion Coefficient = 0.8 
For most of the bridge sites, values of 0.3 and 0.5 were used for the contraction and expansion 
coefficients, respectively.  In general, the setting of the contraction and expansion coefficients 
did not influence the results to any significant degree, for these specific data sets. 
Final Model Adjustments 
Once the calibration of n values and contraction and expansion coefficients was completed, the 
performance evaluation and model comparison was carried out by selecting the downstream 
starting cross section as that section which is nearest to, yet outside of, the assumed expansion 
reach downstream of the bridge.  The starting water surface was set to the observed value at this 
location in order to ensure that any differences between computed and observed water surface 
elevations in the vicinity of the bridge were due solely to the bridge computations.  For most of 
the models the downstream starting section was the exit section.  In a few of the models it was 
necessary to set the starting water surface elevation at the cross section just downstream of the 
exit section.  This was done, for these sites, because the observed water surface information in 
the vicinity of the exit section was inconclusive.  Therefore, it was deemed that it would be better 
to start at the next downstream section with a better known water surface elevation. 
Modeling Results 
During the course of this study it was found that for HEC-RAS and HEC-2, the energy based 
bridge solution methods (Normal Bridge for HEC-2) consistently produced better results than 
any of the other methods available in these models.  This is consistent with the fact that 
friction losses are the predominant factor in the change in energy through the bridges at these 
specific locations.  Because of this, the results shown for HEC-RAS and HEC-2 are only for 
the energy based solution methods. 
The results from this study are presented in the form of tables and graphics.  Table 1 shows 
summary results for all of the events at all of the bridge sites modeled.  This table shows  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested